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Capt. Johnathan Bangs

M, b. circa 1640, d. 9 Nov 1728
Capt. Johnathan Bangs|b. circa 1640\nd. 9 Nov 1728|p105.htm#i42044|Edward Bangs|b. 28 Oct 1591\nd. between 19 Oct 1677 and 5 Mar 1678|p105.htm#i42046|Rebecca (Unknown)|b. 29 Dec 1611|p105.htm#i42047|John Bangs|b. circa 1566\nd. 11 Feb 1631/32|p105.htm#i42048|Jane Chaire|b. circa 1570\nd. 11 Feb 1631/32|p105.htm#i42049|||||||

Relationship=8th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Capt. Johnathan Bangs was born circa 1640 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was the son of Edward Bangs and Rebecca (Unknown). Johnathan married Mary Mayo, daughter of Capt. Samuel Mayo and Tamsen Lumpkin, on 16-Jul-1664 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Johnathan married Sarah (Unknown) before Jun-1719. Johnathan married Ruth Cole, daughter of Daniel Cole, on 23-Jul-1720 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Capt. Johnathan Bangs died in 1728 at Harwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. He died in 1728 at Massachusetts. He died on 9-Nov-1728 at Brewster, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
Occupation1674deputy to the Colony Court at Plymouth 1676, 1682, 1683, 1687, 1688.
Occupation1692Representative to the General Court at Boston

Children of Capt. Johnathan Bangs and Mary Mayo

Mary Mayo

F, b. 1645, d. 26 Jan 1710/11
Mary Mayo|b. 1645\nd. 26 Jan 1710/11|p105.htm#i42045|Capt. Samuel Mayo|b. 1625\nd. 1663|p105.htm#i42083|Tamsen Lumpkin|b. 1626\nd. 16 Jun 1709|p105.htm#i42084|Rev. John Mayo Sr.|b. 16 Oct 1597\nd. 3 May 1676|p106.htm#i42104|Tamisen Brike||p251.htm#i134463|William Lumpkin|b. circa 1600\nd. between 23 Jul 1668 and 29 Jan 1679|p105.htm#i42085|Tamison (Unknown)|b. between 1600 and 1604\nd. 26 Feb 1681/82|p105.htm#i42086|

Relationship=8th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=1st cousin 8 times removed of David Kipp Conover.
      Mary Mayo was born in 1645 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Capt. Samuel Mayo and Tamsen Lumpkin. Mary Mayo was baptized on 8-Feb-1650 at Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Mary married Capt. Johnathan Bangs, son of Edward Bangs and Rebecca (Unknown), on 16-Jul-1664 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Mary Mayo died on 26-Jan-1710/11 at Harwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.

Children of Mary Mayo and Capt. Johnathan Bangs

Edward Bangs

M, b. 28 Oct 1591, d. between 19 Oct 1677 and 5 Mar 1678
Edward Bangs|b. 28 Oct 1591\nd. between 19 Oct 1677 and 5 Mar 1678|p105.htm#i42046|John Bangs|b. circa 1566\nd. 11 Feb 1631/32|p105.htm#i42048|Jane Chaire|b. circa 1570\nd. 11 Feb 1631/32|p105.htm#i42049|Richard Bangs|b. circa 1536\nd. 21 Nov 1586|p105.htm#i42050|Margaret (Unknown)|b. circa 1540\nd. circa 1592|p105.htm#i42051|||||||

Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      Edward Bangs was born circa 1591 at Chichester, Sussex, England. He was baptized on 28-Oct-1591 at Panfield, Essex, England. He was the son of John Bangs and Jane Chaire. Edward married Lydia Hicks, daughter of Robert Hicks and Margaret (Unknown), circa 1633 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Edward married Rebecca (Unknown) between 1634 and 1636 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Edward Bangs died between 19-Oct-1677 and 5-Mar-1678 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Edward's estate was proved on 5-Mar-1677/78.
      He signed his will and several deeds. He was grandted land in the amount of four acres as a passenger of the Anne in 1623 in the division of land in 1623 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He emigrated on 31-Jul-1623 from Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; sailed on the Anne. On 1627 In the 1627 Plymouth division of cattle "Edward Banges" was the thirteenth person in the twelthe company.
In 1633 Edward Bangs was listed as a freeman at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He held the position of committee to divide meadow on 1-Jul-1633. On 7-Mar-1636/37 Edward Bangs was listed as a freeman at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. In 1639 Edward Bangs was listed as a freeman at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts; listed as gone in Plymouth County. On 2-Nov-1640 He was granted ten acres of meadow in the South Meadows.
On 7-Sep-1641 "Edward Banges" was granted a parcel fo fourscore acres of upland about "Warrens Wells."
On 17-Oct-1642 "Wheras fourscore of upland are formerly granted to Edward Banges at Waren's Wells, he now desiring to have some land near his house, it is granted that he shall look out a parcel of land, which upon view shall be laid fourth for him, and to be deducted out of the 80 acres he should have at Warren's Wells."
On 1643 In Plymouth section of list of men able to bear arms.

Edward Bangs purchased from Joyce Wallen, widow for L8 "all that her house and messuage situate and being at Hobs Hole or Wellingsly with the garden place and uplands thereunto adjoining on 7-Sep-1643.
He resided at at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, before 1645. He sold land to Samuel Hicks of Plymouth for L3, 10s "a parcel of marsh meadow lying at the high pines on the Salthouse Beach" on 22-Jun-1651 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. He was an inkeeper on 6-Oct-1657 Edward Bangs at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. On 29-May-1670 Edward Bangs was listed as a freeman at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
Edward's left a will on 19-Oct-1677 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
Occupation3-Jan-1627/28committee to lay out land Plymouth, MA
Occupation5-Jan-1634/35committe to assess taxes, Plymouth, MA
Occupation1-Mar-1635/36commtiiee to assess taxes, Plymouth, MA
Occupation14-Mar-1635/36Plymouth representative to reunite Plymouth and Duxbury (but did not serve)
Occupation4-Oct-1636petit jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation3-Jan-1636/37petit jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation7-Mar-1636/37Grand Jury in Plymouth, MA
Occupation20-Mar-1636/37committee to allocate hay ground, Plymouth, MA
Occupation2-Oct-1637committee to allocate hay ground, Plymouth, MA
Occupation5-Jun-1638grand jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation3-Sep-1639petit jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation3-Dec-1639petit jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation3-Mar-1639/40petit jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation1-Jun-1640committee to allocate hay ground, Plymouth, MA
Occupation2-Jun-1640grand jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation1-Feb-1640/41committe to lay out land Plymouth, MA
Occupation1-Feb-1640/41committee to lay out highway, Plymouth, MA
Occupation3-Aug-1641petit jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation6-Sep-1641petit jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation7-Dec-1641petit jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation1-Mar-1641/42grand jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation1-Mar-1641/42petit jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation6-Jun-1643petit jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation7-Nov-1643petit jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupationbetween 1646 and 1665treasurer, Eastham, MA
Occupation1-Jun-1647Eastham highway surveyor
Occupation4-Jun-1650Eastham highway surveyor
Occupation3-Jun-1651Eastham highway surveyor
Occupation24-Feb-1652committee to lay out highway, Plymouth, MA
Occupation7-Jun-1652grand jury, Plymouth, MA
Occupation7-Jun-1652Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, Deputy to Plymouth Court for Eastham
Occupation30-Oct-1667coroner's jury, Plymouth County, MA

Child of Edward Bangs and Lydia Hicks

Children of Edward Bangs and Rebecca (Unknown)

Rebecca (Unknown)

F, b. 29 Dec 1611

Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=8th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
      Rebecca (Unknown) was born at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. She was born circa 1603 at Wymondham, Norfolk, England. She was baptized on 29-Dec-1611 at Norwich, Norfolk, England. She was baptized on 29-Dec-1611 at Hingham, Norfolk, England. Rebecca married Edward Bangs, son of John Bangs and Jane Chaire, between 1634 and 1636 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
     Rebecca (Unknown) was also known as Supposed Rebecca Hobart She is probably not Edward Bangs wife. She was also known as Rebecca Hubbard.

Children of Rebecca (Unknown) and Edward Bangs

John Bangs

M, b. circa 1566, d. 11 Feb 1631/32
John Bangs|b. circa 1566\nd. 11 Feb 1631/32|p105.htm#i42048|Richard Bangs|b. circa 1536\nd. 21 Nov 1586|p105.htm#i42050|Margaret (Unknown)|b. circa 1540\nd. circa 1592|p105.htm#i42051|Thomas Bangs|b. 1500|p253.htm#i136382||||||||||

Relationship=10th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      John Bangs was born circa 1560 at Panfield, Essex, England. He was born circa 1566 at Norwich, Norfolk, England. He was the son of Richard Bangs and Margaret (Unknown). John married Jane Chaire on 30-Jan-1586/87 at Panfield, Essex, England. John Bangs died on 11-Feb-1631/32 at Hempstead, Essex, England.

Child of John Bangs and Jane Chaire

  • Edward Bangs+ b. 28 Oct 1591, d. between 19 Oct 1677 and 5 Mar 1678

Jane Chaire

F, b. circa 1570, d. 11 Feb 1631/32

Relationship=10th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
      Jane Chaire was born circa 1565 at Norwich, Norfolk, England. She was born circa 1570 at at or near, Panfield, Essex, England. Jane married John Bangs, son of Richard Bangs and Margaret (Unknown), on 30-Jan-1586/87 at Panfield, Essex, England. Jane Chaire died after 1631. She died on 11-Feb-1631/32 at Hempstead, Essex, England.
     She was also known as Joan Chavis. She was also known as Jane Chavis.

Child of Jane Chaire and John Bangs

  • Edward Bangs+ b. 28 Oct 1591, d. between 19 Oct 1677 and 5 Mar 1678

Richard Bangs

M, b. circa 1536, d. 21 Nov 1586
Richard Bangs|b. circa 1536\nd. 21 Nov 1586|p105.htm#i42050|Thomas Bangs|b. 1500|p253.htm#i136382||||||||||||||||

Relationship=11th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=10th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      Richard Bangs was born circa 1536 at Norwich, Norfolk, England. He was the son of Thomas Bangs. Richard married Margaret (Unknown). Richard Bangs died on 21-Nov-1586 at Norwich, Norfolk, England.

Child of Richard Bangs and Margaret (Unknown)

Margaret (Unknown)

F, b. circa 1540, d. circa 1592

Relationship=11th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=10th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
      Margaret (Unknown) was born circa 1540 at Norwich, Norfolk, England. Margaret married Richard Bangs, son of Thomas Bangs. Margaret (Unknown) died circa 1592.

