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Joseph Martin

M, b. 26 Dec 1694
Joseph Martin|b. 26 Dec 1694|p303.htm#i218542|George Martin|b. 21 Oct 1648\nd. 14 Apr 1734|p303.htm#i218546|Hannah (Unknown)|d. between 1697 and 1712|p302.htm#i218538|George Martyn|b. circa 1618\nd. before 23 Nov 1686|p303.htm#i218549|Susannah North|b. 30 Sep 1621\nd. 19 Jul 1692|p303.htm#i218550|||||||

Relationship=6th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Joseph Martin was born on 26-Dec-1694 at Chebacco, Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was the son of George Martin and Hannah (Unknown). Joseph married Mary (Unknown). Joseph married Damaris Story, daughter of Deacon Seth Story and Elizabeth (Unknown), on 17-Mar-1721/22 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Ebenezer Martin

M, b. 20 Apr 1697, d. 13 Jul 1775
Ebenezer Martin|b. 20 Apr 1697\nd. 13 Jul 1775|p303.htm#i218543|George Martin|b. 21 Oct 1648\nd. 14 Apr 1734|p303.htm#i218546|Hannah (Unknown)|d. between 1697 and 1712|p302.htm#i218538|George Martyn|b. circa 1618\nd. before 23 Nov 1686|p303.htm#i218549|Susannah North|b. 30 Sep 1621\nd. 19 Jul 1692|p303.htm#i218550|||||||

Relationship=6th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Ebenezer Martin was born on 20-Apr-1697 at Chebacco, Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was the son of George Martin and Hannah (Unknown). Ebenezer married Mary Willard on 4-Oct-1721 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. Ebenezer married Jerusha Durkee, daughter of William Durkee and Rebecca Gould, on 1-Apr-1729 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. Ebenezer Martin died on 13-Jul-1775 at age 78.

Anna Choate

F, b. 1687, d. 1708/9
      Anna Choate was born in 1687. Anna married George Martin, son of George Martin and Hannah (Unknown), on 29-Nov-1706. Anna Choate died in 1708/9.

John Howard

M
     John Howard published marriage intentions on 22-Feb-1712 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.

George Martin

M, b. 21 Oct 1648, d. 14 Apr 1734
George Martin|b. 21 Oct 1648\nd. 14 Apr 1734|p303.htm#i218546|George Martyn|b. circa 1618\nd. before 23 Nov 1686|p303.htm#i218549|Susannah North|b. 30 Sep 1621\nd. 19 Jul 1692|p303.htm#i218550|||||||Richard North|b. circa 1595\nd. 1 Mar 1666/67|p303.htm#i218565|Joan Bertram||p303.htm#i218566|

Relationship=7th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      George Martin was born on 21-Oct-1648 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was the son of George Martyn and Susannah North. George married Hannah (Unknown) before 1680. George Martin published marriage intentions on 21-Feb-1712 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. George Martin died on 14-Apr-1734 at Chebacco Parrish, Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 85.

Children of George Martin and Hannah (Unknown)

Elizabeth Durkee

F, b. 1670
Elizabeth Durkee|b. 1670|p303.htm#i218547|William Durkee|b. circa 1632\nd. 23 Sep 1711|p302.htm#i218524|Martha Cross|b. 15 Mar 1642/43\nd. 11 Jan 1726/27|p302.htm#i218525|||||||Robert Cross|b. 26 Jun 1613\nd. 8 Feb 1669/70|p302.htm#i218526|Hannah Jordan|b. 1615\nd. 29 Oct 1677|p302.htm#i218527|

Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Elizabeth Durkee was born in 1670 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of William Durkee and Martha Cross. Elizabeth Durkee published marriage intentions on 21-Feb-1712 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Mercy Durkee

F, b. circa 1684, d. 1 Aug 1730
Mercy Durkee|b. circa 1684\nd. 1 Aug 1730|p303.htm#i218548|William Durkee|b. circa 1632\nd. 23 Sep 1711|p302.htm#i218524|Martha Cross|b. 15 Mar 1642/43\nd. 11 Jan 1726/27|p302.htm#i218525|||||||Robert Cross|b. 26 Jun 1613\nd. 8 Feb 1669/70|p302.htm#i218526|Hannah Jordan|b. 1615\nd. 29 Oct 1677|p302.htm#i218527|

Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Mercy Durkee was born circa 1684 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of William Durkee and Martha Cross. Mercy married George Martin, son of George Martin and Hannah (Unknown), on 4-Jun-1709 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. Mercy Durkee died on 1-Aug-1730 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut.

George Martyn

M, b. circa 1618, d. before 23 Nov 1686

Relationship=8th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      George Martyn was born circa 1618 at near, Colchester, England. George married Hannah (Unknown) before 1643. George married Susannah North, daughter of Richard North and Joan Bertram, on 11-Aug-1646 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. George Martyn died before 23-Nov-1686 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. George's estate was proved on 23-Nov-1686.
     He was also known as George Martin. He emigrated from Wales. He immigrated circa 1639 to Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, He came as a servant to Samuel Winsely. He was a proprietor between 1642 and 1664.
George Martyn purchased purchased Job Cole's land rights in East Salisbury circa 1643.
He took the oath of fidelity in 1646. On 1650 He was on the list of commoners in Salisbury.
On between 1667 and 1668 George was on the list of Commoners who drew land in Amesbury. Amesbury was derived from the Northwestern part of Salisbury in 1654.

George's left a will on 19-Jan-1683/84

In ye name of God Amen
I George Martin of ye town of Amsbury in ye County of Essex being through Gods goodness of prfect memory & understanding, doe make this my last will & testament in mannr as followeth
Imprimis I commend my spirit to God whoe gave it, & and my body to ye dust decently to be buried (at ye chardges of my executr, whome I shall hereafter name and appoynt) in hopes of a [joy]full resurrection at ye last day unto life eternall
2dly I give & bequeath unto my natural [i.e. legitimate] Children viz: my Sonns Richrd Martin, & John Martin, & my Daughters, Hanna Wathen: Hester Gimson, Jane Hadley & Abigail Hadlock unto each & every of them five shillings apiece to be payd in good and merchantable pay within one twelvemonth next aftr my decease
3dly I give & bequeath unto my Grandchild John Hadlock five pounds in good & merchantable pay in case yt ye sd John live wth me or my wife or my son
Will: untill yt he come unto ye full & compleat age of twenty one years.
4thly I give & bequeath all ye rest of my housing, lands stock & estate both moveable & Immoveable unto my wife Susanna during her Widowhood, & after her marriage, or decease (in case she marry not againe) unto my youngest son William.
ffinally: I Doe appoint, Constitute & ordaine my Wife Susanna, to be exectutrix and my youngest son Will: martin to be executr in conjunction wth her unto this my last Will & testament. A[nd in] confirmat[ion] of ye promisees I have hereunto subscribed my hand & seale Dated the nineteenth day of January An: Dom: one thousand six hundred eighty & three or foure.

Source: Probate Records of Essex County, Massachusetts.

Doug Norman dmn4211@canada.com 2000-10-07 17:47:34
You may be interested in the following that I received. I have changed my George Martin b. 1648 to reflect it. And I so enjoyed having a witch for an ancestor. Darn!
Source: Kathleen Martin (tomandkatmartin@ctel.net)

Your line of Martins is believed to derive from the immigrant George Martin and wife who arrived on the Hannah and Elizabeth in 1679. All his 6 children were by this first wife, name unknown. Their last child was born 1697. He later married Elizabeth Durkee in 1712-13. His birth date, judging from his stone in 1734, was 1648 - the same year as the son of George and Susanna (North) Martin, though they were a few months apart. For that sole reason Elliot Burnham Watson and Alven Martyn Smith developed a MS genealogy which erroneously linked the George Martin of Ipswich family with that of George Martin of Amesbury.

Edith Harrison of Ontario, Canada and her brother in Amesbury spent many years in the 1990's studying this line. She came to the conclusion that it was far more likely that George of Ipswich was the son of Joseph and Mary Martin of Preshute, Wiltshire, England, christened in 1648. This was a clan of Flemish weavers who had immigrated there from Belgium; and as you may know, George of Ipswich was a weaver. Also, George of Ipswich named two of his children Joseph and Mary.

This is not Geroge Martin of Salisbury.

Occupationa blacksmith

Child of George Martyn and Hannah (Unknown)

Children of George Martyn and Susannah North

Susannah North

F, b. 30 Sep 1621, d. 19 Jul 1692
Susannah North|b. 30 Sep 1621\nd. 19 Jul 1692|p303.htm#i218550|Richard North|b. circa 1595\nd. 1 Mar 1666/67|p303.htm#i218565|Joan Bertram||p303.htm#i218566|John North|b. circa 1565|p372.htm#i300913||||||||||

Relationship=8th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
     Susannah North was baptized on 30-Sep-1621 at Olney, Buckinghamshire, England. She was the daughter of Richard North and Joan Bertram. Susannah married George Martyn on 11-Aug-1646 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. Susannah North died on 19-Jul-1692 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 70; hung as a witch.
     She was also known as Susanna North. The Salem Witch Trials of 1692 resulted in nearly 200 people imprisoned, 20 executed and a further 8 dying in prison. Most of the participants knew each other. Either blood or marriage tied some together. This was true of my ancestors, some were victims, others prosecutors and still others the afflicted.

The trials came about because of the action of a small group of teenage girls who had spent the winter of 1691-92 at the home of their friends, Elizabeth and Abigail Paris. There the girls became fascinated with the tales of the slave Tituba who told of black magic and of spells being placed on people. The 9 girls were Elizabeth Paris, Abigail Paris, Ann Putnam, Elizabeth Hubbard, Mary Warren, Mercy Lewis, Mary Wolcott, Elizabeth Booth and Susan Sheldon. Of these nine girls, only one is related to me, Ann Putnam. Her grandmother was Priscilla Gould, the sister of Zaccheus Gould. Ann was born in 1680 to Thomas Putnam and Ann.

At first only Ann Putnam, Abigail Williams and Betty Parris started to act strangely. "They contorted themselves into odd postures and made strange gestures. They uttered foolish and ridiculous speech of which neither they nor anyone else could make sense. At first it seemed like a game, but soon it became clear it was something more. The three girls were sometimes dumb as if choked. They complained of pains, like those from pins being thrust into their bodies."

