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Amos Ivan TAYLOR was born on 20 FEB 1892 in Springville, Utah County, Utah. He died on 24 MAY 1905 at Springville, Utah County, Utah. Parents: Jabez TAYLOR and Mary Ruth TAYLOR.


Annie E. TAYLOR was born on 10 MAR 1863 in Belper, Derbyshire, England. She died on 25 JUL 1928. Parents: Daniel TAYLOR and Mary BRADSHAW.

Spouse: Henry COOK. Henry COOK and Annie E. TAYLOR were married date unknown in England.


Barbara Colby TAYLOR was born date unknown. Parents: Randy TAYLOR and Catherine Ray RYAN.


Caroline Matilda TAYLOR was born on 6 JUN 1828 in Norridgewock, Somerset County, Maine. She appeared in the census in 1860 in Chelsea, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. She appeared in the census in 1870 in Norridgewock, Somerset County, Maine. She appeared in the census in 1880 in Norridgewock, Somerset County, Maine. She appeared in the census in 1900 in Norridgewock, Somerset County, Maine. She was also known as Carrie.

Spouse: William Hazen COLBY. William Hazen COLBY and Caroline Matilda TAYLOR were married on 8 OCT 1857 in Somerset County, Maine. (SOURCE: FHL Film 0012210; Records, 1833-1890 Maine. Court of County Commissioners (Somerset County).) Children were: Henry T. COLBY, Charles Benjamin COLBY.


Chan TAYLOR was born date unknown. She has Ancestral File Number BHSJ-F9.

Spouse: Thomas Jasper WILLIAMS. Thomas Jasper WILLIAMS and Chan TAYLOR were married date unknown.


Charles TAYLOR was born on 10 APR 1873 in Belper, Derbyshire, England. He died on 7 JAN 1934. Parents: Daniel TAYLOR and Mary BRADSHAW.

Spouse: Lillie Weston SIMPSON. Charles TAYLOR and Lillie Weston SIMPSON were married about 1895 in England.


Charles TAYLOR was born on 5 AUG 1905. Son of Fred Taylor and Etta Holmes. He died on 16 OCT 1988 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

Spouse: Louise Elmira COLBY. Charles TAYLOR and Louise Elmira COLBY were married on 4 AUG 1923. Children were: Fred Eugene TAYLOR, Eleanor May TAYLOR, Edna Frances TAYLOR, Charles TAYLOR.


Charles TAYLOR was born in OCT 1927 in Salisbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. He died in OCT 1927 at Salisbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. (BOOK SOURCE: "The History of Boscawen & Webster, New Hampshire, from 1878 to 1933." by Willis G. Buxton.) Parents: Charles TAYLOR and Louise Elmira COLBY.


Charles Russel TAYLOR was born date unknown. Parents: Russell Vernon TAYLOR and Evelyn Louise COLBY.

Spouse: Pat BAREFOOT. Charles Russel TAYLOR and Pat BAREFOOT were married date unknown.

Spouse: Marcial (---). Charles Russel TAYLOR and Marcial (---) were married date unknown.

Spouse: Marilyn (---). Charles Russel TAYLOR and Marilyn (---) were married date unknown. Children were: Heath Michael TAYLOR, Ryan J. TAYLOR.


Christina Jenckes TAYLOR was born date unknown. Parents: Randy TAYLOR and Catherine Ray RYAN.


Clara Gertrude TAYLOR was born about 1873 in Richmond, Quebec, Canada. She died on 11 JUL 1917 at Tilton, Belknap County, New Hampshire.

Spouse: Fritz Harlan PRESCOTT. Fritz Harlan PRESCOTT and Clara Gertrude TAYLOR were married about 1901. Children were: Mary G. PRESCOTT, Seth Taylor PRESCOTT, Charles William PRESCOTT.


Clifford TAYLOR was born on 5 JUN 1907 in Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts. He died on 4 JUN 1986.

Spouse: Faoline Hope COLBY. Clifford TAYLOR and Faoline Hope COLBY were married on 16 AUG 1945.


Cora M. TAYLOR was born in MAR 1858 in Kansas. She appeared in the census on 6 JUN 1900 in Santa Barbara County, California.

Spouse: John Langdon COLBY. John Langdon COLBY and Cora M. TAYLOR were married on 6 OCT 1888 in New York City, New York County, New York. Children were: John Langdon COLBY.


Craig TAYLOR was born on 21 NOV 1948 in Loa, Wayne County, Utah. He died on 10 OCT 1998. Parents: Lowell J. TAYLOR and Montez HANSEN.


Cyrus TAYLOR was born on 25 OCT 1833 in Sanbornton, Belknap County, New Hampshire. (BOOK SOURCE: "The Colby Family in Early America" by Frederick Lewis Weis, Caledonia, The Colonial Press, pub 1970.) Parents: Dearborn TAYLOR and Mahala COLBY.

Spouse: Mary E. WOODWARD. Cyrus TAYLOR and Mary E. WOODWARD were married on 27 DEC 1856.


Daniel TAYLOR was christened/baptized on 20 FEB 1814 in Belper, Derbyshire, England. He died at India. Parents: Daniel TAYLOR and Susanna HALLSWORTH.


Daniel TAYLOR was christened/baptized on 4 APR 1763 in Duffield, Belper, Derbyshire, England. He died on 22 SEP 1823 at Duffield, Belper, Derbyshire, England. He was buried in Belper, Derbyshire, England.
Burial was at the St. Peters Church, Belper, Derbyshire, England Parents: Samuel TAYLOR and Elizabeth (TAYLOR).

Spouse: Susanna HALLSWORTH. Daniel TAYLOR and Susanna HALLSWORTH were married on 9 OCT 1786 in Duffield, Belper, Derbyshire, England. Children were: Joseph TAYLOR, Thomas TAYLOR, Samuel TAYLOR, William TAYLOR, Thirza TAYLOR, Abraham TAYLOR, Daniel TAYLOR, Nathaniel TAYLOR.


Daniel TAYLOR was born on 23 NOV 1838 in Belper, Derbyshire, England. He died on 29 MAY 1874 at Belper, Derbyshire, England. He was buried on 1 JUN 1874 in Belper, Derbyshire, England. He was a Horse nail maker in Belper, Derbyshire, England. The cause of death was listed as Phthisis (Tuberculosis). Parents: Thomas TAYLOR and Ann BALL.

Spouse: Mary BRADSHAW. Daniel TAYLOR and Mary BRADSHAW were married on 24 MAY 1858 in Belper, Derbyshire, England.
Married in Parish of Horsley, Derbyshire, England. Children were: Mary Ruth TAYLOR, Abraham James TAYLOR, Amos TAYLOR, Annie E. TAYLOR, Emma TAYLOR, Samuel TAYLOR, Sarah TAYLOR, Daniel TAYLOR, John TAYLOR, Charles TAYLOR.


Daniel TAYLOR was born on 8 MAR 1871 in Belper, Derbyshire, England. He died in DEC 1937. Parents: Daniel TAYLOR and Mary BRADSHAW.

Spouse: Ellen WILSON. Daniel TAYLOR and Ellen WILSON were married about 1892 in England.


Darwin Abraham TAYLOR was born on 14 FEB 1894 in Springville, Utah County, Utah. He died on 21 JAN 1970 at Spanish Fork, Utah County, Utah. Parents: Jabez TAYLOR and Mary Ruth TAYLOR.

Spouse: Eleanor May MARTELL. Darwin Abraham TAYLOR and Eleanor May MARTELL were married on 16 APR 1919 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.


Dearborn TAYLOR was born on 24 DEC 1805 in Sanbornton, Belknap County, New Hampshire. Son of Jonathan Taylor and Sarah Dearborn. He died on 22 MAY 1874.

Spouse: Mahala COLBY. Dearborn TAYLOR and Mahala COLBY were married on 3 JAN 1833 in Sanbornton, Belknap County, New Hampshire. Children were: Cyrus TAYLOR, Samuel TAYLOR.


Delora Arabell TAYLOR was born on 2 MAR 1852 in Lempster, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. She appeared in the census on 13 JUN 1860 in Lempster, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. (living at home with father and mother.) She appeared in the census on 18 JUN 1870 in Lempster, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. (living at home with father and mother.) Parents: Erastus Day TAYLOR and Mary COLBY.


Doris TAYLOR was born on 22 JUN 1910 in Springville, Utah County, Utah. She died on 19 MAY 1968 at Springville, Utah County, Utah. She was buried in the Evergreen Cemetery at Springville, Utah County, Utah Parents: Jabez TAYLOR and Mary Ruth TAYLOR.

Spouse: William Lewis GAY. William Lewis GAY and Doris TAYLOR were married on 12 JUL 1933 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.


Edna Frances TAYLOR was born on 4 SEP 1926 in Salisbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. (BOOK SOURCE: "The History of Boscawen & Webster, New Hampshire, from 1878 to 1933." by Willis G. Buxton.) Parents: Charles TAYLOR and Louise Elmira COLBY.


Eleanor May TAYLOR was born on 3 JUL 1925 in Salisbury, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. (BOOK SOURCE: "The History of Boscawen & Webster, New Hampshire, from 1878 to 1933." by Willis G. Buxton.) Parents: Charles TAYLOR and Louise Elmira COLBY.


Elizabeth TAYLOR was born on 20 SEP 1807 in Jaffrey, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. She appeared in the census on 9 AUG 1850 in Bradford, Orange County, Vermont.

Spouse: Moody COLBY. Moody COLBY and Elizabeth TAYLOR filed marriage intentions on 10 JAN 1832 in Jaffery, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. They were married on 17 JAN 1832 in Jaffery, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Children were: Henry Bowditch COLBY.


Elizabeth TAYLOR was born on 24 DEC 1815 in Belper, Derbyshire, England. She died on 11 JAN 1891. Parents: Thomas TAYLOR and Ann BALL.


Ella M. TAYLOR was born on 13 JAN 1843 in Lempster, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. She appeared in the census on 30 OCT 1850 in Lempster, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. (living at home with father and mother.) She appeared in the census on 13 JUN 1860 in Lempster, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. (living at home with father and mother.) Parents: Erastus Day TAYLOR and Mary COLBY.


Emma TAYLOR was born about 1836 in Belper, Derbyshire, England. She died in NOV 1919. Parents: Thomas TAYLOR and Ann BALL.


Emma TAYLOR was born on 27 JUL 1864 in Belper, Derbyshire, England. She died on 18 JAN 1868 at Belper, Derbyshire, England. Parents: Daniel TAYLOR and Mary BRADSHAW.


Photo Emma J. TAYLOR was born on 3 JUL 1842 in Laund Hill, Belper, Derbyshire, England. She immigrated on 23 APR 1862 from England to Utah. JOHN J. BOYD
Ship: 1311 tons: 195' x 38' x 28'
Built: 1855 by S. G. Bogart at New York City, New York
Nearly two thousand Latter-day Saints were transported to America in three voyages by the full-bodied ship John J. Boyd of New York. Her first voyage began at Liverpool on 12 December 1855, just a few months after she was launched. On board were between 508 and 512 Mormon emigrants from Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Iceland, Italy, England, Ireland, and Scotland. Elder Knud Peterson presided over the Saints. The shipmaster was Captain Thomas Austin. He had previously skippered the 1418-ton ship Jacob A. Westervelt and the 1448-ton ship Cultivator. It was a well-ordered company. Rules of cleanliness and conduct were established. A trumpet called the emigrants to prayer morning and evening, and religious services were held frequently in the English, Danish, and Italian languages.
During the crossing the square-rigger encountered severe gales and hurricanes and midway in the Atlantic came upon the clipper ship Louis Napoleon in a sinking condition. The stricken craft was from Baltimore and bound for Liverpool with a cargo of flour. Her mast and spars were blown away and her leeward bulwarks smashed. Realizing the hopeless situation, her master and crew asked to be taken off their ship. They were welcomed aboard the John J. Boyd, whose own hands were suffering from sickness and exhaustion. The emigrants were also suffering. Measles had broken out, and the death rate was high among the children. In describing the weather and health conditions, Elder Charles R. Savage, a returning missionary, wrote:
Our captain got superstitious on account of the long passage, and ordered that there should be no singing on board; the mate said that all ships that had preachers on board were always sure of a bad passage; however, the Lord heard our prayers, and in His own due time we arrived at our destination. On the evening of the 15th of February we were safely at anchor-having been 66 days out from Liverpool.... On our taking the pilot, he informed us that there had been many disasters during the months of January and February; many ships had been wrecked. We made the passage without the loss of a single spar.
On 16 February the emigrants landed at New York.
Under the command of Captain J. H. Thomas, her master since 1857, the John J. Boyd sailed from Liverpool on 23 April 1862 with 702 Latter-day Saints aboard. Apostles Charles C. Rich, Amasa M. Lyman, and George Q. Cannon organized the company and appointed Elders James S. Brown as president and John Lindsay and Joseph C. Rich as his counselors. There were also five other returning missionaries besides the presidency. After a thirty-nine-day voyage, which though successful was somewhat longer than usual because of head winds, the Saints landed on 1 June at New York.
On 30 April 1863 the John J. Boyd with 767 Mormons aboard sailed from Liverpool again under the command of Captain J. H. Thomas. Elder William W. Cluff presided over the Saints, assisted by Elders Knud H. Bruun and William S. Baxter-three of nine returning missionaries. Most of the emigrants were from Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. During the twenty-nine-day voyage sanitation and food were commendable. The emigrants sighted a number of icebergs and whales. The vessel arrived at New York on 29 May.
Named for an early marine merchant, the John J. Boyd was owned by William Tyson of New York. She was a three-decker with a square stern, round tuck, and billethead. Apparently in 1860 this packet ship was damaged by fire and salvaged. In July 1863, probably because of the Civil War, the vessel was sold to foreign owners.
Passenger List Sources: (1855)
LDS Passenger List (Family History Library) Film: #025,691
U.S. Government Passenger List (Family History Library) Film: #175, 516
Identification Number on U.S. Government Passenger List: #071
List of Passengers Published in New York Newspaper, The Mormon (January 5, 1856)
Passenger List Sources: (1862)
LDS Passenger List (Family History Library) Film: #025,691
U.S. Government Passenger List (Family History Library) Film: #175, 575
Passenger List Sources: (1863)
LDS Passenger List (Family History Library) Film: #025,691
U.S. Government Passenger List (Family History Library) Film: #175, 585
Identification Number on U.S. Government Passenger List: #502

==================================
Ship: John J. Boyd
Date of Departure: 23 Apr 1862 Port of Departure: Liverpool, England
LDS Immigrants: 702 Church Leader: James S. Brown
Date of Arrival: 1 Jun 1862 Port of Arrival: New York, New York
Source(s): BMR, Book #1047, pp. 87-125 (FHL #025,691); Customs (FHL #175,575)
Notes: "DEPARTURE. -- The packet ship John J. Boyd, Captain H. Thomas, sailed on the 23rd instant for New York, with 702 souls of the Saints on board. On Monday afternoon, the 21st instant, Presidents Lyman, Rich, and Cannon visited the vessel, as she lay in the river, organized the company appointing Elder James S. Brown president, and Elders John Lindsay and Joseph C. Rich his counselors, and delivered addresses to the Saints on their duties and the necessity for their living continually so as to enjoy the Holy Spirit, that its influence might sustain them under the changing scenes and varied circumstances incident to the journey they had entered upon. The Spirit of God was poured forth, and a holy influence shed its power upon all on board. Elder James S. Brown, late president of the Nottingham District, Elder Joseph C. Rich, late president of the Derbyshire Conference, Elder R. A. McBride, late traveling elder in the London Conference, who all arrived from Zion on the 27th July, 1860; Elder Charles Welch, late president of Hull Conference, Elder R. Hodgerts, late president of the South Conference, Elder Henry Duce, late traveling elder in the Derbyshire Conference, who arrived on September 18th, 1860; and Elder Edward Pugh, late traveling elder in the Herefordshire Conference, who arrived July 28th, 1861, who have been on missions to these lands, left with this company on their return to their homes in the valleys of the mountains. These brethren have labored diligently in the ministry since their arrival here from Zion, and carry home with them the blessings of the presidency and the prayers of those who have been benefitted by their labors. Elder J. S. Brown has suffered more or less from sickness since his arrival; but, by the assistance of the Holy Spirit, he has been able, in his weakness, to do a good work. Elders John Lindsay, late president of the Lincolnshire Conference, Abraham Orme, late president of the Leicester Conference, Aaron Nelson, president of the Derbyshire Conference previous to Elder J. C. Rich's appointment, Edwin Scott, late traveling elder in the Essex Conference, and Daniel Matheson, late traveling elder in the Bedfordshire Conference, of the native ministry, hailed with much joy the arrival of the period when they were privileged to go to Zion with the gathering Saints. May the blessings of heaven be with all on board, and ere long land them safely on the shores of the land of Joseph, and enable them to reach their mountain home with joy and rejoicing."
<MS, 24:18 (May 3, 1862), p.283>

"Wed. 23. [Apr. 1862] -- The ship John J. Boyd sailed from Liverpool, England, with 701 Saints, under the direction of James S. Brown; it arrived at New York June 1st."
<CC, p.67>
She appeared in the census on 11 AUG 1870 in Springville, Utah County, Utah. She was baptized on 3 FEB 1876 in Springville, Utah County, Utah. She appeared in the census on 7 JUN 1880 in Springville, Utah County, Utah. She was ill with Cancer from 1897 to 1907 in Springville, Utah County, Utah. She died on 9 NOV 1907 at Springville, Utah County, Utah. She was buried on 11 NOV 1907 in the Springville City Cemetery, at Springville, Utah County, Utah (Grave Location: Blk. 32 Lot 4 Pos. 3.)
EDWIN THOMAS WATTS FAMILY
PIONEERS OF 1854 TO 1856
Written July 13, 1961
by Sarah Ina Beardall

Part 2

On May 21, 1861, Edwin received his Patriarchal Blessing fro Patriarch John Young who was a brother of Brigham Young. The reporter was L. O. Littlefield of Provo. Edwin was told in this blessing: "You shall have a numerous posterity upon the earth." He was 51 years old at the time he received the blessing and his wife Mary was nearing 60. They must have wondered and thought a great deal about that promise because of their age. They both lived to see the promise fulfilled. Three years later, with Mary's approval and blessing Edwin took a second wife, her name was Emma J. Taylor. On April 9, 1864, he had Emma and Mary sealed to him in the Endowment House at Salt Lake City.

Emma Taylor immigrated with other members of her family including her granparents, Thomas and Ann Ball Taylor, in 1862. Emma was the first child of Abraham and Hannah Varney Taylor. Emma was born in Land Hill which is in Belper, Derbyshire, England, on Sunday, July 3, 1842. She had two sisters, Mary Ann Taylor (Brown), born February 26, 1846; Harriet Taylor (Crandoll), born October 11, 1848. She had two brothers, Hyrum James Taylor, born May 12, 1852, and Jabez Taylor who was born June 19, 1861. They were all born in England.

Emma's father baptized her when she was 12 years old (1854) while still in England. Emma loved to sing and started singing in a choir in England. She spent many enjoyable hours singing and she possessed a lovely soprano voice.

The Taylor sailed from Liverpool on the 23rd of April and arrived in New York, June 1, 1862. They sailed on the Ship 'John J. Boyd' with the James S. Brown Company. Ther were 701 saints who made the trip. This was one of the largest groups to sail on any one ship during the immigration.

After arriving in New York they traveled by rail and by boat to Florence, Nebraska, where they purchased their supplies to cross the plains. The James S. Brown Company left Florence, July 28, with 46 wagons and about 200 immigrants. They were an independent company. Traveling by ox-team and walking most of the way, they arrived in Salt Lake City, Thursday, Octobe 2, 1862.

Emma was twenty years old at the time of her arrival in Utah. On the 6th of December she was married to Jacob Fisher. They were unsuited for each other from the beginning of their marriage. After living together a short time, they were divorced. There were no children of this marriage. Emma later married Edwin Watts and was sealed to him in the Endowment House, April 9, 1864.

Edwin and Emma had their first child, Mary Angelina, on the 26th day of January, 1865 at Provo, Utah. Soon afterward they moved to Springville where their second child, a son, was born. They named him Edwin Thomas, he was born July 13, 1867. After moving from Provo to Springville, Edwin and his family lived in a two room log house which was located at approximately 650 North Main Street in Springville.

Edwin was happy to have a family after so many years. He and Emma were the parents of ten children. The other eight being: Rosehanna (Grosebeck), Born December 22, 1869; Abraham, born September 24, 1872, he died October 29, 1872; Harriet Mehaleth, born November 22, 1874; Hyrm James, born March 11, 1875; Martha Ann, born March 28, 1880; Lucy, born July 5, 1881. The last child May was born May 4, 1863. With the exception of Mary Angelina all the children were born in Springville.

Mary loved Emma's children as if they were her own, and she was a second mother to them. Her busy hands helped to knit and clean the clothes for all of the family. She was a great help to Emma during the time Emma was bearing most of her children. They all worked together for the best interest of the family and they shared alike as a family unit.

On July 3, 1880, at the age of 79, Mary died. She lived a good and worthy life and she was the kind of companion that was missed by all the family.

Edwin was a hard worker and he did anything he could to earn an honest living to support his family. He hauled freight and would often travel some distance to get the goods he sold. During the early days of Utah, he bought rags which were valuable at that time as all the clothing was hand made. He sold them to the paper mills in Salt Lake to help supplement his income. He also sold crockery and worked as a teamster. After settling in Springville, he raised a garden and sold vegetables and fruit in the mining camps nearby. For many years he was the caretaker of the Springville City pasture and kept a record of all the stock kept there.

His one arm had the strength of two and he could handle a team with the best of drivers. He was a kind hearted and good man and was always ready to lend a helping hand to those in need. Often sitting with the sick or doing their chores when he was home.

Roads were called lanes and the mode of travel was by wagon, buggy or carts. People rode horseback when they were in a hurry. People would camp along the highway whenever night overtook them. The Watts' home was located on the main traveled route through Springville and many a traveler stopped at their house for the night. Beds were often made upon the floor for the Watts' children so that the tired travelers might have the comfort of a bed for the night.

Edwin remained active up to the age of 74 when he developed a heart condition. He died January 1, 1885, at Springville, Utah, at 3:00 A.M. on a Thursday. Emma and all their children were at Edwin's bedside at the time of his death. Emma was grief stricken but , with courage, the brave woman faced the future alone, determined to provide for her family, which was no easy task in those days. Mary Angelina was married to Joseph Garlic Shepherd and they had one child, Joseph Hyrum, at the time of her father's death. Harriet was seven years of age and Martha Ann was five. Both girls remembered their father having chin whiskers that tickled them.

William M. Clegg, the Springville poet was a good friend of the family and he also blessed Mary Angelina. He wrote a poem and gave it to Emma at the time of her husband's death. The words of the poem are very descriptive of the famil's feeling at this time.
Lines composed in affectionate remembrance of EDWIN WATTS, who died January 1, 1885 at Springville, Utah.

Dear father you have left us all
We never see you now
In pain for you our tears must fall
Our hearts with sorrow bow

Dear Mother looks for you in vain
At morning, noon and night
But you will never come again
To bless her longing sight

How hard you labored to provide
Food for our daily need
No shepherd harder tried
His waiting flock to feed

The king of terror came at last
And delt the deadly blow
Come all our cherished hopes to blast
And laid our guardian low

But yet a glorious meeting day
Awaits both us and you
If we all keep the narrow way
And to our God be true
(Sic) W. M. Clegg, Jan. 1885

To Emma and the Children.

This poem was retrieved from the records in the possession of Lucy Blackett. It was given to her by her mother.

Three daughters Harriet, Martha and Lucy have told of some of the struggles the family experienced in order to make a living after their father died.

The older girls worked in hames doing cleaning and washing clothes for what small wages they could earn. The family gathered ground cherries, a small green pod covered cherry that grows on vines close to the ground. The small fruit grew abundantly on the hillsides and in uncultivated places near their home. It makes a good preserve when mixed with another tart fruit.

With the help of the children Emma continued to raise a garden and small fruits which helped considerably with their living expenses. They also picked, cut and dried all kinds of fruit, apples, peaches and plums. Many times they picked and cleaned peaches from the Houtz orchard which was located near the foothills just east of their home. They worked for the Houtz by preparing fruit, and their pay was an equal amount to take home. They carried the fruit they earned several blocks to their house where it was also prepared and placed to dry in the sun. There was no canning or bottling in those days as we know it now. The canning that was done was in crock jars. They only used these jars for preserves and pickles. One or two large crocks of preserves was usually the limit of the family's sweet supply, which they used on special occasions and for treats. The preserves were kept for use during the winter time when the snow drifted as hich as the fences.

They had very little sugar. Sorghum was used for most of their sweetening needs. When it was boiled down, the cone syrup made a delicious taffy candy that everyone loved. Molasses candy was a must for all of the holidays, especially for Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Everything that could be dried was stored for winter. Apples had to be pared before drying and sometimes the neighbors children could come and help them with this task. They would all sing and tell stories to pass the time away as they worked. Peaches, plums and corn were also successfully dried. After the products were prepared they were carried up onto the lean-to roof of the house and spread upon large pieces of old muslin or sheeting to dry. The hot sun beating down upon the roof would soon dry the fruit and corn.

There was always the chance of a sudden summer shower soaking the products before they would completely dry. If this happened it had to be eaten right away or thrown away because it would mold if it got wet before it was completely dry.

Watching the fruit was one of Lucy's chores and she had to climb upon the house top many times a day during the drying process to turn and check the fruit. Using the chinked spaces between the logs as a ladder and by gripping the dormer ends of the logs she would get a toehold and pull herself onto the roof to do her task.

The family home was built of logs and it had open ceilings built of rough boards. These were later covered with musling cloth and sealed over. Along one end of the combined kitchen and living room stood a cobblestone fireplace. Fastened into its stone chimney hung the large heavy cast iron kettle that was used to do their cooking and water heating. Black burned from constant use the kettle cooked many one dish meals of patato stew, vegetable soup, or dried bean with pork. The meals were simmered in the pot for hours until the flavors were blended perfedtlly. Such cooking as the may have given the inspiration for the jingle "Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot, nine days old." The large family never had to worry about the porridge becoming nie days old. There were too many hungry mouths to feed to keep the supply fresh. There were times during leaner days when the old kettle cooked a mush with a little sorghum or dried fruit. This kept them from starving.

The Watts family believed in the law of tithing. One winter when they killed a pig, Emma sent half of it to the tithing office. She had faith and believed in what the Bible tells us in Malachi, "Bring ye all the tithes into the store house that there may be meat in mine house, and prove me now herewith, saith the Lord of hosts, if I will not open you the windows of heaven, and pour you a blessing, that there shall not be room enough to receive it." Emma believed what the Lord said and she knew He would keep this promise. If they were faithful He would provide ways and means for them to make a living. Such always proved to be the case.

Wash day meant there would be many trips to the spring for buckets of water. The spring was located about a block from the house. All the water they used for their household needs was carried from this spring. They scrubbed all of their clothes by hand and boiled the white ones to bleach them. They made their own soap and it took all day to do a washing. Carrying water was one of the chores taken care of by the children most of the time. They made their own soap and it took all day to do a washing. Carrying water was one of the chores taken care of by the children most of the time. They were also expected to keep the woodbox filled with logs and kindling for the fireplace. It was a great event for the family when they purchased their first cast iron stove.

Emma and the children were afraid of the Indians that sometimes came to their home begging and often stole their food. The squaws wore full skirts with concealed pockets in them. They usually managed to conceal things in these pockets without being seen. These seemingly small losses worked quite a hardship on the family at times.

Mary and Emma did all their own sewing and made quite a lot of things. They made quilts for the family's beds, tidies for the rocking chairs and knitted stockings. Three pair of stockings had to last each family member a year and so they were well darned and mended. It was once said: "The Watts kids were the best 'darned' kids in town." This was true in more ways than one.

After the death of her husband, the church sometimes helped Emma in the struggle to raise her family. She knitted and mended by the hour to pay her tithing, if she was unable to pay it in produce.

Emma cut and sewed carpet rags for other people for $1.00 per sack. It took hours to cut and sew a sack of raggs. The children all helped with the task. They worked many an evening until they were so tired they couldn't stay awake any longer. Lamp light or the firelight to sew by didn't save any eyes or make the task any easier. It was at such times as this that emma taught the children to sing and enjoy Mormon hymns. She would entertain them for hours with true pioneer stories. Her favorite hymn was "Come! Come! ye Saints." She learned and sang this song while crossing the plains in 1862.

The Springville City Hall was used for all amusements of both young and old. Everyone enjoyed many good times there with their neighbors. The old white meeting house was their house of worship and most of the children were blessed and baptized there.

One by one the children married and moved away, thus the years passed away. On February 3, 1876 Emma was re-baptized by Thomas Child and confirmed the same day by O. Stong.

On May 7, 1901 Emma and her brother Jabez went to the Salt Lake Temple and were proxies for the baptisms of Edwin's family in England that had passed on. Plans for the trip to the temple were made for a long time before they went.

The baptisms, endowments and sealings have been completed for Thomas and Ann Ball Watts, and all of Thomas's and Ann's children. Lucy Watts Chadwick Blackett was instrumental in finishing the work begun by her mother and uncle Jabez in 1901. The work was completed in 1938 in the Salt Lake Temple.

About 1897 Emma's health began failing. She became the victim of cancer which started from a mole on her face. She suffered from this condition for about ten years. She died on November 11, 1907 at the home of her daughter Emma Jemima and her husband Frank Beardall. They cared for her during the last two years of her illness when she became too ill to care for herself.

Emma lived a busy life which was tempered with hardship and pain. She enjoyed many moments of great happiness and joy with her family as she served her mission upon this earth. Her faith never faltered though it was sometimes sorely tried. She was a firm believer in prayer and her family asked the Lord's blessing and gave thanks for the many blessings they received. The children were taught to pray individually and in family prayers.

Edwin, Mary and Emma were among Utah's early pioneers and life was not easy for them. Though we may visualize the part our pioneer ancestors played in building our great nation, that their posterity might live in a land of opportunit, free to worship God as they please, little do we realize, were it not for them and the trials they endured, we would not be here.

Tribute to Edwin, Mary and Emma Watts

For every hill they had to climb
For every stone that bruised their feet
For all the blood and sweat and grime
For blinding storms and burning heat

Their hearts sang but a grateful song
These were the things that made them strong
For strength steel must be tempered and so must man
Tested and proven true as part of God's great plan

Come! Come ye saints no toil nor labor fear
But with joy wind your way
Was the song Emma sang
At the end of each weary day

For their willingness to bear
Life's struggle and strife
That we all may share
In a better life

For all these things bequeathed in hardship and tears
May our hearts sing through all our years
With gratitude and love
To God ..... above

Sarah Ina Beardall

Compiled and written by Sarah Ina Beardall from information gathered from family and church records. Including the Millennial Star, Journal history, Biographies and other sources. Our thanks go to Mabel Kindred, Martha Watts Hamilton, and Lucy Watts Chadwick Blackett for their help, and especially to Aunt Lucy who has spent hours with my husband, Clifton Lavon Beardall, and myself in checking the information we gathered with records in our possession and at the Genealogical Library in Salt Lake City.

__________________________________________________________

Lucy Blackett thinks the name of her mother's first husband was not Jacob. She believes his name was Samuel. At the time Lucy and Agnes Laney sent in the sheets to be cleared for the sealings of her father's group sheet, they were returned with a notation on the back saying they might be "interested to know Emma Taylor's marriage to Samuel Fisher had been annulled in the Endowment House before she was sealed to Edwin Watts." Lucy believes the notation was on the sheet they later returned at the time the work was done. As yet we haave not been able to locate it.

SOURCE: Utah Cemetery Index, Utah County. Emma Taylor Watts, b. 3 July 1842, d. 9 November 1907. Burial: Springville City Cemetery, Springville, Utah
2. TIB card shows baptism as 1855
3. TIB card Endowment House, #3754, Book D, Page 186
4. TIB card Endowment House, # 6638, Book D. Lvg, Page 317

Parents: Abraham TAYLOR and Hannah (Walters) VARNEY.

Spouse: Jacob FISHER. Jacob FISHER and Emma J. TAYLOR were married on 6 DEC 1862 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. They had their marriage annulled about 1863 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.

Spouse: Edwin Thomas WATTS. Edwin Thomas WATTS and Emma J. TAYLOR were married on 9 APR 1864 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. Children were: Mary Angelina WATTS, Edwin Thomas WATTS Jr., Rose Hannah WATTS, Abraham WATTS, Harriet Mahaleth WATTS, Hyrum James WATTS, Emma Jamima WATTS, Martha Ann WATTS, Lucy WATTS, Clara May WATTS.


Erastus Day TAYLOR was born on 27 AUG 1806 in Lempster, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. He appeared in the census on 30 OCT 1850 in Lempster, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. He appeared in the census on 13 JUN 1860 in Lempster, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. He appeared in the census on 18 JUN 1870 in Newport, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. He appeared in the census on 12 JUN 1880 in Newport, Sullivan County, New Hampshire.

Spouse: Mary COLBY. Erastus Day TAYLOR and Mary COLBY were married on 4 OCT 1836. Children were: Helen M. TAYLOR, