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(Unknown) Smith

M, #25204
     (Unknown) married Susanna Van Wyck before 1720.

Cornelius Polhemus

M, #25207, d. before 3 Jul 1741
     Cornelius married Susanna Van Wyck after 1725. Cornelius Polhemus died before 3-Jul-1741. Cornelius's estate was proved on 3-Jul-1741; His estate was left to his widow Susanna and minor children Daniel, Nellie and Margaret Polhemus.
     He resided at at Hempstead, Nassau County, New York, in 1725.

Mary Adams

F, #25216
Mary Adams||p253.htm#i25216|Jeremiah Adams|b. between 1685 and 1695|p181.htm#i18033|Mary Covenhoven|d. before Jan 1738/39|p3409.htm#i340841|||||||Peter Covenhoven||p3409.htm#i340842||||
     Mary Adams was the daughter of Jeremiah Adams and Mary Covenhoven.

Joseph James Kane Jr.

M, #25222, b. 15 Jun 1928, d. 3 Dec 2001
Joseph James Kane Jr.|b. 15 Jun 1928\nd. 3 Dec 2001|p253.htm#i25222|Joseph James Kane Sr.|b. 4 May 1903\nd. 6 Jan 1952|p253.htm#i25230|Martha Elva Conover|b. 18 Sep 1906\nd. 21 Sep 1956|p253.htm#i25231|James E. Kane||p3890.htm#i388936|Helen M. D. M. Herman||p3890.htm#i388937|Elvin S. Conover|b. circa Jun 1870\nd. 26 Oct 1943|p253.htm#i25234|Jeanette C. Young|b. 12 Dec 1869\nd. 6 Apr 1918|p576.htm#i57568|

Relationship=9th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Joseph James Kane Jr. was born on 15-Jun-1928 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Joseph James Kane Sr. and Martha Elva Conover. Joseph married Effie Jack Neil on 7-Dec-1972 at Plainville, Hartford County, Connecticut. Joseph James Kane Jr. died on 3-Dec-2001 at Veterans Adminstration Medical Center, Lebanon, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, at age 73.
     He served in the U. S. Navy between 1945 and 1946.

Every community has a few residents who constantly volunteer their time for the well being of the many who sit back and don't want to become involved. Joe Kane is one of the few who cares.

Joe retired to the Gardens of Gulf Cove three years ago after almost 28 years of police work. Since then he has noted an increase in crime in the area. Joe inquired about the Neighborhood Watch supposedly in effect in the Gardens. He learned it was floundering and almost defunct from lack of leadership, interest, and membership. From long experience he knew how important neighborhood watches are in assisting local police departments in crime detection and prevention. Visibility was essential, which meant more volunteers and increased patrols. With his extensive background in law enforcement it was inevitable that he would become the new director. Joe was back in his element.

It took nine long months of reorganization, equipment changes and recruitment of volunteers, but Joe has been successful in his endeavors. He now has more than 35 individuals and couples who patrol on a regular basis. Through fundraisers, he has secured a cellular phone and eliminated the need of the citizen band radio base station at the Gardens recreation center. The sheriff's department or 911 can now be dialed direct from the security patrol car, without the necessity of a third-party relaying messages.

Joe was in his early 20's and working as an electrician when he decided public service was more suited to his career goals. Taking a substantial decrease in pay he joined the Philadelphia police department and worked his way up from the ranks. He retired as a lieutenant after 20 years. For the next eight years, he subsequently served as police chief in Plainville, CT and Phoenixville, PA. Joe became disillusioned with a judicial system which seemed to have a revolving door approach in early release of criminals, especially those who were habitual. He also became alienated to the political aspects of his position. He finally decided to return to his initial career and worked as an electrician until he was injured and unable to continue that vocation. Always adaptable, Joe was soon taking courses in computer programming which he now enjoys as one of his many recreational activities.

Joe is also a licensed ham radio operator and holds a citizen's band radio license. He is an active member of the Charlotte County Office of Emergency Management and participates on a voluntary basis in emergency communications drills. When he is not busy with computers and communications, he finds time every day to swim at the community pool and is a member of two bowling leagues.

But his most consuming interest these days is his local Neighborhood Watch and securing more volunteers for the security patrols. He stresses that concerned individuals are necessary in crime deterrence. He is also adamant about volunteere observing and reporting only. It is up to the local police department to question and apprehend a suspect, not a private citizen. As a resident of the Gardens I would like to express my appreciation to our Neighborhood Watch participants and Joe Kane who diligently coordinates their efforts.

This article appeared in the local Port Charlotte, FL. newspaper and was written by Terri Martini under her column, Garden Spot.



Joseph James Kane, Jr., 73, following a lengthy illness, died on Monday morning December 3rd, 2001, at the hospice unit of the VA Medical Center in Lebanon, PA.

Kane was a former Philadelphia police lieutenant and a former chief of police for both Phoenixville, PA and Plainville, CT. Before entering Philadelphia's police department in 1952, he worked as an electrician for the Pennsylvania Railroad, a theater manager in Manhattan, NTC, and a trolley operator for the former Philadelphia Transportation Company.

He served in Philadelphia's police force as a patrol officer, detective, and sergeant, being appointed police lieutenant within five and one-half years of entering the department.

After leaving Philadelphia, he served as chief of police in Plainville, CT and in Phoenixville, PA. Following early retirement from police service he worked again as an electrician and as a computer programmer.

His U.S. Navy service was in 1945 and 1946, when he left high school to enlist during World War II. He later completed a GED and pursued college level police training.

Lately of Gordonville, PA, he had also lived in Port Charlotte, FL.

He was a former member of Elks, Rotary Club, Civil Air Patrol, the American Radio Relay League, and various amateur radio, choral singing, walking, and reading science fiction and the history of the light-rail transit.

Born in Philadelphia, PA, he was the son of the late Martha E.(Conover) and Joseph J Kane, Sr.

He was married first to Ruth M. (Ramirez) Kane and second to the late Effie J.(Neil-Stewart) Kane.

Surviving in addition to his first wife are six sons, Edward J. married to Joan L. Davis of Gordonville, PA, Joseph J., III and John P. of Philadelphia, PA, Robert P. of Colorado Springs, CO, Richard J. of Kutztown, PA, and Timothy D. of West Chester, PA; one daughter Patricia R. married to Cigus Vanni of Bala Cynwyd, PA; three step-children, John Stewart of Colorado Springs, CO, Jayne Kench and Deborah Bohn both of Bradenton, FL.

He is also survived by six grandchildren; five step-grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and three sisters, Mary Law and Kathleen Terwilliger both of Marmora, NJ and Beatrice Cunningham of Somers Point, NJ

He was preceded in death by his second wife, by a sister, Martha E. Schnepp, and by a brother, James E. Kane.

Services were private.



Preserving Family MemoriesBy Joseph J. Kane, Jr.Published in the Family News & Views 1996By Mary E. Law

The countries from which my family ancestors emigrated were: on my father’s side, the Kane’s (and Quigley’s) came from Ireland in 1850, the Hoover’s came from Switzerland in 1732, and the Herrman’s from Germany in 1854. On my mother’s side, the Conover’s arrived in 1625 from Holland, and the Higbee’s, Smith’s, Young’s and Hayward’s from England in the 1700’s. My parents are Joseph James Kane, Sr. who was born in Philadelphia, on May 4, 1903, and Martha Elva Conover, who was born in Pleasantville, NJ, on September 18, 1906.

