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Gardner Colby WALWORTH was born on 4 MAY 1878 in Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. He appeared in the census on 1 JUN 1900 in Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. (living at home with father and mother.) Parents: Arthur C. WALWORTH and Mary Frances COLBY.


George Roberts WALWORTH was born on 22 MAY 1881 in Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. He appeared in the census on 1 JUN 1900 in Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. (living at home with father and mother.) Parents: Arthur C. WALWORTH and Mary Frances COLBY.


James Jones WALWORTH was born on 22 JAN 1874 in Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. He appeared in the census on 1 JUN 1900 in Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. (living at home with father and mother.) Parents: Arthur C. WALWORTH and Mary Frances COLBY.


Mary Louisa WALWORTH was born on 28 APR 1890 in Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. She appeared in the census on 1 JUN 1900 in Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. (living at home with father and mother.) Parents: Arthur C. WALWORTH and Mary Frances COLBY.


Elizabeth M WALZ was born on 7 FEB 1878 in Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio. She appeared in the census on 16 APR 1910 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California. She appeared in the census on 20 JAN 1920 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California. She appeared in the census on 10 APR 1930 in El Monte, Los Angeles County, California. She died on 18 NOV 1961.
California Death Index, 1940-1997 Record
Name:
SHINER, ELIZABET M
Social Security #:
Sex: FEMALE
Birth Date: 7 Feb 1878
Birthplace: OHIO
Death Date: 18 Nov 1961
Death Place: LOS ANGELES
Mother's Maiden Name: KLEIN
Father's Surname:

Spouse: Harold Earl SHINER. Harold Earl SHINER and Elizabeth M WALZ were married on 3 SEP 1905 in California.


Clem Jack WANKIER was born on 21 DEC 1942 in Levan, Juab County, Utah. Parents: Clem Joseph WANKIER and Vera MELLOR.

Spouse: Peggy Lee WINN. Clem Jack WANKIER and Peggy Lee WINN were married on 5 AUG 1961.


Clem Joseph WANKIER was born on 24 AUG 1917 in Levan, Juab County, Utah. He died on 3 FEB 1991 at Levan, Juab County, Utah. Parents: Joseph A. WANKIER and Carrie ANDERSON.

Spouse: Vera MELLOR. Clem Joseph WANKIER and Vera MELLOR were married on 7 JUN 1940 in Levan, Juab County, Utah. Children were: Jayne Carolyn WANKIER, Clem Jack WANKIER, Lillian Karen WANKIER, Dorothy Ann WANKIER, Judy Marilyn WANKIER.


Dorothy Ann WANKIER was born on 13 NOV 1946 in Payson, Utah County, Utah. Parents: Clem Joseph WANKIER and Vera MELLOR.

Spouse: Newell Dean RIGBY. Newell Dean RIGBY and Dorothy Ann WANKIER were married on 9 SEP 1967.


Jayne Carolyn WANKIER was born on 2 MAY 1941 in Gunnison, Sanpete County, Utah. Parents: Clem Joseph WANKIER and Vera MELLOR.

Spouse: Elmo LeGrande WILSON. Elmo LeGrande WILSON and Jayne Carolyn WANKIER were married on 19 JUL 1960.


Joseph A. WANKIER was born date unknown.

Spouse: Carrie ANDERSON. Joseph A. WANKIER and Carrie ANDERSON were married date unknown. Children were: Clem Joseph WANKIER.


Judy Marilyn WANKIER was born on 6 MAR 1951 in Nephi, Juab County, Utah. Parents: Clem Joseph WANKIER and Vera MELLOR.


Lillian Karen WANKIER was born on 9 JAN 1944 in Levan, Juab County, Utah. Parents: Clem Joseph WANKIER and Vera MELLOR.

Spouse: Agustive TRUJILLO. Agustive TRUJILLO and Lillian Karen WANKIER were married on 4 SEP 1968.

Spouse: George FISH. George FISH and Lillian Karen WANKIER were married about 1980.


Amy D. WARD was born on 18 DEC 1870 in Easthamptom, Hampshire County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: FHL Film 0186147; Town meeting records, 1785-1865 Easthampton (Massachusetts). Town Clerk. Listed as Dolly A. Ward.) She died young. SOURCE: "A Genealogy of the Descendants of Abraham Colby and Elizabeth Blaisdell, his wife Who settled in Bow in 1768" By one of them, Concord, NH Printed by the Republican Press Association 1895. Parents: Oscar WARD and Ella J. ALEXANDER (twin).