Their parents became concerned and their doctor was called in who declared that the girls were bewitched. The girls and their story were brought to the attention of Magistrate John Hawthorne (One of the magistrate’s descendants was the author Nathaniel Hawthorne). Because witchcraft was a crime Magistrate Hawthorne organized an inquiry and grand jury to investigate these "witches". During the course of the investigation Mary Lewis and Mary Walcott also became afflicted thus leading to the trials and executions.

When the accused were brought into the courtroom during the examinations the following is typical of what occurred;

"The circle of afflicted girls were brought into the room. When the accused person glanced at them, they instantly succumbed to their afflictions, fits in which they writhed on the floor in strange agonies and grievous torments. Captain Alden, a sea captain who was accused, described the girls as ‘those wenches who played their juggling tricks, falling down, crying out, and staring in other people’s faces." However when the accused person touched an arm or another part of their bodies, they immediately revived and came to themselves. The afflicted girls swore that the accused person caused their fits. They swore that they had seen a specter come out of the accused person’s body and physically attack them, causing them great pain and torment. This testimony became the decisive evidence used by the court to establish that the accused person was not a rich."

One of the accused was Susannah North Martin. Susannah was born in 1625 in England. She was the widow of George Martin, a blacksmith. At the time of her trial, Susanna was 67 years old and a widow for 6 years. Descriptions of Susanna say that she was short, slightly plump, active, and "of remarkable personal neatness." She was also said to be very outspoken, contemptuous of authority, and defiant in the face of slander, which had followed her for years.

This was the second time she had charged with witchcraft. In 1669 she had posted bond of 100 pounds when she was charged with witchcraft. While the court records of this case do not exist it is obvious that she was not found guilty since witchcraft was a capitol offense. At he same time her husband sued William Sargent Jr. for slandering his wife by calling her a witch. The Martins won the case but were publicly insulted when the court awarded them the amount of "a white wampum peague (colonial currency) or the eighth part of a penny damage."

In 1671, George, Susanna and her sister Mary Jones became involved in lengthy litigation over their father’s (Richard North) estate. In October 1674, they lost their inheritance when the court found against them. Some scholars feel that the lengthy litigation over this estate caused much bitterness and accusations and was a factor in Susanna being charged as a witch 21 years later.

A complaint was filed against her on April 30, 1692. On May 2 she was arrested. Her warrant reads as follows;

To: To The Marshall of the County of Essex or his Lawfull deputie or to the Constable
of Amesburry.

You are in their Majests names hereby required forthwith or as soon as may be to apprehend and bring (before us) Susanna Martin of Amesbury in the County of Essex Widdow at the house of Lt Nathaniell Ingersalls in Salem Village, in order to her Examination Relateing to high Suspition of Sundry acts of Witchcraft donne or Committed by her upon the Bodys of Mary Walcot Abigail Williams Ann putnam and Marcy Lewis of Salem Village or farmes

Where by great hurt and dammage hath benne donne to the bodys of Said persons according to Compl't of Capt Jonathan Walcot & Serg't Thomas putnam in behalfe of their Majests this day Exhibited before us for themselfes and also for Severall of theire Neighbours and here of You are not to faile at your perills. Dated Salem Aprile 30th 1692

*John. Hathorne

*Jonathan Corwin

(Reverse) according this warrant I have apprehended susanna Martin widdow of Amsbery and have brought or caused hir to be brought to the place appointed for his examination

p me *Orlando Bagly: Constable of Amsbery

salem village this 2:th may 1692

(Reverse) Susanna Martin Warrant


(Mittimus for Susannah Martin, Lydia Dustin, Dorcas Hoar, and Sarah Morey)


To: To. the Keeper of theire Majests Goale
in Boston

You are in theire Majests names hereby required to take into, your care and safe Custody the Bodys of Susanah Martin of Amesbury Widdow, Lydia Dastin of Reding Wi[ddow], Dorcas Hoare of Beverly widdow and Sarah Murrill also of Beverly who all stand Charged with high Suspition of Sundry acts of Witchcraft donne or Committed by them upon the Bos of Mary Walcot Marcy Lewis Abigail Williams Ann putnam Elizabeth Hubbert and Susannah Sheldon and Goody Viber of Salem Village or farmes whereby great hurt and dammage hath beene donne to the bodys [of] said persons according to Complaint of Capt Jonathan Walcot and Serj't Thomas putnam of Salem Village Yeoman Exhibited Salem April the 30th. 1692: Whome you are to secure in order to theire further Examination or Tryall and hereof you are not to faile


Dated Salem Village May 2d. 1692
*John Hathorne

*Jonathan. Corwin


During her trial Susannah was pointed out as a witch by a number of the afflicted girls. Abigail Williams said that it was Goody Martin who "hath hurt me often" and that she "had been afflicted by the apparition of Susannah Martin", Mary Lewis pointed towards her and fell into a little fit.

Besides the testimony of these afflicted girls, a number of Susannah Martin's own neighbors testified against her. A few of the stories are as follows;

William Brown, a 70 year old resident of Salisbury, stated that 30 years ago Susannah Martin had put a spell on his wife Elizabeth causing her much mental and physical anguish. According to Brown, his wife was walking from their house to the mill in Salisbury when she came upon Susanna Martin. Just as they approached each other, Susanna disappeared causing Elizabeth great fright. Susanna also appeared at the Brown house on a number of occasions and each time Elizabeth suffered from a physical ailment such as " birds pecking her legs or pricking her with the motion of their wings and then it would rise up into her stomach with pricking pain as nails and pins of which she did bitterly complain and cry out like a woman in travail and after that it would rise up to her throat in a bunch like a pullet's egg and then she would turn back her head and say, witch you shan't choke me. "

John Pressey stated that about 24 years previously (around 1668) he had been walking home from the Amesbury ferry. The distance was about 3 miles and the ground well known by Mr. Pressey. He claimed that he became confused and lost. While trying to find his way home he saw a light on his left. He kept going leaving the light behind. A short time later the light was again on his left. He then took his walking stick and struck the light at least 40 times. He then tried to leave but something grabbed his heels and he was flung to the ground. He felt himself sliding into a deep place but was able to grab a bush and prevent himself from sliding into the hole. He then got up and fled. A short distance away he saw Susanna Martin standing to his left just as the light had previously done. She said nothing and Mr. Pressey continued on to his house. He was in such fear that he could not speak until his wife spoke to him. Mr. Pressey added that he later heard that the next day Susanna Martin was in extreme pain, pain he believed was caused by him striking the light.

Both Mr. Pressey and his wife, Mary, both testified that a few years after the above incident, Susanna Martin came to their house and cursed them. She told them that no matter what they did, they would never prosper and that they would never have more then two cows. They added that even though they both tried to increase their herd in the past twenty years they had never managed to have more then two cows at a time.

Bernard Peach in his deposition stated;

"That about six or seven years past this deponent living at the house of Jacob Morell in Salisbury being in bed on a Lord's Day night he heard a scrabbling at the window, he this deponent saw Susanna Martin wife of George Martin of Amesbury come in at the window and jumped down upon the floor. She was in her hood and scarf and the same dress that she was in before at meeting the same day. Being come in she was coming up towards this deponent's face, but turned back to his feet and took hold of them and drew up his body into a hoop and lay upon him about an hour and half or 2 hours in all which time this deponent could not stir nor speak, but feeling himself beginning to be loosened or lightened he beginning to strive he put out his hand among the clothes and took hold of her hand and brought it up to his mouth and bit three of the fingers (as he judge) to the breaking of the bones. Which done the said Martin went out of the chamber down the stairs and out of the door.

And as soon as she went away this deponent called to the people of the house and told them what was done and that said Martin was now gone out of the door this deponent did also follow her but the people did not see her (as they said) but without the door there was a bucket of ___ on the left hand side and there was a drop of blood on the handle too, more upon the snow for there was a little flight of snow and there were the print of her two feet about a foot without the threshold, but no more footing did appear. "

Jarvis Ring stated that on a number of occasions he had been asleep in bed when something came upon him and lay on him so that he could neither move nor speak. He was unable to see what had been doing this until on one occasion he recognized Susanna Martin. She then took him by the hand and bit his finger to the bone leaving a scar.

Joseph Ring stated that he had been out cutting timber when he was strangely drawn to a deserted house. There he met three persons, two females and a Mr. Thomas Hardy. One of the females was Susanna Martin. There was a fire going and they had plenty of cider. The night passed and just before dawn Susanna Martin turned into the shape of a black hog and ran off, as did the other two persons. Mr. Ring was carried off and found himself by Samuel Wood’s house in Amesbury. He further stated that Mr. Hardy has troubled him on a number of occasions since this first incident and that Susanna Martin was present during many of these meetings.

John Kimball testified that he had bought some land from the Martins in the year 1667 and that he offered them the choice of three cows from his herd. The only condition was that he reserved several cows that he (Kimball) wished to keep. He said that George Martin was satisfied with this arrangement but that Susanna was upset and told him that he would never get anything good from those reserved cows. True enough one of the cows died, for no apparent reason, a short time later, The other two cows died soon after the first.

John Allen stated that he had had a similar problem concerning Susanna Martin and his oxen. In this case Susanna had asked him if he could use his oxen to help her cart some staves. He refused, they had an argument, and she escaped by flying over a brook. In a short time a number of his oxen had sickened while others had gotten lost. He blamed this on Susanna.

Joseph Knight testified that in 1686 he was walking in the woods with Nathaniel Clark when they saw Susanna Martin approaching them. A small dog was running at her side. They then saw her pick up the dog and hold it at her side. They were much surprised as the three passed each other for Susanna Martin was not holding a dog but a keg. When the two got their horses, which had been picketed nearby, the horses would not approach the path Susanna Martin had been walking on. Elizabeth Clark, the wife of Nathaniel, testified that her husband had told her of this incident that night in 1686 and that it had occurred as Joseph Knight had stated.