What I remember most about my mother from my childhood is how hard she worked to give us the same as other children in spite of our economic condition, lack of ANY modern (even 1930’s standards) conveniences, (not even UTILITIES) and how she never seemed to have anything new. She was always overweight, loved ice cream, and enjoyed having her hair combed by one of her children!

What I remember most about my father was that he was always studying, trying to learn a way to change his trade which had ceased to exist in the Northern U.S. He also built chicken houses and rabbit hutches and stocked them, and raised goats and ducks to put food on the table. He kept a garden and hunted (in and out of season) for the same reason. He trapped for furs to sell for a little cash. He taught me how to live outdoors, build my own shelter, get my own food and to be self-sufficient.

My father’s trade was a full fashion hosiery knitter, but in the early 30’s, all of this industry moved (sometimes in the middle of the night) to North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia, leaving him unemployed for most of the 1930’s. In the 1940’s, he worked at the Frankford Arsenal in small arms ammunition, then became a security guard for companies until his death on January 6, 1952. My mother was a “housewife” all of her adult life, although prior to her marriage, she worked for Whitman’s Chocolate’s, and RCA in Camden, NJ as a “carver” on the old phonograph cabinets. I was born on June 15, 1928, at Episcopal Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the third of six children. As far as unusual circumstances of my birth, there were none. But my mother always said, “You were born after dinner, that’s why you’re always hungry.” The name chose for me was Joseph James Kane. According to what my father told me, I was named after an uncle, Joseph Kelly. However, my birth certificate says Joseph James Kane Jr. with no comma between Kane and Jr. Therefore, I always felt that I was actually named for my father. The name Edward was chosen by me for my Catholic Confirmation.

I have one brother and four sisters. Our names and birth dates are:

Martha Elva 6/7/1925
James Edward 6/7/1926
Joseph James 6/15/1928
Mary Elizabeth 11/11/1931
Kathleen Margaret 12/14/1934
(whose twin died at birth)
Beatrice Ann 4/27/1941

As for looks in the family, I most look like my sister, Mary. In answer to the question of which sibling I felt closest to, it was Mary. This is probably because Martha and Jimmy were closest in age and tended to exclude me from activities. So, in turn, I guess I automatically gravitated to the next oldest to me. But also, I was close to Jimmy when it came to outdoors and work. Mary and I played all sorts of games, built “clubhouses” out of junk lumber, played “prizefighting” and in general, we got along well. Jim and I would learn how to set up camps in the woods from Dad, camp out together, were Boy Scouts together and delivered newspapers and set pins at the same bowling alleys. Because of our poor economic circumstances, we had no car and took no family vacations. Our individual vacations were staying for a week each, and having cousins visit us for a week. And we all loved our week during the summer with “Nana,” Grandmother Kane. Jim and I also camped out several times during the summer and sometimes with visiting cousins, such as; Bill Gass, Jerry Jones, Snooky Fuhs and friends.

No foreign language was spoken in our home, except for some German expressions my father used, but he knew no foreign language, either.

All of my siblings and I were baptized Roman Catholic. But, from my age of six to fourteen, we lived in the Somerton section of Philadelphia which only had a chapel. It was associated with the main church in the Bustleton section, which was about 10 miles away. Therefore, we were sent to the Chapel, which was St. Edward’s for Sunday mass but for all other church activities such as Baptisms, First Holy Communion, Confirmations, and Holy Day processions, we had to arrange to get to the “big” church: Maternity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, either through the priests or friends, as we had no car. Even the chapel was over one mile form home. We also had to attend “Sunday School” at the chapel every Saturday, some weekend! My mother had not been a Catholic until she converted when she married my father.

Our lack of money most definitely was a concern to me, s our town of Somerton was very affluent, and we were the poor people. It cost me most in school, where if I did well, the teachers, were forced by parents’ complaints, to move their children ahead of me. I lost Spelling Bee’s, parts in School plays, earned awards, good marks, ad got undeserved punishment. Today, I feel that this did them harm, but no harm to me. However, at the time, I was very bitter. Our “worst” times were the several times my father would finally get a job and then worry so much about keeping it, he would get his “chest pains” and lose the job when the pains prevented him going to work. I’ve always felt these “pains” were actually heart attacks brought on by his tension of worrying about the job. Another “worst time” was when my father borrowed the pickup truck from my Grandfather Kane and, with us kids in the back, was taking us swimming at Pennypack Creek. A car his us broadside at a blind intersection, turned the truck completely upside down and spilled us all over the road. However, no one was seriously hurt. The best times for me were every Christmas! How my parents managed it, I will never know, but Santa Claus never missed our home. Granted, we didn’t get everything (or necessarily anything) we wanted, but after opening all of our gifts of toys, games and new clothing, we felt as though we had gotten everything we wanted, including the small items, candy and fruit in our stockings. Another of the good times we had was making root beer, aging it, and then drinking it at the “doggie roasts” we had in the back yard of that famous “shack-by-th-railroad-track!” So you’ll know what a “doggie roast” is, it’s the similar to a barbecue but each individual roasts a hot dog on the end of a stick, over an open fire. You can cook marshmallows the same way, but they catch fire if you’re not careful.

My first memory going back as far as I can remember was way back to when I was still in a high chair and my mother was in the back yard (Church Rd in Cheltenham) trying to stop the neighbors’ cow from wrecking our back yard. The cow had a loose chain on and began chasing my mother who ran around a tree and the chain got tangled. She just kept going around until the chain had the cow tight against the tree.

The homes we lived in when I was young were located on Jeannes Street in Fox Chase, Church Road in Cheltenham, on other house off of Laurel Avenue in Cheltenham, an apartment at Laurel & Central Avenues and at 342 Laurel Avenue. Also, one on Cottman Street (just next to where Northeast High School is now). When we moved from 342 Laurel Avenue, we moved to East Byberry Road by the Reading Railroad (that was the address) which was the “shack-by-the-railroad-track” in the Somerton section of Philadelphia. However, it was country all around us, all farms, fields and woods. The town of Somerton was a mile away, and the Roosevelt Boulevard was a half mile away in the opposite direction. We moved there in July, 1934 when I’d just turned six years old, and moved from there when I was about 14 years old. We had no electricity, gas, telephone, plumbing or any conveniences, just four walls and a roof. It had two rooms on each floor, but my father divided one of them on the second floor so Jimmy and I had one side, Martha and Mary shared the other. Kay was born five months after we moved there, and slept in a crib in our parents room until she was older, then shared a room with her sisters. My youngest sister, Bea, was also born here (1941) at “the shack.”


In the first and second grades, going by bus to St. Cecelia’s School, some of the older (and richer) kids called me “Foozy” after a comic character at that time. I did NOT like it. They also gave my sister (Martha) and brother (Jim) nicknames from the same comic strip. Otherwise, I was called Joe or “Kaney” by everyone I knew. We had so many pets when we lived at the “shack,” it’s hard to remember them all. I do remember my one dog, Spot (he did not have any spots). He went everywhere with me when I was about 9 or 10 years old. Then suddenly, he disappeared. One day, while walking along the railroad tracks, near home, I saw this dirty, matted dog walking up a path I’d built. He was limping but he still looked like Spot. I called him and he stopped, looked over, and RAN, limping, to me. It was Spot, and he knew he was home. His paws were all bloody and who knows how far he had walked to get home again.