Ann WARD was born on 12 OCT 1848 in Eaton-Bray, Bedfordshire, England. She died on 4 SEP 1908 at Spanish Fork, Utah County, Utah. She was buried on 6 SEP 1908 in Spanish Fork, Utah County, Utah. She has Ancestral File Number 1SZJ-4K.
Eliza and Her Daughter Ann

In common with the early Latter-day Saints, Ann Ward King and her mother Eliza Dyer Ward Fenn helped to establish their homes in the New World under great adversity, suffering severe persecutions and hardships. They knew only the meager comforts of their pioneer generation. Remembering their sacrifices on the altar of liberty and happiness, we turn our thoughts back over one hundred years to catch a glimpse of their lives and show tribute and appreciation of the blessings that have come to our families today because of their efforts. Much of the history of the Mormon settlement of Genoa, Nebraska, has been taken from the diary of Henry James Hudson.


Ann Ward King

Ann was born to a young widowed mother on October 12, 1848, at Eaton Bray, England, the daughter of Charles William and Eliza Ann Dyer Ward who were married by banns September 16, 1847, in the parish church in the presence of Thomas Sear and Jane Mitchell who signed her name with an X. Charles Ward is shown as being deceased. He died at the age of eighteen, six months after his marriage to Eliza. Ann was five years old when her mother married Elder George Fenn who had returned to England on a mission to the area of his own people. His home town of Leighton Buzzard was only three or four miles from Eaton Bray. The marriage of Eliza and George took place in Eaton Bray but probably not in the same parish church in which she had previously married Charles Ward. On April 2, 1854, a son was born who was named John Fenn.

George Fenn was influential in persuading many Saints to come to Zion. His father, William Fenn had sailed with his large family from Liverpool on April 4, 1854, only two days after John Fenn was born. Elder Fenn, after being released from his two-year mission in the fall of 1854 returned to the United States with his wife, Eliza, and stepdaughter, Ann Ward, now six years of age, and baby son, John. Ann was a great help in caring for her brother while crossing the rough ocean. When they arrived in St. Louis, the family was welcomed by great-grandfather, John Fenn, Sr., then 78 years of age. It was a joyous occasion also for him to welcome a great-grandson, his own namesake. In St. Louis July 13, 1856, a second son, Alfred, was born. They stayed less than three years in St. Louis, then in 1857 George and family were called to settle in Nebraska. The leader of the company was Henry James Hudson in whose diary George Fenn was mentioned at least twice.

April 14, 1857, 110 Mormon families, making a total of 200 Mormons and 100 non-member passengers, boarded the Hannibal, a sidewheel steamer put into service in 1844, their destination Genoa, Nebraska, via the Missouri River. This Nebraska settlement was one of several important "lifelines" to the steady streams of immigrants. Brigham Young had told the converts seeking release from the crowded cities of the old world that they could avail themselves of the opportunity to be independent land owners in Zion. These people came with weak bodies, half starved from their voyage and hoped to rest and recuperate in Genoa before continuing their journey to Utah the next season. Little did this group boarding the Hannibal know of the hardships ahead. The Saints were transported for only $4.00, and the other passengers paid $ 8.00 each. This cost George Fenn and family $16.00 for their fare. It was very difficult to obtain a place to sleep on the Hannibal as there were not enough berth accommodations, and the boat was laden to capacity with many tons of baggage and freight of every description. The boat often stopped to "wood," taking on great quantities for fuel. Rarely were the passengers able to replenish their scanty food supply. Some days there was little or no bread and Ann's stomach grumbled. One night the Hannibal struck a sandbar and the captain was unsuccessful in getting her afloat. Finally he had to hire the boat Sultan to move the Hannibal off the bar, which cost the captain $400.00 There were ever so many more sandbars to delay their progress on this unusually long trip. The boat averaged three miles per hour. On occasions when the steamer tied up for the night, provision chests were replenished more economically.

Measles broke out, affecting one entire family-one member dying. The Saints were very humble, fasting often and holding prayer meetings daily, and with the singing of Gospel hymns, their hearts were lifted and encouraged to meet their daily trials. One of the most difficult problems was the weather. Some nights the temperature dropped and a strong northeast wind arose and continued the whole night, rendering it very uncomfortable for the deck passengers. These cold piercing winds continued for many days, snow fell and the decks became icy. Then one day the temperature suddenly soared high and caused many to have sick headaches. More often the rain would continue to pour down and all through the dark night the wind would persist, everything was wet and damp, so men, women and children with aching bones lay down dispirited. Many came down with ague.