Robert Downer stated that when Susanna Martin had been accused of being a witch in 1669 he had told her that he believed that she was a witch. She replied that a she-devil would fetch him away. That "night as he lay in his bed in his own house alone there came at his window the likeness of a cat and by and by come up to his bed took fast hold of his throat and lay hard upon him a considerable while, and was like to throttle him. At length he minded what Susanna Martin had threatened him with the day before. He strove what he could and said avoid thou she devil in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost and then it let him go and slumped down upon the floor and went out at window again."

Sarah Atkinson stated that about eighteen years earlier Susanna Martin had walked to her house during some very wet weather. The distance between the houses was about a mile but when Susanna entered the Atkinson house Sarah noticed that her feet were dry and not even muddy.

Other neighbors that testified against her were Mary Andrews, Moses Pike, Thomas Putnam, Sam Parris, Nathaniel Ingersoll, Abigail Williams, Ann Putnam, Elizabeth Hubbard, Mercy Lewis, Sarah Vibber,and John Atkinson. Most of them described various pains, aliments and troubles as coming from Susanna. (For a full version of her neighbor's testimony against her click here).

Susannah Martin did not help her cause with her independence and sharp tongue. Her testimony reads;

Magistrate; Pray, what ails these People?


Martin; I don't know.


Magistrate; But what do you think ails them?


Martin; I don't desire to spend my Judgment upon it.


Magistrate; Don't you think they are Bewitch'd?


Martin; No, I do not think they are.


Magistrate; Tell us your thoughts about them then.


Martin; No, my thoughts are my own when they are in, but when they are out, they are anothers. Their Master --


Magistrate; Their Master? who do you think is their Master?


Martin. If they be dealing in the Black Art, you may know as well as I.


Magistrate; Well, what have you done towards this?


Martin; Nothing at all.


Magistrate. Why, tis you or your Appearance.


Martin; I cannot help it.


Magistrate. Is it not Your Master? How comes your Appearance to hurt these?


Martin; How do I know? He that appeared in the shape of Samuel, a Glorify'd Saint, may Appear in any ones shape.

It was then also noted in her, as in others like her, that if the Afflicted went to approach her, they were flung down to the Ground. And, when she was asked the Reason of it, she said, "I cannot tell; it may be, the Devil bears me more Malice than another."

Another version of her testimony which took place on May 2, 1692 reads as follows;

As soon as she came into the meeting-house many fell into fits

Hath this Woman hurt you?

Abig: Williams said it is Goody Martin, she hath hurt me often Others by fits were hindered from speaking.

Eliz: Hubbard said she had not hurt her. John Indian said he never saw her Mercy Lewes pointed at her & fell into a fit. Ann Putman threw her Glove in a fit at her

What do you laught at it?

Well I may at such folly.

Is this folly, to see these so hurt?

I never hurt man, woman or child.

Mercy Lewes cryed out, she hath hurt me a great many times & plucks me down.

Then Martin laught againe

Mary Walcot said this woman hath hurt her a great many times

Susannah Sheldon also accused her of hurting her

What do you say to this?

I have no hand in Witchcraft.

What did you do? Did you consent these should be hurt?

No never in my life.

What ails these people?

I do not know.

But what do you think ails them?

I do not desire to spend my judgment upon it

Do you think they are Bewitcht?

No I do not think they are.

Well tell us your thoughts about them?

My thoughts are mine own when they are in, but when they are out they are an others

You said their Master -- Who do you think is their Master?

If they be dealing in the black art, you may know as well as I.

What have you done towards the hurt of these?

I have done nothing

Why it is you, or your appearance

I cannot help it

That may be your Master that hurt them

I desire to lead my life according to the word of God

Is this according to the word of God?

If I were such a person I would tell you the Truth

How comes your appearance just now to hurt these?

How do I know?

Are you not willing to tell the Truth?

I cannot tell: He that appeared in sams::shape can appear in any ones shape.

Do you beleive these afflicted persons do not say true?

they may lye for ought I know.

May not you lye?

I dare not tell a lye if it would save my life

Then you will not speak the truth will you?

I have spoken nothing else. I would do them any good.

I do not think that you have such affections for these whom just now you insinuated had the Devil for their Master

The marshall said she pincht her hands & Eliz: Hubbard was immediately afflicted.

Severall of the afflicted cryed out they saw her upon the Beam.

Pray God discover you if you be guilty.

Amen, Amen. A false tongue will never make a guilty person.

You have been a long time coming to day said Mercy Lewes, you can come fast enough in the night

No sweet heart --

And then said Mercy, & all the afflicted beside almost were afflicted

John Indian fell into a fit, & cryed it was that woman, she bites, she bites. And then said Martin was biting her lips.

Have not you compassion on these afflicted --

No I have none

They cryed out there was the black man along with her, & Goody Bibber confirmed it

Abig: Williams went towards her, but could not come near her. nor Goody Bibber tho she had not accused her before: also Mary Walcot could not come near her. John Indian said he would kill her, if he came near her, but he fell down before he could touch her

What is the reason these cannot come near you?

I cannot tell it may be the Devil bears me more malice than an other.

Do you not see God evidently discovering you?

No, not a bit for that.

All the congregation besides think so.

Let them think what they will.

What is the reason these cannot come to you?

I do not know but they can if they will or else if you please

I will come to them.

What was that the black man whisperd to you?

There was none whispered to me.

She insisted that she was not guilty and at the trial stated that she had "no hand in witchcraft." She also stated that she felt that the afflicted were not bewitched and added that she had no compassion for the afflicted girls. Her attitude and actions probably contributed much towards her final fate. It certainly made the famous and influential, Reverend Cotton Mather upset. He declared that Susannah Martin "was one of the most impudent, scurrilous, wicked creatures in the whole world."Her indictment reads as follows;

(Indictment v. Susannah Martin, No. 1)
Anno Regis et Reginae Willm et Mariae . nunc Angliae &c Quarto Essex ss.

The Jurors for our Sovereigne Lord & Lady the King and Queen prsents That Susanna Martin of Amsbury in the County of Essex widdow the Second Day of may in the forth year of the Reigne of our Sovereigne Lord and Lady William and Mary by the Grace of God of England Scottland: France and Ireland King and Queen: Defenders of the faith &. divers other Dayes and Times as well before as after certaine Detestable arts, called witchcrafts & Sorceries wickedly and feloniously hath used Practised & Exercised at and within the Townership of Salem in the County of Essex aforesaid in upon and ag't one Mary Wallcott of Salem Village Single woman, by which Said wicked arts the s'd. Mary walcott the Second day of May in the forth year afores'd: and at Divers other Dayes & times as well before as after was, and is Tortored Afflicted Pined wasted and Tormented as also for Sundry other acts of witchcraft by Said Susanah Martin committed and Done before and Since that time ag't the Peace of our Sovereigne Lord & Lady william and Mary King and Queen of England theire Crowne and Dignity and ag't: the forme of the Statute in that case made & Provided.