We had some special types of fun over the years. At ages 6 thru 10 we played with trucks and cars in between the house and the railroad, building roads in the dirt for them. We also built several “huts” for “secret clubs” of which I was the only member. Up to the age of 14, we continued making “huts” but now had friends who shared “secret club” membership. We built dams on the Poquessing Creek which made great swimming holes. We learned how to camp out with no equipment but an axe and a knife. We fished in creeks and had a muskrat trapping route. However, we also delivered magazines and newspapers, and set pins in the bowling alley. These activities cut down on fun and games. I was fortunate in that I was never really sick. I had all of what was then called “normal childhood diseases” meaning chicken pox, mumps, measles, and whooping cough. I also regularly got “sun poisoning” during the summer where I would blister, have a fever and chills, but I never had any real health problems. My memories about the schools I attended were that Kindergarten was across Laurel Avenue in Cheltenham and up a steep hill to the back of the school. My teacher was Miss Brooks. For the first and second grades, I attended St. Cecilia’s Catholic School in Fox Chase. Both grades had about 60 children and were taught by the same nun in the same room. I had to walk over one mile, regardless of the weather, to Byberry Road and Bustleton Pike, to get the bus (monkey-cage), a 1928 Ford which stopped frequently on the hills, followed by attempts to make it up again. The bus route was about eight miles and took more than an hour. For the third through eighth grades, I went to Watson Comley School in Somerton. At that time, the Philadelphia public school district had one and a half to two grades in each classroom with 45 to 60 students per room. Teachers names I remember were Miss Ruby, Miss Bainbridge, Mrs. Paul, Miss Rawling, and Miss Ross. We walked over half a mile to go to this school, just far enough away so that we were denied school bus transportation. As far as favorite books or stories, I read almost anything. There were all types of stories in what was called, “The Big-Little Books” which I borrowed from friends. And happily, I discovered the “Blue Book,” a monthly magazine which had many mysteries and cowboy stories, to which my Grandfather Kane subscribed and I read all of them. In a rafter at the old freight building (by “the shack”) I found an old World War I Bible. It was pocket sized and covered with khaki material. I read it several times cover to cover. But I had to leave it where I found it as it was not a Catholic version, and my father would not have allowed me to read it, nor, at that time, would the church allow it either. When I was young I wanted to be first, a policeman, second, an electrician, and third, a farmer. This, of course, would be in agreement with what my parents wanted me to do or be…to graduate from high school, and then to acquire a skilled trade to earn a decent living. Back in “those days”, the cost of living was much different than now:

Clothes: most of my clothes were hand-me-downs or Christmas gifts from my Kane grandparents. However, I remember shoes for $2.50, sneakers for $.99, and pants at $1.50.

Food: bread at five to eight cents a loaf, ice cream cones, even some double and triple dips, at five to seven cents, small hamburgers at five cents, sodas were five cents for eight to twelve ounces.

Movies: ten cents, until Philadelphia put a 10 percent tax, then it was 11 cents for children under 12, but we had to also figure on 10 cents each way for busses, as we were at least 15 miles from the nearest theater.

Toys: really don’t know, as the only toys I ever got were gifts, mostly at Christmas, and some for birthdays.

Gasoline: when I was about 12 years old, gas was about 12 cents per gallon, but we had no car so it didn’t matter. Then during World War II, if was rationed, and even if we’d had a car, we wouldn’t have gotten enough.

Stamps: two cents for first class mail and they still allowed a special rate of one and a half cents for unsealed envelopes which we used mostly for Christmas cards, but businesses used fro advertisement.

I had household chores or jobs that I had to do. From age 10 to 12, I delivered newspapers, but took turns washing or drying dishes or setting the table. As I got older, I set pins, the old way, at a bowling alley. But I still had jobs at home, including keeping firewood for a huge fireplace at our house on Roosevelt Boulevard in Somerton. At the house we lived in at 3541 N. 16th Street in North Philadelphia, I had to keep the furnace fired with coal and putting out the ashes for collection. I continued, during this time, setting pins, working in a diner, and at Willow Grove Amusement Park in various jobs, plus I went to school full time. I never received an allowance, and in fact, on my jobs, I was required to give most of my income to my parents. Later, after I worked full time, I had to pay $15.00 a week board and purchase of my own clothing.

We used public transportation when we needed to go anywhere long distance. Sometimes on occasion my Grandfather Kane would loan my father his car or pickup truck. We traveled (until 1941) by double-decker gasoline-electric buses from Somerton to Frankford. From there we could get other buses, trolleys and the elevated (El) train to all other areas. However, the last “B” bus to Somerton left Frankford at 1:05 a.m. and, because of the late hours of my job(s), I often missed it. Then, after the “59” trolley took me to Bustleton, I’d walk the six miles home. I quit school in the 11th grade to try to push my father into signing for my enlistment in the U.S. Navy. He did just after I was 17. However, halfway through boot camp, Word War II was over. Eventually, I did complete Secondary school! When I got out of the Navy, I went back to my old school, but transferred to and graduated from, Temple University High School. In school, the subject I most liked was Shop, but I liked History and the Sciences, too. I hated English and Gym (I felt it was stupid). I disliked Math but was reasonably good in it. And I absolutely hated any form of homework. Fortunately, Mastbaum VoTech High School had a rule for teachers: “no homework.” Most of the subjects which I disliked were ones in which I was bored, as I kept ahead of the class by reading. I slept through some of my Junior High School classes because of working nights, yet managed to maintain grades of good and excellent because of my reading. This annoyed several of my teachers but they were honest in marking. Sports were not exactly a big priority in school. In elementary school, before starting all my illegal jobs of newspapers, setting pins, etc., I played the usual unsanctioned baseball, football, and basketball, etc. When I went back to Mastbaum VoTech after the Navy, I was the fullback on their FIRST football team. The coach was my electric shop teacher and he would coach one day while I kept his class in line, then I would practice the next day while he taught the class.

Although sports were not what I enjoyed, music and drama was another story. I always loved singing and was, according to my father, a ‘natural harmonist.” I was often chosen for elementary school plays, but because of our “social” position, was often taken out by teachers bowing to pressures from “rich” parents. I got seriously involved in singing in my late teens. I even got paid for some performances and, in my early 20’s, in drama, belonging to a Little Theater Group with the Kelly’s (including Grace). I never received any awards or prizes for achievements in athletics or scholarship, but I was a member of a few clubs. In Junior high school, I belonged to the Dance Club, the Science Club, and several others that I cannot remember. In Senior high school, I continued with the Dance Club. While at Temple University High School, there were no clubs so I had no opportunity. In later years, I belonged to many social, fraternal, civic, professional and “fun” clubs.

The dances that were popular back when I was a teen and in my early twenties were the “slow” dances, but the rage was the “jitterbug,” and that even spawned a type of dress, accessories and semi-behavior. The most popular songs were from the “Big Bands” including the WWII era. Some were beautiful, some were primarily silly, but fun. The “Big Band” era created some of the best songs and music in our history. Comparing the kinds of clothing which youths wore in my younger days to what is worn by young people today would be that then: the late 40’s, “peg” pants, “hung” jackets, large lapels, double-breasted jackets, bow ties, or at least, ties. Now’ early 90’s, straight leg pants, sport coats, reasonable length and lapels, no ties or thin 4 inch hand ties. (The above “now” is for formal occasions in place of jeans and t-shirts, while “then” was for all occasions except while working a dirty job).

The person who most influenced my thinking during my younger days is my father, as he was a studier. He had studied all about television, its technology, etc. long before the first television station aired. He was, I discovered, a very knowledgeable man who never had an opportunity to use it. Also, my mother, who in spite of the fact that I “knew everything”, managed to instill in me a sense of what was right and wrong, as well as what was proper. Of course, my sisters also influenced me with their opposite views on getting along with girls in general. With my future relationships in the balance, I accepted their views very readily, as they were given without rancor. “Friends” also influenced me at this time. As a teenager, I did not really get along with either of my parents as I felt that they were not up-to-date. I had a certain sense of fear of my father and took that out on my mother by being belligerent toward her. However, I respected BOTH of their opinions, even though I disagreed with them. It took some time until I recognized the fact that they were not against me, but were trying their very best to help me. That is when I learned what is meant by “Love Thy Parents!” As far as moving away from home is concerned, several times, in my late teens, I left for several weeks or months to “spread my wings.” I’d live with friends, mostly to gain the freedom which I felt my parents would not allow me. Once, I stayed away for four months, living with friends and at a hotel. However, I was always accepted back home with them. I was three months shy of my 22nd birthday when I actually moved for good. I had been offered a job in New York City and took it. While I was living there, my family moved from Philadelphia to Palermo, NJ. I married an usherette named Ruth M. Ramirez and she is the mother of my seven children. Although we lived with my parent’s part of the time prior to and immediately after the birth of our first child Edward, I and my family had “moved” from home.

Our family celebrated special holidays. The June birthdays of my oldest sister, Martha, my brother, Jimmy, and myself were observed as ONE family holiday since our birthdays were so close. They shared the seventh and mine was the fifteenth of June. This was the time for a “doggie roast” to celebrate all our birthdays. We had a fire in our backyard and roasted hot dogs on sticks, drank home brewed root beer and toasted marshmallows. Since this was not necessarily on any of our actual dates of birth, we would sometimes have a cake and receive gifts from our parents, and Grandmother and Grandfather Kane. Mary, Kay, and Bea had parties but my recollections of them, with such varied dates, are less vivid. We always had some king of party or celebration for ALL Baptisms, Confirmations, and First Holy Communions as they were very important to our family life.

We did not have any traditional or favorite recipes that were prepared for family gatherings, but we did have the traditional turkey with stuffing on most Thanksgivings, Christmases, and New Years, although I remember times on Thanksgiving Day that I gave thanks for hot dogs. Over time, our family economic condition improved. Then it was mostly turkey, stuffing, cranberries, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes (I hated sweet potatoes, even candied), several vegetables, and giblet gravy. For dessert; pumpkin, mince, apple, and lemon meringue pies. Religious holidays that were celebrated in our home included: Christmas, New Years Day (A Feast Day), Lent, Good Friday, and Easter. All Catholic Holy Days started with going to church services, whether they were celebration days or not.

Christmas – Church, home and opening of gifts, then the afternoon dinner.

New Years Day – Church, then afternoon dinner.

Lent – Church for Ash Wednesday, then every Friday for the stations of the Cross. Also, each person gave up something for the 40 days which they liked and we could not eat meat on Wednesday, Friday, or Saturday.

Good Friday – Complete silence was observed from 12 noon to 3 p.m., preferable while in church.

Easter – Church, then home to see what we had in our Easter baskets, then a search around the house for colored eggs, then the afternoon dinner (roast ham when we could afford it).

As for music for these occasions, we only had an old crank-up victrola to play records, and most of the time, the spring was broken. I can remember no special “readings” for holidays or holy days, as these would be church oriented and we had that in church. I do remember on several Christmases that my father read “The Night Before Christmas” and parts of “Scrooge”. The family or holiday traditions that were the most meaningful to me as a child was Christmas! We not only celebrated the birth of Christ, but also received gifts, regardless of our financial condition. I also enjoyed our combined birthday “doggie roast” which was the big event at the beginning of summer.

When I met my future wife, I had just been hired as the assistant manager of Loew’s Lincoln Square Theater at 66th Street and Broadway in New York City. Ruth was my only “Spanish” usherette and when I first talked to her, she told me I was the first non-spanish person she ever met who actually pronounced her last name, Ramirez, properly. Six months later, we were married. When we met, I was 21 years old (Loew’s Theater and everyone else thought I was 25), but I turned 22 before we were married. I guess what attracted us to each other was the same things that attract any two persons of the opposite sex at the ages of 18 and 21. We should have, at that time in New York city, avoided each other as there was much dislike and distrust between the Puerto Ricans and the Irish. However, we never let that disturb us, as we liked and trusted each other. It was still safe to walk in Central Park in 1950, and we would walk all through it, even late at night. We had one favorite spot, probably ¼ mile east of Central Park West, which had several boulders piled atop and around each other. We were sitting on those boulders when we decided to get married. Although Ruth’s mother, Maria, had come to the theater many times (for which I would not let her pay), she came in several nights after our decision to marry and DEMANDED to know if I really wanted to marry her daughter. Her concern for Ruth started my love for my future mother-in-law. Our wedding took place on September 8, 1950 at about 4:00 p.m. in St. Joseph’s Church, west of Broadway. It was Ruth’s Parish Church. My strongest memory from my wedding day was my brother, Jim, showing up at the last minute! He was the “best man” and hadn’t even been fitted for his formal wear. We got it, finally, but what a sweat. Another memory is leaving the reception and realizing we had nowhere to go. I finally remembered a dignified and respectable hotel, off Broadway, then known as the “Hotel Abbey!” In general, those attending the wedding were my brother, Jim, my sister, Mary, and Billy Kiss, who worked for me at the Loew’s Commodore Theater, along with friends from the Commodore and Lincoln Square Theaters. Also, many of Ruth’s friends from Julia Richman High School, her mother, Maria H (Vargas) Ramirez, her sister, Carmen, her brother, Jose Ramirez, and many other of her relatives and friends. We went on a honeymoon, sort of. Since Ruth had never even been near Philadelphia and it was my hometown, I took her there. I showed her that we had subways, elevated trains, and even a city hall, just like New York. She never knew where she was on the subways or elevated trains, but she never knew in New York either. It’s a good thing I knew both transit systems. In Philadelphia we stayed at a hotel which later was converted for senior citizens. It caught fire with a huge loss of life. As far as adjustments and/or surprises in married life, there were none. I couldn’t wink at other girls, I couldn’t talk to other girls, I couldn’t smile at other girls. Ruth’s mother was NOW my mother-in-law.

I had to think in terms of supporting and having shelter for two people, staying employed and maintaining INCOME at all times. Comforting a person who is scared, trying to relax a person who is tense, planning ahead for two persons instead of just letting things work out, comforting a person who is unsure of her own abilities, encouraging a person to comfort me. Also, preparing for future additions to our family, emotionally, psychologically, and financially. NO REAL SUPRISES, BUT DEFINITELY SOMETHING NEW!

You don’t really “raise” a family, you live a life with a family. Trying to guide them when they need it without stifling them, try to get your children to avoid the pitfalls that you know, and to avoid making mistakes which you made yourself or those you know to be mistakes. You let them know that you are there to help them with their problems and that, no matter what, you love them! Raise a family? No! You can only guide and encourage it. Vice versa, the family raises the parent. My proudest moment was on September 26, 1951, when I was told “it’s a boy.” I went to the nursery and saw this wrinkled creature, my first son, Edward Joseph Kane. My second proudest moment was in 1955, when after competing with 250 acting detectives and about 3,000 other policemen, the results for the examination for promotion to detective were published. No. 1 was Joe Golden, (also awaiting appointment as captain); No. 2 was Earl White (also waiting appointment as lieutenant); and No. 3 was Joseph Kane, Rookie Cop!