Child of Margaret (Unknown) and Richard Bangs

Jacob Burgess

M, b. circa 1631, d. 17 Mar 1719
Jacob Burgess|b. circa 1631\nd. 17 Mar 1719|p105.htm#i42052|Thomas Burgess|b. 16 Aug 1601\nd. 13 Feb 1684/85|p105.htm#i42054|Dorothy (Unknown)|b. circa 1605\nd. 27 Feb 1686/87|p105.htm#i42055|Disproven Thomas Burgess|b. circa 1580\nd. 20 Jul 1626|p131.htm#i73506|Disproven Elizabeth Pye|b. circa 1572|p131.htm#i73507|||||||

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Jacob Burgess was born circa 1631 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was born in 1631 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. He was the son of Thomas Burgess and Dorothy (Unknown). Jacob married Mary Nye, daughter of Benjamin Nye and Katherine Tupper, on 1-Jun-1660 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts; The date of 1670 is assumed as the date of marriage. The date in the records is 1660. Jacob Burgess died on 17-Mar-1719 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. He died on 17-Mar-1719 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
     He was also known as Jacob Burge. Jacob Burgess helped to repair the meetinghouse in 1644, and was early a member of the church. He served the town for many years in the subordinate offices of surveyor, constable and grand juror. He took the oath of allegiance in 1657. He inherited, in behalf of his son Thomas, the paternal estate in Sandwich, while the other brothers removed: Thomas to Newport, John to Yarmouth, and Joseph to Rochester. He was one of the Executors of his father's Will. in 1644. Jacob2 Burgess the 3rd son of Thomas1, helped to repair the meetinghouse in 1644, and was early a member of the church. He served the town for many years in the subordinate offices of surveyor, constable and grand juror. He took the oath of allegiance in 1657. He inherited, in behalf of his son Thomas3, the paternal estate in Sandwich, while the other brothers removed, Thomas to Newport, John to Yarmouth, and Joseph to Rochester. He was one of the Executors of his father's Will. He m Mary, dau of Benjamin Nye, June 1 1670, who d June 23 1706. He d Mar 17, 1719. Children: Samuel b 8 Mar 1671, Ebenezer b 2 Oct 1673, Jacob b 18 Oct 1676, Thomas b Mar 1680, Benjamin d at Martha's Vineyard 1753, Mary m Christopher Gifford of Conway. This Thomas was a child of 4 yrs when the grandfather made his Will, and entailed to him the old homestead, both in honor of his name and to perpetuate the estate in the family. Vain are human plans. Having no male heir surviving, he constituted Zaccheus, the eldest son of his brother Jacob, as his true and lawful heir, giving him a deed of the homestead, dated Feb 18, 1754. between 1644 and 1754. Mr Jacob Burge (Burgess is, by corruption, the modern name) was a prominent citizen, son of Mr Thoms Burge who was in Sandwich in 1637, deputy 1646, &c, and d Feb 27, 1685, ae 82. Jacob m Mary, dr Benj Nye, June 1, 1660, and had Samuel Mar 8, 1671; Ebenr Oct 2, 1673; Jacob Oct 18, 1676; and Thomas Mar 29, 1680; perhaps others. Jacob, son of Jacob, by his wife Mary, had Zaccheus Mar 9, 1704/5; Jedidah Jul 29, 1706, who m Thos Phillips of Duxbury Dec 4, 1729; Abia Ap 14, 1708; Abigail Jun 29, 1709; Samuel Nov 2, 1711; and Jacob Nov 9, 1715. Zaccheus, eldest son of Jacob 2d, by his wife Temperance who d Dec 8, 1748, had Josiah who removed to Fairfield, ME; Thomas (called by distinction 'Honest Tommy') who also went to ME; Elisha 1743; and Jedida 1745, who m Eleazar Blackwell Dec 8, 1763. Elisha, of the last family, m Hannah Nye of Falmouth, and had Betsey 1774, who prob m Elisha Gibbs 1797; Elisha; Abia Feb 11, 1776; Benjamin Aug 26, 1778; Rebecca Nov 22, 1781, who m Thos Ellis; Hannah Feb 6, 1783; Jacob Sept 19, 1786; Hepzibah Ap 5, 1788, who m Saml Harlow of Mid; and Anson Dec 2, 1791 who m Mary Crocker. Mr Elisha Burgess d Nov 10, 1832, ae 89. Benjamin Esq, of the last family, m Mary dr of Mr Clark Swift, June 3 1804, who d Jan 29, 1861, ae 78; and their issue was Adaline June 20, 1805, who m Nathan B Gibbs and d; Mary Sept 2, 1807 who m 1st Hirah Ellis, snd Enos Briggs; Thomas T Feb 10, 1810, who m Achsah Gibbs, and d July 18, 1834; Eliza Swift Mar 24, 1813, who m N B Gibbs; Hephzibah Feb 7, 1816, who m Dr Alanson Abbe; Benjamin Franklin Sept 6, 1818, who m Cordelia dr of Capt Abner Ellis; and Caroline Beal Mar 1, 1821, who m Fred W Sawyer Esq of Boston, Sept 18, 1849. Benjamin Burgess Esq, was many years representative from this town, and has filled various offices, but is distinguished esp as an enterprising and successful merchant. in 1646. Jacob Burgess stated he "was drawne to testify that which hee did conserning Barlow, by Benujamine Nye, by feare, as threatened that in case he would not attend Barlow in his occations against the Quakers, and so to give the psent evidence hee should not have his daughter to wife." The court record of 1660 confims the 1660 marriage date leaving the eleven year gap in the record. on 13-Jun-1660.

Jabob Burgess was the only one of the four sons of Thomas Burgess to remain in Sandwich in 1719.

Was on a list of owners whose lands were to be surveyed.

Children of Jacob Burgess and Mary Nye

Mary Worden

F, b. 10 Feb 1638/39, d. 5 Nov 1688
Mary Worden|b. 10 Feb 1638/39\nd. 5 Nov 1688|p105.htm#i42053|Peter Worden|b. circa 1608\nd. 11 Jan 1680|p371.htm#i296809|Mary Sears|b. 1610\nd. 1687|p371.htm#i296810|||||||||||||

Relationship=8th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Mary Worden was born on 10-Feb-1638/39 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Peter Worden and Mary Sears. Mary married John Burgess, son of Thomas Burgess and Dorothy (Unknown), on 8-Sep-1657 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Mary Worden died on 5-May-1687 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, at age 48. She died on 5-Nov-1688 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, at age 49. She died in 1723 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
      Her parents are probably not Peter Worden 56869 and Mary Winslow 42091.

She was also known as Mary Warden.

Children of Mary Worden and John Burgess

Thomas Burgess

M, b. 16 Aug 1601, d. 13 Feb 1684/85
Thomas Burgess|b. 16 Aug 1601\nd. 13 Feb 1684/85|p105.htm#i42054|Disproven Thomas Burgess|b. circa 1580\nd. 20 Jul 1626|p131.htm#i73506|Disproven Elizabeth Pye|b. circa 1572|p131.htm#i73507|||||||||||||

Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
     Thomas was buried at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts; (Information from Little Compton Families) His grave had a monumental slab which came from England. He was born on 16-Aug-1601 at Turo, Cornwall, England. He was the son of Disproven Thomas Burgess and Disproven Elizabeth Pye. Thomas Burgess was born circa 1603. He was baptized in 1603 at Turo, England. Thomas married Dorothy (Unknown) in 1628 at Truro, Cornwall, England. Thomas was buried on 13-Feb-1685; Cemetery stone reads: THOMAS BURGESS BORN IN ENGLAND SETTLED IN 1637 IN THAT PART OF SANDWICH NOW CALLED SAGAMORE DYED FEB Ye 13 1685 AGED 82 YEARS THIS STONE ERECTED IN 1917 BY BURGESS DESCENDANTS FOR BROKEN ORIGINAL. He died on 13-Feb-1684/85 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, at age 83. Thomas was buried on 13-Feb-1684/85 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. He died on 23-Feb-1685 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, at age 83; Thomas Burge deceased the 23 february annodom 1685. He died on 23-Feb-1684/85 at Duxbury, Plymonth Colony, Massachusetts, at age 83.
     He resided at at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts; ' It appears that Thomas arrived in Salem with a young family not far from 1630, and lodged for a time at Lynn.' Assigned land in Duxbury (Plymouth) July 3, 1637. He moved to Sandwich in 1637. (Information from Burgess Genealogy - 1865 edition) Thomas Burges was in Sandwich in 1637, Representative to the General Court, (Information fromenealogies of Mayflower Familes Vol.i). In 1642, He fought in the Narragansett War, 1645., Etc. Savage calls him 'One of the Chief Men of the Town.' Through the Agency of Capt. Miles Sytandish he received a Grant of Land 3 March 1652/3 in Manomet, the area later called Monument, Lying to the North of Sandwich Settlement which was named Herring River Village (Within the Township of Sandwich). (Information from Little Compton Families) His grave had a monumental slab which came from England. DOUBTFUL THOMASES