Sarah Vibber Sworn

Mary Wolcutt Sworn

The Salem Witch Trials of 1692 resulted in nearly 200 people imprisoned, 20 executed and a further 8 dying in prison. Most of the participants knew each other. Either blood or marriage tied some together. This was true of my ancestors, some were victims, others prosecutors and still others the afflicted. The trials came about because of the action of a small group of teenage girls who had spent the winter of 1691-92 at the home of their friends, Elizabeth and Abigail Paris. There the girls became fascinated with the tales of the slave Tituba who told of black magic and of spells being placed on people. The 9 girls were Elizabeth Paris, Abigail Paris, Ann Putnam, Elizabeth Hubbard, Mary Warren, Mercy Lewis, Mary Wolcott, Elizabeth Booth and Susan Sheldon. Of these nine girls, only one is related to me, Ann Putnam. Her grandmother was Priscilla Gould, the sister of Zaccheus Gould. Ann was born in 1680 to Thomas Putnam and Ann. At first only Ann Putnam, Abigail Williams and Betty Parris started to act strangely. "They contorted themselves into odd postures and made strange gestures. They uttered foolish and ridiculous speech of which neither they nor anyone else could make sense. At first it seemed like a game, but soon it became clear it was something more. The three girls were sometimes dumb as if choked. They complained of pains, like those from pins being thrust into their bodies." Their parents became concerned and their doctor was called in who declared that the girls were bewitched. The girls and their story were brought to the attention of Magistrate John Hawthorne (One of the magistrate’s descendants was the author Nathaniel Hawthorne). Because witchcraft was a crime Magistrate Hawthorne organized an inquiry and grand jury to investigate these "witches". During the course of the investigation Mary Lewis and Mary Walcott also became afflicted thus leading to the trials and executions. When the accused were brought into the courtroom during the examinations the following is typical of what occurred; "The circle of afflicted girls were brought into the room. When the accused person glanced at them, they instantly succumbed to their afflictions, fits in which they writhed on the floor in strange agonies and grievous torments. Captain Alden, a sea captain who was accused, described the girls as ‘those wenches who played their juggling tricks, falling down, crying out, and staring in other people’s faces." However when the accused person touched an arm or another part of their bodies, they immediately revived and came to themselves. The afflicted girls swore that the accused person caused their fits. They swore that they had seen a specter come out of the accused person’s body and physically attack them, causing them great pain and torment. This testimony became the decisive evidence used by the court to establish that the accused person was not a rich." One of the accused was Susannah North Martin. Susannah was born in 1625 in England. She was the widow of George Martin, a blacksmith. At the time of her trial, Susanna was 67 years old and a widow for 6 years. Descriptions of Susanna say that she was short, slightly plump, active, and "of remarkable personal neatness." She was also said to be very outspoken, contemptuous of authority, and defiant in the face of slander, which had followed her for years. This was the second time she had charged with witchcraft. In 1669 she had posted bond of 100 pounds when she was charged with witchcraft. While the court records of this case do not exist it is obvious that she was not found guilty since witchcraft was a capitol offense. At he same time her husband sued William Sargent Jr. for slandering his wife by calling her a witch. The Martins won the case but were publicly insulted when the court awarded them the amount of "a white wampum peague (colonial currency) or the eighth part of a penny damage." In 1671, George, Susanna and her sister Mary Jones became involved in lengthy litigation over their father’s (Richard North) estate. In October 1674, they lost their inheritance when the court found against them. Some scholars feel that the lengthy litigation over this estate caused much bitterness and accusations and was a factor in Susanna being charged as a witch 21 years later. A complaint was filed against her on April 30, 1692. On May 2 she was arrested. Her warrant reads as follows; To: To The Marshall of the County of Essex or his Lawfull deputie or to the Constable of Amesburry. You are in their Majests names hereby required forthwith or as soon as may be to apprehend and bring (before us) Susanna Martin of Amesbury in the County of Essex Widdow at the house of Lt Nathaniell Ingersalls in Salem Village, in order to her Examination Relateing to high Suspition of Sundry acts of Witchcraft donne or Committed by her upon the Bodys of Mary Walcot Abigail Williams Ann putnam and Marcy Lewis of Salem Village or farmes Where by great hurt and dammage hath benne donne to the bodys of Said persons according to Compl't of Capt Jonathan Walcot & Serg't Thomas putnam in behalfe of their Majests this day Exhibited before us for themselfes and also for Severall of theire Neighbours and here of You are not to faile at your perills. Dated Salem Aprile 30th 1692 *John. Hathorne *Jonathan Corwin (Reverse) according this warrant I have apprehended susanna Martin widdow of Amsbery and have brought or caused hir to be brought to the place appointed for his examination p me *Orlando Bagly: Constable of Amsbery salem village this 2:th may 1692 (Reverse) Susanna Martin Warrant (Mittimus for Susannah Martin, Lydia Dustin, Dorcas Hoar, and Sarah Morey) To: To. the Keeper of theire Majests Goale in Boston You are in theire Majests names hereby required to take into, your care and safe Custody the Bodys of Susanah Martin of Amesbury Widdow, Lydia Dastin of Reding Wi[ddow], Dorcas Hoare of Beverly widdow and Sarah Murrill also of Beverly who all stand Charged with high Suspition of Sundry acts of Witchcraft donne or Committed by them upon the Bos of Mary Walcot Marcy Lewis Abigail Williams Ann putnam Elizabeth Hubbert and Susannah Sheldon and Goody Viber of Salem Village or farmes whereby great hurt and dammage hath beene donne to the bodys [of] said persons according to Complaint of Capt Jonathan Walcot and Serj't Thomas putnam of Salem Village Yeoman Exhibited Salem April the 30th. 1692: Whome you are to secure in order to theire further Examination or Tryall and hereof you are not to faile Dated Salem Village May 2d. 1692 *John Hathorne *Jonathan. Corwin During her trial Susannah was pointed out as a witch by a number of the afflicted girls. Abigail Williams said that it was Goody Martin who "hath hurt me often" and that she "had been afflicted by the apparition of Susannah Martin", Mary Lewis pointed towards her and fell into a little fit. Besides the testimony of these afflicted girls, a number of Susannah Martin's own neighbors testified against her. A few of the stories are as follows; William Brown, a 70 year old resident of Salisbury, stated that 30 years ago Susannah Martin had put a spell on his wife Elizabeth causing her much mental and physical anguish. According to Brown, his wife was walking from their house to the mill in Salisbury when she came upon Susanna Martin. Just as they approached each other, Susanna disappeared causing Elizabeth great fright. Susanna also appeared at the Brown house on a number of occasions and each time Elizabeth suffered from a physical ailment such as " birds pecking her legs or pricking her with the motion of their wings and then it would rise up into her stomach with pricking pain as nails and pins of which she did bitterly complain and cry out like a woman in travail and after that it would rise up to her throat in a bunch like a pullet's egg and then she would turn back her head and say, witch you shan't choke me. " John Pressey stated that about 24 years previously (around 1668) he had been walking home from the Amesbury ferry. The distance was about 3 miles and the ground well known by Mr. Pressey. He claimed that he became confused and lost. While trying to find his way home he saw a light on his left. He kept going leaving the light behind. A short time later the light was again on his left. He then took his walking stick and struck the light at least 40 times. He then tried to leave but something grabbed his heels and he was flung to the ground. He felt himself sliding into a deep place but was able to grab a bush and prevent himself from sliding into the hole. He then got up and fled. A short distance away he saw Susanna Martin standing to his left just as the light had previously done. She said nothing and Mr. Pressey continued on to his house. He was in such fear that he could not speak until his wife spoke to him. Mr. Pressey added that he later heard that the next day Susanna Martin was in extreme pain, pain he believed was caused by him striking the light. Both Mr. Pressey and his wife, Mary, both testified that a few years after the above incident, Susanna Martin came to their house and cursed them. She told them that no matter what they did, they would never prosper and that they would never have more then two cows. They added that even though they both tried to increase their herd in the past twenty years they had never managed to have more then two cows at a time. Bernard Peach in his deposition stated; "That about six or seven years past this deponent living at the house of Jacob Morell in Salisbury being in bed on a Lord's Day night he heard a scrabbling at the window, he this deponent saw Susanna Martin wife of George Martin of Amesbury come in at the window and jumped down upon the floor. She was in her hood and scarf and the same dress that she was in before at meeting the same day. Being come in she was coming up towards this deponent's face, but turned back to his feet and took hold of them and drew up his body into a hoop and lay upon him about an hour and half or 2 hours in all which time this deponent could not stir nor speak, but feeling himself beginning to be loosened or lightened he beginning to strive he put out his hand among the clothes and took hold of her hand and brought it up to his mouth and bit three of the fingers (as he judge) to the breaking of the bones. Which done the said Martin went out of the chamber down the stairs and out of the door. And as soon as she went away this deponent called to the people of the house and told them what was done and that said Martin was now gone out of the door this deponent did also follow her but the people did not see her (as they said) but without the door there was a bucket of ___ on the left hand side and there was a drop of blood on the handle too, more upon the snow for there was a little flight of snow and there were the print of her two feet about a foot without the threshold, but no more footing did appear. " Jarvis Ring stated that on a number of occasions he had been asleep in bed when something came upon him and lay on him so that he could neither move nor speak. He was unable to see what had been doing this until on one occasion he recognized Susanna Martin. She then took him by the hand and bit his finger to the bone leaving a scar. Joseph Ring stated that he had been out cutting timber when he was strangely drawn to a deserted house. There he met three persons, two females and a Mr. Thomas Hardy. One of the females was Susanna Martin. There was a fire going and they had plenty of cider. The night passed and just before dawn Susanna Martin turned into the shape of a black hog and ran off, as did the other two persons. Mr. Ring was carried off and found himself by Samuel Wood’s house in Amesbury. He further stated that Mr. Hardy has troubled him on a number of occasions since this first incident and that Susanna Martin was present during many of these meetings. John Kimball testified that he had bought some land from the Martins in the year 1667 and that he offered them the choice of three cows from his herd. The only condition was that he reserved several cows that he (Kimball) wished to keep. He said that George Martin was satisfied with this arrangement but that Susanna was upset and told him that he would never get anything good from those reserved cows. True enough one of the cows died, for no apparent reason, a short time later, The other two cows died soon after the first. John Allen stated that he had had a similar problem concerning Susanna Martin and his oxen. In this case Susanna had asked him if he could use his oxen to help her cart some staves. He refused, they had an argument, and she escaped by flying over a brook. In a short time a number of his oxen had sickened while others had gotten lost. He blamed this on Susanna. Joseph Knight testified that in 1686 he was walking in the woods with Nathaniel Clark when they saw Susanna Martin approaching them. A small dog was running at her side. They then saw her pick up the dog and hold it at her side. They were much surprised as the three passed each other for Susanna Martin was not holding a dog but a keg. When the two got their horses, which had been picketed nearby, the horses would not approach the path Susanna Martin had been walking on. Elizabeth Clark, the wife of Nathaniel, testified that her husband had told her of this incident that night in 1686 and that it had occurred as Joseph Knight had stated. Robert Downer stated that when Susanna Martin had been accused of being a witch in 1669 he had told her that he believed that she was a witch. She replied that a she-devil would fetch him away. That "night as he lay in his bed in his own house alone there came at his window the likeness of a cat and by and by come up to his bed took fast hold of his throat and lay hard upon him a considerable while, and was like to throttle him. At length he minded what Susanna Martin had threatened him with the day before. He strove what he could and said avoid thou she devil in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost and then it let him go and slumped down upon the floor and went out at window again." Sarah Atkinson stated that about eighteen years earlier Susanna Martin had walked to her house during some very wet weather. The distance between the houses was about a mile but when Susanna entered the Atkinson house Sarah noticed that her feet were dry and not even muddy. Other neighbors that testified against her were Mary Andrews, Moses Pike, Thomas Putnam, Sam Parris, Nathaniel Ingersoll, Abigail Williams, Ann Putnam, Elizabeth Hubbard, Mercy Lewis, Sarah Vibber,and John Atkinson. Most of them described various pains, aliments and troubles as coming from Susanna. (For a full version of her neighbor's testimony against her click here). Susannah Martin did not help her cause with her independence and sharp tongue. Her testimony reads; Magistrate; Pray, what ails these People? Martin; I don't know. Magistrate; But what do you think ails them? Martin; I don't desire to spend my Judgment upon it. Magistrate; Don't you think they are Bewitch'd? Martin; No, I do