The boat traveled for days through Indian country and on the 2nd of May, Florence was reached 19 days and almost 800 miles after leaving St. Louis. Large numbers of Indians came around the boat begging, some of them wearing nothing more than a buffalo robe to cover their nakedness. The squaws tried to obtain bread and money. One of them had an infant about two weeks old, a male child and white as if it had been born of white parents. She offered to sell the child for 75 cents. Rumors had spread that some immigrants who had arrived in the territory the preceding fall had frozen to death in their wagons.

Now that their destination by boat was reached, it was an ordeal to claim their belongings from the immense pile of freight that took hours to discharge. Not all of their freight was put off at Florence. Flour, cornmeal and plows were taken on and landed at Omaha which took much effort to retrieve. Sometimes the brethren were hired to help discharge the freight at the rate of 25 cents an hour, men made as much as $1.00 which was a godsend to those who were anxious to work. The sick children and most of the women were provided a house in which to stay until they could leave Florence. The remainder slept in wagons and tents. Henry James Hudson records that he visited other Saints who had come to Florence in the spring, and endeavored to encourage those who thought their prospects were dark. The men bought supplies, such as seeds, grain and flour, and on Tuesday, May 5, 1857, a meeting was held with the brethren to arrange for the journey and to urge the Saints to have everything ready to start when the oxen arrived that were to be driven overland.

On May 11, 1857, the group left Florence for Genoa, and after traveling 102 miles reached their destination five days later. The trip was especially difficult for Eliza Dyer Ward Fenn as three days after their arrival in Genoa she gave birth to her third son, whom they named Walter. The very best care they had to offer her was most crude; a wagon bed was her castle for sometime.

There was a gap of nearly six months in the diary of Henry James Hudson from which one is left to imagine the grim task of providing shelter and the urgency of getting crops planted at this late time of the year that could mature before the early frosts. The company was organized so as to obtain the best results from labors. Some began plowing, others making sod fences and ditches. The women who were able, followed the plows, dropping corn, potato sets and other seeds, while the capable children herded the cattle, always in sight of the laborers, all watching for marauding Indians. Twelve hundred acres were thus fenced and five miles of ditches made.

At this date, with scant food and scantier shelter, many were still very weary; however, as newly arriving companies came, they also were organized to help get logs out and put up houses sufficient for the population before the coming winter. The men who had been making ditches were then set to work excavating the much talked of dugouts, which were built on the higher lands and sunk about four feet into the ground and raised with logs an additional three feet. These were then covered with poles, either round or split, and covered over with willows, sod and earth, making a very comfortable shelter for winter.

By July 1, 1857, the settlers had good gardens and other crops. Flour, however, was out of the question. It had to be hauled 100 miles at a cost of $8.00 to $10.00 per sack, so tin pans and plates were perforated with a sharp tool and the soft corn was grated and cooked in milk. This was no small chore to prepare for hungry people with appetites sharpened by hard labor. The coffee mills were made to do service by grinding buckwheat, and mosquito netting was used for the sifting of grain. In the spring of 1858 a small grist mill was bought to help relieve the situation, but it was still not possible to supply all the settlers. A ferry was put in across the Loup Fork River, and homes, fields, ditches and fences were steadily improved. Other industries such as sawmills and brickyards had been going full blast for over a year. Their goal was to build the finest town in all of Nebraska.

On July 21, 1858, tragedy again came to the George Fenn family. Their third son, Walter, now fourteen months old died and was buried. By January 1, 1859, a very small meetinghouse was completed and dedicated with a big celebration and a feast of vegetables, bread, butter, meat, pies, tarts, etc. served to ninety-five adults, after which old and young danced until 1 a.m. The children's day followed on Saturday, the 2nd, and fifty children had toast and milk and danced and recited. Ann Ward was in attendance, as was the entire Fenn family.