"Thomas and Dorothy Burgess and their young family came from Cornwall, England in (or not far from) 1630 and settled in Lynn (or Salem), Massachusetts Bay Colony." All Burgess researchers have seen similar statements - and some have accepted part or all as fact. Our purpose in this article is to question (and perhaps generate some discussion about) the Cornwall origin, but first let us look briefly at the supposed arrival date of the Burgess family in New England. "I do not know who was the first one responsible for the assertion that Thomas came to these shores about 1630, lived in Lynn or Salem, within Essex County, Mass., thence to Plymouth Colony with the Saugus (then part of Lynn) group. But there seems not an iota of documentary proof for the idea. My careful study shows no evidence that Thomas was ever of the Bay Colony; it is apparently just an example of those myths oft repeated, sans checking, by the copyists." These words are found in Burgess Lineage, a typescript prepared for a client in 1957-1958 by Winifred Lovering Holman, S.B., F.A.S.G., whose manuscript collection is now in the NEHGS Library in Boston. (Miss Holman later married Frank R. Dodge and we will refer to her hereafter as Mrs. Dodge. We consider her discussion of the early Burgess generations in this country to be the most authoritative and best documented we have seen and will cite it several more times in the following paragraphs.) For the first chapter alone, devoted to the progenitor, Thomas Burgess or Burge, she reviewed nearly ninety references and cited many of them. The first official record for Thomas Burgess places him in Duxbury on 3 July 1637 and shortly thereafter, he is found in Sandwich. Until we see an iota or two of documentary proof, we must consider any statement of Thomas' presence in New England much prior to this date as conjecture. For a time we too believed it very likely that Thomas was from Cornwall; we now consider it only a possibility. We began our genealogical pursuits in 1985 while living in Saudi Arabia where there are no genealogical libraries and our alternative was to create our own. One of our early acquisitions was the three volume Genealogies of Mayflower Families from the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, selected and introduced by Gary Boyd Roberts and published in 1985 by the Genealogical Publishing Company., Inc. A check of the indices quickly led us to Volume III and the article, "Ezra Perry of Sandwich, Mass." by Lydia B. (Phinney) Brownson and Maclean W. McLean. On page 4, first published in The Register, Vol. 115 (Apr. 1961), we found "Elizabeth (Burges) Perry, born probably in or near Truro, Cornwall, England, about 1629, was the only daughter of Thomas and Dorothy Burges of Sandwich." The compilers did not disclose the basis for this probability, but we were elated; we had a clue Not long after, we received a letter from a newly discovered cousin telling us that another cousin had told her that our Thomas was believed to have been the son of Thomas Jr. and Elizabeth (Pye) Burges of Truro, Cornwall and the grandson of Thomas and Honner (Sidman) Burges, also of Truro. Because of the Perry/Cornwall link, we had already planned to visit Truro on our next trip to England and we immediately wrote to this cousin, asking for more information about the Truro Thomas and the possibility that he could be identical to the Thomas who married Dorothy Waynes in Tanfield, co. York, in 1628. Our letter was forwarded to R. A. Lovell, Jr., then the Archivist/Historian at the Sandwich (Mass.) Archives & Historical Center. He replied, "We have resource material on many Cape Cod families, and try to establish what is proven and detailed, as against what is claimed or hopeful. Unfortunately much that is in print and has been used by many researchers is not in the proven category." Mr. Lovell included in his reply a copy of a 15 April 1964 letter found in the Burgess material in Mrs. Dodge's papers in the NEHGS. The author, Benjamin F. Wilbour (also a descendant of Thomas and Dorothy Burgess), told Mrs. Dodge of his discovery of the Thomas Burgess and Dorothy Waynes marriage record and added, "In the Hartford Times someone tied him up to the Burgess family of Truro in Cornwall who had a Thos. bapt. 1601... I think this very wrong, as people did not marry out of their class then, and "Goodman" Burgess who could not sign his name would hardly come from the gentry." Mr. Lovell, referring to Mr. Wilbour, stated "He therefore feels, as we do, that it is much more likely that our Thomas was the one who married Dorothy Waynes in York in 1628. However, there is no proof either way." Other cousins, in more recent correspondence, have observed that certainly our Thomas, who "served the town in every office, humble or honorable, from road-surveyor to deputy to the Court at Plymouth" and who was called a chief man of the town, must have been literate. They point out that because of age and other infirmities, many literate persons have signed their wills with a mark and that others, especially those with strong religious convictions, signed their wills with a mark closely resembling a cross. Others, citing such works as Rev. Dr. Ebenezer Burgess' Burgess Genealogy, Memorial of the Family of Thomas and Dorothy Burgess, who were Settled at Sandwich, in the Plymouth Colony, in 1637 (Boston: Press of T. R. Marvin & Son, 1865) and Dr. Barry Hovey Burgess' Burgess Genealogy, Kings County, Nova Scotia Branch of the Descendants of Thomas and Dorothy Burgess who came from England in 1630 and settled in Sandwich, Massachusetts (New York: Chas. E. Fitchett, 1941), claim that Thomas actually signed his will with his signature. True, the wills as printed in these volumes contain no indication that they were signed with a mark and the witnesses to the will made oath "that they saw Thomas Burgess sign, seal and declare this to be his last Will and Testament." Dr. Ebenezer Burgess included the notation, "Orthography slightly amended." Dr. Barry Hovey Burgess copied from Dr. Ebenezer Burgess and added, "The compiler has searched in vain for the original document, in the hope of here presenting a photostatic copy. He fails to see any advantage in altering its orthography, for which, in those days, there were no established rules; in fact, a variety of spelling was considered by some a mark of literary skill. The purpose of any document is to convey its intent in unmistakable terms, and in this respect the will of Thomas Burgess compares most favorably with present-day documents, many of which are so encumbered with complicated legal phrases that their interpretation would defy the wisdom of Socrates." Mrs. Dodge, in Burgess Lineage, gives us a copy of the will with unaltered orthography, with this caveat: "This seems to be an imperfect copy; it is from the official copies of the Plymouth Colony Wills, Mass. Archives, made from the volumes on file at Plymouth, Mass. The Rev. Ebenezer Burgess in his book on the family may have used the copy in the volumes at Plymouth." In addition to the unaltered orthography, the version given by Mrs. Dodge contains a significant difference: "Thomas Burg his T mark (seal)." We thus establish that not only did Thomas sign his will with his mark, but that his mark was not an "X" or a cross, but a "T." At the time he "signed" his will, Thomas was over 80 years of age and his inability to then write his full name is not proof of illiteracy. To establish that fact, we must look at earlier documents bearing his mark. Mrs. Dodge states, "It is entirely clear that neither Thomas or his son, Jacob Burgess, were able to write; few could sign their names in that epoch." In her chapter on Thomas, she cites documents spanning a full thirty years before the date of Thomas' will. It will be noted that in each instance where his mark is described, it is a "T":

o 5 April 1654 - Thomas Burgis of Sandwidge sold land to ffrancis Allen of Sandwidge, acknowledged by Thomas Burgess senir and Dorothy his wife before Myles Standish: "The marke of Tho T Burgis."

27 Dec 1654 - Thomas Burgis of Sandwidge sold land to John Jenkens of Sandwidge: "Thomas Burgis mark."

11 Jul 1667 - Thomas Burge witnessed, by mark, an Indian deed.

28 May 1668 - An indenture between Thomas Burg and Edmond ffreeman senr: "The mark of Thomas T Burg senior." Mrs. Dodge included a photocopy of a reduced photograph of this indenture, clearly showing Thomas' mark as a "T."

4 Oct 1682 - Inventory of the estate of Mr. Edmond Freeman, late of Sandwich deceased: witnessed by the "Mark of Thomas Burge senir.

4 Apr 1684 - Will of Thomas Burg Senr: "Thomas Burg his T mark."

On our final departure from Saudi Arabia in 1987 we spent a week in the library of the Society of Genealogists in London and then enjoyed a one-on-one tutorial with Gary Boyd Roberts at NEHGS, followed a few weeks later by a week long Come Home to New England Seminar, also at NEHGS. Thomas Burgess was no stranger to any of the professional genealogists who assisted us during those weeks; all advised us that given their knowledge of the resources available in their respective libraries, our limited time would be better spent researching other families where we would be far more likely to be successful. A genealogist at the Society of Genealogists pointed out the improbability of our Thomas being the son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Pye) Burgess, noting that in the will of the latter Thomas, written 22 April 1626, his son Thomas was listed last of six sons who had not yet "accomplished the age of one and twenty," suggesting that he was the youngest, born probably not much before 1613 and quite likely several years later. This conclusion was supported by the 1620 Visitation of Truro, listing no Thomas among the children of Thomas and Elizabeth (Pye) Burgess.

Thanks to the advice to look elsewhere, we gathered so much data on other ancestral families during our week and a day at NEHGS that over five years later we are still entering that data into our computer files. In late 1991 we discovered or were discovered by several new Burgess cousins, causing us to look anew at our Burgess data. Edith Spencer, one of our new cousins, reminded us of the Truro Visitation and Cornwall wills - which we had almost forgotten until dusting off our notes - and inspiring us to a renewed effort in talking to our computer. Some of our new cousins are convinced of the Cornwall origin, some share our doubts, and some "just don't know what to believe." Our advice: don't believe anything until it is proven"

FURTHER:

In April 1964 Benjamin F. Wilbour wrote to Mrs. Frank R. Dodge (Winifred Lovering Holman): "I think I have discovered the marriage of Thomas Burgess, Goodman Burgess. From Paver's Marriage licenses in Yorkshire Archaelogical Journal #20 Page 74 [1909]. 'Thomas Burges and Dorothy Waynes at Tanfield - There 1628.'" (His finding was published later that year in the "Register" (Oct. 1964)). "In the Hartford Times someone tied him up to the Burgess family of Truro in Cornwall who had a Thos. bapt. 1601. See Visitation of the Gentry in Vivian's Cornwall. I think this is very wrong, as people did not marry out of their class then, and 'Goodman' Burgess who could not sign his name would hardly come from the gentry." "There is however one fly in our ointment. Thomas Burgess' eldest son bore arms in 1643 and if at the right age would be 16 and therefore born 1627 but many times wanting to bear arms, they lied about their age." A copy of Mr. Wilbour's letter was provided to us by the Sandwich Archives, who added the following note: "[The day after ones' fifteenth birthday, he was automatically in his 16th year, and thus able to bear arms - Sand. Archives.]" Based only on the Tanfield marriage record, with no further proof, we tentatively place the Thomas Burgess and Dorothy Waynes who married in 1628 as identical to our immigrant Thomas and Dorothy and based on the Sandwich Archives note, we place eldest son Thomas' birthdate as circa 1628."

Others comment:

The ancestry of Thomas Burgess is not certain. Research indicates several
possible roots. On January 12, 1995, Paul F. Burgess, author of "The Burgess
History Tree", wrote a letter to "The Burgess Bulletin" and stated that he had
hired a researcher in England. The researcher indicated several possible
connections but did state that he was not the Thomas born in 1601 in Truro,
which is the one with the Pye/Phippen connections. Other possible connections
include: Thomas Burgess baptized 2 Oct 1603, son of Thomas Burgess and
Elizabeth Seddon of Lancashire; Another Thomas Burgess was baptized 4 Nov 1603 and his wife, Dorothy Goodman, baptized in 1613 at Coffinswell, Devonshire, England. This leads to speculation since Thomas was known as "The Goodman Burgess" in early New England records.

He immigrated in 1630 to Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts; believed to have arrived on the ship "The Blessing of the Bay." He immigrated in 1630 to Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts; It appears that Thomas arrived in Salem with a young family not far from 1630, and lodged for a time at Lynn. He resided at at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, in 1637; 'With them [original 10 grantees in 1637] came also a large number of persons chiefly from Lynn, Duxbury, and Plymouth, viz: Thomas Burge, Henry Ewer, John & Jonathan & Nathaniel Fish.' He was granted on 3-Apr-1637 at Duxbury, Plymonth Colony, Massachusetts. He resided at at Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, on 3-Jul-1637; ' It appears that Thomas arrived in Salem with a young family not far from 1630, and lodged for a time at Lynn.' Assigned land in Duxbury (Plymouth) July 3, 1637. He moved to Sandwich in 1637. (Information from Burgess Genealogy - 1865 edition) Thomas Burges was in Sandwich in 1637, Representative to the General Court, (Information fromenealogies of Mayflower Familes Vol.i). In 1642, He fought in the Narragansett War, 1645., Etc. Savage calls him 'One of the Chief Men of the Town.' Through the Agency of Capt. Miles Sytandish he received a Grant of Land 3 March 1652/3 in Manomet, the area later called Monument, Lying to the North of Sandwich Settlement which was named Herring River Village (Within the Township of Sandwich). (Information from Little Compton Families) His grave had a monumental slab which came from England. He resided at at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, in 1638. He was he received 7 1/2 acres in the division of land at Sandwich Barnstable County, MA in 1640 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. He fought in the Narragansett War in 1642.
Thomas's left a will on 4-Apr-1684

named his four sons Thomas the eldest, John, Jacob, and Joseph.