not think they are. Magistrate; Tell us your thoughts about them then. Martin; No, my thoughts are my own when they are in, but when they are out, they are anothers. Their Master -- Magistrate; Their Master? who do you think is their Master? Martin. If they be dealing in the Black Art, you may know as well as I. Magistrate; Well, what have you done towards this? Martin; Nothing at all. Magistrate. Why, tis you or your Appearance. Martin; I cannot help it. Magistrate. Is it not Your Master? How comes your Appearance to hurt these? Martin; How do I know? He that appeared in the shape of Samuel, a Glorify'd Saint, may Appear in any ones shape. It was then also noted in her, as in others like her, that if the Afflicted went to approach her, they were flung down to the Ground. And, when she was asked the Reason of it, she said, "I cannot tell; it may be, the Devil bears me more Malice than another." Another version of her testimony which took place on May 2, 1692 reads as follows; As soon as she came into the meeting-house many fell into fits Hath this Woman hurt you? Abig: Williams said it is Goody Martin, she hath hurt me often Others by fits were hindered from speaking. Eliz: Hubbard said she had not hurt her. John Indian said he never saw her Mercy Lewes pointed at her & fell into a fit. Ann Putman threw her Glove in a fit at her What do you laught at it? Well I may at such folly. Is this folly, to see these so hurt? I never hurt man, woman or child. Mercy Lewes cryed out, she hath hurt me a great many times & plucks me down. Then Martin laught againe Mary Walcot said this woman hath hurt her a great many times Susannah Sheldon also accused her of hurting her What do you say to this? I have no hand in Witchcraft. What did you do? Did you consent these should be hurt? No never in my life. What ails these people? I do not know. But what do you think ails them? I do not desire to spend my judgment upon it Do you think they are Bewitcht? No I do not think they are. Well tell us your thoughts about them? My thoughts are mine own when they are in, but when they are out they are an others You said their Master -- Who do you think is their Master? If they be dealing in the black art, you may know as well as I. What have you done towards the hurt of these? I have done nothing Why it is you, or your appearance I cannot help it That may be your Master that hurt them I desire to lead my life according to the word of God Is this according to the word of God? If I were such a person I would tell you the Truth How comes your appearance just now to hurt these? How do I know? Are you not willing to tell the Truth? I cannot tell: He that appeared in sams::shape can appear in any ones shape. Do you beleive these afflicted persons do not say true? they may lye for ought I know. May not you lye? I dare not tell a lye if it would save my life Then you will not speak the truth will you? I have spoken nothing else. I would do them any good. I do not think that you have such affections for these whom just now you insinuated had the Devil for their Master The marshall said she pincht her hands & Eliz: Hubbard was immediately afflicted. Severall of the afflicted cryed out they saw her upon the Beam. Pray God discover you if you be guilty. Amen, Amen. A false tongue will never make a guilty person. You have been a long time coming to day said Mercy Lewes, you can come fast enough in the night No sweet heart -- And then said Mercy, & all the afflicted beside almost were afflicted John Indian fell into a fit, & cryed it was that woman, she bites, she bites. And then said Martin was biting her lips. Have not you compassion on these afflicted -- No I have none They cryed out there was the black man along with her, & Goody Bibber confirmed it Abig: Williams went towards her, but could not come near her. nor Goody Bibber tho she had not accused her before: also Mary Walcot could not come near her. John Indian said he would kill her, if he came near her, but he fell down before he could touch her What is the reason these cannot come near you? I cannot tell it may be the Devil bears me more malice than an other. Do you not see God evidently discovering you? No, not a bit for that. All the congregation besides think so. Let them think what they will. What is the reason these cannot come to you? I do not know but they can if they will or else if you please I will come to them. What was that the black man whisperd to you? There was none whispered to me. She insisted that she was not guilty and at the trial stated that she had "no hand in witchcraft." She also stated that she felt that the afflicted were not bewitched and added that she had no compassion for the afflicted girls. Her attitude and actions probably contributed much towards her final fate. It certainly made the famous and influential, Reverend Cotton Mather upset. He declared that Susannah Martin "was one of the most impudent, scurrilous, wicked creatures in the whole world."Her indictment reads as follows; (Indictment v. Susannah Martin, No. 1) Anno Regis et Reginae Willm et Mariae . nunc Angliae &c Quarto Essex ss. The Jurors for our Sovereigne Lord & Lady the King and Queen prsents That Susanna Martin of Amsbury in the County of Essex widdow the Second Day of may in the forth year of the Reigne of our Sovereigne Lord and Lady William and Mary by the Grace of God of England Scottland: France and Ireland King and Queen: Defenders of the faith &. divers other Dayes and Times as well before as after certaine Detestable arts, called witchcrafts & Sorceries wickedly and feloniously hath used Practised & Exercised at and within the Townership of Salem in the County of Essex aforesaid in upon and ag't one Mary Wallcott of Salem Village Single woman, by which Said wicked arts the s'd. Mary walcott the Second day of May in the forth year afores'd: and at Divers other Dayes & times as well before as after was, and is Tortored Afflicted Pined wasted and Tormented as also for Sundry other acts of witchcraft by Said Susanah Martin committed and Done before and Since that time ag't the Peace of our Sovereigne Lord & Lady william and Mary King and Queen of England theire Crowne and Dignity and ag't: the forme of the Statute in that case made & Provided. Sarah Vibber Sworn Mary Wolcutt Sworn [M]r Sam'll Parris. Sworn Elizabeth Hubbard Marcy Lewis (Reverse) Bil a Vera ( Essex County Archives, Salem -- Witchcraft Vol. 1 Page 58 ) (Indictment v. Susannah Martin, No. 2.) Anno Regis et Reginae Willm et Mariae : nunc Angliae &c Quarto Essex ss The Jurors for our Sovereigne Lord & Lady the King and Queen: prsents That Susanah Martin of Amsbury in the County of Essex widdow the Second day of may in the forth Year of the Reigne of our Sovereigne Lord & Lady william and Mary by the Grace of God of England Scottland France & Ireland King and Queen Defenders of the faith &c: and divers other Dayes & times as well before as after. certaine Detestable Arts called witchcrafts and Sorceries wickedly: and felloniously hath used Practised & Exercised at and within the Towneship of Salem in the County of Essex aforesd: in and upon and ag't: one Marcy Lewis: of Salem Villiage Singlewoman by which said wicked arts the: Said Marcy Lewis. the said second day of may in the forth year aforesaid and at Divers other dayes and times as well before as after was and is Tortured: Afflicted Pined wasted and Torminted as also for Sundrey other acts of witchcraft by said Suzanah Martin Committed and done before and since that time ag't the Peace of our Sovereigne Lord. and Lady William & Mary King & Queen of England there Crowne and Dignity. and ag't the forme of the Statute in that case made and Provided. Witnesses Marcy Lewis Mr. Samll: Parris Sworn Anne Puttman Sworn Sarah Biber Sworne Elizabeth Hubbard Mary Wallcott Sworne in Court June 2d. 92. ( Essex County Archives, Salem -- Witchcraft Vol. 1 Page 58 ) On July 19, 1692, Susanna Martin was taken to Gallows Hill. Accompanying her were 4 other condemned 'witches', Sarah Good, Elizabeth Howe, Rebecca Nurse, and Sarah Wilder. While at the gallows awaiting her fate, Susannah was asked by Rev. Noyes to confess. He told her that he knew she was a witch and that she should repent. "She replied that he lied, and that she was no more a witch then he was a wizard, and if he took away her life, God would give him blood to drink." (Tradition has it that Rev. Noyes later died of internal bleeding, some blood observed coming from his mouth. Another source I read attributes this question being asked to Sarah Good rather then Susanna Martin. The sentence was then carried out. Their bodies were later taken down and flung into a nearby ravine, because they could not be buried in consecrated ground. It is unknown as to the eventual fate of Susannah's body but it is likely that family members secretly removed it for burial in an unknown gravesite. More then just the actions of the afflicted and a general belief in witches spurred on these trials and accusations. A number of the accused confessed to being a witch. An example is the case of Mary Lacy who gave the following answers to questions at her examination; Q:"Do you acknowledge now you are a witch?" A: "Yes." Q: Did the devil appear to you?" A:" Yes." Q: "In what shape?" A: "In the shape of a horse." Q: Did he bid you worship him?" A: Yes, he bid me also to affect persons." Q: "Did you use at any time to ride upon, a stick or a pole?" A: "Yes." Q:" How high." A: "Sometimes above the trees." These confessions served to inflame the people and strengthen their beliefs that there were witches and that a number of them were in their community. They encouraged even more accusation, trials and executions. Besides Susannah Martin, a number of other people connected with the trials have ties to my family tree. Most are cousins. Issac Cummings was the son of the Issac Cummings who was the first in the line to came to America. The Gould family was well represented at the trials. John Gould testified at a grand jury inquest. Sarah Wildes was the wife of John Wildes whose first wife, and mother of his children, was Priscilla Gould a granddaughter of Zaccheus Gould. Two of John Wildes children, Sarah and Phoebe were also arrested during the trials. Benjamin Gould testified against Giles Corey who refused to enter a plea of guilty or not guilty. Giles knew that without such a plea he could not be tried, found guilty and as a result lose his property. In doing this, Giles knew that he would die, but with the knowledge that his property pass on to his children. To obtain a plea, Giles was taken out and large rocks placed on his prone body to induce him to cooperate. He refused and died of the pressing. Benjamin also testified against John Proctor who was hanged on August 19, 1692. Elizabeth Howe and her husband, who had been blind since 1685, lived in Topsfield, Massachusetts. She was accused and charged with being a witch on May 28, 1692. On May 31, 1692 Ephraim Wildes, the Topsfield constable, arrested her. When examined by the court Elizabeth refused to confess even though she knew that this could result in her death. She told the court that "If it was the last moment I was to live, God knows I am innocent of anything in this nature." There were a number of people who testified against Elizabeth Howe other then the afflicted young girls. Samuel Perley and his wife Ruth claimed that Elizabeth bewitched their young daughter Hannah in 1682. They stated that Hannah was afflicted with pain day and night and complained of being pinched with pins and also suffered from fits. They added that Hannah herself blamed Elizabeth for these problems. Reverend Samuel Philips and Reverend Edward Payson testified in support of the Perley’s statement. Also testifying against Elizabeth was her brother-in-law John Howe who blamed her for the mysterious death of one of his sows. Issac Cummings, his wife Mary and their son Issac Jr., testified that she was responsible for the distemper suffered by one of their horses. Elizabeth was condemned and was hung along with four others, including Susanna Martin. The Putnam family, who were descended from Priscilla Gould the wife of John Putnam, were heavily involved. They were involved in many of the arrests, as John, John Jr., Jonathan, Nathaniel, Edward and Thomas Putnam were all constables at the time. The author of the book "The Devil Discovered" feels that the Putnam’s were also deeply involved in persuading the afflicted girls to accuse certain persons, persons whose death would benefit the Putnam’s. Kendall Soames was the granddaughter of John Kendall and Elizabeth Sacherell. In 1692 she was staying with a friend, Samuel Gaskill of Salem. Though she was bedridden at the time of her accusation, she was arrested anyway. She was imprisoned but later released. The trials stopped in 1693 through the efforts of Governor Phipps who in May of 1693 ordered the release of all those imprisoned for being suspected of being witches. Of all those involved in the trials and executions, only Judge Samuel Sewall recanted and asked the people to pardon him for his actions. There are a number of theories as to the cause of the girls afflictions. One was that the girls were living in an uncertain time and that the recent threat of Indian raids combined with the stories of witchcraft told over the long lonely winter led to mass hysteria. The general belief in and fear of witches then fed this hysteria. One author suggested that the afflicted girls were steered into certain accusations by persons who would benefit by the arrests and convictions of these people. Governor Hutchinson was of the opinion that it was "wholly the result of fraud and deception on the part of the affected children." Linda Caporael put another theory forth in "Science" magazine on April 2, 1976. She felt that the girl’s affliction could have been caused by "Convulsive Ergotism" a disorder resulting from the ingestion of contaminated rye grain. Rye was a staple in New England at the time of the trials. According to Caporael the weather conditions were ripe for the fungus that causes this disorder. The symptoms for the disorder are similar to that suffered by the young girls. Interestingly the disorder mainly affects young females. The symptoms are "hallucinations, violent fits, choking, pinching, itching, a crawling sensation in the skin and muscular contractions." Unfortunately at this time no one can be sure of the causes of the Salem Witch Trials. John Greenleaf Whittier was a major American poet during the 19th century. He was a direct descendant of Susanna Martin, and in 1857 published the poem "The Witches Daughter" in The National Era. This poem was about the daughter of Susanna Martin. Sources; "The Devil Discovered" by Enders Robinson, Hippocrene Books,NY 1991, "The Witchcraft Delusion of 1692" by Gov. Hutchinson, NEHG Register Vol. 24, Oct 1870, "The Witches at Salem 1692" by Dick Eastman, Compuserve Genealogy Forum, "Records of Salem Witchcraft" W. Woodward, Roxbury,Mass. 1864, "Priscilla, Wife of John Putnam" R. Putnam, NEHG Register, vol.119,July 1865.r Sam'll Parris. Sworn

Elizabeth Hubbard

Marcy Lewis

(Reverse) Bil a Vera

( Essex County Archives, Salem -- Witchcraft Vol. 1 Page 58 )


(Indictment v. Susannah Martin, No. 2.)
Anno Regis et Reginae Willm et Mariae : nunc Angliae &c Quarto Essex ss

The Jurors for our Sovereigne Lord & Lady the King and Queen: prsents That Susanah Martin of Amsbury in the County of Essex widdow the Second day of may in the forth Year of the Reigne of our Sovereigne Lord & Lady william and Mary by the Grace of God of England Scottland France & Ireland King and Queen Defenders of the faith &c: and divers other Dayes & times as well before as after. certaine Detestable Arts called witchcrafts and Sorceries wickedly: and felloniously hath used Practised & Exercised at and within the Towneship of Salem in the County of Essex aforesd: in and upon and ag't: one Marcy Lewis: of Salem Villiage Singlewoman by which said wicked arts the: Said Marcy Lewis. the said second day of may in the forth year aforesaid and at Divers other dayes and times as well before as after was and is Tortured: Afflicted Pined wasted and Torminted as also for Sundrey other acts of witchcraft by said Suzanah Martin Committed and done before and since that time ag't the Peace of our Sovereigne Lord. and Lady William & Mary King & Queen of England there Crowne and Dignity. and ag't the forme of the Statute in that case made and Provided.

Witnesses

Marcy Lewis

Mr. Samll: Parris Sworn

Anne Puttman Sworn

Sarah Biber Sworne

Elizabeth Hubbard

Mary Wallcott Sworne in Court June 2d. 92.

( Essex County Archives, Salem -- Witchcraft Vol. 1 Page 58 )

On July 19, 1692, Susanna Martin was taken to Gallows Hill. Accompanying her were 4 other condemned 'witches', Sarah Good, Elizabeth Howe, Rebecca Nurse, and Sarah Wilder. While at the gallows awaiting her fate, Susannah was asked by Rev. Noyes to confess. He told her that he knew she was a witch and that she should repent. "She replied that he lied, and that she was no more a witch then he was a wizard, and if he took away her life, God would give him blood to drink." (Tradition has it that Rev. Noyes later died of internal bleeding, some blood observed coming from his mouth. Another source I read attributes this question being asked to Sarah Good rather then Susanna Martin. The sentence was then carried out. Their bodies were later taken down and flung into a nearby ravine, because they could not be buried in consecrated ground. It is unknown as to the eventual fate of Susannah's body but it is likely that family members secretly removed it for burial in an unknown gravesite.

More then just the actions of the afflicted and a general belief in witches spurred on these trials and accusations. A number of the accused confessed to being a witch. An example is the case of Mary Lacy who gave the following answers to questions at her examination;

Q:"Do you acknowledge now you are a witch?"

A: "Yes."

Q: Did the devil appear to you?"

A:" Yes."

Q: "In what shape?"

A: "In the shape of a horse."

Q: Did he bid you worship him?"

A: Yes, he bid me also to affect persons."

Q: "Did you use at any time to ride upon, a stick or a pole?"

A: "Yes."

Q:" How high."

A: "Sometimes above the trees."

These confessions served to inflame the people and strengthen their beliefs that there were witches and that a number of them were in their community. They encouraged even more accusation, trials and executions.

Besides Susannah Martin, a number of other people connected with the trials have ties to my family tree. Most are cousins. Issac Cummings was the son of the Issac Cummings who was the first in the line to came to America. The Gould family was well represented at the trials. John Gould testified at a grand jury inquest. Sarah Wildes was the wife of John Wildes whose first wife, and mother of his children, was Priscilla Gould a granddaughter of Zaccheus Gould. Two of John Wildes children, Sarah and Phoebe were also arrested during the trials. Benjamin Gould testified against Giles Corey who refused to enter a plea of guilty or not guilty. Giles knew that without such a plea he could not be tried, found guilty and as a result lose his property. In doing this, Giles knew that he would die, but with the knowledge that his property pass on to his children. To obtain a plea, Giles was taken out and large rocks placed on his prone body to induce him to cooperate. He refused and died of the pressing. Benjamin also testified against John Proctor who was hanged on August 19, 1692. Elizabeth Howe and her husband, who had been blind since 1685, lived in Topsfield, Massachusetts. She was accused and charged with being a witch on May 28, 1692. On May 31, 1692 Ephraim Wildes, the Topsfield constable, arrested her. When examined by the court Elizabeth refused to confess even though she knew that this could result in her death. She told the court that "If it was the last moment I was to live, God knows I am innocent of anything in this nature."

There were a number of people who testified against Elizabeth Howe other then the afflicted young girls. Samuel Perley and his wife Ruth claimed that Elizabeth bewitched their young daughter Hannah in 1682. They stated that Hannah was afflicted with pain day and night and complained of being pinched with pins and also suffered from fits. They added that Hannah herself blamed Elizabeth for these problems. Reverend Samuel Philips and Reverend Edward Payson testified in support of the Perley’s statement. Also testifying against Elizabeth was her brother-in-law John Howe who blamed her for the mysterious death of one of his sows. Issac Cummings, his wife Mary and their son Issac Jr., testified that she was responsible for the distemper suffered by one of their horses. Elizabeth was condemned and was hung along with four others, including Susanna Martin.

The Putnam family, who were descended from Priscilla Gould the wife of John Putnam, were heavily involved. They were involved in many of the arrests, as John, John Jr., Jonathan, Nathaniel, Edward and Thomas Putnam were all constables at the time. The author of the book "The Devil Discovered" feels that the Putnam’s were also deeply involved in persuading the afflicted girls to accuse certain persons, persons whose death would benefit the Putnam’s.

Kendall Soames was the granddaughter of John Kendall and Elizabeth Sacherell. In 1692 she was staying with a friend, Samuel Gaskill of Salem. Though she was bedridden at the time of her accusation, she was arrested anyway. She was imprisoned but later released.

The trials stopped in 1693 through the efforts of Governor Phipps who in May of 1693 ordered the release of all those imprisoned for being suspected of being witches. Of all those involved in the trials and executions, only Judge Samuel Sewall recanted and asked the people to pardon him for his actions.

There are a number of theories as to the cause of the girls afflictions. One was that the girls were living in an uncertain time and that the recent threat of Indian raids combined with the stories of witchcraft told over the long lonely winter led to mass hysteria. The general belief in and fear of witches then fed this hysteria. One author suggested that the afflicted girls were steered into certain accusations by persons who would benefit by the arrests and convictions of these people. Governor Hutchinson was of the opinion that it was "wholly the result of fraud and deception on the part of the affected children."

Linda Caporael put another theory forth in "Science" magazine on April 2, 1976. She felt that the girl’s affliction could have been caused by "Convulsive Ergotism" a disorder resulting from the ingestion of contaminated rye grain. Rye was a staple in New England at the time of the trials. According to Caporael the weather conditions were ripe for the fungus that causes this disorder. The symptoms for the disorder are similar to that suffered by the young girls. Interestingly the disorder mainly affects young females. The symptoms are "hallucinations, violent fits, choking, pinching, itching, a crawling sensation in the skin and muscular contractions." Unfortunately at this time no one can be sure of the causes of the Salem Witch Trials.

John Greenleaf Whittier was a major American poet during the 19th century. He was a direct descendant of Susanna Martin, and in 1857 published the poem "The Witches Daughter" in The National Era. This poem was about the daughter of Susanna Martin.

Sources; "The Devil Discovered" by Enders Robinson, Hippocrene Books,NY 1991, "The Witchcraft Delusion of 1692" by Gov. Hutchinson, NEHG Register Vol. 24, Oct 1870, "The Witches at Salem 1692" by Dick Eastman, Compuserve Genealogy Forum, "Records of Salem Witchcraft" W. Woodward, Roxbury,Mass. 1864, "Priscilla, Wife of John Putnam" R. Putnam, NEHG Register, vol.119,July 1865.

Legislature exonerates last Salem 'witches'


BOSTON -- Gov. Jane M. Swift righted a 300-plus-year wrong yesterday, exonerating five women who went to their deaths in the Salem witch trials.

