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William G. Woodworth

M, b. 1791, d. 1860
      William G. Woodworth was born in 1791 at Washington County, New York. William married Elizabeth Buchanan, daughter of Thomas Buchanan and Sarah Livingston, at Napoli, Cattaraugus County, New York. William G. Woodworth died in 1860 at Cattaraugus County, New York.
Census29-Aug-1850Napoli, Cattaraugus County, New York
Census14-Jun-1860Napoli, Cattaraugus County, New York, personal property 500.00
Census-Occ29-Aug-1850a manufacturer
Census-Occ14-Jun-1860a farmer

Sarah Buchanan

F, b. 15 Jan 1794, d. after 9 Mar 1794
Sarah Buchanan|b. 15 Jan 1794\nd. after 9 Mar 1794|p152.htm#i94069|Thomas Buchanan|b. 14 Mar 1767\nd. 25 Sep 1853|p11.htm#i820|Sarah Livingston|b. 1769\nd. 23 Sep 1843|p11.htm#i821|||||||||||||

Relationship=3rd great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=2nd great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Sarah Buchanan was born on 15-Jan-1794 at Cambridge, Washington County, New York. She was the daughter of Thomas Buchanan and Sarah Livingston. Sarah Buchanan was baptized on 9-Mar-1794. She died young after 9-Mar-1794.

Richard Higgins

M, b. circa 1640, d. 14 Mar 1690
      Richard Higgins was born circa 1640. He died on 14-Mar-1690. Richard married Lydia Bangs, daughter of Edward Bangs and Rebecca (Unknown), circa 1694.

Rev. (Unknown) Lewis

M
     (Unknown) married Jane Bell, daughter of Robert Bell Sr. and Agnes Fleming.
     Rev. (Unknown) Lewis resided at at Of, Hampshire County, Virgina.

John or Charles Saviers

M, b. circa 1736, d. 1765
John or Charles Saviers|b. circa 1736\nd. 1765|p152.htm#i95534|Nicholas Seaver||p187.htm#i104310||||||||||||||||
      John or Charles Saviers was born circa 1736 at Hampshire County, Virgina. He was the son of Nicholas Seaver. John married Jane Bell, daughter of Robert Bell Sr. and Agnes Fleming. John or Charles Saviers died in 1765.
     He was also known as Charles Sevier. The Saviers property was left to his children, John and Lydia Saviers/ in 1766.

Children of John or Charles Saviers and Jane Bell

(Unknown) Hultz

M
     (Unknown) married Jane Bell, daughter of Robert Bell Sr. and Agnes Fleming, after 1790 at Allegheny, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.
     (Unknown) Hultz was also known as (Unknown) Hulse.

Robert Bell Sr.

M, b. between 1700 and 1710, d. between 1772 and 1773

Relationship=6th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Robert Bell Sr. was born between 1700 and 1710 at Ulster, Tyrone County, Ireland. Robert married Agnes Fleming, daughter of William Fleeming and Janet Clark, circa 1737 at Bellfast, Antrim County, Ireland. Robert Bell Sr. died between 1772 and 1773 at near, Romney, Hampshire County, Virgina; Now West Virginia, thrown from a horse.
     He a Protestant. He and Agnes Fleming resided at at near, Belfast, Antrim County, Ireland, circa 1738. William Bell of Chester County, PA born about 1700 could be a brother, his will was filed in 1744 circa 1744.

Robert Bell Sr. and Agnes Fleming immigrated circa 1744; They immigrated with four children, all under the age of seven. This was during the Scots religious and political persecutions. Tradition is that he arrived at the port of Philadelphia with two brothers. One of the brothers went south and the other to Pennsylvania. Robert Bell Sr. leased Phillip Martin, Esq: Captain of the island of Newfoundland by his attorney and brother Thomas Bryan Martin of Frederick County, Virginia leases (farmlets) lot No. 11 of 330 acres on the Patterson Creek Manor to Robert Ball and sons Samuel Bell and Joseph Bell and for his lifetime for 20 shillings per year for each 100 acres plus other conditions as noted theein. on 13-Aug-1771 at Patterson Creek Manor.

From Tom Clevland, descendant of Bell, emailed in April 2001


The history of our Bell Ancestors dates back to the early part of the 18th century when Robert Bell (Sr) was born in Tyrone, Ireland, He married Agnes Fleming of Edinburgh, Scotland, they migrated to the "new world" and settled on the South branch of the Potomac river, about four miles from Romney, Virginia ( now West Virginia).

Robert Bell was the offspring of Scottish Presbyterians who had settled the British colony of Ulster ( including county Tyrone) during the 17th century. Due to high rents, short leases, and insecure tenure under English landlord rule, an estimated 250,000 "Scotch-Irish"settled in the American colonies during the colonial period, about 90% of whom spent some time in servitude as the only way to afford passage across the sea (1).

It was in the hills of what is known as the Eastern panhandle of West Virginia that Robert and Agnes Bell cleared the dense forest and built their first log cabin. By act of the General Assembly of Virginia on December 13, 1753 , the western part of what was then known as Frederick County was formed in Hampshire County with the courthouse in Romney. Thus Romney became West Virginia's first town and Hampshire became its first county , both
having existed long before the state did.

The first families to settle in this valley were lured by traversing Indian traders and hunters telling of the fertile valleys, spreading forests, and navigable waters. The editor of HISTORIC HAMPSHIRE reported that nearly 200 persons had moved into the Romney area by 1748. "Besides being off the direct path of the warrior tribes on the Ohio, the surrounding territory offered many natural advantages; the fertile soil, grass and peavine covered terraces were well adapted to tobacco growing and stock raising- a consideration of primary importance to the pioneers".

A book on the Capon Valley pioneers( A valley in Hampshire County) describes this county's land as three classes: first, smooth upland, suited to general
farm crops, orchards, and pastures. Second, river bottom lands that are very productive, suited to corn, wheat, oats hay, potatoes, and gardening. Third,
mountain acres, more or less stony and too steep for cultivation, that are forested but some of this land is cleared and used for orchards or summer
sheep pasture.

All of the larger area was referred to as the "Northern Neck" of Virginia. It was owned by Lord Thomas Fairfax and those settled there usually had to
pay "quit rents" to Lord Fairfax, meaning the payments quit any other obligations such as servitude of labor.

HISTORIC HAMPSHIRE says that Lord Fairfax saw the growth in this area as an "opportunity to recoup his depleted fortune and build for himself a perpetual income". As his surveys were made ( a surveying party which included 16 year old George Washington), those living on the land were forced to take up the properties they occupied by lease or actual purchase. :In either case, his lordship required a fixed rental to be paid annually on the feast day of Saint Michael the Archangel. From the renters he also extracted a small down payment which her termed " composition money". He stipulated in the deeds that the buyers should never kill elk, deer, buffalo, beaver, or other game without consent of his majesty, Lord Fairfax or his heirs.

Pioneers flocked into the region, some pushing their way across the wilderness from Pennsylvania, and others coming by way of the Shenandoah valley.

Robert and Agnes ( Fleming ) Bell had 10 children: eight sons and two daughters. Their first son became our direct ancestor: James Bell ( Sr). The other children were Margaret( believed to be the eldest), John, Robert, David, Samuel, Charles, Joseph, William, and Jane, In an era of smallpox, deadly influenza, pneumonia without antibiotics, a paucity of hospitals and doctors, and many pioneer dangers, it is remarkable that all of these children are believed to have survived to adulthood.

The following excerpt is from "The history of the Pioneer family Bell Family", by Agnes M. Justus( granddaughter of James Bell, Jr.):

This family and their neighbors had to endure many hardships and had many narrow escapes from death at the hands of the Indians. One day Robert Bell,
Sr. and two other young men named Vaughn and Scisson went out to look for some horses which had wandered away. The three men were caught in an Indian ambush on a branch of Flaugherty's run and Vaughn was killed outright. An Indian threw his tomahawk at Bell, cutting a severe gash in his thigh and
passing through his horses saddle girth. Scisson and Bell turned their horses and fled. They had gone no more than a mile when Bell's saddle slipped and he fell from his horse. Scisson, thinking Bell dead, rode off and left him. Bell's frightened horse reached home before Scisson and the neighbors, realizing hat had happened at once a party was formed to pursue the Indians. Several days later this party overtook the Indians as they were crossing the Ohio River and the white men completely routed the marauders.