Thomas's left a will on 4-Apr-1684

THOMAS BURGESS of Sandwich, Massachusetts Will dated 4 April 1684, proved 5 March 1684/85 Copied from Winifred Lovering Holman, S.B., FASG manuscript prepared for Mrs. Farnsworth Loomis, 1957-58, in the library of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Mass. The will, differing slightly, may also be found in Rev. Ebenezer Burgess' 'Burgess Genealogy: Memorial of the family of Thomas and Dorothy Burgess, who were settled at Sandwich, in the Plymouth Colony, in 1637' (Boston: Press of T. R. Marvin & Son, 1865), p. 12. Dr. Ebenezer Burgess included the notation, 'Orthography slightly amended.' Dr. Barey Hovey, in his book, copied from Dr. Ebenezer Burgess and added, 'The compiler has searched in vain for the original document, in the hope of here presenting a photostatic copy. He fails to see any advantage in altering its orthography, for which, in those days, there were no established rules; in fact, a variety of spelling was considered by some a mark of literary skill. The purpose of any document is to convey its intent in unmistakable terms, and in this respect the will of Thomas Burgess compares most favorably with present-day documents, many of which are so encumbered with complicated legal phrases that their interpretation would defy the wisdom of Socrates.' Mrs. Holman, who preserved the original orthography, noted that the original will is no longer extant and added 'This seems to be an imperfect copy; it is from the official copies of the Plymouth Colony Wills, Mass. Archives, made from the volumes on file at Plymouth, Mass. The Rev. Ebenezer Burgess in his book on the family may have used the copy in the volumes at Plymouth.' Superscript characters are enclosed in square brackets ([text]). 'I Thomas Burg Sen an unknown person of Sandwich being through gods goodness full of years & waiting for my Chang, & yet haveing my understanding remaining with me blessed be god, and also through gods great goodness as possessed of a competent outward estate & doe now upon serious Consideration make this my last will & testament touching y[e] disposall of my estate & after my dear wife & selfe be decently buried & all necessary charges defraid & debts paid y[e] remaining part I give as followeth It I give unto my Eldest son Thomas Burg of Rhode Iland five pounds out of my moveable estate to be paid by my execuktors after our decease. It I give unto my son Jacob Burg upon good Considerations all my house lott dwelling house barn & out housing all my upland on both sides y[e] cart way all that belongs to my home dwelling. I also give him all my meadow that I have lying below Michaell Blackwell his dwelling house on both sides scussitt River for him my s4-Apr-1684 son Jacob Burg to enjoy use & posses during his natural life & after his decease I give y[e] said housing my dwelling house Barne & all y[e] fore mentioned lands both upland and meadow to his son Thomas Burg my grandson to him & his heirs for ever but if my s4-Apr-1684 grandson dye without heirs then my will is y[t] y[e] s4-Apr-1684 house & lands above mentioned shall return to y[e] next heir of my son Jacob Burg his body: I also give my s4-Apr-1684 son Jacob Burg all that my land lying neer & adiacent to Thomas Tupper his lands below y[e] Cart way: haveing M an unknown person freeman his land upon y[e] wester side, I give to him upon this condition that he my sd son Jacob Burg pay or cause to be paid unto my grand son Thomas Burg son of John Burg my son ten pounds in good pay to be made to him my Grand son at twenty & three years of age. It I give unto my son Joseph Burg y[e] first & second lott that lyes adioyning to his other lands near his house if my sd son accepts of it so as to pay unto my son John Burg five pounds but if my son Joseph refuse sd land upon such termes: as to pay sd five pounds as aforesd, then my will is that sd land returne to my son Ezra perry and he to performe ye Condition: I onely meane by two lotts those lotts that were once [ blank ] then I give them I give my sd son Ezra Perry all my other lands that lyes above y[e] sd two lotts for him to inioy for ever y[e] which land I bought of M an unknown person Edward ffreeman Juni an unknown person : Item I give my dear wife all my moveable estate to be at her owne disposing at her decease & I meane Cattle of all sorts that I have And I doe appoint & ordaine my son Ezra Perry & my son Jacob Burg to be my Executors to see this my last will performed as I witnes my hand & seal this fourth day of Aprill 1684. Thomas Burg his T mark (seal) Witness Thomas Tupper Martha Tupper Martha Tupper made his(?) oath to this will this 2[th] day of March 1684-5 before y[e] Governo an unknown person and M an unknown person John Thatcher Assist.'

Was on the list of those 'age 16-60, liable to bear arms.' Plymouth Colony Deeds. 29, [37] 1652 BRADFORD GOVNR Witnesseth these prsents that wheras Miles Standish by order was appointed to satisfy an Indian whose name is called Josiah Dwelling at Nawsett for a smale Tract of Land lying att Manomett and graunted to Thomas Burgis senior of Sandwidge the which said tract of land the aforsaid Josiah the Indian hath barganed and sold unto the aforsaid Miles Standish in the behalfe of the said Thomas Burgis to him and his heires forever; . . . Witnesse his hand this third of March 1652 This sale was acknowlidged before Mr Bradford Govr by both pties the Day and yeare above written; Witnesseth These prsents That Thomas Burgis of Sandwidge hath absolutly barganed and sold to ffrancis Allen of Sandwidge to him and heires for ever a pcell or tract of land being within a ffence which said upland I the said Thomas Burgis senr bought of Thomas Boardman. as also a pcell of meadow bought of the said Thomas Boardman as aforsaid this meadow bounded with 2 Creekes lying before or Joyning to the aforsaid upland to the said ffrancis Allen to have and to hold to him and his heires forever; This Bargane and sale acknowlidged by Thomas Burgis senir and Dorathy his wife this 5t of Aprill 1654 before mee Myles Standish The Marke of Tho T Burgis. LAND: NEHGR9:313; NOTE: [THOMAS BURGE, SR., TO EZRA PERRY] [p. 122] 1663 Prence Govr: The 10th of July 1663 Memorand: That Thomas Burge senr of the Towne of Sandwich in in the jurisdiction of Plymouth in New England plantor Doth acknowlidg that for and in Consideration of a valluable sume; to him already payed by his son in law Named Esra Perrey of the Towne aforsaid in the Jurisdiction aforsaid plantor; hee hath bargained and sold enfeofed and Confeilmed and by these prsents Doth bargaine allianate sell enfeof and Confeirme unto the said Esra Perrey the one halfe of a Certaine tract of land lying and being att a place Called Mannomett in the Jurisdiction aforsaid; which said Tract of land was purchased by Captaine Standish by the appointment of the Court of Josias of Nausett an Indian Sachem; in the behalfe of the said Thomas Burge as appeers by a Deed bearing Date the third Day of march Anno Dom 1652. LAND: NEHGR9:313 ; NOTE: That Thomas Burgis of Sandwidge hath absolutly barganed and sold to ffrancis Allen of Sandwidge to him and heires for ever a pcell or tract of land being within a ffence which said upland I the said Thomas Burgis senr bought of Thomas Boardman. as also a pcell of meadow bought of the said Thomas Boardman as aforsaid this meadow bounded with 2 Creekes lying before or Joyning to the aforsaid upland to the said ffrancis Allen to have and to hold to him and his heires forever; This Bargane and sale acknowlidged by Thomas Burgis senir and Dorathy his wife this 5t of Aprill 1654 before mee Myles Standish The Marke of Tho T Burgis. Subject: [BURGESS] Thomas BURGESS father of Elizabeth b.c. 1631 MA; 29 Aug 2000, from: Dean Burgess ; to: BURGESS-L@rootsweb.com Here is where the Thomas Burgess debate now stands. A Thomas Burgess did marry Dorothy Waynes, but Paul Burgess, who will probably also reply to you, hired a British genealogist to trace this marriage record and the couple had no children. We know Dorothy Burgess was not a Waynes. While I was in Cornwall I traced all of the children of the Rev. George Phippen (all of the records still exist) and found he had no daughter named Dorothy. The origin of this name as her maiden name comes from the fact that Thomas Burgess of Truro (widely believed to be Thomas of Sandwich MA's father) calls George Phippen his 'brother-in-law' in his will. Records show he was his brother-in-law, but that was because George Phippen married, as his second wife, Thomas Burgess's wife's sister. Thomas's wife was Elizabeth Pye. We know Dorothy Burgess was not a Phippen. While in Cornwall I discovered the will of John Pye of St. Stephens in Brannel which says his granddaughter was named Dorothy. I think, since the Pyes and Burgesses intermarried frequently, no record exists of her marrying someone else, no record exists of her dying young, they were both Puritan families, Dorothy Pye was about the right age and they lived in the same county that the most likely wife for Thomas Burgess of Sandwich is this Dorothy Pye. That is not proven, but I think she is one of the most likely candidates. Current wisdom is that Thomas Burgess was the son of Thomas Burgess Jr. of Truro, Cornwall, and his wife Elizabeth Pye. He was the son of Thomas Burgess and Honour Sydenham (usually spelled Sidnam in America) and the grandson of Ellis Burgess and Catherine Corniche. All of this comes from the Heralds Visitation of Cornwall in 1620 and various Burgess, Sydenham and other wills. If so his father was the mayor of Truro and either his father, or grandfather was a member of Parliament for Truro in the first and last Parliaments of James I (Puritan parliaments). There is a serious, but not necessarily fatal flaw in this. The records of the Church of St. Mary Magdalen in Truro (where George Phippen was rector and the Burgesses worshiped) all survive. They do list the birth of a Thomas Burgess at about the correct time to Thomas Burgess Jr. and Elizabeth Pye. The problem is that they also list the death of a Thomas Burgess as an infant, and in the will of Thomas Burgess Jr. he mentions a son Thomas as a minor (too young to be our Thomas). The only hope for this line is that the death notice at St. Mary's does not call the father of the infant 'Thomas Burgess Jr.' as he is called in all the other parts of the record, families do use a name twice and our Thomas may have already married, or left the country by this time. Joe Burgess argues that the Truro family was literate (the elder Thomas signs his will) and Thomas Burgess of Sandwich signs his name with the letter 'T' as his mark, and that makes this connection unlikely. My personal opinion is that Dorothy Pye married another Thomas Burgess in Cornwall and they were the Sandwich, MA, Burgesses. The Burgess family in Cornwall was very large and date back in the duchy to at least the 14th century, often associated in the records with the Pyes. Several Burgesses by the name Thomas also existed in the duchy records, other than the one in Truro. I should point out, however, that there is another possible claim for a Thomas Burgess in Northamptonshire. Joe Burgess may want to tell you about some of these other possibilities. I have several other Pye wills I copied in the record office in Truro and I hope that some day research in this very interesting family will unearth the truth of the Dorothy Pye claim. The Pyes were sequesterers (that is during the reign of Oliver Cromwell they appropriated the land of the nobility and the clergy) and the following litany was current in Cornwall churches at the time: 'From the Sprys and the Pyes Good Lord deliver us.' Elizabeth Pye's brother Otwell Pye (who would be a cousin of Dorothy Pye) is listed in the records of Oxford University from the time as a student and noted as 'from Cornwall.' A later Pye became poet laureate of England in the time of George III and it was his sycophantic verse which was the origin of the Mother Goose rhyme: 'Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a Pye - When the Pye was opened the birds began to sing. Wasn't that a dainty dish to set before the king.' I like this Puritan family and hope research on them will continue and be fruitful, but I do not claim this as a fact certain yet. Subject: [BURGESS] Thomas BURGESS father of Elizabeth b.c. 1631 MA; 29 Aug 2000; from: 'Paul F. Burgess' , to: BURGESS-L@rootsweb.com Hi,some of your info is correct ,our Thomas Burgess and Dorothy (?) maiden name not proven (but several names are 'floating' around out there),did have 5 children ,Elizabeth being the only daughter,the parents of Thomas are not known/proven. the Thomas Burgess and Elizabeth Pye are a different line ,their son Thomas died prior to age 3,(according to a genealogist in England) this is to the best of my knowledge and belief. You are taking a cautious approach to this as we all should ,no matter where the info comes from if it is not documented/proven ,much info that is published has errors (my own book included) although the compiler/author 'believes' it to be correct at the time,if one were to try and document each bit of info it would be next to impossible ,so caution all the way around is a good policy.My line is of Jacob son of Thomas and Dorothy(?).
Occupation1658Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, to help with the surveying, 'to lay out and order the true bounds of every inhabitant's lands'

Children of Thomas Burgess and Dorothy (Unknown)

Dorothy (Unknown)

F, b. circa 1605, d. 27 Feb 1686/87

Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Dorothy (Unknown) was born circa 1605 at England. Dorothy married Thomas Burgess, son of Disproven Thomas Burgess and Disproven Elizabeth Pye, in 1628 at Truro, Cornwall, England. Dorothy (Unknown) died on 27-Feb-1686/87 at Duxbury, Plymonth Colony, Massachusetts. She died on 27-Feb-1686/87 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Dorothy was buried after 27-Feb-1687 at Old Town Cemetery, Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
     She was also known as posibly Dorothy Phippen. She was also known as Disproven Dorothy Waynes.