The settlers never lacked for obstacles and new problems. Suddenly they were astounded by the information that the Pawnee Indians had selected the Genoa settlement as their reservation. The Indian agent had previously indoctrinated them that they should locate within the city boundaries of Genoa. Through all this agitation, the Indians clearly showed a higher sense of right than did the agent. They stated that they were willing to move ten miles further west and be neighbors, and admitted that the settlers had been kind and had fed them well. However, the troublesome agent continued to send messengers to the settlement telling untruths. He got the settlers into a state of terror saying he could not restrain the Indians from coming and taking possession of their homes and other belongings. He even hinted they might ravish the women. The agent saw he was fast gaining his point and at the same time he was infusing into the Indian chief a spirit that once aroused was not easily abated. He talked to them about how much of their timber the settlers had used; that the houses the settlers built were really theirs; it was their wood that built the barns and corrals; that the corn and grain was theirs, raised on their land! The Indian agent helped to prepare a great feast. Twelve large steers were turned over to the four bands of Pawnees and a grand pow-pow commenced. It was kept up with supplies of flour and provisions from the agent's store. Thus the Indians were influenced to his way of thinking and a great wrong culminated to a poor, industrious people who had endured untold privations to lay the foundation for homes for themselves and their families. To make matters worse, the winter was just upon them. Tension continued to mount so the settlers moved their homes by the 20th of November and rebuilt their dugouts and shelters for their teams in an adjoining area in order to appease the Indians. They had even moved their grain stacks from what was now called "the reservation" to adjoining land, and busied themselves preparing threshing floors as there were yet no threshing machines in the settlement.

The agent continued to harass the Saints when they refused to sell their produce and improvements to him at his price. Suddenly and without ceremony, a fire came sweeping over the prairie, driven by a fierce northwest wind. There was alarm and terror. Grain stacks and houses were on fire. Only four or five homes escaped the blaze and that was because of the frantic efforts of the women and children carrying water from the river, wetting the grass between spaces left by the plows that were put hurriedly to work to prepare fire breaks against the furious element, licking everything before it. The fire was started willfully at a point between the agent's house and the settler's recently vacated fields.

November was cold. Eliza was again in delicate health. Her heart was heavy as she gave a last look to the area where her baby son, Walter, had been buried about sixteen months previously. Such a scene of desolation which met her eye was dispiriting and heartbreaking. The journey back to Council Bluffs, Iowa, of over one hundred miles was a trying, uncomfortable experience. About six weeks later Eliza Fenn gave birth to twin sons; the mother and twins died and were buried in the same coffin. The story has been told as follows:

On January 14, 1860, George Fenn and his children had gone to gather wood. Eliza appeared well when they left, but when they returned they found mother and twins sons dead. The mother had no help during childbirth.

The death toll in John's immediate family was his mother, Sarah Reeves Fenn, who died in St. Louis in 1854. Also a brother, Caleb Fenn, a sister, Emma Fenn, both died the same year. Waller, his baby son had died in Genoa on July 21, 1858, and now his wife, Eliza, and the unnamed twin sons had passed on. Little did he realize at this time that before he could reach Utah, his pioneer father, William Fenn, also would have passed away by drowning at Charleston, near Provo, Utah, July 1860.

In the spring of 1860, George and his remaining children, Ann Ward, age 12; John Fenn, 7, and Alfred, age 4, joined a company of Saints who were going to Utah--Captain John Smith's. George drove his team across the plains, arriving in Utah in the fall. This same year, 1860, he married his second wife, Sarah Ann Jarvis, and they made their home in Provo, Utah, until the spring of 1862, at which time at the request of President Brigham Young, he went to Gunnison, Utah. In 1870 he moved his family to Salina, Utah.

Ann Ward had little chance for education. Six years after arriving in Provo, she married on December 31, 1866, Horace David Andrew Jackson King who was sixteen years her senior. To them were born eight children, four girls and four boys: Franklin Maron King, born February 1866, Provo, Utah, who died as an infant; Eliza Ann King, born January 21, 1868, at Provo, who married John E. Carter; Clinton King, born 1869 at Provo, who died as an infant; Mary Elizabeth King, born January 29, 1871, at Provo, married John William Kramer; George Alfred King, born September 1, 1875, at Gunnison, married Eva Carter; John Thomas King, born March 8, 1878, at Gunnison, who died age twenty-one years; Sarah Emma King, born March 12, 1882, at Gunnison, married Canute Canuteson; Esther Matilda King, born February 14, 1886, at Palmyra, married William Francis Carter.