" To return to Bell, it seems that after the first attack, the Indians did not follow the two white men but fled themselves in the opposite direction. After falling from his horse, Bell crawled some distance in the bed of a stream and then hid for the night. In the morning he was unable to walk so he was obliged to crawl again and in this fashion he finally reached Fort Pitt, where his wound was dressed by Dr. Knight.

"Sometime before this, Dr. Knight and Col. William Crawford were captured by Wyandotte and Delaware Indians. They were taken to a spot near the present
town of Crawfordville and here Crawford was burned at the stake. Dr. Knight was doomed to a similar fate but he managed to escape. After wandering the
woods for three weeks, he finally reached Fort Pitt."

Flaugherty Run, mentioned in the above account , is a creek in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, north of what is now the Greater Pittsburgh airport. It flows into the Ohio River at a point 12 to 14 miles west of the point of three rivers in Pittsburgh where Fort Pitt was located. If our ancestor indeed had to crawl the entire distance, suffering from pain and blood loss , it seems a miracle that he survived.

"But what" you may be asking , " was Robert Bell, Sr. doing so far away from his Hampshire County home and his family?" "And what was it that motivated
the Indians to ambush a small search party?" There is one answer for both questions: The French and Indian War, also known as the seven years was in
America. The British and French empires were increasingly in conflict and one of their most bitter and bloody fights was over who was to control this new America.

In the Ohio Valley, The French were in such a strong position they had driven away the English traders. The Indians of this area had two options: either accept the French rule and support their military cause, or nobly starve to death, As Francis Jennings writes in EMPIRE OF FORTUNE: " it is quite evident that they ( the Ohio Indians) would have preferred to sit out a war between Britain and France. But the "nobility of such starvation was not clear to them , so they accommodated and fought French battles. Raiding parties were organized and with a Frenchman or two at the head of each, and they brought fire and slaughter to the inhabitants of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia.

Undoubtedly anxious about the growing military might and trade control of the French, Governor Dinwiddie of Virginia sent a young man by the name of
George Washington to "The Forks"( of the Ohio river) in the winter of 1753-54. This was the first of Washington's six trips across the Allegheny mountains. Upon the French refusal of Washington's request, Virginia recruited a force of about 400 colonials( including Robert Bell, Sr.) to drive them out.

(1) source - Encyclopedia of Colonial and Revolutionary America.



From: Bob Francis
To: "BELL family genealogy list"
Subject: Robert BELL
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 1997 08:51:30 +0100
Errors-to:
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In response to our listowner's request for information on BELL family members, I am posting the following sketch on my 6G grandfather Robert BELL. I know that it is a long document and I ask forgiveness and kind patience for this breaking of "netiquette;" but I thought that a single sketch would not get lost as easily in transmission.

So, here goes.

Bob Francis
_________________________________________
Name:     Robert BELL

Birth Date:     1700
Birth Place:     County Tyrone, Ireland

Death Date:     17683
Death Place:     Romney, Virginia

Occupation:     farmer

Spouse:     Agnes FLEMING
Marriage Date:     Circa 1737
Children:     Margaret Fry
     James
     John
     Robert
     David
     Samuel
     Charles
     Joseph
     William
     Jane "Jean"

Notes:
W. J. Winstein of Academy street furnished the following interesting story of the early settlers in the Chartiers Valley. The paper was presented to Mr. Winstein by descendants of Robert Bell, Sr., and for a number of years was stored away in an old trunk, where it was recently found. The Bells were the first settlers in the Chartiers Valley, staking out a claim in what is now known as Rosslyn, in 1768. Many descendants of the original settlers are still living in this vicinity.

The paper follows:
Robert Bell, Sr., of Tyrone, Ireland, and wife, of Edinburgh, Scotland, located four miles from Romney, Va., on the south branch of the Potomic river, in the seventeenth century. Mr. Bell had many narrow escapes from the Indians of that forest. In company with two other young men, named Vaughan and Scisson, one day Robert Bell was in search of strayed horses, when the party was surprised by an Indian ambushcade on a branch of __augherty Run, Va. Vaughan was killed, a savage threw his tomahawk at Bell and wounded him. Scisson turned on his horse and fled. After the fight Mr. Bell was able to get on his horse, but he only went a short distance when he fell off. Mr. Bell’s horse arrived home before Scisson did and a party at once was formed to search for Bell. The party met Scisson at the Ohio river and he related what had happened to Mr. Bell. They supposed he was dead and returned to their homes. Within a week later they found Bell at Ft. Pitt, his wounds dressed by Dr. Knight, who figured conspicuously at the burning of Crawford. Mr. Bell served in the expedition of 1754, during the French and Indian War, and was among the number who accompanied General George Washington on his first trip on the Ka_awha. General Washington made a note in one of his diaries of those who accompanied him in his canoe. “Mr. and Mrs. Bell had eight sons and two daughters. James Bell, Sr., the oldest, was born in 1751. When he was a small lad of ten years, his father went to Patterson Fort for a wagon load of wood. James and his brother went along, their father wanted them to gather wood while he was hauling some home. The two boys were busy gathering wood when the Indians attacked them. They caught James but his brother ran and the Indians shot at him and he fell under a log, the Indians thinking he was dead; he was not hurt, however, and later went home and told that James was captured. The Indians took James to Indiana and kept him there till he was returned by treaty. When his father went after him he took two horses that James might ride home. When they met, James got on the horse but had ridden only a short distance when he saw a woman and some children who were also set free. James dismounted, letting the woman ride. “When he arrived home it was at night. His mother, hearing the wooden latch lift with a string, called: ‘Is that you, James?’ and his father answered, yes. It was a joyful meeting. James had many stories to relate of his capture. Among them, was that when the Indians took him the Ohio river they made a canoe and put him in it and they had nothing to eat save what they called ‘cush meat.’ He always claimed they crossed into Pennsylvania and came through Chartiers Valley, near Chartier’s Creek. He told how they would have two lines of Indians and would make him run between the lines. And of an old Indian squaw who would be angry if they struck him, but he was a fast runner and did not get struck often. They pulled all his hair out of the top of his head and put rings in his ears. After he had been with them awhile the Indians got very friendly with him and when he left the old Indian squaw cried. “In 1765 his father, Robert Bell, Sr., came from Virginia to Western Pennsylvania. On returning as he was nearing home in Virginia, after inspecting the land he intended to settle on in Pennsylvania, he was thrown from his horse and killed. “In October, 1768, John and James Bell, Sr., came to Chartiers Valley, to what is now Carnegie. The first night was spent in Chartiers Township, now east Carnegie, and the second day they crossed Chartiers Creek, to what now is Rosslyn. The second night they slept under a sycamore tree near the Fording. When they awoke in the morning, James was alarmed at the noise of Indians ringing bells to see if there were any horses in the neighborhood. The Indians did not disturb the first settlers, and waded the creek at the rocks near the Fording and continued on with their noise. The two Bell men, after marking their respective claims, returned to their homes in Virginia. In the following spring, 1769, they brought their mother and their families. The mother remained with John Bell at East Carnegie, until she died. James Bell, Sr., had marked for his claim at Rosslyn, some 400 acres and 151 perches. He built his first log cabin near the present old Bell homestead, formerly owned by Mrs. Morrow, a granddaughter of James Bell, Sr. Mr. Bell, Sr., erected a family altar in his new cabin. “The Indians were quite numerous. His wife, Mrs. Mary Bell, (nee Newkirk), would hang blankets around the wood fire place, then she would sit and mould the bullets, while James Bell, Sr., would shoot out of a small window, whenever the horses would come running from the spring near the oak tree. Many an Indian rested in its shade. They knew to look and get ready for the red man. James Bell, Sr., always carried his gun on his shoulder to church. “In 1772, James Bell, Sr., built a stone house. In that house he used to relate his stories of his captivity by the Indians to his grandchildren. One day he and his youngest son, James Bell, Jr., was in Pittsburgh. They met some friendly Indians and some he knew. They presented James Bell, Sr., with a bead belt and a small trunk. The bead belt is in the possession of one of his son’s descendants in Virginia. The small trunk is in the possession of one of James Bell, Sr.’s daughter’s descendants and is well preserved. James Bell, Sr., died December 5th, 1836, and was buried in Chartiers cemetery. The first burial plot was where the present Lead Works is located on the little knoll in Rosslyn.”