Children of Dorothy (Unknown) and Thomas Burgess

Deacon Johnathan Shaw

M, b. 2 Mar 1629, d. Jul 1701
Deacon Johnathan Shaw|b. 2 Mar 1629\nd. Jul 1701|p105.htm#i42056|John Shaw|b. circa 1597\nd. after 30 Jan 1663/64|p105.htm#i42058|(Unknown) (Unknown)|b. circa 1600|p258.htm#i140029|||||||||||||

Relationship=8th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Deacon Johnathan Shaw was born on 2-Mar-1629 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was the son of John Shaw and (Unknown) (Unknown). Deacon Johnathan Shaw was born circa 1631. Johnathan married Phebe Watson, daughter of George Watson and Phebe Hicks, on 22-Jan-1656/57 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Johnathan married Persis Dunham, daughter of Deacon John Dunham and Abigail Barlow, in Aug-1683 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Deacon Johnathan Shaw died in Jul-1701 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, at age 72.
     The Inventory of Deacon Johnathan Shaw was taken on 30-Jul-1701 at Lakenham, Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

Children of Deacon Johnathan Shaw and Phebe Watson

Phebe Watson

F, b. 1638, d. say 1682
Phebe Watson|b. 1638\nd. say 1682|p105.htm#i42057|George Watson|b. circa 1602\nd. 31 Jan 1688/89|p105.htm#i42060|Phebe Hicks|b. 15 Mar 1614/15\nd. 22 May 1663|p105.htm#i42061|||||||Robert Hicks|b. 1578\nd. 24 Mar 1646/47|p105.htm#i42062|Margaret (Unknown)|b. circa 1589\nd. 1666|p105.htm#i42063|

Relationship=8th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Phebe Watson was born in 1638 at Plympton, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. She was born in 1638 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of George Watson and Phebe Hicks. Phebe married Deacon Johnathan Shaw, son of John Shaw and (Unknown) (Unknown), on 22-Jan-1656/57 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Phebe Watson died say 1682 at Lakenham, Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
     She was also known as Phoebe Watson.

Children of Phebe Watson and Deacon Johnathan Shaw

John Shaw

M, b. circa 1597, d. after 30 Jan 1663/64

Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      John Shaw was born circa 1597. John married (Unknown) (Unknown) circa 1621 at England. John married Alice (Unknown) before 3-Nov-1653 at England. John Shaw died after 30-Jan-1663/64 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
     He immigrated in 1627 to Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. On 1627 he shared in the division of cattle, the first person in the sixth company.
John Winslow sold to John Shaw "all his arable land that is lying in that tract of land that is commonly called Knave's Acre otherwise named Woodbee"; part of the consideration was "all the meadow ground tha butteth at the upper end of the said arable land" on 8-Jul-1630. In 1633 John Shaw amongst those admitted as a freeman before January 1, 1632/33 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was are found on the tax list at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, assessed 18s on 25-Mar-1633. He was are found on the tax list at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, assessed 9s on 27-Mar-1634. He was "allowed to enlarge at the end of his lot lying at Black Brooke" on 14-Jan-1636/37. He was one of three men "to have enlargement of lands abutting above their lots at Playne Dealing, to the nothward", and these are probably the same lots referred to on Apr. 2, 1638 and Feb. 4, 1638/39 on 2-Oct-1637. He served on the Jury on 4-Sep-1638. "John Shawe of Plymouth, planter," sold to William Kemp of Duxbury two acres and a half of meadow on 2-Apr-1640. He served on the Jury on 1-Jun-1641. He served on the Jury on 6-Sep-1641. He served on the Jury on 3-May-1642. He was on the list of men able to bear arms in 1643 Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He held the position of highway surveyor on 7-Mar-1642/43 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He served on the Jury on 5-Mar-1643/44. He held the position of highway surveyor on 5-Jun-1644 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He served on the Jury on 5-Jun-1644. He served on the Jury on 22-Jul-1648. He served on the Coroner's Jury on 6-Aug-1648. He served on the Jury on 3-Oct-1648. He served on the Ptit Jury on 4-Oct-1648. He served on the Jury on 28-Oct-1649. 3-Nov-1653 John Shaw Sr. and Alice Shaw his wife agreed with Thomas Savory and Annis Savory his wife, all of New Plymouth, that the Savorys' son, Benjamin, aged nine years old, would live with the Shaws until he was twenty-one, and the Shaws would pay him £5 at the end of his service, and if John or Alice died, Benjamin was to serve out his time with Jonathan Shaw, the son of John Shaw, and Jonathan was to teach him a trade, writing and reading, and give him two suits of apparel. On March 4, 1657 Jonathan was cleared of this engagement by mutual consent of all the persons "that are now alive" (reflecting the fact that Alice had died in the interim). John Shaw Sr. of Plymouth, planter, purchased of Mr. John Winslow of Plymouth, a two acre parcel of marsh meadow in Green Harbor Marsh on 28-Dec-1653. John Shaw Sr. of Plymouth deeded to "my son Jonathan Shaw all that my house and land I am now possessed of and live upon in the township of Plymouth aforesaid containing twenty and five acres of upland...provided...I reserve and intrest in my orchard during my life and decease to be my said son Jonathan's...reserve unto my self liberty to employ or improve some small spot of upland for the planting of tobacco...during my life...[also] unto my said son Jonathan all my meadow land fresh or salt in any place belonging to me, in particular three acres of marsh meadow bought of Mr. John Winslow...and six acres more or less of fresh meadow lying on the south arm of Joanes River...one quarter part of my purchase land... on 31-Dec-1656. John Shaw Sr. of Plymouth deeded to "my son-in-law Stephen Bryant of Plymouth...all that my whole share of land allotted unto me near unto Namassakett...also...another portion of land the south side of the Smelt River...be it forty acres more or less." To the one fourth part of my said lot at Cushena I give unto my son-in-law Stephen Bryant...also my purpose and will is that my daughter Abigail Bryant after my decease shall have my bed and all the furniture thereunto belonging, as also my chest and whatsoever else doth any ways appertain to me" on 26-Mar-1658. John Shaw Sr. of Plymouth, planter, deeded to his son Sergeant James Shaw of New Plymouth one half of his land at Cushena, unless John Shaw son of the said John Shaw Senior "shall come within the term of four years beginning from the first of March 1657/58" then John Shaw Jr. should have on half of the land given to James Shaw, i.e., one quarter part of the whole on 26-Mar-1658. He resided at at Marlborough, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, in 1662; one of the first settlers.

Children of John Shaw and (Unknown) (Unknown)

Alice (Unknown)

F, d. 6 Mar 1654/55
     Alice married John Shaw before 3-Nov-1653 at England. Alice (Unknown) died on 6-Mar-1654/55 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
     She and (Unknown) (Unknown) were maybe one and the same if she is the mother of John Shaws children. 3-Nov-1653 John Shaw Sr. and Alice Shaw his wife agreed with Thomas Savory and Annis Savory his wife, all of New Plymouth, that the Savorys' son, Benjamin, aged nine years old, would live with the Shaws until he was twenty-one, and the Shaws would pay him £5 at the end of his service, and if John or Alice died, Benjamin was to serve out his time with Jonathan Shaw, the son of John Shaw, and Jonathan was to teach him a trade, writing and reading, and give him two suits of apparel. On March 4, 1657 Jonathan was cleared of this engagement by mutual consent of all the persons "that are now alive" (reflecting the fact that Alice had died in the interim).

George Watson

M, b. circa 1602, d. 31 Jan 1688/89

Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      George Watson was born circa 1602. George married Phebe Hicks, daughter of Robert Hicks and Margaret (Unknown), circa 1635 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. George Watson died on 31-Jan-1688/89 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
      Robert Watson is not his father.

He immigrated in 1631 to Penobscot, Maine. He testified regarding the activities of Edward Ashley on 19-Jul-1631 at Penobscot, Maine. He removed to at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, before 1634.
George Watson purchased purchased a house and garden from John Jenny in 1635 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
He was allowed the rest of the meadow at Island Creek with Mr. Hicks and the next year it was allowed again on 14-Mar-1635/36. He served on the Jury Januaray 2, 1637/38; September 1, 1640; March 2, 1646/47; June 6, 1654; March 6, 1654/55; March 5, 1655/56; March 7, 1659/60; March 6, 1661/62; October 2, 1662; March 3, 1662/63; March 5, 1666/67; March 1, 1669/70; June 7, 1670; October 29, 1670; October 29, 1673. He was was fined with others for trading with the Indians for corn on 6-Feb-1636/37. On 7-Mar-1636/37 George Watson was listed as a freeman at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was granted four acres on 5-Feb-1637/38. He with others petitioned for land towards the Six Mile Brook on 7-May-1638.
George Watson purchased three acres from William Bradford in 1639.
He held the position of Overseer of surveying on 7-Jan-1638/39. He was on the Grand Jury on 4-Jun-1639. He was granted six acres of marsh meadow on Green Harbor on 20-Nov-1640. He was on the Jury on higways on 1-Feb-1640/41. He was one of those with interest in the town's land at Punckateesett over against Rhode Island in Mar-1651. He served on Coroner's Jury July 26, 1652 on the body of James Glasse; June 5, 1678 on the body of Samuell Drew; March 8, 1678/79 on the body of Thomas Lucase of Plymouth; and on October 8, 1678/79 on the bodies of Joseph Truwant and Irraell Holmes of Marshfield. He was granted a "little slip of meadowabove the bridge ... at South Meadows" on 17-Mar-1654. He held the position of Arbiter on 6-Oct-1659. He petitioned the court in belalf of "his son John Watson and his nephew John Bangs" that Samuel Hicks was entered in error s the purchaser of their land, when Mr. Robert Hickes should have been entered on 1-May-1660. He held the position of Constable on 6-Jun-1660. He held the position of Overseer of surveying on 10-Jan-1661/62. George Waston's request for Land at Mannomett Ponds caused Plymouth to select men to take charge of disposing of lands on 24-May-1662. He held the position of Manager of exchange on 21-Feb-1663 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
George Watson purchased purchased land from "Gyles Gilbert of Taunton," yeoman, the land that had be bequeathed to him by his father Mr. John Gilbert. on 14-Mar-1663.
He shared lot twenty-two at Puncateesett Neck with John Shaw Sr. on 22-Mar-1663. The six acres belonging to George Watson which if bought of George Bonum was acknowledged to him and and exchange fo three acres for two acres was ordered on 14-Apr-1664. He was and others complained that the whole town of Taunton suffered as a result of James Walker neglecting to leave sufficient passage for the herrings to go up river on 3-May-1664.
George Watson purchased purchased from Mr. Nathaniel Souther, yeoman. sometimes of Plymouth a half acre of marsh meadow in Plymouth. Recorded on 18-Nov-1664.