Sarah Ann Carter Huff Anderson, her granddaughter said:

Grandmother married very young; she was not quite eighteen while her husband was thirty-seven. She became the mother of eight children, four boys and four girls. Two of the boys died in infancy and her son John died at the age of twenty-one. She mourned his death and I, being the oldest granddaughter, lived with her during the summers. My grandparents had charge of a dairy ranch in Palmyra, Utah, and all members of the family were busily employed every day, caring for the cows, milking and keeping the dairy spotlessly clean. The shining milk pans, filled with milk were placed on a bench to cool in the milk house which they built. Grandmother was the only one who skimmed the milk, then she and the girls, with the help of a dasher churn, made hundreds of rounds of butter which they sold in Spanish Fork. The butter was placed in a large pan, covered with grape leaves and a damp cloth put on top and delivered to the customers, always cool and sweet. Grandmother raised a beautiful garden and was a splendid cook, her Sunday dinner being chicken and dumplings.

There came a time when the owner of the ranch decided to manage it himself, so this meant a move for my grandparents. A friend, William Monk, gave them a piece of land upon which they built a small house. This was the first home Grandmother could call her own and she kept it neat and clean, a homemade rug on the floor, a cupboard and table, one or two chairs, a very clean cook stove, and her bed always made up with a white spread. Her declining years were spent in reading good books and attending church regularly. The same day I was married to my first husband, Archer Huff, March 20th, 1907, Grandmother and Grandfather King went to the Salt Lake Temple with us and received their endowments. (End of quote.)

Ann was small of stature. It is said of her that her by-word was a mild "oh my goodness." She was without guile, a glorious mother, even her grandchildren called her perfect. Palmyra, Utah, was home to Ann Ward King. Her history is carved in the memories of that town. She was known as a good neighbor and a kind friend. She passed away September 4, 1908, and her husband died June 11, 1918. Her trials were many, and she saw scenes of desolation and destruction. There is a story that has been passed down through the family that about the year 1900 George Fenn, her stepfather, came to see Ann at Palmyra and said:

"Ann, there is a fortune waiting for you in England and I've come to take you over there. You're the only heir of Eliza Ann Dyer Ward Fenn." She answered, "I wouldn't cross that water for all the money there is in England!" He said, "Then it will be turned over to the orphanage." Bearl Fenn Gasher

Parents: Charles William WARD and Elizabeth Ann "Eliza" DYER.

Spouse: Horace David Andrew Jackson KING. Horace David Andrew Jackson KING and Ann WARD were married on 31 DEC 1866 in Provo, Utah County, Utah. Children were: Franklin Maroni KING, Eliza Ann KING, Clinton KING, Clinton KING, Mary Elizabeth KING, George Alfred KING, John Thomas KING, Sarah Emma KING, Esther Matilda KING.


Benjamin Horace WARD was born on 5 SEP 1889 in Danville, Caledonia County, Vermont. He died on 5 NOV 1972 at Danville, Caledonia County, Vermont. He was buried in the Danville Green Cemetery at Danville, Caledonia County, Vermont

Spouse: Helen Myra COLBY. Benjamin Horace WARD and Helen Myra COLBY were married on 5 MAR 1913 in Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: NEHGS, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1911-1915.)


Charles William WARD was born on 30 OCT 1830 in Eaton-Bray, Bedfordshire, England. He died on 14 OCT 1848 at Eaton-Bray, Bedfordshire, England. He has Ancestral File Number 4JHC-B1. Parents: Thomas WARD and Hannah ASHDEN.

Spouse: Elizabeth Ann "Eliza" DYER. Charles William WARD and Elizabeth Ann "Eliza" DYER were married on 10 SEP 1847 in Eaton-Bray, Bedfordshire, England. Children were: Ann WARD.


Clarence WARD was born on 5 JAN 1933 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. He was a Manager - Market. Parents: Melton Cass WARD and Hazel Henrietta DALRYMPLE.

Spouse: Correne Marie HAARHUES. Clarence WARD and Correne Marie HAARHUES were married on 23 NOV 1956 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. Children were: Danice Lynn WARD, Diane Jill WARD, Sheryl Lee WARD, Kristine Corenne WARD.


Danice Lynn WARD was born on 12 FEB 1958 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. Parents: Clarence WARD and Correne Marie HAARHUES.


Daniel Eugene WARD was born on 1 JAN 1953 in Fairbanks, Alaska. Parents: Glen Melton WARD and Marjorie FULLER.


Debra Lynn WARD was born on 30 DEC 1958 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. Parents: Glen Melton WARD and Marjorie FULLER.


Diane Jill WARD was born on 15 MAY 1959 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. Parents: Clarence WARD and Correne Marie HAARHUES.


Donald W. WARD was born on 1 JUN 1960 in Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington. Parents: Glen Melton WARD and Marjorie FULLER.