Research:
ROBERT BELL SR was born in Ulster, County Tyrone, Ireland between 1700 and 1710. He was of Protestant ancestry.350 ROBERT and AGNES FLEMING married about 1737. She was born in Edinburgh, Midlothian County, Scotland between 1700 and 1710. They lived near Belfast, Antrim County, Ireland.351

They emigrated to America with their four children, all under the age of seven in about 1744. This was during the Scots religious and political persecutions. Tradition is that he arrived at tbe Port of Philadelphia, with two of his brothers. One of the brothers went south and the other to Pennsylvania.352

Robert and Agnes settled in the province of Virginia, on Patterson Creek, which is on the south branch of the Potomac River, four miles from the present town of Romney. This was an area known as the Manor of Patterson Creek, Hampshire County, Virginia and is now West Virginia.353 There, they engaged in farming and stock-raising on their 330 acre farm.354

After living in this county for ten years, Robert served in the French and Indian War, under Colonel George Washington. He was a Private on the rolls of Captain Stobo's Company and Captain Van Braam's Company. Robert was wounded in the battle of Great Meadows 09 Jul. 1754 and retired with a small one time disability.355 Their son, James age fourteen was taken prisoner by the Indians and held for several years until he was returned as a consequence of a treaty.356

Their father, Robert signed a deed in 1771 in Romney.357 He owned a fine horse named Drednot, which was generally regarded as swift and sure footed, though spirited and irnpetuos; but once attemping to leap a brook, the settle girths burst and Mr. Bell Sr. was instantly killed in 1772.358 His estate was sold by his heirs 09 Mar. 1773 to Okey Johnson.359

This unfortunate accident did not deter his sons from pursuing the occupation in which they were already engaged, that of stock raising. Within a few years after their father's death the eldest two sons, James and John set out from home to seek more extended land ownership in the region west of the mountains, which was the formation of the "Ohio Company". The French wars had rendered this area familiar to many. They passed pass through Washington County and followed the Chartiers creek to it's mouth, reaching a point just above the borough of Mansfield on a evening in October where tradition says they passed the night. A bear had been killed during the day, and a large chip was cut froma swamp oak to afford means of cutting and preparing the meat. The vitalitywas not impaired; it survived several generationsof the Bell family, and died of old age in October, 1873. They traveled by horseback to for the purpose of exploration. On the next day they crossed Chartiers Creek and spent the second night within Robison Township; and after marking the bounds of their respective claims inthe customary mannor, they then returned to Virginia,with the intention of removing their families to Pennsylvania and there making his home. The following spring they brought their families. James was the first permanent settler in Robison Township and John lived in Chartiers Township until their deaths.360

All of Robert's family then moved to Washington County, Pennsylvania361 settling in the Old Sewickley Settlement on the Ohio River and in Carnegie near Chartiers Creek. From there Agnes's sons and sons-in-law served in the Revolutionary War. After the war, her children Robert, William, DAVID, and Joseph moved to Harrod's Creek, Kentucky. They had not found the locality as well adapted to stock raising as they had anticipated. Samuel moved to Harrison Co., Indiana. James and John remained behind with their mother.

Agnes was living with her son John near Chartiers Creek, in Carnegie, Pennsylvania when she died in 1785. She was first buried on her spn's homestead in the Old Wood's Graveyard at Peter's Creek, Pennsylvania. Her body was moved back to Hampshire County, Virginia.362

The birth order of their children is uncertain. Dr. & Mrs. J. H. Bell Jr., Windber, Pa. report it to be Robert Jr. 1736, Joseph 1738, Samuel 1740, Margaret 1742, all born near Belfast, John 1743, Jane 1744,
William 1746, DAVID 1748, James 1750 and Charles 1752.

Last Modified:     April 10, 1997

Reference Note 3
Eric Shawn: 1772

Reference Note 350
The Bells in U.S.A. & Allied Families, by Getha Gina Bell 1977.

Reference Note 351
Source; Dr. & Mrs. J.H. Bell, Jr., 1110 Somerset Ave., Windber, Pennsylvania 15963. The FGS is located in the Hampshire Co., West Virginia Public Library.

Reference Note 352
William Bell of Chester County, Pennsylvania, born about 1700, could be a brother. His will was filed in 1774.

Reference Note 353
Land Record; Abstracts of Northern Neck Warrents & Surrveys, 1697-1784, Vol. 4, by Peggy Shomo Joyner, pg. 24 shows Robert Bell as a chain carrier for a survey dated 11 Dec. 1750 in Manor Patterson Creek. Page 38 he was a chain carrier 10 Oa. 1752-20 Apr. 1753 etc.

Reference Note 354
Patterson Creek Manor Tax List of 1762.

Reference Note 355
Library of Congress, Roll of Virgina Regiments, Washington's Journal 29 Ju1.1754. Virginia County Records Vol. 11, (Va Colonial Militia) 1651-1776. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1982. Page ll3 &116. Virginia Colonial Soldiers, Page 46, 47, 49-51, 128,131, 133,143,159. Journal of House of Burgess, 1752-58, Pagc 265 and 273.

Reference Note 356
Encyclopedia of Biography Vol. VII Pages 2540-41, by John 1. Jordan, LLD, N.Y. Lewis Historical Pub. Co., 1916.

Reference Note 357
Hampshire Co., Virginia Deeds, Bill of Sale: Book No.3, Page 17, 18,289-291 from Thomas B. Martin 1771.

Reference Note 358
Source; Barbara A. O'Callaghan, 8042 N.14th Avenue, Phocnix, Arizona 35021. Thomas Jefferson Postlewait/Jane Mary (Bell) Postlewait/John Bell "Squire"/Robert Bell Jr/JROBERT BELL.

Reference Note 359
West Virginia Settlements, by Ross R. Johnston 1977.

Reference Note 360
History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, Vol. 1, A Warner & Co. Publishers, Chicago, ILL. in 1889.

Reference Note 361
This area first settled in 1760 and became Alleghany Co., Pennsylvania in 1786.

Reference Note 362
Hampshire County, Virginia is now part of West Virginia.

===============================================================================
From: Bob Francis
To: "BELL family genealogy list"
Subject: Margaret Fry BELL
Date: Thu, 17 Apr 1997 10:21:54 +0100
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Continuing contribution to the BELL family research. My next several contributions to the BELL family discussion group will be about the children of Robert BELL and Agnes Fleming (brief description below). In this sketch, I will concentrate on Margaret Fry BELL.

Robert BELL. Born 1700 in County Tyrone, Ireland. Died 1768 in Romney, Virginia. Occupation farmer.

Research: ROBERT BELL SR was born in Ulster, County Tyrone, Ireland between 1700 and 1710. He was of Protestant ancestry. ROBERT and AGNES FLEMING married about 1737. She was born in Edinburgh, Midlothian County, Scotland between 1700 and 1710. They lived near Belfast, Antrim County, Ireland.

The birth order of their children is uncertain. Dr. & Mrs. J. H. Bell Jr., Windber, Pa. report it to be Robert Jr. 1736, Joseph 1738, Samuel 1740, Margaret 1742, all born near Belfast, John 1743, Jane 1744,
William 1746, DAVID 1748, James 1750 and Charles 1752.

He married Agnes FLEMING. Born 1700 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died 1780.
They had the following children:

     2     i.     Margaret Fry BELL
     3     ii.     James BELL
     4     iii.     John BELL
     5     iv.     Robert BELL
     6     v.     David BELL
     7     vi.     Samuel BELL
     8     vii.     Charles BELL
     9     viii.     Joseph BELL
     10     ix.     William BELL
     11     x.     Jane BELL

2. Margaret Fry BELL. Born 17381 in Romney, Virginia2. Died 1795 in Ruddle's Mills, Bourbon Co., Kentucky.

Research: Margaret (Bell) Shawhan, wife of Daniel (3), has been described as having "hair like the sunsets, filled with gold and red." Born in Virginia, she was the daughter of Robert Bell of County Tyrone, Ireland, and his wife Agnes (Fleming) Bell, of Edinburgh, Scotland, who had settled on land 4 miles Romney, Va. (W. Va.) on the south branch of the Potomac River. Robert Bell was "instantly killed when the breaking of the saddle girth threw him, when his mount 'Drednot' attempted to leap a brook." Her two elder brothers, James and John Bell, subsequently migrated west and surveyed/tomahawked (marked trees) land in the Chartiers Valley, St. Clair Twp., now Allegheny Co., Pa; their mother and the remaining 10 children arrived in 1769.