My saddest and most painful times were when my grandparents died and when my parents died. My most embarrassing moment happened while operating the Route 50 trolley car in Philadelphia. I got to 6th Street and Susquehanna Avenue and automatically threw the switch to go west on Susquehanna, then I switched to go south on 8th Street. About three blocks later, a passenger came up and asked me, “Are you on the right route?” I said “of course!” Then I realized I had followed Route 47 instead of 50. I had to call in to find out where the switches were located to get back on the right route because with a trolley, you can’t just drive back.


I have lived in New York City: the Germantown, Nicetown, Frankford, West Oak Lane, Torresdale, and Olney sections of Philadelphia; Plainville, CT; Valley Forge, PA; and the gardens of Gulf Cove in Charlotte County, FL. Although I had many enjoyable times everywhere I lived, I’d have to say that I’m enjoying my warm weather retirement, with lots of activities here in Florida the most. The biggest trip I’ve ever taken was to Hawaii in May, 1992, with my wife, Effie. However, I’ve been to California several times, Canada twice, Puerto Rico once, and about 35 states.


I have been asked the question, “Have I ever met anyone famous?” I’ve met many “famous” and “infamous” politicians, but I do not consider them “famous” in that sense. I’ve also met many well-know show business personalities, but do not think of them as “famous” either. The most “famous” persons I have met, in my opinion, are those many persons who do as well as they can, the job of living, supporting and raising a family and occasionally, become heroes.


On politics, I was always independent or non-partisan because police and politics should not be mixed. Most politicians would disagree, and have in my life, caused me many problems. In 1990, after moving to Florida, I registered as a Republican. Their philosophies are the nearest to mine. I have never been actively involved in politics, either as a candidate or campaign supporter, for the reasons above. I learned to dislike politics and to dislike and distrust most politicians.


My children’s names, birth dates and birth places are:

Edward Joseph: 9/26/1951

Shore Memorial Hospital

Somers Point, NJ

Joseph James: 12/8/1952

Temple University Hospital

Philadelphia, PA

Patricia Ruth: 1/12/1954

Einstein Hospital

Philadelphia, PA

John Patrick: 7/5/1958

Doctor’s Hospital

Philadelphia, PA

Robert Phillip: 1/29/1960

Doctor’s Hospital

Philadelphia, PA

Richard John: 5/24/1961

Doctor’s Hospital

Philadelphia, PA

Timothy Daniel: 3/22/1963

Pennsylvania Hospital

Philadelphia, PA


Some of my favorite recollections of when my children were young: On his first birthday, Eddie playing with a flashbulb instead of his presents. Picnics all over Eastern Pennsylvania State parks and Fairmount Park, at least twice a month all summer. Every birthday child having a party; and every Christmas, which was an important day to all of us! Riding the elevated train and the subway from end-to-end, just for the fun of it, with Eddie, Joey and Patti, in 1955-56. “Trading” children for a week with their uncles and aunts. One of ours with them and one of theirs with us.


The parts of being a parent that have been the most difficult for me was trying to balance the good and poor behavior, accomplishments, and objectives and later, actions. Keeping up with my responsibilities in spite of weekly rotating shifts at work for 18 years. Trying to maintain a family life for them during various periods when their mother was not there. Helping several of them when they would not try to help themselves. Losing several of them (mostly to indifference) in later life. But I love them all anyway. The parts of being a parent that were the easiest or most rewarding were: As young children (and as a young parent), pleasing them with praise and, on birthdays, Christmas and sometimes for no reason at all, small gifts and presents, even going to the corner store and getting a bag of “penny candies.” Being asked and giving advice to them. Not necessarily “earth shaking” but important to them at that time. Taking them on picnics, which they liked, and so did I. Having them bring friends home (who had problems) to seek my advice. Helping them (without their knowing) choose the right way out of a problem, and even in schooling or a career choice. Concerning my feelings about becoming a grandparent for the first time include the fact that I did not know for some time (Amber was my first grandchild) that I had become a grandfather. Therefore, I probably did not have normal grandparent feelings when I found out. However, I was NOT unhappy. Since that time, I have been very happy for myself, my children and step-children on the birth of each grandchild.

As of now (1993), I have six grandchildren and five step-grandchildren. The best part of being a grandparent is BRAGGING. Living in a community of mostly older persons, they all brag about their grandchildren, so I like to brag back about how handsome, good, pretty, accomplished, intelligent, well-behaved and well-bred my grandchildren are. As a grandparent I like that the family will continue with them, and my children now know how I felt toward them.

What is the one time in my life I’d like to live over? Really, all of it! ‘Though I’d try not to make the mistakes I made, having the knowledge now to know what those mistakes were.

Additional information about this storyDescription     Joseph Kane, Jr., wrote this story about his memories in 1993. A copy was furnished to his sister, Mary (Kane) Law to publish in three parts for the Family
News & Views." The chapters appeared in July 1996, February 1997, and May 1997.

Joseph James Kane Sr.

M, #25230, b. 4 May 1903, d. 6 Jan 1952
Joseph James Kane Sr.|b. 4 May 1903\nd. 6 Jan 1952|p253.htm#i25230|James Edward Kane||p3890.htm#i388936|Helen Maurice DeForest Miller Herman||p3890.htm#i388937|||||||||||||
Joseph James Kane
      Joseph James Kane Sr. was born on 4-May-1903 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of James Edward Kane and Helen Maurice DeForest Miller Herman. Joseph married Martha Elva Conover, daughter of Elvin Smith Conover and Jeanette Christina Young, on 4-Oct-1924 at St. Malachy's Church, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. Joseph James Kane Sr. died on 6-Jan-1952 at Somers Point, Atlantic County, New Jersey, at age 48.
     

The sudden death of Joseph Kane, Plant Guard, on January 6, came as a great shock to all L&N'ers who knew him. Throughout his more than seven years' association with the Company, Mr. Kane had won the respect of all and proved himself a dependable and faithful employee. Born in 1903 in Philadelphia, he attended Ryerss Elementary School and Frankford High School. He came to Leeds & Northrup in 1944 as a member of our guard force. Following a brief illness in December, he had returned to work, only to succumb to a heart attack on January 6. Our sincere sympathy goes to his wife and family on their great loss. on 7-Jan-1952.



Joseph (Joe) James Kane's father James Edward Kane had a childhood friend Joseph Kelly. Jim Kane and Joe Kelly were very close friends and when they were very young they made a few pacts. One was that every year, Joe would give Jim a necktie for Christmas and Jim would give Joe a pipe. Which they did until their deaths. Another pact was that each would name his first son after the other however; Joe Kelly did not keep the pact. He named his first son after himself. His son Joseph Kelly Jr was born in 1900. Jim Kane's first son was born on May 4, 1903 and true to his word he named him Joseph Kane after his good friend Joe Kelly. Joseph Kane was christened at St. Veronica's Church with his Uncle Joe Kelly and his wife Margaret (James Kane's sister) as his godparents. Joe Kane later would take James as his confirmation (middle) name after his father.Joe's parents moved to Burholme when he was six months old. They were not able to purchase their own home on L Street (became Montour later on) in Burholme until February 1910. Joe was almost 7 years old and his sister Beatrice was 3 years old. At the time the street was not paved and was a dirt road. There were very few sidewalks that were cement, mostly they were cinders. Also, there was no gas, electric, or water running up the street. The home had an iron pump with a drinking well. Hot water came from the hot water boiler which was over a coal stove in the kitchen with a hood. The coal stove was for warmth and cooking. Water and gas went through the street around 1913 and electric around 1920. Joe's parents were poor, but like many people at the time everything was used and re-used, such as clothing. Helen Kane did all her own baking, washing, ironing, and cleaning. Jim Kane grew many vegetables that were preserved for the winter months. Cooking was done on a coal stove and wood was used in the stove in the summer. When electricity came to L Street in Burholme Joe's mother Helen went from sweeping the rugs to using a vacuum cleaner.On the corner of L and Cottman Streets there was a pond which sometimes would come up to the fence in the yard. In the winter, it froze and Joe and his sister with all the kids in the neighborhood would skate or sled on it. A neighbor who owned the lot behind the Kane family, allowed Joe's father to fence in a play lot for the kids. It had a home made swing, a sand bin and a seesaw. Joe and some of his friends built a one room bunk house. They shingled the outside and got tiles for the floor. It had a cot in it and a little garden on the one side. Joe sometimes would keep rabbits in the bunk house. As a young boy Joe fished and swam in the Pennypack Creek. He went swimming at a place he called “the dam” which was up along the New York railroad tracks, where the tracks went over Krewstown Road at the “the 90 foot bridge”. When a man in the neighborhood named Mr. Hingley started a Boy Scout Troop, Joe joined right away. He loved camping, fishing, and hunting. Although he very poor eyesight, he was a good shot. He could hit a bull’s eye and shoot the first bull’s eye with a second. When Joe was about 18, he and three friends went up the Delaware River in two canoes for two weeks. They slept along the shore in pup tents (the area was much more wild country then). He came home with horrible red blisters and telling of a glorious time.While growing up Joe and his family always went to visit Aunt Margaret and Uncle Joe Kelly who lived in Collingswood, NJ. The family went to the zoo and Willow Grove Park once every year too. Around 1914 Burholme started a yearly tradition of a Fourth of July Celebration. There would be a Parade in the morning, games in the afternoon, and fireworks or a movie at night. Joe’s parents always volunteered to help with the refreshments during the games in the afternoon. The Burholme Improvement Association would give out tickets for each school child to play games or buy refreshments. Joe and his sisters, and brother would get .25 cents from their parents as well. That would be enough money for a lot of food and games.When Joe was 16, he decided that he did not want to continue with school. Reluctantly his parents agreed and he started his first job. Jim Kane worked as a manager for Louis H. Carre who owned a Carpentry business. Jim was able to get Joe a position as office messenger. After sometime, Joe decided to work for the Victor Talking Machine Company because they paid very well. He carved the feet on the legs of the Victrola, which he liked, but he had to leave because the sawdust was getting into his throat and lungs. He went on to learn the Knitting business (Hosiery), and worked in this field, until he was older and became a Security Guard for several companies in Philadelphia.Joseph Kane married Martha Conover in St. Malachy’s Church on October 4, 1924. They went on to have six children, 30 grandchildren, and many great-grandchildren.

written by Beatrice M. Kane "A Letter about the Family History" to her great nephew Edward Joseph Kane 1965.

Children of Joseph James Kane Sr. and Martha Elva Conover

Martha Elva Conover

F, #25231, b. 18 Sep 1906, d. 21 Sep 1956
Martha Elva Conover|b. 18 Sep 1906\nd. 21 Sep 1956|p253.htm#i25231|Elvin Smith Conover|b. circa Jun 1870\nd. 26 Oct 1943|p253.htm#i25234|Jeanette Christina Young|b. 12 Dec 1869\nd. 6 Apr 1918|p576.htm#i57568|Charles P. Conover|b. 19 Aug 1840\nd. 11 Sep 1925|p253.htm#i25235|Martha S. Smith|b. circa 1845\nd. 29 Jan 1906|p253.htm#i25236|Abraham A. Young||p4654.htm#i465368|Mary J. Hayward||p4654.htm#i465369|

Relationship=8th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
Martha Elva Conover
      Martha Elva Conover was born on 18-Sep-1906 at Pleasantville, Atlantic County, New Jersey. She was the daughter of Elvin Smith Conover and Jeanette Christina Young. Martha married Joseph James Kane Sr., son of James Edward Kane and Helen Maurice DeForest Miller Herman, on 4-Oct-1924 at St. Malachy's Church, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. Martha Elva Conover died on 21-Sep-1956 at Somers Point, Atlantic County, New Jersey, at age 50.
     

Mrs. Martha Kane, 50, VFW Auxiliary Officer Mrs. Martha Kane, 50, of Shore Rd., Palermo, died Friday in Shore Memorial Hospital after a brief illness.

She was president of the Fraser-Ross-Sack-Watchko VFW Auxiliary at Marmora, a member of St. Joseph's Alter and Rosary Society, Somers Point; member of St. Augustine's PTA, Ocean City, and senior vice president of the Cape May County VFW District

Surviving are four daughters, Mrs. Martha E. Schnepp of Croydon, Pa., Mrs. Mary E. Law of Hoboken, Mrs Kathleen Terwilliger of Palermo and Miss Beatrice Kane of Palermo; two sons, James E. of Palermo and Joseph J. Jr. of Philadelpia; a brother Kenneth Conover of Falls Church, Va; one sister, Mrs. Marie Jones of Pataskala, Ohio, and 10 grandchildren.

Services will be in St. Cecilia's Church, Philadelphia, tomorrow, with burial in St. Dominic's Cemetery, Philadelphia.

Census23-Feb-1920with her sister Mabel, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania

Children of Martha Elva Conover and Joseph James Kane Sr.

Elvin Smith Conover

M, #25234, b. circa Jun 1870, d. 26 Oct 1943
Elvin Smith Conover|b. circa Jun 1870\nd. 26 Oct 1943|p253.htm#i25234|Charles P. Conover|b. 19 Aug 1840\nd. 11 Sep 1925|p253.htm#i25235|Martha S. Smith|b. circa 1845\nd. 29 Jan 1906|p253.htm#i25236|Adam Conover|b. circa 1805\nd. after 1883|p253.htm#i25237|Naomi Higbee|b. circa 1808\nd. 9 Feb 1876|p253.htm#i25238|||||||

Relationship=7th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Elvin Smith Conover was born circa Jun-1870 at New Jersey. He was the son of Charles P. Conover and Martha S. Smith. Elvin married Jeanette Christina Young, daughter of Abraham A. Young and Mary Jane Hayward, circa 1891. Elvin Smith Conover died on 26-Oct-1943 at Westmont, Camden County, New Jersey. He died on 26-Oct-1943 at Possibly, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. Elvin was buried at Forest Hills Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.
     In the census on 11-Jun-1910 Elvin Smith Conover was named Elwin S. Conover.
Census4-Jun-1900Newark, Essex County, New Jersey, 3 children, 2 living
Census11-Jun-1910Egg Harbor Twp., Atlantic County, New Jersey, 7 children, 5 living
Census-Occ4-Jun-1900a driver, milk
Census-Occ11-Jun-1910a casrpenter, jobbing

Children of Elvin Smith Conover and Jeanette Christina Young

Charles P. Conover

M, #25235, b. 19 Aug 1840, d. 11 Sep 1925
Charles P. Conover|b. 19 Aug 1840\nd. 11 Sep 1925|p253.htm#i25235|Adam Conover|b. circa 1805\nd. after 1883|p253.htm#i25237|Naomi Higbee|b. circa 1808\nd. 9 Feb 1876|p253.htm#i25238|Elias Conover|b. 15 May 1779\nd. 1 Jun 1854|p84.htm#i8390|Polly Newberry|b. circa 1775\nd. 18 Feb 1857|p84.htm#i8391|Absalom Higbee|b. circa 1763\nd. 1833|p255.htm#i25413|Rachel Scull|b. 1763|p255.htm#i25414|

Relationship=6th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Charles P. Conover was born on 19-Aug-1840 at Oceanville, Atlantic County, New Jersey. He was the son of Adam Conover and Naomi Higbee. Charles married Martha S. Smith on 3-Sep-1865 at Port Republic, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Charles P. Conover died on 11-Sep-1925 at Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey, at age 85.
Census23-Jun-1880Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey
Census4-Jun-1900Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey, 8 children, 5 living
Census20-Apr-1910with his daughter Hattie, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey, a widower
Census20-Jan-1920with his son in law Nelson Baine, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey
Census-Occ23-Jun-1880a carpenter
Census-Occ4-Jun-1900a carpenter
Census-Occ20-Apr-1910a carpenter
Census-Occ20-Jan-1920a carpenter

Children of Charles P. Conover and Martha S. Smith

Martha S. Smith

F, #25236, b. circa 1845, d. 29 Jan 1906
      Martha S. Smith was born circa 1845 at New Jersey. Martha married Charles P. Conover, son of Adam Conover and Naomi Higbee, on 3-Sep-1865 at Port Republic, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Martha S. Smith died on 29-Jan-1906.
     She was also known as Martha Elva Smith.
Census23-Jun-1880Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey
Census4-Jun-1900Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey, 8 children, 5 living

Children of Martha S. Smith and Charles P. Conover

Adam Conover

M, #25237, b. circa 1805, d. after 1883
Adam Conover|b. circa 1805\nd. after 1883|p253.htm#i25237|Elias Conover|b. 15 May 1779\nd. 1 Jun 1854|p84.htm#i8390|Polly Newberry|b. circa 1775\nd. 18 Feb 1857|p84.htm#i8391|Peter Covenover|d. circa May 1779|p14.htm#i1367|Sarah (Unknown)||p84.htm#i8387|||||||

Relationship=5th cousin 5 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=4th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Adam Conover was born circa 1805 at New Jersey. He was the son of Elias Conover and Polly Newberry. Adam married Naomi Higbee, daughter of Absalom Higbee and Rachel Scull, on 1-Jun-1825 at Gloucester County, New Jersey. Adam Conover died after 1883.
     He and Adam Conover were possibly one and the same person.
Census8-Aug-1850Galloway Twp., Atlantic County, New Jersey, real estate value 1,000.00
Census6-Jul-1870Galloway Twp., Atlantic County, New Jersey, real estate 700.00 personal 100.00
Census-Occ8-Aug-1850a carpenter
Occupation6-Jul-1870a house carpenter

Children of Adam Conover and Naomi Higbee

Naomi Higbee

F, #25238, b. circa 1808, d. 9 Feb 1876
Naomi Higbee|b. circa 1808\nd. 9 Feb 1876|p253.htm#i25238|Absalom Higbee|b. circa 1763\nd. 1833|p255.htm#i25413|Rachel Scull|b. 1763|p255.htm#i25414|John Higbee|b. 1739\nd. 7 Nov 1786|p85.htm#i8454|Mary Smith|b. 9 Jul 1738\nd. 1808|p85.htm#i8455|Joseph Scull|b. 1731\nd. 1810|p1559.htm#i155844|Sarah H. (Unknown)|b. 1734\nd. 1819|p1559.htm#i155845|

Relationship=6th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Naomi Higbee was born circa 1808 at Galloway Twp., Atlantic County, New Jersey. She was the daughter of Absalom Higbee and Rachel Scull. Naomi married Adam Conover, son of Elias Conover and Polly Newberry, on 1-Jun-1825 at Gloucester County, New Jersey. Naomi Higbee died on 9-Feb-1876.
Census8-Aug-1850Galloway Twp., Atlantic County, New Jersey, real estate value 1,000.00
Census6-Jul-1870Galloway Twp., Atlantic County, New Jersey, real estate 700.00 personal 100.00

Children of Naomi Higbee and Adam Conover

Martha Elva Kane

F, #25239, b. 7 Jun 1925, d. 28 Feb 1985
Martha Elva Kane|b. 7 Jun 1925\nd. 28 Feb 1985|p253.htm#i25239|Joseph James Kane Sr.|b. 4 May 1903\nd. 6 Jan 1952|p253.htm#i25230|Martha Elva Conover|b. 18 Sep 1906\nd. 21 Sep 1956|p253.htm#i25231|James E. Kane||p3890.htm#i388936|Helen M. D. M. Herman||p3890.htm#i388937|Elvin S. Conover|b. circa Jun 1870\nd. 26 Oct 1943|p253.htm#i25234|Jeanette C. Young|b. 12 Dec 1869\nd. 6 Apr 1918|p576.htm#i57568|

Relationship=9th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Martha Elva Kane was born on 7-Jun-1925 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Joseph James Kane Sr. and Martha Elva Conover. Martha married Francis Englebert Schnepp on 24-Sep-1949 at Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey. Martha Elva Kane died on 28-Feb-1985 at Levittown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, at age 59.

Donald Eugene Darnell Jr.

M, #25249, b. 21 May

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Donald Eugene Darnell Jr. was born on 21-May.

Tina Marie Darnell

F, #25250, b. 10 Mar

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Tina Marie Darnell was born on 10-Mar.

Francis Joseph Schnepp Jr.

M, #25251, b. 3 Jul
Francis Joseph Schnepp Jr.|b. 3 Jul|p253.htm#i25251|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Francis Joseph Schnepp Jr. was born on 3-Jul.

Patricia Ann Claar

F, #25252, b. 19 Feb
Patricia Ann Claar|b. 19 Feb|p253.htm#i25252|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Patricia Ann Claar was born on 19-Feb.

James B. Claar III

M, #25253, b. 10 Oct
James B. Claar III|b. 10 Oct|p253.htm#i25253|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      James B. Claar III was born on 10-Oct.

Richard Keith Claar

M, #25254
Richard Keith Claar||p253.htm#i25254|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.

William Donald MacTaggart Jr.

M, #25260, b. 16 Mar
William Donald MacTaggart Jr.|b. 16 Mar|p253.htm#i25260|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      William Donald MacTaggart Jr. was born on 16-Mar.

James Edward Kane

M, #25261, b. 7 Jun 1926, d. 6 Oct 1997
James Edward Kane|b. 7 Jun 1926\nd. 6 Oct 1997|p253.htm#i25261|Joseph James Kane Sr.|b. 4 May 1903\nd. 6 Jan 1952|p253.htm#i25230|Martha Elva Conover|b. 18 Sep 1906\nd. 21 Sep 1956|p253.htm#i25231|James E. Kane||p3890.htm#i388936|Helen M. D. M. Herman||p3890.htm#i388937|Elvin S. Conover|b. circa Jun 1870\nd. 26 Oct 1943|p253.htm#i25234|Jeanette C. Young|b. 12 Dec 1869\nd. 6 Apr 1918|p576.htm#i57568|

Relationship=9th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
James Edward Kane
      James Edward Kane was born on 7-Jun-1926 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Joseph James Kane Sr. and Martha Elva Conover. James married Patricia Joan Winner. James Edward Kane died on 6-Oct-1997 at Portsmouth, Virgina, at age 71.