Douglas Wayne WARD was born in DEC 1951 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. Parents: Glen Melton WARD and Marjorie FULLER.


Effie May WARD was born on 23 OCT 1877 in Easthamptom, Hampshire County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: FHL Film 0186147; Town meeting records, 1785-1865 Easthampton (Massachusetts). Town Clerk.) She appeared in the census in 1880 in Easthamptom, Hampshire County, Massachusetts. (living with father) Parents: Oscar WARD and Ella J. ALEXANDER (twin).


Elizabeth D. WARD was born on 24 MAY 1889 in Warner, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She appeared in the census on 8 JAN 1920 in Hillsborough, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. She died in 1962. She was buried in the New Pond Cemetery at Bradford, Merrimack County, New Hampshire

Spouse: Lloyd Eugene COLBY. Lloyd Eugene COLBY and Elizabeth D. WARD were married on 29 NOV 1911 in Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.
Groom's Name: Lloyd E. Colby
Groom's Birth Date: 1886
Groom's Birthplace: Warner, N. H.
Groom's Age: 25
Bride's Name: Elizabeth D. Ward
Bride's Birth Date: 1889
Bride's Birthplace: Warner, N. H.
Bride's Age: 22
Marriage Date: 29 Nov 1911
Marriage Place: Concord, New Hampshire
Groom's Father's Name: Charles M. Colby
Groom's Mother's Name: Erneline Davis
Bride's Father's Name: Chester D. Ward
Bride's Mother's Name: Belle E. Davis
Groom's Race: White
Groom's Marital Status: Single
Groom's Previous Wife's Name:
Bride's Race: White
Bride's Marital Status: Single
Bride's Previous Husband's Name:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M01466-4
System Origin: New Hampshire-EASy
Source Film Number: 1003063
Reference Number: p 51
Collection: New Hampshire Marriages, 1720-1920

Children were: Thelma R. COLBY.


Esther WARD has Ancestral File Number 19W5-21N. He Widow.

Spouse: Ebenezer HAWLEY. Esther WARD and Ebenezer HAWLEY were married on 19 APR 1678 in Stratford, Fairfield County, Connecticut.


Frank WARD was born date unknown.

Spouse: Mary MOOD. Frank WARD and Mary MOOD were married date unknown. Children were: Melton Cass WARD.


Glen Melton WARD was born on 2 NOV 1931 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. He was a Railroad worker. Parents: Melton Cass WARD and Hazel Henrietta DALRYMPLE.

Spouse: Marjorie FULLER. Glen Melton WARD and Marjorie FULLER were married on 13 JUL 1950 in Fort Lewis, Pierce County, Washington. Children were: Douglas Wayne WARD, Daniel Eugene WARD, Debra Lynn WARD, Donald W. WARD.


Hattie Jane WARD was born on 29 NOV 1862 in Corinth, Orange County, Vermont. Daughter of Levi Ward and Harriet McCrillis. She appeared in the census on 13 MAR 1920 in Corinth, Orange County, Vermont. She died on 23 JAN 1935 at Corinth, Orange County, Vermont.

Spouse: Victor Alson COLBY. Victor Alson COLBY and Hattie Jane WARD were married on 11 NOV 1888 in Corinth, Orange County, Vermont. Children were: Nellie COLBY, Charles COLBY, Calvin Joseph COLBY, Earl Victor COLBY, Glen COLBY, Ruby Mae COLBY, Infant Son COLBY.


Kristine Corenne WARD was born on 22 JAN 1963 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. Parents: Clarence WARD and Correne Marie HAARHUES.


Lester J. WARD died on 14 JAN 1970 at Florida. He was born date unknown.

Spouse: Mildred Violet COLBY. Lester J. WARD and Mildred Violet COLBY were married on 6 APR 1968 in Jenson Beach, Martin County, Florida.


Martha WARD was born about 1633 in Potton, Bedfordshire, England. She is reference number 3417.

Spouse: John MILLAR. John MILLAR and Martha WARD were married on 4 MAY 1654 in Potton, Bedfordshire, England. Children were: Jasper (Jesper) MILLAR (twin), Mary MILLAR, John MILLAR, John MILLAR (twin), Anne MILLAR, Elizabeth MILLAR (twin), Ric (Richard) MILLAR (twin).