She married Daniel (3) SHAWHAN Jr., son of Daniel (2) SHAWHAN & Jennett, 1762 in Hampshire County, Va. Born December 17, 1738 in Kent County, Maryland. Military in Revolutionary War Veteran. Died May 11, 1791 in Bourbon County, Ky. Buried May 11, 1791 in Ruddles Mills Grave Yard. Occupation Whiskey distiller.

Daniel went with his family and father to Frederick County, Md., and then to Hampshire County, Va., where he met and married the beautiful Margaret Bell "who had hair like sunsets filled with gold and red" (see Bell ca 1762/3).

After the death of Robert Bell in 1768, Agnes Fleming and her 10 children moved to Alleghany County, Pa. It is thought that this move prompted Daniel and Margaret to migrate to Alleghany County sometime
after October 23, 1771. It is recorded that Daniel purchased 640 acres six miles out of Fort Pitt, in the vicinity of the Old Mt. Lebanon Presbyterian Church, a section now called Carnegie, Pa., but then called
St. Clair Township. The property (as of 1951) was still in the hands of the family under the name of "Shawhan Place." In 1788, Daniel and his family moved back to the vicinity of Ruddles Mills, Ky. Madsen, p. 11

Daniel was the first of the family to make the same type of whiskey he had developed back in the Monongahela Valley, near Fort Pitt. "Monongahela Red" now became known as "Kentucky Bourbon," named after the county where it was made.

Daniel married Margaret Bell in 1762 near Romney, Virginia and fathered eight children, one of whom was Benjamin (Plummer Shawhan)'s father, Daniel (1765-1840). Daniel, b. 1738, took his family to Allegheny County, Pennsylvania in the 1770's, where he prospered as a farmer and as a distiller of fine whiskey. He also served in the Pennsylvania militia during the Revolutionary War, as did one of his sons, Robert. During the time of the Whiskey Rebellion, in the late 1780's, Daniel pulled up stakes and traveled down the Ohio river to what was then western Virginia, present-day Kentucky. He resumed distilling whiskey, in Bourbon County, Kentucky, where his secret formula for "bourbon" became known far and wide for its smooth taste; Shawhan brand of whiskey continued to be distilled through the 1970's. The little town of Shawhan, Kentucky, a still-existing hamlet near Paris, Kentucky, was established before the Civil War by one of the descendents of this Daniel, as a railroad shipping point for the produce, including whiskey, of the area.



They had the following children:

     12     i.     Robert (4) SHAWHAN
     13     ii.     Daniel (4) SHAWHAN III
     14     iii.     Agnes (Nancy) (4) SHAWHAN
     15     iv.     John (4) SHAWHAN
     16     v.     Jane "Jennie" (4) SHAWHAN
     17     vi.     Benjamin Shawnson (4) SHAWHAN
     18     vii.     Elizabeth (4) SHAWHAN
     19     viii.     Joseph (4) SHAWHAN
     20     ix.     Mary (4) SHAWHAN
     21     x.     George (4) SHAWHAN

For those interested in the SHAWHAN side of the family, please let me know.

Bob Francis


=============================================================================================
Date: Fri, 01 Jun 2001 08:16:58 -0500
From: Bob Francis
To: BELL-L@rootsweb.com
Message-ID: <3B1795C9.55A88EF2@nemr.net>
Subject: [BELL-L] Bell, Robert
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1; x-mac-type="54455854"; x-mac-creator="4D4F5353"
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Fellow researchers,

Its been a long time since I posted my BELL, so here goes:

Name: Robert BELL
_________________________________________
Birth: 1700/1710 County Tyrone, Ireland
Death: 1765 Romney, Virginia Age: 65
Military: French And Indian War
Occupation: farmer

Misc. Notes
ROBERT BELL SR was born in Ulster, County Tyrone, Ireland between 1700 and 1710. He was of Protestant ancestry. (The Bells in U.S.A. & Allied Families, by Getha Gina Bell 1977.) ROBERT and AGNES FLEMING married about 1737. They lived near Belfast, Antrim County, Ireland. (Source; Dr. & Mrs. J.H. Bell, Jr., 1110 Somerset Ave., Windber, Pennsylvania 15963. The FGS is located in the Hampshire Co., West Virginia Public Library.)

They emigrated to America with their four children, all under the age of seven in about 1744. This was during the Scots religious and political persecutions. Tradition is that he arrived at the Port of Philadelphia, with two of his brothers. One of the brothers went south and the other to Pennsylvania. (NOTE: William Bell of Chester County, Pennsylvania, born about 1700, could be a brother. His will was filed in 1774.)

Robert and Agnes settled in the province of Virginia, on Patterson Creek, which is on the south branch of the Potomac River, four miles from the present town of Romney. This was an area known as the Manor of Patterson Creek, Hampshire County, Virginia and is now West Virginia. (NOTE: Land Record; Abstracts of Northern Neck Warrents & Surrveys, 1697-1784, Vol. 4, by Peggy Shomo Joyner, pg. 24 shows Robert Bell as a chain carrier for a survey dated 11 Dec. 1750 in Manor Patterson Creek. Page 38 he was a chain carrier 10 Oa. 1752-20 Apr. 1753 etc.) There, they engaged in farming and stock-raising on their 330 acre farm. (NOTE: Patterson Creek Manor Tax List of 1762.)

After living in this county for ten years, Robert served in the French and Indian War, under Colonel George Washington. He was a on the rolls of Captain Stobo's Company and Captain Van Braam's Company. Robert was wounded in the battle of Great Meadows 09 Jul. 1754 and retired with a small one time disability. (NOTE: Library of Congress, Roll of Virgina Regiments, Washington's Journal 29 Ju1.1754. Virginia County Records Vol. 11, [Va Colonial Militia] 1651-1776. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1982, page ll3 &116. Virginia Colonial Soldiers, pages 46-47, 49-51, 128, 131, 133, 143,159. Journal of House of Burgess, 1752-58, pages 265 and 273.) Their son, James age fourteen was taken prisoner by the Indians and held for several years until he was returned as a consequence of a treaty. (NOTE: Encyclopedia of Biography Vol. VII, pages 2540-41, by John L. Jordan, LLD, N.Y. Lewis Historical Pub. Co., 1916.)

Their father, Robert signed a deed in 1771 in Romney [Hampshire Co., Virginia Deeds, Bill of Sale: Book No.3, pages 17-18, 289-291 from Thomas B. Martin 1771.] (NOTE: there is date inconsistency here. Reference below in Winstein article shows Robert Bell’s death as taking place in 1765—REF). He owned a fine horse named Drednot, which was generally regarded as swift and sure footed, though spirited and irnpetuos; but once attemping to leap a brook, the saddle girths burst and Mr. Bell Sr. was instantly killed in 1772. (NOTE: Source; Barbara A. O'Callaghan, 8042 N.14th Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 35021. Thomas Jefferson Postlewait/Jane Mary (Bell) Postlewait/John Bell "Squire"/Robert Bell Jr/J ROBERT BELL.) His estate was sold by his heirs 09 Mar. 1773 to Okey Johnson. (NOTE: West Virginia Settlements, by Ross R. Johnston 1977.)

This unfortunate accident did not deter his sons from pursuing the occupation in which they were already engaged, that of stock raising. Within a few years after their father's death the eldest two sons, James and John set out from home to seek more extended land ownership in the region west of the mountains, which was the formation of the "Ohio Company". The French wars had rendered this area familiar to many. They passed pass through Washington County and followed the Chartiers creek to it's mouth, reaching a point just above the borough of Mansfield on a evening in October where tradition says they passed the night. A bear had been killed during the day, and a large chip was cut from a swamp oak to afford means of cutting and preparing the meat. The vitality was not impaired; it survived several generations of the Bell family, and died of old age in October, 1873. They traveled by horseback to for the purpose of exploration. On the next day they crossed Chartiers Creek an!
d spent the second night within Robison Township; and after marking the bounds of their respective claims inthe customary mannor, they then returned to Virginia,with the intention of removing their families to Pennsylvania and there making his home. The following spring they brought their families. James was the first permanent settler in Robison Township and John lived in Chartiers Township until their deaths. (NOTE: History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, Vol. 1, A Warner & Co. Publishers, Chicago, ILL. in 1889.)

All of Robert's family then moved to Washington County, Pennsylvania (NOTE: This area first settled in 1760 and became Alleghany Co., Pennsylvania in 1786.) settling in the Old Sewickley Settlement on the Ohio River and in Carnegie near Chartiers Creek. From there Agnes's sons and sons-in-law served in the Revolutionary War. After the war, her children Robert, William, David, and Joseph moved to Harrod's Creek, Kentucky. They had not found the locality as well adapted to stock raising as they had anticipated. Samuel moved to Harrison Co., Indiana. James and John remained behind with their mother.