One of the women whose name was cleared is Susannah Martin of Amesbury, who was tried, convicted and hanged for witchcraft in 1692. The other women are Bridget Bishop, Alice Parker, Margaret Scott and Wilmott Redd.

The pardon is the culmination of more than three years of letter writing and e-mailing to state lawmakers by the women's descendants.

The bill granting the pardons was gaveled through the House Tuesday by state Rep. Paul E. Tirone, D-Amesbury, whose wife, Sharron, is related to Sarah Wildes of Topsfield, who was executed as a witch but exonerated in the 1700s.

To Tirone the law not only rights a past wrong, but it also teaches an important lesson about tolerance in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

"It's a powerful thing, hysteria. Once people get whipped up, reason goes out the window," Tirone said. "That is what we have to be vigilant about today. We have to make sure we are directing our actions in the right place, and making people who did the crime pay the penalty."

Juliet H. Mofford, the author of "Cry 'Witch: The Salem Witch Trials 1692'' and the director of education and research at the Andover Historical Society, agrees.

"It's really about fanaticism and intolerance. It's too easy to say it was just about a bunch of excited Puritans in a crazy time. It happened then and it is still happening," Mofford said.

Twenty men and women were hanged or crushed to death during the witchcraft hysteria, which was fueled by the isolation of colonial Massachusetts, a deep belief in the supernatural and political feuds. Almost as quickly as they began, the executions stopped, just four months after the first hanging. By the end of 1692, 200 people were jailed under charges of witchcraft.

In 1711, prodded in part by convicted witch Abigail Dane Faulkner of Andover, the Legislature exonerated and paid damages to the survivors of those who were executed.

Faulkner was the daughter of Andover senior minister, the Rev. Francis Dane, and was sparred from execution because she was expecting her seventh child.

Those who were convicted of witchcraft, but were later released remained "under Attainer," which meant they had no legal rights and could not reclaim any property, Mofford said.

The five women pardoned this week were ignored in 1711 when none of their family members appeared in court.

Another attempt to absolve the women was made in 1957, but the law was poorly written and only cleared Ann Pudeator. In 1998, Paula Gauthier Keene of Salem, Mass., discovered the error and asked state Rep. Michael Ruane, D-Salem, to file a bill to correct it.

Amesbury's Martin was like several women who were accused of witchcraft, a strong-willed, outspoken elderly widow who owned a sizable piece of land. She had run afoul of her neighbors before.

In 1669, she was accused of witchcraft, but the charges were dropped, and her husband sued successfully for slander.

But when the witchcraft hysteria broke in 1692 in Salem Village, now Danvers, some of her old enemies resurfaced and provided damaging testimony against her. Martin boldly ridiculed much of the evidence against her, and laughed out loud when the girls making the accusations writhed on the floor and screamed -- a sight that judges considered credible evidence of witchcraft.

Her constant denials that she was not a witch did not help, and on June 26 she was sentenced to death. Ten days later, Martin was hanged on Gallows Hill in Salem.

The witchcraft hysteria began when four young girls, including the daughter of the Salem Village minister, the Rev. Samuel Parris, began dabbling in fortune-telling games with Tituba, a female slave belonging to Parris.

When the girls started showing mysterious physical symptoms, the town doctor concluded they were "bewitched."

Then the girls began naming people they suspected of inflicting of symptoms. Those who were named initially -- including Tituba -- lived on the edges of society.

In time, however, the accusations spread to more prominent citizens, including Salem Village's former minister, George Burroughs, who was named by the girls as the master of all Massachusetts witches and the leader of the Salem Coven. A key to the trials was so-called spectral evidence, reports of ghostly presences inflicting torment under the command of suspected witches.

Eventually, the thirst for prosecutions waned and the use of spectral evidence was rejected. The trials ended in May 1693, when Gov. William Phips pardoned all remaining witchcraft suspects.

By Nancy C. Rodriguez
Eagle-Tribune Writer.

Children of Susannah North and George Martyn

Hannah (Unknown)

F, d. before 1645
     Hannah married George Martyn before 1643. Hannah (Unknown) died before 1645.

Child of Hannah (Unknown) and George Martyn

Hannah Martin

F, b. 1 Feb 1643/44
Hannah Martin|b. 1 Feb 1643/44|p303.htm#i218552|George Martyn|b. circa 1618\nd. before 23 Nov 1686|p303.htm#i218549|Hannah (Unknown)|d. before 1645|p303.htm#i218551|||||||||||||

Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Hannah Martin was born on 1-Feb-1643/44 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of George Martyn and Hannah (Unknown). Hannah married Ezekiel Worthen, son of George Worthen and Margery (Unknown), on 4-Dec-1661 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Ezekiel Worthen

M, b. circa 1636
Ezekiel Worthen|b. circa 1636|p303.htm#i218553|George Worthen||p375.htm#i307492|Margery (Unknown)||p375.htm#i307493|||||||||||||
      Ezekiel Worthen was born circa 1636. He was the son of George Worthen and Margery (Unknown). Ezekiel married Hannah Martin, daughter of George Martyn and Hannah (Unknown), on 4-Dec-1661 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. Ezekiel's estate was proved on 6-Aug-1716.
     He was also known as Ezekiel Wathen in old records. On Jun-1644 He was apprenticed to Thomas Abre, of Avery when eight and one half years old until he should be twenty years old: was discharged Jun 1656 being twenty years old.
He received land in 1663 at Amesbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. He gave oath of allegiance in 1677.
Ezekiel's left a will on 5-May-1715.

Richard Martin

M, b. 29 Jun 1647, d. 11 Mar 1728/29
Richard Martin|b. 29 Jun 1647\nd. 11 Mar 1728/29|p303.htm#i218554|George Martyn|b. circa 1618\nd. before 23 Nov 1686|p303.htm#i218549|Susannah North|b. 30 Sep 1621\nd. 19 Jul 1692|p303.htm#i218550|||||||Richard North|b. circa 1595\nd. 1 Mar 1666/67|p303.htm#i218565|Joan Bertram||p303.htm#i218566|

Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Richard Martin was born on 29-Jun-1647 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was the son of George Martyn and Susannah North. Richard married Mary Hoyt circa 1674. Richard Martin died on 11-Mar-1728/29 at Amesbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 81.
     He resided at at Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.

John Martin

M, b. 25 Jan 1650/51, d. 6 Oct 1693
John Martin|b. 25 Jan 1650/51\nd. 6 Oct 1693|p303.htm#i218555|George Martyn|b. circa 1618\nd. before 23 Nov 1686|p303.htm#i218549|Susannah North|b. 30 Sep 1621\nd. 19 Jul 1692|p303.htm#i218550|||||||Richard North|b. circa 1595\nd. 1 Mar 1666/67|p303.htm#i218565|Joan Bertram||p303.htm#i218566|

Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      John Martin was born on 25-Jan-1650/51 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was the son of George Martyn and Susannah North. John married Mary Weed, daughter of John Weed. John Martin died on 6-Oct-1693 at Amesbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, at age 42.

Esther Martin

F, b. 7 Apr 1653, d. after 1696
Esther Martin|b. 7 Apr 1653\nd. after 1696|p303.htm#i218556|George Martyn|b. circa 1618\nd. before 23 Nov 1686|p303.htm#i218549|Susannah North|b. 30 Sep 1621\nd. 19 Jul 1692|p303.htm#i218550|||||||Richard North|b. circa 1595\nd. 1 Mar 1666/67|p303.htm#i218565|Joan Bertram||p303.htm#i218566|

Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Esther Martin was born on 7-Apr-1653 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of George Martyn and Susannah North. Esther married John Jameson on 15-Mar-1669/70 at Amesbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. Esther Martin died after 1696.

Jane Martin

F, b. 2 Nov 1656
Jane Martin|b. 2 Nov 1656|p303.htm#i218557|George Martyn|b. circa 1618\nd. before 23 Nov 1686|p303.htm#i218549|Susannah North|b. 30 Sep 1621\nd. 19 Jul 1692|p303.htm#i218550|||||||Richard North|b. circa 1595\nd. 1 Mar 1666/67|p303.htm#i218565|Joan Bertram||p303.htm#i218566|

Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Jane Martin was born on 2-Nov-1656 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of George Martyn and Susannah North. Jane married Samuel Hadley, son of George Hadley, circa 1676.

Abigail Martin

F, b. 10 Sep 1659
Abigail Martin|b. 10 Sep 1659|p303.htm#i218558|George Martyn|b. circa 1618\nd. before 23 Nov 1686|p303.htm#i218549|Susannah North|b. 30 Sep 1621\nd. 19 Jul 1692|p303.htm#i218550|||||||Richard North|b. circa 1595\nd. 1 Mar 1666/67|p303.htm#i218565|Joan Bertram||p303.htm#i218566|

Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Abigail Martin was born on 10-Sep-1659 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of George Martyn and Susannah North. Abigail married James Hadlock, son of James Hadlock and Damaris (Unknown), on 3-Dec-1679 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts.

William Martin

M, b. 11 Dec 1662, d. after 1733
William Martin|b. 11 Dec 1662\nd. after 1733|p303.htm#i218559|George Martyn|b. circa 1618\nd. before 23 Nov 1686|p303.htm#i218549|Susannah North|b. 30 Sep 1621\nd. 19 Jul 1692|p303.htm#i218550|||||||Richard North|b. circa 1595\nd. 1 Mar 1666/67|p303.htm#i218565|Joan Bertram||p303.htm#i218566|

Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      William Martin was born on 11-Dec-1662 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was the son of George Martyn and Susannah North. William married Mary Stone circa 1697. William Martin died after 1733.

Samuel Martin

M, b. 29 Sep 1667
Samuel Martin|b. 29 Sep 1667|p303.htm#i218560|George Martyn|b. circa 1618\nd. before 23 Nov 1686|p303.htm#i218549|Susannah North|b. 30 Sep 1621\nd. 19 Jul 1692|p303.htm#i218550|||||||Richard North|b. circa 1595\nd. 1 Mar 1666/67|p303.htm#i218565|Joan Bertram||p303.htm#i218566|

Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Samuel Martin was born on 29-Sep-1667 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was the son of George Martyn and Susannah North.

Mary Hoyt

F
     Mary married Christopher Bartlett on 17-Dec-1663 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. Mary married Richard Martin, son of George Martyn and Susannah North, circa 1674.