Mary Elizabeth WARD was born on 2 AUG 1844 in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Daughter of Proctor D. WARD and Senith. She appeared in the census in 1870 in Warner, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She appeared in the census in 1880 in Bradford, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She appeared in the census in 1900 in Bradford, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She died in 1909 at Bradford, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She was buried in the New Pond Cemetery at Bradford, Merrimack County, New Hampshire

Spouse: Uriah COLBY. Uriah COLBY and Mary Elizabeth WARD were married on 28 AUG 1864 in Warner, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. (SOURCE: FHL Number 1000976; COLBY, Uriah, Age: 26 years; Marriage: Mary E. WARD, Age: 21 years; Date: 28 Aug 1864; Recorded in: Birth and Marriage Index for New Hampshire.) Children were: Clara Dell COLBY, Fred A. COLBY.


Mary Jane WARD was born in JUN 1852 in Indian Falls, Genesee County, New York. Daughter of Emery WARD 1814-1890 and Susan HIGGINS b. Pavilion Center, NY. She appeared in the census in 1880 in Pembroke, Genesee County, New York. She appeared in the census on 14 JUN 1900 in Pembroke, Genesee County, New York. (7 children, 5 living.) She died in 1928. Buried at Evergreen Hill Cemetery, Corfu, Genesee County, New York.

Spouse: Alexander COLBY. Alexander COLBY and Mary Jane WARD were married about 1872. Children were: Bertha COLBY, Alice C. COLBY, Charles H. COLBY (twin), Harriet H. COLBY (twin), Estella M. COLBY, William COLBY, Jennie L. COLBY, Ruth COLBY, Earl Glenn COLBY.


Mattie M. WARD was born in AUG 1851 in Vermont. She appeared in the census on 28 JUN 1900 in Derby, Orleans County, Vermont. (1 child, 1 living.)

Spouse: Nehemiah M. COLBY. Nehemiah M. COLBY and Mattie M. WARD were married on 1 JAN 1883 in Derby, Orleans County, Vermont. Children were: Ward R. COLBY.


Melton Cass WARD was born on 16 JUL 1911 in Texas. He was a Dealer. Parents: Frank WARD and Mary MOOD.

Spouse: Hazel Henrietta DALRYMPLE. Melton Cass WARD and Hazel Henrietta DALRYMPLE were married on 9 NOV 1930 in Ellensburg, Kittitas County, Washington. Children were: Glen Melton WARD, Clarence WARD, Norma Jean WARD.

Spouse: Ozel BHEAR. Melton Cass WARD and Ozel BHEAR were married date unknown.


Myrtie L. WARD was born on 1 OCT 1879 in Easthamptom, Hampshire County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: FHL Film 0186147; Town meeting records, 1785-1865 Easthampton (Massachusetts). Town Clerk. Listed as Lydia A. Ward.) She appeared in the census in 1880 in Easthamptom, Hampshire County, Massachusetts. (living with father) Parents: Oscar WARD and Ella J. ALEXANDER (twin).


Nettie Ella WARD was born on 15 APR 1873 in Easthamptom, Hampshire County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: FHL Film 0186147; Town meeting records, 1785-1865 Easthampton (Massachusetts). Town Clerk.) She appeared in the census in 1880 in Easthamptom, Hampshire County, Massachusetts. (living with father) SOURCE: "A Genealogy of the Descendants of Abraham Colby and Elizabeth Blaisdell, his wife Who settled in Bow in 1768" By one of them, Concord, NH Printed by the Republican Press Association 1895. Parents: Oscar WARD and Ella J. ALEXANDER (twin).


Norma Jean WARD was born on 30 DEC 1936 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. Parents: Melton Cass WARD and Hazel Henrietta DALRYMPLE.

Spouse: Andrew Lewis FOLK Jr.. Andrew Lewis FOLK Jr. and Norma Jean WARD were married on 8 JUN 1957 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. Children were: Michael Wayne FOLK, Kenneth Ward FOLK, Martha Hazel FOLK, Mark Andrew FOLK.