George Watson purchased purchased from James Davis. sometimes of Plymourt, seaman "five acres of upland ground lying on the south side of the town of Plymouth. Recorded on 18-Nov-1664.
He held the position of Selectman on 5-Feb-1665/66 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He held the position of Constable on 5-Jun-1666. He held the position of Selectman on 13-Oct-1667 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He held the position of Arbiter on 29-Oct-1667. He sold to Joseph Bartlett Sr. fo Plymouth, yoeman, a parcel of land at Mannomett Ponds in Plymouth being one-third of a tract of land granted by the town to George Watson, William Harlow Sr., and Nathaniel Morton sr. on 22-Aug-1681. He acknowledged that he had exchanged land with Mr. Edward Gray on 28-Oct-1681. George Watson of Plymouth, mariner, deeded to "Elkanah Watson my dear and natural son" the seventh lot in the Freeman's Land on 9-Dec-1681. The Inventory of George Watson was taken was untotalled and included no real estate on 2-Feb-1688/89.
Occupation5-Mar-1643/44Arbiter
Occupation3-May-1653a mariner, impressed with the barque of which he was master

Children of George Watson and Phebe Hicks

Phebe Hicks

F, b. 15 Mar 1614/15, d. 22 May 1663
Phebe Hicks|b. 15 Mar 1614/15\nd. 22 May 1663|p105.htm#i42061|Robert Hicks|b. 1578\nd. 24 Mar 1646/47|p105.htm#i42062|Margaret (Unknown)|b. circa 1589\nd. 1666|p105.htm#i42063|||||||||||||

Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
     Phebe Hicks was baptized on 15-Mar-1614/15 at St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondsey, Surrey, England. She was the daughter of Robert Hicks and Margaret (Unknown). Phebe married George Watson circa 1635 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Phebe Hicks died on 22-May-1663 at age 48.

Children of Phebe Hicks and George Watson

Robert Hicks

M, b. 1578, d. 24 Mar 1646/47

Relationship=10th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Robert Hicks was born in 1578 at Southwark, Surrey, England. Robert married Margaret (Unknown) before 1603 at Surrey, England. Robert Hicks died on 24-Mar-1646/47 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Robert's estate was proved on 15-May-1648.
     He resided at at London, Middlesex, England, on 6-Jul-1618. He immigrated on 9-Nov-1621 to Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; aboard the ship fortune. "Robert Hickes" was granted one acre as a passenger on the Fortune, and his wife and children were granted four acres as passengers on the Anne. in 1623 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. On 1627 In the division of cattle Robert Hicks, Margaret Hicks, Samuel Hicks, Ephriam Hicks, Lydia Hicks, and Phebe Hicks wert the sixth throught eleventh persons in the twelfth company.

Robert Hicks purchased purchased two acres on the north side of town from Steven Dean on 10-Feb-1629 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
Before 1-Jan-1632/33 Robert Hicks was listed as a freeman at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was are found on the tax list at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, assessed 18s on 25-Mar-1633. He was are found on the tax list at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, assessed 12s on 27-Mar-1634. On 7-Mar-1636/37 Robert Hicks was listed as a freeman at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Clement Briggs acknowledged his sale of "one acre of land in the upper fall near the second brook" to "Mr. Rob[er]te Heeks" on 29-Aug-1638 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Clement Briggs of Weymoth, fellmonger, deposed August 29, 1638; that about two and twenty years since his departure then dwelling with one Mr. Samuel Lathame in Barmundsey Streete in Southwarke a fellmonger and one Thomas Harlow then also dwelling with Mr. Rob[er]te Heeks in the same stree a fellmonger the said Harlow and this deponent had often confrence together how many pelts each of their master pulled a week. And this deponent deposeth and saith the the said Rob[er]te Heeks did pull three hundred pelts a week and diverse times six or seven hundred & more a week in the killing seasons, which was the most part of the year (except the time of Lent) for the space of three or four years. And that the said Rob[er]te Heeks sold his sheep's pelts for 40s a hundred to Mr Arnold Allard, whereas this deponent's Mr Samuel Lathame sold his pelts for 50s per hundred to the same man at the same time and Mr. Heeks pelts were much better ware. Robert Hicks of Plymouth "citizen and leatherseller of London," by a bill dated July 6, 1618 was indebted to Thomas Heath citizen and cooper of London for £180, which amount was demanded by letter of attorney made by Hannah Cugley but Hicks showed and acquitance of all debts to Heath, havein paid it long ago on 13-Jul-1639. George Soule acknowledged his sale of two acres of land to Robert Hicks of Plymouth on 13-Jul-1639. John Barnes of Plymouth, yeoman, adcknowledged his sale of four acres of meadow at the Heigh Pynes to Mr. Robert Hicks on 20-Jul-1639 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. "Mr. Rob[er]te Hicks rented five acres at Reed Pond to John Smyth for three years, Smyth to fence the east side of the land on 9-Dec-1639 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Mr. Robert Hicks of Plymouth, planter, sold to Samuel Hicks his eldest son all his house, outhouses and garden in Plymouth, together with four acres of land and eight acres of land and all the meadow at Heigh Pynes and Hand Creek, and all his right, title and interest in the land, and three cows on 11-Feb-1639/40. He acknowledged his deed to John Reyonr of three acres of marsh at Heigh Pynes on 7-Apr-1642 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He sold land two acres of marsh at Heigh Pynes to Mr. William Bradford on 7-Apr-1642 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
Robert's left a will on 28-May-1645 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

"Robert Hicks of Plymouth ... being full of infirmities of body" bequeathed to "my son Ephriam all that my dwelling house barn an buildings with the gardens ... in Plymouth," also "all those three fields on lying on the north side of the said town of Plymouth ..., the second which I lately prurchased of Mr. John Alden and the third called south field," but my mind and wills is thay my executrix hereafter named shall have and enjoy three rooms in the said house during her life she keepeing herself un married, viz. the hall and chamber over and cellar underneath, and also that my son Ephriam shall pay her the thirds of the said lands during her life and widowhood", to "my said son Ephriam all my lands lying at Iland Creek on Duxberry side except two lots of upland of twenty acres apiece lying next unto Mr. Kemps lands, which I hereby give and bequeath unto John Bangs my grandchild"; to my executrix ... the rents of the said land not set and let forth for six years yet to come if she shall so lon live, but all the rest of my lands ... I give unto my son Ephriam", I give unto John Reyner the son of Mr. John Reyner our teacher fifty acres of the purchased lands accruing ... to me as a purchaser of my share of lands laying at Seawams of Secunck if the said Mr. John Reyner his father do reamin at Plymouth"; to "Samuell my eldest son" fifty acres; to "my said son Ephriam" fifty acres; to "John Watson" fifty acres; to "John Bangs" fifty acres; to "the youger of Mr. Charls Chancy's sonswhich his wife had at one birth when he dwelt in Plymouth" fifty acres; to "my son Ephriam" household goods; to the Town of Plymouth one cow calf; to "William Pnotus" 20s: to "John Faunce' 20s; to "Nathaneell Morton" 20s; to "Thomas Cushman" 20s; "Margaret my loving wife" sole executrix and residue; Mr. John Howland, Mannasses Kemton, and Thomas Cushman overseers; to John Howland, Mannasses Kemton 10s each for a remeberance; to Joshua Prat "a suit of my wearing clothes with a pair of shoes and stockings"; to Samuell Eddy a pair of wearing stockings; to "my son Ephriam ... my four oxen, paying my loving wife ... the thirds of the profits of the lands as before mentioned ... and to draw her 20 loads of wood yearly to her house in Plymouth during her life."

He sold land Georg Patrrich a parcel of marsh meadow consisting of two acres on 9-Oct-1645 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. The Inventory of Robert Hicks was taken totalled £39 13s, with not real estate included on 4-May-1648. "Gorge Watson" on behalf of his son John Watson and nephew John Bangs, requested that, because "Samuel Hicks" was mistakenly entered in the court records as prurchaser of lands at Cushenah and Accoaksett, etc., and it should have been "Mr, Robert" Hickes, it be corrected, thre matter was referred to a later court. on 1-May-1660 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
Occupation1616England, fellmonger

Children of Robert Hicks and Margaret (Unknown)

Margaret (Unknown)

F, b. circa 1589, d. 1666

Relationship=10th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Margaret (Unknown) was born circa 1589 at Southwark, Surrey, England. Margaret married Robert Hicks before 1603 at Surrey, England. Margaret (Unknown) died in 1666 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Margaret's estate was proved on 6-Mar-1665/66.
     She immigrated to Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; aboard the Anne. She and Samuel Hicks could not agree on the division of goods in Robert's estate and the matter was taken to court on 7-Jun-1661 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. "Margaret Hickes of Plymouth, widow, as sole executrix to my husband Mr. Robert Hickes," confirmed his bequest fo fifty acres to "Elnathan Chauncye the younger of the twins of Mr Charles Chauncye" on 7-Oct-1662 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. "Mistris Hickes" and "Sam[uel] Hickes" were granted Lot 7 in the Plymouth lands at "Puncateesett Necke" on 22-Mar-1663/64 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
Margaret's left a will on 8-Jul-1665

"Margarett Hickes widow of the town of Plymouth" bequethed to "my son Samuell Hickes" £5; to "my daurgheter-in-law Lydia Hickes" 30s; to my "son Samuel's children" 10s each "there being seven of them"; said legacies to be paid by "son Samuell Hickes" from his debt "he having already received a large portion of that whch God hath given me not only in lands but also in goods and chattels which was not only my husband's and son Ephriam's estate formerly but also given to me by will at my son Ephriam's death"; to "my grandchild John Bangs" 40s; redidue to "the children of my son-in-law Gorg Watson and my loving daughter that is deceased Phebe Watson"; "my son-in-law Gorg Watson and my friend Captain Southworth" oversears.

The Inventory of Margaret (Unknown) was taken totalled £53 12s 6d and included no real estate on 5-Mar-1665/66.