John Jameson

M, b. 1640 or 1648, d. after 1713
      John Jameson was born in 1640 or 1648. John married Esther Martin, daughter of George Martyn and Susannah North, on 15-Mar-1669/70 at Amesbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. John Jameson died after 1713.

James Hadlock

M, d. 2 Jul 1716
James Hadlock|d. 2 Jul 1716|p303.htm#i218563|James Hadlock|b. 1617\nd. 3 Dec 1687|p340.htm#i252770|Damaris (Unknown)|b. circa 1615\nd. 21 Apr 1659|p367.htm#i278994|Henry Hadlock||p367.htm#i279008||||||||||
     James Hadlock was the son of James Hadlock and Damaris (Unknown). James married Sarah Draper on 19-May-1669 at Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. James married Abigail Martin, daughter of George Martyn and Susannah North, on 3-Dec-1679 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. James's estate was proved on 2-Jul-1716. He died on 2-Jul-1716 at Amesbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.
     James's left a will on 14-Nov-1678 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts.
James's left a will on 8-Sep-1714.

Mary Stone

F
     Mary married William Martin, son of George Martyn and Susannah North, circa 1697.

Richard North

M, b. circa 1595, d. 1 Mar 1666/67
Richard North|b. circa 1595\nd. 1 Mar 1666/67|p303.htm#i218565|John North|b. circa 1565|p372.htm#i300913||||||||||||||||

Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
     Richard married Annis (Unknown). Richard North was born circa 1595 at Romsey, Hampshire, England. He was born circa 1595 at Ramsey, Essex, England. He was the son of John North. Richard married Joan Bertram at Romsey, Hampshire, England. Richard North died on 1-Mar-1666/67 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.
     He resided at at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, in 1640. On 2-Jun-1641 Richard North was listed as a freeman.
Richard's left a will on 26-Jan-1648 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.

In the name of God Amen: The 26th day of January 1648 I Richard North of the towne of Salisbury in ye County of Norfolke, massechusets in Newengland husbandman being weake in body butt of sound & pfect memory (pryse bee giune to God for the same) and knowing the vncertenty of this life on earth, and being desierous to settle things in Order doe make this my last will & Tesatment in manner & forme following:
That is to say first & principally I comend my Soule to Allmighty God my Creator assueredly belieiuing that I shall receiue full pardon & free remission of all my Sinns, & bee saved by ye prsious death & meritts of my blessed Savior & Redeemer Christ Jesus, & my body to ye earth whence it was taken to bee buried with such decent, & Christian manner as to my Executrix herafter named shalbee thought meet & convenient And as touching such worldly estate as ye Lord in mercy hath lent mee, my will & meaning is the same shalbee imployed, & bestowed as here after by this my will is expressed:
And first I doe revoke renounce frustrate, & make void all wills by mee formerly made or declared by w____ writing & declare, & appoint this my last will & Testament & none other:
ffirst I will that those debts & duties as I owe in right, & Conscience to any manner of pson or psons whatsoever shalbee well & truly contented & payd, or ordeined to bee payd wthin convenient tyme after my decease by my Executrix:
Item I giue & bequeth to my daughter Mary Jones, the wyfe of Thomas Jones fiue pound: & to my grand childe Ann Bates the child of my daughter Sarah Old at an unknown age m fiue pound pvided shee be aliue att my decease:
Item I giue & bequeath vnto my daugh[ter] Susana Martyn ye wyfe of George Martyn tweny shillings & the tenn pound wch hir husband the said George Martyn doth owe vnto mee for cattle wch hee receiued of mee:
Item I giue & bequeath the residue of all my goods Chattells lands howsings debts bills bonds wth all other Rights and privilidges to mee any wayes appertaining ot belonging: (after my debts pay'd my funerall expences performed & these my Lagasies conteined in this my prsent Testament fullfilled) vnto my deare & welbeelooued wyfe Vrsula North whom I doe make & ordeine my sole Executrix:
Also I doe make & Ordeine my trustie and welbeeloued ffriends Mr Tho. Bradbury & Richard Wells both of Salibury Overseers fo this my Will & Testament and for their care & paynes therin I bequeath to each of them tenn shilligs as a token of my love: And In witness that this is ye Act & deed of mee the said Richard North I haue hervnto sett my hand & seal the daye and yeare aboue written.

Richard (his) mark ) North (SEAL)
Attested by Tho. Bradbury and Mary Jones, now wife of Nath Winsley. [no date]

Inventory of the estate of Richard North of Salisbury, taken Mar 16, 1667-8, by Richard Wells, Henry Browne and Sammuell ffelloes:
houses, landes, midoes and preveliges belonging there vnto, £ 40; debtes due, £ 75 17s. 9d; 2 cows and there calfes, £ 8; one yeare old calfe, £ 1; cooorne, 14s;puter and brase, £ 2 10s; iron potes, in old iron, 1; books, 12s; waring cloes linon and wollon and shoes, £ 7; mony 6s;the trunke and linnon in it, £ 5; a bed and beding,£ 5; a trunelbed, tabell and other wodden hould goodes, £ 2; prouission in the house, £ 1 10s; erthen vesselles and othe small thinges, 5s.

Attested in Salisbury court 14:2:1668 by Ursula North

Francis (his W marke) Bate and wife Ann (her D mark) formerly Ann Oldum acknowledged the receipt from Ursula North, executrix of Richard North of Salisbury, deceased, of a legacy given to said Ann in the will of her grandfather, Richard North, Oct. 4, 1669.
Witness: Tho: Bradbury and Richard Wells.
Acknowledged by both Oct 5, 1669, before Robert Pike, commissioner.

Thomas (his O mark) Jones of Gloucester, formerly called Cape Ann, acknowledged receipt from Ursula North of Salisbury, widow, of a legacy given to his wife Mary in the will of her father Richard North of Salisbury, late deceased, July 24, 1669.
Witness: Tho. Bradbury and William Bradbury.
Proved by oath of the witnesses in court at Salisbury Apr. 29, 1673 Norfolk County Records, vol. 2, leaf 292

Susanna Martyn and Mary Jones making application for the division of the estate of Richard North between them, by virtue of a judgment of the Court of Assistants in March 1673-4, which declared that said North's will was not legally proved and referred it to the Norfolk court 14:2:1674, affirmed that it had been legally proved, and Capt. Bradbury testified that he was one of the witnesses before the court and at the time he was compos mentis.
Salisbury Quarterly Court Records, vol. 2, leaf 28

Court 14:2:1674, ordered that the papers put into this court about North's will be delivered to Susannah Martyn and Nathll. Winsley, each to have their own papers, all except the copp of the judgement of the Court of Assistants, last past.
Salisbury Quarterly Court Records, vol. 2, leaf 30.

Children of Richard North and Joan Bertram

Joan Bertram

F

Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
     Joan married Richard North, son of John North, at Romsey, Hampshire, England.
     Joan Bertram was also known as Ursula (Unknown).

Children of Joan Bertram and Richard North

Sheldon Hawkins

M, b. 10 Jun 1810, d. 10 Feb 1872
Sheldon Hawkins|b. 10 Jun 1810\nd. 10 Feb 1872|p303.htm#i218569|George Washington Hawkins|b. 11 Mar 1779\nd. 4 Sep 1864|p2.htm#i81|Avis Sheldon|b. 20 Jun 1783\nd. 28 May 1865|p2.htm#i82|Uriah Hawkins|b. 1731\nd. 10 Apr 1809|p106.htm#i42108|Deborah Winsor|b. circa 1728|p188.htm#i104469|John Sheldon|b. 1752\nd. 17 Jul 1845|p271.htm#i154415|Abigail Phillips|b. 17 Nov 1752\nd. 1842|p271.htm#i154416|

Relationship=2nd great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=Great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Sheldon Hawkins
      Sheldon Hawkins was born on 10-Jun-1810 at Gloucester, Providence County, Rhode Island. He was the son of George Washington Hawkins and Avis Sheldon. Sheldon married Matha Peterson circa 1837. Sheldon married Mary Van Alstyne, daughter of Cornelius Van Alstyne and Rachel Dunham, circa 1846. Sheldon Hawkins died on 10-Feb-1872 at Picton, Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada, at age 61.

Mary Van Alstyne

F, b. 20 May 1816, d. 1 Aug 1868
Mary Van Alstyne|b. 20 May 1816\nd. 1 Aug 1868|p303.htm#i218570|Cornelius Van Alstyne||p303.htm#i218571|Rachel Dunham||p303.htm#i218572|||||||||||||
      Mary Van Alstyne was born on 20-May-1816 at Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada. She was the daughter of Cornelius Van Alstyne and Rachel Dunham. Mary married Sheldon Hawkins, son of George Washington Hawkins and Avis Sheldon, circa 1846. Mary Van Alstyne died on 1-Aug-1868 at Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada, at age 52.

Cornelius Van Alstyne

M
     Cornelius married Rachel Dunham.

Child of Cornelius Van Alstyne and Rachel Dunham

Rachel Dunham

F
     Rachel married Cornelius Van Alstyne.

Child of Rachel Dunham and Cornelius Van Alstyne

Adaline Hawkins

F, b. Jan 1821, d. 23 May 1821
Adaline Hawkins|b. Jan 1821\nd. 23 May 1821|p303.htm#i218666|George Washington Hawkins|b. 11 Mar 1779\nd. 4 Sep 1864|p2.htm#i81|Avis Sheldon|b. 20 Jun 1783\nd. 28 May 1865|p2.htm#i82|Uriah Hawkins|b. 1731\nd. 10 Apr 1809|p106.htm#i42108|Deborah Winsor|b. circa 1728|p188.htm#i104469|John Sheldon|b. 1752\nd. 17 Jul 1845|p271.htm#i154415|Abigail Phillips|b. 17 Nov 1752\nd. 1842|p271.htm#i154416|

Relationship=2nd great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=Great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Adaline Hawkins was born in Jan-1821. She was the daughter of George Washington Hawkins and Avis Sheldon. Adaline Hawkins died on 23-May-1821. Adaline was buried at Hawkins Family Cemetery, New Lisbon, Otsego County, New York.
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