Oscar WARD was born in 1845 in New York. He appeared in the census in 1880 in Easthamptom, Hampshire County, Massachusetts.
Census Place: Easthamptom, Hampshire, Massachusetts
Source: FHL Film 1254537 National Archives Film T9-0537 Page 334B
Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Oscar WARD Self M M W 34 NY
Occ: Overser In The Suspender Mill Fa: NY Mo: NY
Ella J. WARD Wife F M W 29 MA
Occ: Keeping House Fa: NH Mo: NH
Nettie E. WARD Dau F S W 7 MA
Occ: At School Fa: NY Mo: MA
Effie N. WARD Dau F S W 2 MA
Fa: NY Mo: MA
Myrtie L. WARD Dau F S W 7M MA
Fa: NY Mo: MA
Lydia WARD Other F S W 25 NY
Occ: Work In The Suspender Mill Fa: NY Mo: NY
Addie DONALDSON Other F S W 19 VT
Occ: Work In The Suspender Mill Fa: VT Mo: VT

Spouse: Ella J. ALEXANDER (twin). Oscar WARD and Ella J. ALEXANDER (twin) were married in 1868 in Easthamptom, Hampshire County, Massachusetts. Children were: Amy D. WARD, Nettie Ella WARD, Effie May WARD, Myrtie L. WARD.


Sheryl Lee WARD was born on 28 SEP 1960 in Yakima, Yakima County, Washington. Parents: Clarence WARD and Correne Marie HAARHUES.


Thomas WARD was born about 1798 in Eaton-Bray, Bedfordshire, England. He has Ancestral File Number CQ3H-MJ.

Spouse: Hannah ASHDEN. Thomas WARD and Hannah ASHDEN were married on 27 JUL 1823 in Eaton-Bray, Bedfordshire, England. Children were: Charles William WARD.


Annie Sabera WARE was born on 29 NOV 1837 in Stonington, Hancock County, Maine. She has Ancestral File Number 1TTG-R8V. Parents: Nathaniel WARE and Eunice Thurlow COLBY.


Esther Hannah WARE was born about 1843/44 in Stonington, Hancock County, Maine. She appeared in the census on 9 AUG 1850 in Deer Isle, Hancock County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother.) She appeared in the census on 12 JUN 1860 in Deer Isle, Hancock County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother.) She has Ancestral File Number 1TTG-RCH. Parents: Nathaniel WARE and Eunice Thurlow COLBY.


Eunice Colby WARE (twin) was born on 3 MAY 1841 in Stonington, Hancock County, Maine. She has Ancestral File Number 1TTG-R93. Parents: Nathaniel WARE and Eunice Thurlow COLBY.


James Llewellyn Duncon WARE was born on 30 DEC 1831 in Deer Isle, Hancock County, Maine. He appeared in the census on 9 AUG 1850 in Deer Isle, Hancock County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother.) He appeared in the census on 12 JUN 1860 in Deer Isle, Hancock County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother.) He has Ancestral File Number 1TTG-R58. Parents: Nathaniel WARE and Eunice Thurlow COLBY.

Spouse: Lydia A. COLE. James Llewellyn Duncon WARE and Lydia A. COLE were married on 17 DEC 1855 in Deer Isle, Hancock County, Maine.


Joseph Colby WARE (twin) was born on 3 MAY 1841 in Stonington, Hancock County, Maine. He appeared in the census on 12 JUN 1860 in Deer Isle, Hancock County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother.) He has Ancestral File Number 1TTG-RB9. Parents: Nathaniel WARE and Eunice Thurlow COLBY.


Mary Vienne WARE was born on 8 OCT 1833 in Stonington, Hancock County, Maine. She appeared in the census on 9 AUG 1850 in Deer Isle, Hancock County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother.) She has Ancestral File Number 1TTG-R8G. Parents: Nathaniel WARE and Eunice Thurlow COLBY.


Nathaniel WARE was born in 1774 in New Hampshire. He appeared in the census on 9 AUG 1850 in Deer Isle, Hancock County, Maine. He appeared in the census on 12 JUN 1860 in Deer Isle, Hancock County, Maine. He has Ancestral File Number 1TTG-PH0.

Spouse: Eunice Thurlow COLBY. Nathaniel WARE and Eunice Thurlow COLBY were married about 1830. Children were: James Llewellyn Duncon WARE, Mary Vienne WARE, Sarah Lovina WARE, Annie Sabera WARE, Joseph Colby WARE (twin), Eunice Colby WARE (twin), Esther Hannah WARE.


Samuel WARE was born in 1788 in Connecticut. In 1850 he was a F. W. Baptist Minister in Sodus, Wayne County, New York. He appeared in the census in 1850 in Sodus, Wayne County, New York. In 1860 he was a F. W. Baptist Minister in Commerce, Oakland County, Michigan. He appeared in the census in 1860 in Commerce, Oakland County, Michigan.

Spouse: Lucy DENNIS. Samuel WARE and Lucy DENNIS were married about 1845 in Sodus, Wayne County, New York.

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