Children of Margaret (Unknown) and Robert Hicks

Gov. Thomas Prence

M, b. 1600, d. 29 Mar 1673
Gov. Thomas Prence|b. 1600\nd. 29 Mar 1673|p105.htm#i42077|Thomas Prence Sr.|b. circa 1575\nd. before 14 Aug 1630|p105.htm#i42079|Elizabeth Todlerby||p105.htm#i42080|Thomas Prence|b. circa 1550|p134.htm#i80912||||John Todlerby|b. circa 1551|p134.htm#i80911||||

Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Gov. Thomas Prence was born in 1600. He was the son of Thomas Prence Sr. and Elizabeth Todlerby. Thomas married Patience Brewster, daughter of William Brewster and Mary Wentworth, on 5-Aug-1624 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Thomas married Mary Collier, daughter of William Collier and Jane Clarke, on 1-Apr-1635 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; five issue of this marriage. Thomas married Appia Quicke before 8-Dec-1662 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Thomas married Mary Burr between 1666 and 1668; Between Feb 26 1665/6 and Aug 1 1668. Gov. Thomas Prence died on 29-Mar-1673 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Thomas was buried on 8-Apr-1673 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Thomas's estate was proved on 5-Jun-1673.
     He immigrated on 9-Nov-1621 to Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; arrived on the ship Fortune. In the 1623 Plymouth Division of land Thomas Prence received on acre as a passenger on the Fortune. In the 1627 Plymouth division of cattle Thomas Prince, Patience Prince and Rebecca Prince are the tenth, eleventh and twefth persons in the fifth company. In the Plymouth tax list Thomas Prence was assessed £1 7s. 25-Mar-1633. He resided at at Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, before 1637. He resided at at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, in 1644. He resided at at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, before 1665.
Thomas's left a will on 13-Mar-1672/73. The Inventory of Gov. Thomas Prence was taken Totalled £422 10s. 7d. on 23-Apr-1673.
Occupationbetween 1657 and 1673Governor of Plymouth Colony

Children of Gov. Thomas Prence and Patience Brewster

Children of Gov. Thomas Prence and Mary Collier

Mary Collier

F, b. 18 Feb 1611/12, d. before 8 Dec 1662
Mary Collier|b. 18 Feb 1611/12\nd. before 8 Dec 1662|p105.htm#i42078|William Collier|b. circa 1585\nd. before 5 Jul 1671|p105.htm#i42081|Jane Clarke|b. 20 Oct 1591\nd. after 28 Jun 1666|p105.htm#i42082|Abraham Collier||p196.htm#i104789||||John Clarke|b. 26 Mar 1575|p251.htm#i134700|Mary Morton||p252.htm#i134701|

Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
     Mary Collier was baptized on 18-Feb-1611/12 at St. Olave Parish, Southwark, Surry, England. She was the daughter of William Collier and Jane Clarke. Mary married Gov. Thomas Prence, son of Thomas Prence Sr. and Elizabeth Todlerby, on 1-Apr-1635 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; five issue of this marriage. Mary Collier died circa 1658 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. She died before 8-Dec-1662.

Children of Mary Collier and Gov. Thomas Prence

Thomas Prence Sr.

M, b. circa 1575, d. before 14 Aug 1630
Thomas Prence Sr.|b. circa 1575\nd. before 14 Aug 1630|p105.htm#i42079|Thomas Prence|b. circa 1550|p134.htm#i80912||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Thomas Prence Sr. was born circa 1575 at Lechlade, Gloucestershire, England. He was the son of Thomas Prence. Thomas married Elizabeth Todlerby, daughter of John Todlerby. Thomas Prence Sr. died before 14-Aug-1630 at All Saints, Barking, London, England. Thomas's estate was proved on 14-Aug-1630.
     He and Elizabeth Todlerby resided at at All Hallows Barking, London, Middlesex, England.
Thomas's left a will on 31-Jul-1630 at Lechdale, Gloucestershire, England.

left a legacy to his son Thomas Prence "now remaining in New England in the parts beyond the seas."

Child of Thomas Prence Sr. and Elizabeth Todlerby

Elizabeth Todlerby

F
Elizabeth Todlerby||p105.htm#i42080|John Todlerby|b. circa 1551|p134.htm#i80911||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
     Elizabeth Todlerby was the daughter of John Todlerby. Elizabeth Todlerby was born circa 1577 at Lechlade, Gloucestershire, England. Elizabeth married Thomas Prence Sr., son of Thomas Prence.
     Elizabeth Todlerby and Nicholas Newlin resided at at Lechlade, Gloucestershire, England. Elizabeth Todlerby and Thomas Prence Sr. resided at at All Hallows Barking, London, Middlesex, England.

Child of Elizabeth Todlerby and Thomas Prence Sr.

William Collier

M, b. circa 1585, d. before 5 Jul 1671
William Collier|b. circa 1585\nd. before 5 Jul 1671|p105.htm#i42081|Abraham Collier||p196.htm#i104789||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      William Collier was born circa 1585 at London, Middlesex, England. He was born between 1585 and 1590 at St. Olave, Southwark, Surry, England. He was the son of Abraham Collier. William married Jane Clarke, daughter of John Clarke and Mary Morton, on 16-May-1611 at Saint Olave, Southwark, Surrey, England. William Collier died before 5-Jul-1671 at Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
      William Collier Birth: BEF 1590 ,England Death: 1670 probably,Duxbury,Massachusetts Notes: He came to New England in 1633. He lived in Duxbury. The signature of William Collier appears in the Composition with the Plymouth Colony on 15/25 November 1626. (See Arber 1897, p.321). Apparently this one of the only 42 people in England with some stake in Plymouth Plantation at the time. He served as Assistant Governor of the Plymouth Colony. He was reported to be the 'Richest Man in the Colony'. He was an advocate of Religious Toleration. From Leon Clark Hills, 'Cape Cod Series, Vol. II, WILLIAM COLLIER: History and Genealogy of the Mayflower Planters and first Comers to Ye Olde Colonie.' Hills Pub. Co., Washington D.C., 1941: He was a Merchant Adventurer & Brewer of London, and very active in support of the New England Settlers. In fact, he was one of those to subscribe for special aid to the Plymouth colonists on Nov 15, 1626. He finally decided, like so many other merchants, to remove himself and family to America. It is not surprising to find him, his four daughters and apprentices (not servants), among whom were the brothers John, Job, and Daniel Cole, disembarking from the good ship 'Mary and James,' together with 190 other passengers when it arrived at Plymouth in 1633. His wife probably had died, leaving him with the children. He was an able man and soon took a high position in the Colony, especially in the matter of final settlement of acounts with the London Adventurers. He was a comissioner at the first meeting of the United Colonies in 1643, and served as Governor's Assistant from 1634 to 1665, a period of 31 years. The Court ordered a special aide for him in 1659, on account of 'age and much business.' Note: he was also in on the first purchase of Dartmouth in 1652. A posting on soc.roots by Jerry.Hodgeswindmill,agape.com, 3009 47th Lubbock TX 79413, claimed that one of his wives was Jane Clark, and a dau. of their was Ruth (Collier) COLE, wife of Daniel Cole. : Jane at ,England Source Chrisman Pedgree COLLIER, WILLIAM-One of the few Adventurers to come to live in New England, he was praised by Nathaniel Morton (New Englands Memoriall, p. 91): 'This year [1633] likewise Mr. William Collier arrived with his Family in New-England, who as he had been a good Benefactor to the Colony of New-Plimouth before he came over, having been an Adventurer unto it at its first beginning; so also he approved himself a very useful Instrument in that Jurisdiction after he arrived, being frequently Chosen, and for divers years serving God and the Country in the place of Magistracy, and lived a godly and holy life untill old Age.' He was often elected an Assistant between 1634/35 and 1665, and he appeared to side with the more conservative leaders, such as in the 1645 fight with Vassal]. James Cudworth wrote that 'Mr. Collier last June would not sit on the Bench, if I sate there' (Bishop, p- 176). He was on the Council for War, and he served at times as a commissioner of the United Colonies. He resided in Duxbury, and in 1649/50 he deeded ten acres of land in Duxbury to 'my kinsman William Clark' (PCR 12:182). Collier married Jane Clark at St. Olave, Southwark, 16 May 1611, and he and his wife had four daughters with them in Plymouth Colony: Sarah, who married (1) Love Brewster and (2) Richard Parke of Cambridge; Rebecca, who married Job Cole; Mary, who married Thomas Prence; and Elizabeth, who married Constant Southworth- Robert S. Wakefield, 'More on the Children of William Collier,' TAG 49:215 and 51:58, identified eight other children in England (all of whom had died young there), and he showed that Collier had lived in St. Mary Magdalen Parish, Bermondsey, Surrey, and St. Olave Parish, Southwark. In the St. Olave register he was called a grocer. Bradford referred to a 'brew-house of Mr. Colliers in London' (Ford 2:125). On 7 June 1653 Mrs. Jane Collier made a claim on behalf of her grandchild, the wife of Nathaniel 2 Warren (MD 3:141). The grandchild was Sarah (Walker) Warren, who was baptized at St. Olave, Southwark, 10 November 1622, the daughter of William Walker (TAG 51:92). On 2 December 1661 William Collier of Duxbury, gentleman, with the consent of Mrs. Jane Collier, sold all his house and land that he was living on in Duxbury to Benjamin Bartlett, who was not to enter into possession until the death of both William and Jane Collier. Collier died before 5 July 1671, when men were appointed to administer his estate (PCR 5:68). An excellent documented narrative of various aspects of his life is given in Moore Families, P. 196-205. (See also John Cole, above, and the Hunt article shown under job Cole, above.) Source: Plymouth Colony Its History & People 1620-1691 by Eugene Aubrey Stratton. He immigrated in 1633 to Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He and Jane Clarke immigrated in 1633; aboard the Mary and Jane. William Collier resided at at Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, after 1639.

Children of William Collier and Jane Clarke

Jane Clarke

F, b. 20 Oct 1591, d. after 28 Jun 1666
Jane Clarke|b. 20 Oct 1591\nd. after 28 Jun 1666|p105.htm#i42082|John Clarke|b. 26 Mar 1575|p251.htm#i134700|Mary Morton||p252.htm#i134701|||||||||||||

Relationship=10th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Jane Clarke was born circa 1590 at at or near, Southwark, Surry, England. She was born on 20-Oct-1591 at Of, London, Middlesex, England. She was the daughter of John Clarke and Mary Morton. Jane married William Collier, son of Abraham Collier, on 16-May-1611 at Saint Olave, Southwark, Surrey, England. Jane Clarke died on 2-Dec-1661 at age 70. She died after 28-Jun-1666 at Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
     She was also known as Jane Clark. She and William Collier immigrated in 1633; aboard the Mary and Jane.