Children of James Edward Kane and Patricia Joan Winner

Christine Dorothy Kane

F, #25263, b. 18 Jul
Christine Dorothy Kane|b. 18 Jul|p253.htm#i25263|James Edward Kane|b. 7 Jun 1926\nd. 6 Oct 1997|p253.htm#i25261|Patricia Joan Winner||p4654.htm#i465372|Joseph J. Kane Sr.|b. 4 May 1903\nd. 6 Jan 1952|p253.htm#i25230|Martha E. Conover|b. 18 Sep 1906\nd. 21 Sep 1956|p253.htm#i25231|||||||

Relationship=10th cousin of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Christine Dorothy Kane was born on 18-Jul. She was the daughter of James Edward Kane and Patricia Joan Winner.

Children of Christine Dorothy Kane

James Edward Kane Jr.

M, #25264, b. 2 Jul
James Edward Kane Jr.|b. 2 Jul|p253.htm#i25264|James Edward Kane|b. 7 Jun 1926\nd. 6 Oct 1997|p253.htm#i25261|Patricia Joan Winner||p4654.htm#i465372|Joseph J. Kane Sr.|b. 4 May 1903\nd. 6 Jan 1952|p253.htm#i25230|Martha E. Conover|b. 18 Sep 1906\nd. 21 Sep 1956|p253.htm#i25231|||||||

Relationship=10th cousin of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      James Edward Kane Jr. was born on 2-Jul. He was the son of James Edward Kane and Patricia Joan Winner.

Child of James Edward Kane Jr.

John Albert Utegg Jr.

M, #25265, b. 5 Jul
John Albert Utegg Jr.|b. 5 Jul|p253.htm#i25265|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      John Albert Utegg Jr. was born on 5-Jul.

Jason Paul Utegg

M, #25266, b. 27 Mar
Jason Paul Utegg|b. 27 Mar|p253.htm#i25266|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Jason Paul Utegg was born on 27-Mar.

Christy Lynn Hemsath

F, #25267, b. 2 Dec
Christy Lynn Hemsath|b. 2 Dec|p253.htm#i25267||||Christine Dorothy Kane|b. 18 Jul|p253.htm#i25263|||||||James E. Kane|b. 7 Jun 1926\nd. 6 Oct 1997|p253.htm#i25261|Patricia J. Winner||p4654.htm#i465372|

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Christy Lynn Hemsath was born on 2-Dec. She was the daughter of Christine Dorothy Kane.

Michael Albert Amos Jr.

M, #25268, b. 12 Jun
Michael Albert Amos Jr.|b. 12 Jun|p253.htm#i25268||||Christine Dorothy Kane|b. 18 Jul|p253.htm#i25263|||||||James E. Kane|b. 7 Jun 1926\nd. 6 Oct 1997|p253.htm#i25261|Patricia J. Winner||p4654.htm#i465372|

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Michael Albert Amos Jr. was born on 12-Jun. He was the son of Christine Dorothy Kane.

Jordon Ruth

M, #25269, b. 14 Sep
Jordon Ruth|b. 14 Sep|p253.htm#i25269||||Christine Dorothy Kane|b. 18 Jul|p253.htm#i25263|||||||James E. Kane|b. 7 Jun 1926\nd. 6 Oct 1997|p253.htm#i25261|Patricia J. Winner||p4654.htm#i465372|

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Jordon Ruth was born on 14-Sep. He was the son of Christine Dorothy Kane.

James Edward Kane 3rd

M, #25270, b. 15 Jun
James Edward Kane 3rd|b. 15 Jun|p253.htm#i25270|James Edward Kane Jr.|b. 2 Jul|p253.htm#i25264||||James E. Kane|b. 7 Jun 1926\nd. 6 Oct 1997|p253.htm#i25261|Patricia J. Winner||p4654.htm#i465372|||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      James Edward Kane 3rd was born on 15-Jun. He was the son of James Edward Kane Jr.

Christian Michael Vanni

F, #25271, b. 6 Jan
Christian Michael Vanni|b. 6 Jan|p253.htm#i25271|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Christian Michael Vanni was born on 6-Jan.

David Ellsworth Law 3rd

M, #25276, b. 21 Jul
David Ellsworth Law 3rd|b. 21 Jul|p253.htm#i25276||||Gloria Cowdrick||p4452.htm#i445178|||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      David Ellsworth Law 3rd was born on 21-Jul. He was the son of Gloria Cowdrick.

Daniel Erik Law

M, #25277, b. 10 Jul 1975, d. 15 Dec 2007
Daniel Erik Law|b. 10 Jul 1975\nd. 15 Dec 2007|p253.htm#i25277||||Gloria Cowdrick||p4452.htm#i445178|||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
     Daniel was buried at Seaside Cemetery, Palermo, Cape May County, New Jersey. He was born on 10-Jul-1975 at Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey. He was the son of Gloria Cowdrick. Daniel Erik Law died on 15-Dec-2007 at University of Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, at age 32.

Dawn Elizabeth Law

F, #25278, b. 12 Jan 1977, d. 7 Nov 2006
Dawn Elizabeth Law|b. 12 Jan 1977\nd. 7 Nov 2006|p253.htm#i25278||||Gloria Cowdrick||p4452.htm#i445178|||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Dawn Elizabeth Law was born on 12-Jan-1977. She was the daughter of Gloria Cowdrick. Dawn Elizabeth Law died on 7-Nov-2006 at Woodbine, Cape May County, New Jersey, at age 29. She died on 7-Nov-2006 at Petersburg, New Jersey, at age 29. Dawn was buried at Seaside Cemetery, Palermo, Cape May County, New Jersey.
     She was graduated in 1995 at Ocean City High School, Ocean City, Cape May County, New Jersey.

Child of Dawn Elizabeth Law

Michael David Rosenfeld

M, #25283, b. 19 Feb
Michael David Rosenfeld|b. 19 Feb|p253.htm#i25283|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Michael David Rosenfeld was born on 19-Feb.

Mark William Simmerman

M, #25287, b. 1 Apr
Mark William Simmerman|b. 1 Apr|p253.htm#i25287|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandson of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Mark William Simmerman was born on 1-Apr.

Sarah Amber Law

F, #25290, b. 15 Feb
Sarah Amber Law|b. 15 Feb|p253.htm#i25290|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Sarah Amber Law was born on 15-Feb.

Chelsea Elizabeth Law

F, #25291, b. 22 Jun
Chelsea Elizabeth Law|b. 22 Jun|p253.htm#i25291|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Chelsea Elizabeth Law was born on 22-Jun.

Laura Ann Law

F, #25292, b. 2 Nov

Relationship=10th cousin of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Laura Ann Law was born on 2-Nov.

Susan Lynn Terwilliger

F, #25298, b. 15 Sep
Susan Lynn Terwilliger|b. 15 Sep|p253.htm#i25298|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Susan Lynn Terwilliger was born on 15-Sep.

Rhonda Sue Terwilliger

F, #25299, b. 15 Apr
Rhonda Sue Terwilliger|b. 15 Apr|p253.htm#i25299|||||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-granddaughter of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven.
      Rhonda Sue Terwilliger was born on 15-Apr.
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