Agnes was living with her son John near Chartiers Creek, in Carnegie, Pennsylvania when she died in 1785. She was first buried on her son's homestead in the Old Wood's Graveyard at Peter's Creek, Pennsylvania. Her body was moved back to Hampshire County, Virginia. (NOTE: Hampshire County, Virginia is now part of West Virginia.)

The birth order of their children is uncertain. Dr. & Mrs. J. H. Bell Jr., Windber, Pa. report it to be Robert Jr. 1736, Joseph 1738, Samuel 1740, Margaret 1742, all born near Belfast, John 1743, Jane 1744, William 1746, David 1748, James 1750 and Charles 1752.

("Robert BELL," pp. 17-19)
-----
The following story is from an unknown source, sent to me by Ronald T. Shawhan:
"W. J. Winstein of Academy street furnished the following interesting story of the early settlers in the Chartiers Valley. The paper was presented to Mr. Winstein by descendants of Robert Bell, Sr., and for a number of years was stored away in an old trunk, where it was recently found. The Bells were the first settlers in the Chartiers Valley, staking out a claim in what is now known as Rosslyn, in 1768. Many descendants of the original settlers are still living in this vicinity. The paper follows:

"Robert Bell, Sr., of Tyrone, Ireland, and wife, of Edinburgh, Scotland, located four miles from Romney, Va., on the south branch of the Potomic river, in the eighteenth century. Mr. Bell had many narrow escapes from the Indians of that forest. In company with two other young men, named Vaughan and Scisson, one day Robert Bell was in search of strayed horses, when the party was surprised by an Indian ambushcade on a branch of __augherty Run, Va. Vaughan was killed, a savage threw his tomahawk at Bell and wounded him. Scisson turned on his horse and fled. After the fight Mr. Bell was able to get on his horse, but he only went a short distance when he fell off. Mr. Bell’s horse arrived home before Scisson did and a party at once was formed to search for Bell. The party met Scisson at the Ohio river and he related what had happened to Mr. Bell. They supposed he was dead and returned to their homes. Within a week later they found Bell at Ft. Pitt, his wounds dressed by !
Dr. Knight, who figured conspicuously at the burning of Crawford. Mr. Bell served in the expedition of 1754, during the French and Indian War, and was among the number who accompanied General George Washington on his first trip on the Kanawha. General Washington made a note in one of his diaries of those who accompanied him in his canoe.

"Mr. and Mrs. Bell had eight sons and two daughters. James Bell, Sr., the oldest, was born in 1751. When he was a small lad of ten years, his father went to Patterson Fort for a wagon load of wood. James and his brother went along, their father wanted them to gather wood while he was hauling some home. The two boys were busy gathering wood when the Indians attacked them. They caught James but his brother ran and the Indians shot at him and he fell under a log, the Indians thinking he was dead; he was not hurt, however, and later went home and told that James was captured. The Indians took James to Indiana and kept him there till he was returned by treaty. When his father went after him he took two horses that James might ride home. When they met, James got on the horse but had ridden only a short distance when he saw a woman and some children who were also set free. James dismounted, letting the woman ride.

"When he arrived home it was at night. His mother, hearing the wooden latch lift with a string, called: ‘Is that you, James?’ and his father answered, yes. It was a joyful meeting. James had many stories to relate of his capture. Among them, was that when the Indians took him the Ohio river they made a canoe and put him in it and they had nothing to eat save what they called ‘cush meat.’ He always claimed they crossed into Pennsylvania and came through Chartiers Valley, near Chartier’s Creek. He told how they would have two lines of Indians and would make him run between the lines. And of an old Indian squaw who would be angry if they struck him, but he was a fast runner and did not get struck often. They pulled all his hair out of the top of his head and put rings in his ears. After he had been with them awhile the Indians got very friendly with him and when he left the old Indian squaw cried.

"In 1765 his father, Robert Bell, Sr., came from Virginia to Western Pennsylvania. On returning as he was nearing home in Virginia, after inspecting the land he intended to settle on in Pennsylvania, he was thrown from his horse and killed.

"In October, 1768, John and James Bell, Sr., came to Chartiers Valley, to what is now Carnegie. The first night was spent in Chartiers Township, now east Carnegie, and the second day they crossed Chartiers Creek, to what now is Rosslyn. The second night they slept under a sycamore tree near the Fording. When they awoke in the morning, James was alarmed at the noise of Indians ringing bells to see if there were any horses in the neighborhood. The Indians did not disturb the first settlers, and waded the creek at the rocks near the Fording and continued on with their noise. The two Bell men, after marking their respective claims, returned to their homes in Virginia. In the following spring, 1769, they brought their mother and their families. The mother remained with John Bell at East Carnegie, until she died. James Bell, Sr., had marked for his claim at Rosslyn, some 400 acres and 151 perches. He built his first log cabin near the present old Bell homestead, formerly !
owned by Mrs. Morrow, a granddaughter of James Bell, Sr. Mr. Bell, Sr., erected a family altar in his new cabin.

"The Indians were quite numerous. His wife, Mrs. Mary Bell, (nee Newkirk), would hang blankets around the wood fire place, then she would sit and mould the bullets, while James Bell, Sr., would shoot out of a small window, whenever the horses would come running from the spring near the oak tree. Many an Indian rested in its shade. They knew to look and get ready for the red man. James Bell, Sr., always carried his gun on his shoulder to church.

"In 1772, James Bell, Sr., built a stone house. In that house he used to relate his stories of his captivity by the Indians to his grandchildren. One day he and his youngest son, James Bell, Jr., was in Pittsburgh. They met some friendly Indians and some he knew. They presented James Bell, Sr., with a bead belt and a small trunk. The bead belt is in the possession of one of his son’s descendants in Virginia. The small trunk is in the possession of one of James Bell, Sr.’s daughter’s descendants and is well preserved. James Bell, Sr., died December 5th, 1836, and was buried in Chartiers cemetery. The first burial plot was where the present Lead Works is located on the little knoll in Rosslyn."

Spouses
_________________________________________
1: Agnes FLEMING
Birth: about 1716 Edinburgh, Scotland
Death: 1785 Carnegie, Pennsylvania Age: 69
Father: William FLEMING (1691->1750)
Marriage: circa 1737
Children: Robert (1736-1826)
Joseph (~1738-)
Margaret Fry (1742->1830)
Samuel (1742->1820)
John (1743-1833)
Jane "Jean" (1746-)
William (~1746-1816)
Charles (1748-)
James (1750-1836)
David (ca1755-)

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ROBERT BELL SR was born in Ulster, County Tyrone, Ireland between 1700 and 1710. He was of Protestant ancestry. (The Bells in U.S.A. & Allied Families,
by Getha Gina Bell 1977.) ROBERT and AGNES FLEMING married about 1737. They lived near Belfast, Antrim County, Ireland. (Source; Dr. & Mrs. J.H. Bell,
Jr., 1110 Somerset Ave., Windber, Pennsylvania 15963. The FGS is located in the Hampshire Co., West Virginia Public Library.)

They emigrated to America with their four children, all under the age of seven in about 1744. This was during the Scots religious and political persecutions. Tradition is that he arrived at the Port of Philadelphia, with two of his brothers. One of the brothers went south and the other to Pennsylvania. (NOTE: William Bell of Chester County, Pennsylvania, born about 1700, could be a brother. His will was filed in 1774.)

Robert and Agnes settled in the province of Virginia, on Patterson Creek, which is on the south branch of the Potomac River, four miles from the present town of Romney. This was an area known as the Manor of Patterson Creek, Hampshire County, Virginia and is now West Virginia. (NOTE: Land Record; Abstracts of Northern Neck Warrents & Surrveys, 1697-1784, Vol. 4, by Peggy Shomo Joyner, pg. 24 shows Robert Bell as a chain carrier for a survey dated 11 Dec. 1750 in Manor Patterson Creek. Page 38 he was a chain carrier 10 Oa. 1752-20 Apr. 1753 etc.) There, they engaged in farming and stock-raising on their 330 acre farm. (NOTE: Patterson Creek Manor Tax List of 1762.)