Children of Jane Clarke and William Collier

Capt. Samuel Mayo

M, b. 1625, d. 1663
Capt. Samuel Mayo|b. 1625\nd. 1663|p105.htm#i42083|Rev. John Mayo Sr.|b. 16 Oct 1597\nd. 3 May 1676|p106.htm#i42104|Tamisen Brike||p251.htm#i134463|John Mayo|b. 1565\nd. 1629/30|p106.htm#i42105|Katherine (Unknown)|d. 1633|p106.htm#i42106||||Susanna Breyck||p345.htm#i261665|

Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Capt. Samuel Mayo was born in 1625 at England. He was the son of Rev. John Mayo Sr. and Tamisen Brike. Samuel married Tamsen Lumpkin, daughter of William Lumpkin and Tamison (Unknown), circa 1643 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Capt. Samuel Mayo died in 1663 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
     On an unknown date along with some members of the Sandwich Church was connectred witrh the purchase of Oyster Bay, Long Island.
He resided at at Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, in 1639. He was deeded land land for a fish house by the town, on Criwell's Point below his dwelling in Barnstable in 1647 at Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. On 1650 he became the Master of the bark Desire, the first important ship to hail from Barnstable. She was a swift craft and log has interest, as she wat the third vessel laid down in Massachusetts. She was built at Marblehead in the summer of 1636, 120 tons burden.
In 1654 his vessel, Desire, was seized by Carpt. Thomas Baxter a Rhode Island privateer commisioned to act against the Dtuch, at Hampstead Harbour for alleged unlawfull tolerence with the Dutch which was regarded as a high handed offense against the dinity of Plymouth Colony. The Commisoners of the United Clonies took the matter up, the Providence Assembly repudiated Baxter. He was arrested in Connecticut, and prosecuted in the Connectiuct Court by the owners of the Desire: Dea. William Paddy, Capt. Thomas Wilet, merchant John Barnes, and Capt. Samuel Mayo. Baxter was mulcted £150 damages, obliged to give up the ship, and penalized £50 for his "insolent carriages in the Court." He resided at at Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, in 1658.
Occupationa mariner, running a packet for some time between the Cape and Boston

Children of Capt. Samuel Mayo and Tamsen Lumpkin

Tamsen Lumpkin

F, b. 1626, d. 16 Jun 1709
Tamsen Lumpkin|b. 1626\nd. 16 Jun 1709|p105.htm#i42084|William Lumpkin|b. circa 1600\nd. between 23 Jul 1668 and 29 Jan 1679|p105.htm#i42085|Tamison (Unknown)|b. between 1600 and 1604\nd. 26 Feb 1681/82|p105.htm#i42086|||||||||||||

Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Tamsen Lumpkin was born in 1626 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of William Lumpkin and Tamison (Unknown). Tamsen married Capt. Samuel Mayo, son of Rev. John Mayo Sr. and Tamisen Brike, circa 1643 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Tamsen married John Sunderline in Mar-1665. Tamsen Lumpkin died on 16-Jun-1709 at Brewster, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. She died on 16-Jun-1709 at Harwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Tamsen was buried at Old Cemetery, Brewster, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
     She was also known as Tamosin Lumpkin. She was also known as Tamison Lumpkin. She was also known as Thomasine Lumpkin. She joined at Rev. Lathrop's Church, Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, 20-Jan-1650.

Children of Tamsen Lumpkin and Capt. Samuel Mayo

Children of Tamsen Lumpkin and John Sunderline

William Lumpkin

M, b. circa 1600, d. between 23 Jul 1668 and 29 Jan 1679

Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      William Lumpkin was born circa 1600 at England. William married Tamison (Unknown) before 1623 at England. William Lumpkin died between 23-Jul-1668 and 29-Jan-1679 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. William's estate was proved on 29-Oct-1671.
      Original settlers of Yarmouth, MA.

He held the position of Foreman of a coroner's jury in 1667.
William's left a will on 23-Jul-1668 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.

The Last Will and Testament of Mr. William Lumpkin of Yarmouth in the Jurisdiction of New Plymouth ordered by the Court helt att Plymouth the 29th of October 1671 To be heer Recorded as followeth. Witnesseth these prsents That I Willam Lumpkin of Yarmouth in the Collonie of New Plymouth being weake but of prfect sence and memory, Doe make and ordaine this my Last will and Testament in mannor and forme following ffirst I Resigne my soule to God that Gave it and my body the eart from whence it was; and all my estate and Goods I give and bequath unto my now wife Tamasin Lumpkin whome I make my sole Exequitrix of all my jousing and of my whole estate; both of lands Cattle and goods During her Naturall life; and after her Decease I Doe will and bequeath; halfe of my estate oth of lands Cattle and Goods and housing unto my Daughter Tamasin the wife of John Sunderling; To her and to heires and assignes for ever and I Doe will and bequeath unto my Granchild Willam Gray; whom I make my heire of the other halfe of my estate and to his heirs and assignes for ever; both of lands Cattles goods and housing what ever; provided and my will is That my said Grandchild Willam Gray shall pay or cause to be payed; unto my Grandchild Elisha Eldred the sume of five pounds in Currant pay; when hee Comes to the age of twenty one yeares old; and my will is that the said Elisha Eldred my Grandchild shall have my Loome; with all the Slayes and tacklinges that belonge to my weaveing trade; and my Will is that My Daughter Tamasine the wife of John Sunderling shall pay or cause to be payed unto Bethyah Eldred my Grandchild; when shee is twenty yeares old; or att the Day of her Marriage; the sume of five pounds in Country pay; and I Doe Nominate and appoint my beloved frinds Mr. Edmond hawes and John Thacher; as frinds in trust; To see this my last Will and Testament truely prformed; In witnes heerof to this my last will and Testament I have this three and twentyeth Day of July Anno Dom 1668 Sett to my hand and seale Signed & sealled in the prsense of Edmond hawes.

The Inventory of William Lumpkin was taken appraised at £93. It included "the bed in the Parlour and the bedstead," in "the kitchen the bed and beding," in the "Inner Roame the bed and bedding," two loomes, cards and spinning wheeles, farming implements of "Plow and share, coulter and copps," one cart, saddle and bridle, 3 oxen, 6 cows, 2 calves, 1 horse, 1 musket, 1 sword.
_______________________________________
THE INVENTORY OF WILLIAM LUMPKIN

An Inventory of the estate of the deceased Mr William Lumpken as it was apprised by vs this 29th of Ianuary 1670

And first for Clothing 04 00 06

Item 1 gold Ring 01 00 00

Table Linnine 01 02 00

Item pillow bears 00 15 06

Item in sheets 03 16 00

Item 1 Carpett 00 10 00

Item 1 great brush 01 00 06

Item the bed in the Parlour 05 18 00

Item the bedstead 00 05 00

Item 1 Chest 1li 1 Chest & box 1li 02 00 00

Item yarne 12s a Table 10s 2 Chaires and Cushens 01 06 00

Item Andirons and tonggs 00 13 00

Item in the kitchen the bed and beding 06 03 00

Item a warming pan 00 14 00

Item in pewter 02 11 00

Item a drinking Cupp edged with siluer 00 10 00

Item 2 earthen dishes 1s spoones 1s trenchers 1s 6d 00 03 06

Item trayes 3s pailes 2s 6d 1 Iron morter 5s 00 10 06

Item 1 Iron pott and 2 pothookes 3s 6d: 2 brasse Skilletts 9s 00 12 06

Item 1 Iron skillett 4s 2 brasse kettles 1li 01 04 00

Item Chimney hookes or trauises 8s 2 Iron doggs 8s 00 16 00

Item a gridjron 3s a fierpan 1s 6 bellowes 1 6d 00 06 00

Item a Chaffing dish 1s 2 box Irons 3s a spitt 3s 00 07 00

Item a brasse Candlesticke 1s 3 bibles 12s 00 13 00

Item an other book 10s . 2 Iron bulletts 3s 00 13 00

Item a Chest and a seifting trough 10s 00 10 00

Item in the Inner Rome the bed and beding 03 02 00

Item a Flax Combe 12s a paire of Loomes and harnis 04 12 00

Item in yarne 1li 2s 6d a [quil?] wheele 2s 6d 01 05 00

Item beer barrell and tunnel 7s 6d a frying pan all 00 09 06

Item in the leantoo keelers trayes tubbs and other lumber 01 18 06

Item in the Chamber 4s [sic] sickles 2s hoee 6s a frow 3s 00 15 00

Item Chaines and hookes 14s 6d a beame 8s sythes 5s 01 07 06

Item wedges axes and other Iron thinges 00 19 00

[31]

Cotton woole 6s Flax 15s sheeps wssle 20s 02 02 00

Item Cards 7s 2 butts 5s spining wheels 14s 01 06 00

Item warping barrs and Scarlett 6s and other lumber 01 06 00

Item Saddle and bridle 01 00 00

Item an Iron kettle 01 00 00

Item 1 plow and share and Coulter and Copps 00 10 00

Item Cart and wheeles 01 00 00

Item 1 muskett and sword 01 00 00

Item 3 oxen 10 00 00

Item six Cowes 151i 15 00 00

Item 2 Calues 18s 00 18 00

Item 1 horse 5 li 05 00 00

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93 03 06

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Iohn Crowell

Ionn hall

And as for the debts that are owing to this estate; or that are to be payed from it; Mris Lumpkin knowes very little difference; and they are not much either of them; soe farr as shee knowes

The 8th day of the 12th month 1670; Mistris Tamasin Lumpkin the wife formerly of Mr Wllliam Lumpkin deceased did take oath that this Inventory of the said Mr Lumpkin abouewritten is a true Invertory of the said Mr Lumpkins estate; soe farr as shee doth know; Before mee

Nathaniel Bacon

Assistant on 29-Jan-1670.

Children of William Lumpkin and Tamison (Unknown)

Tamison (Unknown)

F, b. between 1600 and 1604, d. 26 Feb 1681/82

Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=8th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
      Tamison (Unknown) was born between 1600 and 1604. Tamison married William Lumpkin before 1623 at England. Tamison married Rev. John Mayo Sr., son of John Mayo and Katherine (Unknown), between 1671 and 1676 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. Tamison (Unknown) died on 26-Feb-1681/82 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
     She was also known as Thomasine (Unknown). She was also known as Jamesin (Unknown). Original settlers of Yarmouth, MA.



The fact that John Mayo's widow was the same person as William Lumpkin's widow is established by the following: 1. In the settlement of John Mayo's estate [Md.9:119], is states: "Mistris Tamasin Mayo the Relict of Mr. John Mayo above mensioned made oath to the truth of this Inventory soe farr as shee knowes; excepting onely the Goods and estate which shee had before theire Intermarriage, which shee had not Claimed Right nor power to Dispose of but onely to use while they lived together as, as shee affeirmeth and to bring in what further shee may know the 2cond of June 1676". 2. Court Orders, V., 7 June 1787: [MD 9:121]: Adminstrators appointed to "the estate of Mr. John Mayo Deceased...with
Reference unto his wifes prte and amonst his Children" 3. A church record in the hand-writing of Rev. Increase Mather says: "In the beginning of the year 1670, Mr. Mayo, the pastor, grew very infirm. On the 15th of April he removed his person, and his goods also from Boston to reside with his daughter in Barnstable, ..." In ["The Reverend John Mayo, Genealogy" by E. Jean Mayo, p.2] 4. The rarity of the name Tamison. 5. No known records of a Tamison Lumpkin after William Lumpkin's death aside from those known under the name of Tamison Mayo. 6. The close connection between the Lumpkins and Mayos as evidenced by the marriage of their children Samuel and Thomasine. Number 1 and 2 above show that they had not been married long at the time of Rev. John Mayo's death. Record 3 shows that John Mayo was wifeless in 1670, so that his widow was not his original wife.
------------------------------------------------------------------ Her Possible Roots:
A 1990 submission to I.G.I. by "Director 088-002A, Nancy Ruth Waldo Clement, 9 Collier St., St. Catherines, Ontario Canada L2P2RD" stated the following information: Thomasine Constable born 1605 in West Rasen, Lincoln, England, died 1682; daughter of Marmaduke Constable and Ann ---. It shows her husband William Lumpkin born 19 Jan 1584 at St. Peter, Lincolnshire, England, died 1671, son of
Richard Lumpkin (no mother named). The Constable/Lumpkin marriage is given as 1625 at Barnstable, Barnstable Co., Mass. A note on the back shows "Thomasine Constable md (2) Rev. John Mayo." The source was given as "James Savage - I.G.I, or possibly 1.6.1, but is not to be found in Savage's genealogical dictionary of New England. Courtesy of ed.chapman@@idealink.washington.dc.us.

Children of Tamison (Unknown) and William Lumpkin

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