After living in this county for ten years, Robert served in the French and Indian War, under Colonel George Washington. He was a on the rolls of Captain Stobo's Company and Captain Van Braam's Company. Robert was wounded in the battle of Great Meadows 09 Jul. 1754 and retired with a small one
time disability. (NOTE: Library of Congress, Roll of Virgina Regiments, Washington's Journal 29 Ju1.1754. Virginia County Records Vol. 11, [Va Colonial Militia] 1651-1776. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1982, page ll3 &116. Virginia Colonial Soldiers, pages 46-47, 49-51, 128, 131, 133, 143,159. Journal of House of Burgess, 1752-58, pages 265 and 273.) Their son, James age fourteen was taken prisoner by the Indians and held for several years until he was returned as a consequence of a treaty. (NOTE: Encyclopedia of Biography Vol. VII, pages 2540-41, by John L. Jordan, LLD, N.Y. Lewis Historical Pub. Co., 1916.)

Their father, Robert signed a deed in 1771 in Romney [Hampshire Co., Virginia Deeds, Bill of Sale: Book No.3, pages 17-18, 289-291 from Thomas B. Martin 1771.] (NOTE: there is date inconsistency here. Reference below in Winstein article shows Robert Bell's death as taking place in 1765-REF). He owned a fine horse named Drednot, which was generally regarded as swift and sure footed, though spirited and irnpetuos; but once attempting to leap a brook, the saddle girths burst and Mr. Bell Sr. was instantly killed in 1772. (NOTE: Source; Barbara A. O'Callaghan, 8042 N.14th Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 35021. Thomas Jefferson Postlewait/Jane Mary (Bell) Postlewait/John Bell "Squire"/Robert Bell Jr/J ROBERT BELL.) His estate was sold by his heirs 09 Mar. 1773 to Okey Johnson. (NOTE: West Virginia Settlements, by Ross R. Johnston 1977.)

This unfortunate accident did not deter his sons from pursuing the occupation in which they were already engaged, that of stock raising. Within a few years after their father's death the eldest two sons, James and John set out from home to seek more extended land ownership in the region west of the mountains, which was the formation of the "Ohio Company". The French wars had rendered this area familiar to many. They passed pass through Washington County and followed the Chartiers creek to it's mouth, reaching a point just above the borough of Mansfield on a evening in October where tradition says they passed the night. A bear had been killed during the day, and a large chip was cut from a swamp oak to afford means of cutting and preparing the meat. The vitality was not impaired; it survived several generations of the Bell family, and died of old age in October, 1873. They traveled by horseback to for the purpose of exploration. On the next day they crossed Chartiers Creek and spent the second night within Robison Township; and after marking the bounds of their respective claims in the customary manner, they then returned to Virginia,with the intention of removing their families to Pennsylvania and there making his home. The following spring they brought their families. James was the first permanent settler in Robison Township and John lived in Chartiers Township until their deaths. (NOTE: History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, Vol. 1, A Warner & Co. Publishers, Chicago, ILL. in 1889.)

All of Robert's family then moved to Washington County, Pennsylvania (NOTE: This area first settled in 1760 and became Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania in
1786.) settling in the Old Sewickley Settlement on the Ohio River and in Carnegie near Chartiers Creek. From there Agnes's sons and sons-in-law served in the Revolutionary War. After the war, her children Robert, William, David, and Joseph moved to Harrod's Creek, Kentucky. They had not found the locality as well adapted to stock raising as they had anticipated. Samuel moved to Harrison Co., Indiana. James and John remained behind with their mother.

Agnes was living with her son John near Chartiers Creek, in Carnegie, Pennsylvania when she died in 1785. She was first buried on her son's homestead in the Old Wood's Graveyard at Peter's Creek, Pennsylvania. Her body was moved back to Hampshire County, Virginia. (NOTE: Hampshire County, Virginia is now part of West Virginia.)

The birth order of their children is uncertain. Dr. & Mrs. J. H. Bell Jr., Windber, Pa. report it to be Robert Jr. 1736, Joseph 1738, Samuel 1740, Margaret 1742, all born near Belfast, John 1743, Jane 1744, William 1746, David 1748, James 1750 and Charles 1752.

("Robert BELL," pp. 17-19)
-----
The following story is from an unknown source, sent to me by Ronald T. Shawhan:

"W. J. Winstein of Academy street furnished the following interesting story of the early settlers in the Chartiers Valley. The paper was presented to Mr. Winstein by descendants of Robert Bell, Sr., and for a number of years was stored away in an old trunk, where it was recently found. The Bells were the first settlers in the Chartiers Valley, staking out a claim in what is now known as Rosslyn, in 1768. Many descendants of the original settlers are still living in this vicinity. The paper follows:

"Robert Bell, Sr., of Tyrone, Ireland, and wife, of Edinburgh, Scotland, located four miles from Romney, Va., on the south branch of the Potomac river, in the eighteenth century. Mr. Bell had many narrow escapes from the Indians of that forest. In company with two other young men, named Vaughan and Scisson, one day Robert Bell was in search of strayed horses, when the party was surprised by an Indian ambushcade on a branch of __augherty Run, Va. Vaughan was killed, a savage threw his tomahawk at Bell and wounded him. Scisson turned on his horse and fled. After the fight Mr. Bell was able to get on his horse, but he only went a short distance when he fell off. Mr. Bell's horse arrived home before Scisson did and a party at once was formed to search for Bell. The party met Scisson at the Ohio river and he related what had happened to Mr. Bell. They supposed he was dead and returned to their homes. Within a week later they found Bell at Ft. Pitt, his wounds dressed by Dr. Knight, who figured conspicuously at the burning of Crawford. Mr. Bell served in the expedition of 1754, during the French and Indian War, and was among the number who accompanied General George Washington on his first trip on the Kanawha. General Washington made a note in one of his diaries of those who accompanied him in his canoe.

"Mr. and Mrs. Bell had eight sons and two daughters. James Bell, Sr., the oldest, was born in 1751. When he was a small lad of ten years, his father went to Patterson Fort for a wagon load of wood. James and his brother went along, their father wanted them to gather wood while he was hauling some home. The two boys were busy gathering wood when the Indians attacked them. They caught James but his brother ran and the Indians shot at him and he fell under a log, the Indians thinking he was dead; he was not hurt, however, and later went home and told that James was captured. The Indians took James to Indiana and kept him there till he was returned by treaty. When his father went after him he took two horses that James might ride home. When they met, James got on the horse but had ridden only a short distance when he saw a woman and some children who were also set free. James dismounted, letting the woman ride.

"When he arrived home it was at night. His mother, hearing the wooden latch lift with a string, called: 'Is that you, James?' and his father answered, yes. It was a joyful meeting. James had many stories to relate of his capture. Among them, was that when the Indians took him the Ohio river they made a canoe and put him in it and they had nothing to eat save what they called 'cush meat.' He always claimed they crossed into Pennsylvania and came through Chartiers Valley, near Chartier's Creek. He told how they would have two lines of Indians and would make him run between the lines. And of an old Indian squaw who would be angry if they struck him, but he was a fast runner and did not get struck often. They pulled all his hair out of the top of his head and put rings in his ears. After he had been with them awhile the Indians got very friendly with him and when he left the old Indian squaw cried.

"In 1765 his father, Robert Bell, Sr., came from Virginia to Western Pennsylvania. On returning as he was nearing home in Virginia, after inspecting the land he intended to settle on in Pennsylvania, he was thrown from his horse and killed.

Occupationa farmer

Children of Robert Bell Sr. and Agnes Fleming

Agnes Fleming

F, b. between 1700 and 1710, d. between 1780 and 1789
Agnes Fleming|b. between 1700 and 1710\nd. between 1780 and 1789|p152.htm#i95537|William Fleeming|b. circa 1665|p189.htm#i104527|Janet Clark|b. circa 1669|p273.htm#i156156|||||||||||||

Relationship=6th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Agnes Fleming was born between 1700 and 1710 at Edinburgh, Midlothian County, Scotland. She was the daughter of William Fleeming and Janet Clark. Agnes Fleming was born on 12-Dec-1703 at Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland. She was born on 11-Jun-1704 at Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland. She was born on 11-Jun-1707 at Campbeltown, Argyll, Scotland. Agnes married Robert Bell Sr. circa 1737 at Bellfast, Antrim County, Ireland. Agnes was buried in 1780 at Old Woods Graveyard, Peter's Creek, Pennsylvania. She died between 1780 and 1789 at Chartiers Creek, Washington County, Pennsylvania.
     She was also known as Agnes Fleeming. She and Robert Bell Sr. resided at at near, Belfast, Antrim County, Ireland, circa 1738. Agnes Fleming and Robert Bell Sr. immigrated circa 1744; They immigrated with four children, all under the age of seven. This was during the Scots religious and political persecutions. Tradition is that he arrived at the port of Philadelphia with two brothers. One of the brothers went south and the other to Pennsylvania.

Children of Agnes Fleming and Robert Bell Sr.

John Thorn

M, b. circa 1749, d. circa 1813
John Thorn|b. circa 1749\nd. circa 1813|p152.htm#i95545|William Thorn|b. circa 1685\nd. 1761|p132.htm#i73546|Sarah (Unknown)|b. circa 1710\nd. circa 1786|p295.htm#i179185|||||||||||||

Relationship=6th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      John Thorn was born circa 1749 at Prince William County, Virgina. He was the son of William Thorn and Sarah (Unknown). John married Mary Sanford, daughter of Augustine Sanford and Hernrietta Randall. John Thorn died circa 1813 at perhaps, Prince William County, Virgina.
     On 2-Mar-1771 JOHN THORN of Prince William Co Va. court records ,along with his wife Mary, as deeding land owned by his father William THORN.
Between 1788 and 1794 John Thorn appears in Personal Property Tax lists for lower Prince Wiliam Co Va. This is between Cedar Run and Potoamc River.
5-Oct-1795 JOHN THORN of Prince William County, to my loving son WILLIAM THORN, 100 acres on Lick Branch, a branch of Occoquan, being part of certain tract taken by my deceased father,WILLIAM THORN. (Prince William County Deed Book Y, p. 601).
5-Oct-1795 JOHN THORN of Prince William County, to my son AUGUSTINE THORN, 100 acres on west side of Lick Branch of Occoquan, part of tract taken up by my father WILLIAM THORN. (Deed Book Y, p. 602).
5-Dec-1803 JOHN THORN and wife MARY of Prince William County to WILLIAM LATHOM of Prince William County,for L120,15s., 105 acres,west side of Cockrell's Mill Run. Signed by JOHN THORN, MARY THORN (Deed Book 2 p. 281).
On 7-Jan-1805 An early deeds index (1827) shows that Jno. THORN Senr. gave Jno. THORN Jr. property recorded in Deed Book 2, p. 443. Unfortunately that page has been removed from the book (a plat of the town of Occoquan was on the reverse). The surrounding deeds were recorded on 7 Jan. 1805, so we can be confident that is the same date of recording for this deed. It is apparently the 105 acres that John THORN Junior owned from that time. Since John Sr. had no brothers or nephews named THORN (see 1806 deed below), John Jr. would undoubtedly to be his son.
1806 John Thorn was are found on the tax list at Prince William County, Virgina, THORN JOHN Senr - 304 ac -.46 per ac.,$139.84 value.68 tax.
THORN JOHN Junr - 105 ac-.46 per ac. $48.30 value.34 tax.
THORN WILLIAM - 100 ac -.46 per ac. $46.00 value, .22 tax.
At this date Augustine had sold his land and moved on to Smith Co Tennessee.
On 3-Jun-1811 JOHN THORN signed a Bond as Constable of Prince William County for two years. His securities were PETER TRONE and WILLIAM FAIRFAX. (Prince William County Deed Book 4, p.300) Not sure if this was John Sr or John Jr. Most likely it was John Sr as he does not appear on the tax lists after this time. Constables were excused from tithable conscription.
On 1815 Virginia Land Owners Directory
Vol 4 Northern Region by Rogere G. Ward 1999
Prince WIlliam Co Va
THORN, JOHN 10NW (could be son of John )
THORN, WILLIAM 10NW
These are the only THORNS found in the reference book of the Northern Neck Region of Virginia.
Census1787Virgina, no white males 16-21,3 slaves over 16,1 slave 12-16,4 horses,9 cattle. (1787 Census Of Virginia,by Schreiner-Yantis and Love p.906)
Census1810Dumfries, Prince William County, Virgina, 1 male age 45 and over 1 female age 45 and over
Living two dwellings away is WILLIAM THORN - most likely his son.

Margaret Fry Bell

F, b. 1742, d. 1795
Margaret Fry Bell|b. 1742\nd. 1795|p152.htm#i95548|Robert Bell Sr.|b. between 1700 and 1710\nd. between 1772 and 1773|p152.htm#i95536|Agnes Fleming|b. between 1700 and 1710\nd. between 1780 and 1789|p152.htm#i95537|||||||William Fleeming|b. circa 1665|p189.htm#i104527|Janet Clark|b. circa 1669|p273.htm#i156156|

Relationship=5th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=4th great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Margaret Fry Bell was born in 1742 at near, Belfast, Antrim County, Ireland. She was the daughter of Robert Bell Sr. and Agnes Fleming. Margaret married Daniel Shawhan, son of Daniel Shawhan and Jennett (Unknown), in 1762 at Hampshire County, Virgina. Margaret Fry Bell died in 1795 at Ruddles Mills, Bourbon County, Tennessee. She died after 1830 at Clark County, Indiana.

Daniel Shawhan

M, b. 17 Dec 1738, d. 11 May 1791
Daniel Shawhan|b. 17 Dec 1738\nd. 11 May 1791|p152.htm#i95549|Daniel Shawhan||p381.htm#i345651|Jennett (Unknown)||p381.htm#i345652|||||||||||||
      Daniel Shawhan was born on 17-Dec-1738 at Kent County, Maryland. He was the son of Daniel Shawhan and Jennett (Unknown). Daniel married Margaret Fry Bell, daughter of Robert Bell Sr. and Agnes Fleming, in 1762 at Hampshire County, Virgina. Daniel Shawhan died on 11-May-1791 at Bourbon County, Kentucky, at age 52. Daniel was buried after 11-May-1791 at Ruddle's Mills Cemetery.
     He served in the Revolutionary War circa 1778.

Elizabeth Lettice

F, b. circa 1637, d. 31 Oct 1693
      Elizabeth Lettice was born circa 1637. Elizabeth married William Shurtleff before 1669. Elizabeth married Jacob Cooke, son of Francis Cooke and Hester Mahiew, on 18-Nov-1669 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Elizabeth Lettice died on 31-Oct-1693 at Swansea, Bristol County, Massachusetts.

William Shurtleff

M
     William married Elizabeth Lettice before 1669.

John Wilcox

M, b. 1670, d. before 28 Feb 1717
John Wilcox|b. 1670\nd. before 28 Feb 1717|p152.htm#i95580|Daniel Wilcox|b. 4 Mar 1632/33\nd. 2 Jul 1702|p26.htm#i5654|Elizabeth Cooke|b. before 1644\nd. 6 Dec 1715|p26.htm#i5659|||||||John Cooke|b. between Jan 1607 and Mar 1607\nd. 23 Nov 1695|p3.htm#i120|Sarah Warren|b. circa 1614\nd. after 15 Jul 1696|p3.htm#i115|

Relationship=2nd cousin 7 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=2nd cousin 6 times removed of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      John Wilcox was born in 1670 at Rhode Island. He was the son of Daniel Wilcox and Elizabeth Cooke. John married Rebecca Mosher in 1698. John Wilcox died before 28-Feb-1717 at Little Compton, Newport County, Rhode Island.

Child of John Wilcox and Rebecca Mosher

Arnauld Noirett

M, b. circa 1550

Relationship=11th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      Arnauld Noirett was born circa 1550 at France. Arnauld married Barbe Du Chesne.

Child of Arnauld Noirett and Barbe Du Chesne

Barbe Du Chesne

F

Relationship=11th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
     Barbe married Arnauld Noirett.

Child of Barbe Du Chesne and Arnauld Noirett

Cornelius Volkertsen Viele

M, d. circa 1649
Cornelius Volkertsen Viele|d. circa 1649|p152.htm#i95667|Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher||p152.htm#i95668|Marriten Jens||p152.htm#i95669|||||||||||||
      Cornelius Volkertsen Viele was born at Kniphausen, Oldneburg. He was the son of Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher and Marriten Jens. Cornelius married Maria du Trieux, daughter of Philippe Antoni du Trieux and Jacquemine Noirett, circa 1639. Cornelius Volkertsen Viele died circa 1649.
     He was also known as Cornelius Volkertsen.

Children of Cornelius Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux

Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher

M
     Volkert married Marriten Jens.

Child of Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher and Marriten Jens

Marriten Jens

F
     Marriten married Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher.

Child of Marriten Jens and Volkert Maertnesen Seylemaecher

Aernoudt Cornelisen Viele Sr.

M, b. May 1640, d. after 1704
Aernoudt Cornelisen Viele Sr.|b. May 1640\nd. after 1704|p152.htm#i95670|Cornelius Volkertsen Viele|d. circa 1649|p152.htm#i95667|Maria du Trieux|b. 5 Apr 1617\nd. before 1684|p121.htm#i67199|Volkert M. Seylemaecher||p152.htm#i95668|Marriten Jens||p152.htm#i95669|Philippe A. du Trieux|b. Jul 1586 or Aug 1586\nd. before 8 Sep 1653|p121.htm#i67200|Jacquemine Noirett|b. circa 1592\nd. before 17 Jul 1621|p121.htm#i67201|

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Aernoudt Cornelisen Viele Sr. was born in May-1640. He was the son of Cornelius Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux. Aernoudt Cornelisen Viele Sr. was born circa 27-May-1640. Aernoudt married Gerritje Gerritse Vermeulen before 1667. Aernoudt Cornelisen Viele Sr. died after 1704.
      Parents were did not marry at the time of his birth. His parents were did not marry at the time of his birth.

Cornelius Cornelisen Viele

M, b. 5 Feb 1643, d. circa 1690
Cornelius Cornelisen Viele|b. 5 Feb 1643\nd. circa 1690|p152.htm#i95671|Cornelius Volkertsen Viele|d. circa 1649|p152.htm#i95667|Maria du Trieux|b. 5 Apr 1617\nd. before 1684|p121.htm#i67199|Volkert M. Seylemaecher||p152.htm#i95668|Marriten Jens||p152.htm#i95669|Philippe A. du Trieux|b. Jul 1586 or Aug 1586\nd. before 8 Sep 1653|p121.htm#i67200|Jacquemine Noirett|b. circa 1592\nd. before 17 Jul 1621|p121.htm#i67201|

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Cornelius Cornelisen Viele was born in 1643. He was born on 5-Feb-1643 at Schenectady, Schenectady County, New York. He was the son of Cornelius Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux. Cornelius married Suster Bouts circa 1667 at Schenectady County, New York. Cornelius Cornelisen Viele died circa 1690 at Schenectady, Schenectady County, New York.

Child of Cornelius Cornelisen Viele and Suster Bouts

Suster Bouts

F, b. 1650
      Suster Bouts was born in 1650 at Of, Schenectady, Schenectady County, New York. Suster married Cornelius Cornelisen Viele, son of Cornelius Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux, circa 1667 at Schenectady County, New York. Suster married Douve Aukes circa 1690.

Child of Suster Bouts and Cornelius Cornelisen Viele

Douve Aukes

M
     Douve married Suster Bouts circa 1690.

Jacomintje Viele

F, b. Aug 1645
Jacomintje Viele|b. Aug 1645|p152.htm#i95674|Cornelius Volkertsen Viele|d. circa 1649|p152.htm#i95667|Maria du Trieux|b. 5 Apr 1617\nd. before 1684|p121.htm#i67199|Volkert M. Seylemaecher||p152.htm#i95668|Marriten Jens||p152.htm#i95669|Philippe A. du Trieux|b. Jul 1586 or Aug 1586\nd. before 8 Sep 1653|p121.htm#i67200|Jacquemine Noirett|b. circa 1592\nd. before 17 Jul 1621|p121.htm#i67201|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Jacomintje Viele was born in Aug-1645. She was the daughter of Cornelius Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux.

Pieter Cornelisen Viele

M, b. 9 Feb 1648
Pieter Cornelisen Viele|b. 9 Feb 1648|p152.htm#i95675|Cornelius Volkertsen Viele|d. circa 1649|p152.htm#i95667|Maria du Trieux|b. 5 Apr 1617\nd. before 1684|p121.htm#i67199|Volkert M. Seylemaecher||p152.htm#i95668|Marriten Jens||p152.htm#i95669|Philippe A. du Trieux|b. Jul 1586 or Aug 1586\nd. before 8 Sep 1653|p121.htm#i67200|Jacquemine Noirett|b. circa 1592\nd. before 17 Jul 1621|p121.htm#i67201|

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
     Pieter Cornelisen Viele was baptized on 9-Feb-1648 at New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. He was the son of Cornelius Volkertsen Viele and Maria du Trieux. Pieter Cornelisen Viele was born circa 1650. Pieter married Jacomyntje Swart circa 1670. Pieter married Jacomyntje Swart circa 1682.
     Pieter Cornelisen Viele was also known as Pieter Viele.

Annetje Peake

F, b. 15 Oct 1651, d. 19 Dec 1690
Annetje Peake|b. 15 Oct 1651\nd. 19 Dec 1690|p152.htm#i95676|Jan Peeck|b. circa 1615|p121.htm#i67198|Maria du Trieux|b. 5 Apr 1617\nd. before 1684|p121.htm#i67199|||||||Philippe A. du Trieux|b. Jul 1586 or Aug 1586\nd. before 8 Sep 1653|p121.htm#i67200|Jacquemine Noirett|b. circa 1592\nd. before 17 Jul 1621|p121.htm#i67201|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Annetje Peake was born in Oct-1651. She was baptized on 15-Oct-1651 at New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. She was the daughter of Jan Peeck and Maria du Trieux. Annetje married Johannes Senderse Glen on 2-May-1667 at New York. Annetje Peake died on 19-Dec-1689 at Scotia, Schenectady County, New York, at age 38. She died on 19-Dec-1690 at Schenectady, Schenectady County, New York, at age 39.
     She was also known as Anna Peeck. She was also known as Anna Peake. She was also known as Anna.

Johannes Senderse Glen

M, b. 5 Nov 1648, d. 6 Nov 1731
      Johannes Senderse Glen was born on 5-Nov-1648 at Scotia, Schenectady County, New York. Johannes married Annetje Peake, daughter of Jan Peeck and Maria du Trieux, on 2-May-1667 at New York. Johannes married Dievertje Wendel, daughter of Evert Jansen Wendel and Susanna du Trieux, on 21-Jun-1691. Johannes Senderse Glen died on 6-Nov-1731 at Scotia, Schenectady County, New York, at age 83.
     He was also known as Johannes Sanders Glen. He was also known as John Glenn. He was also known as John Alexander Glen.

Jacobus Peake

M, b. 16 Jan 1654
Jacobus Peake|b. 16 Jan 1654|p152.htm#i95678|Jan Peeck|b. circa 1615|p121.htm#i67198|Maria du Trieux|b. 5 Apr 1617\nd. before 1684|p121.htm#i67199|||||||Philippe A. du Trieux|b. Jul 1586 or Aug 1586\nd. before 8 Sep 1653|p121.htm#i67200|Jacquemine Noirett|b. circa 1592\nd. before 17 Jul 1621|p121.htm#i67201|

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
     Jacobus Peake was baptized on 16-Jan-1654 at New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. He was the son of Jan Peeck and Maria du Trieux. Jacobus Peake was born in Jan-1656. He was baptized on 16-Jan-1656 at Dutch Reformed Church, New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. Jacobus married Elizabeth Van Imburgh on 18-Jul-1683.
     Jacobus Peake was also known as Jacobus Peek.

Elizabeth Van Imburgh

F
     Elizabeth married Jacobus Peake, son of Jan Peeck and Maria du Trieux, on 18-Jul-1683.
     Elizabeth Van Imburgh was also known as Elisabeth Teunise.

Maria Peeck

F, b. Mar 1658
Maria Peeck|b. Mar 1658|p152.htm#i95680|Jan Peeck|b. circa 1615|p121.htm#i67198|Maria du Trieux|b. 5 Apr 1617\nd. before 1684|p121.htm#i67199|||||||Philippe A. du Trieux|b. Jul 1586 or Aug 1586\nd. before 8 Sep 1653|p121.htm#i67200|Jacquemine Noirett|b. circa 1592\nd. before 17 Jul 1621|p121.htm#i67201|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Maria Peeck was born in Mar-1658 at Schenectady, Schenectady County, New York. She was the daughter of Jan Peeck and Maria du Trieux. Maria Peeck was baptized on 6-Mar-1658 at Dutch Reformed Church, New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. Maria married Goosen Van Noort before 1686 at Albany, Albany County, New York.
     Maria Peeck was also known as Maria Peake.
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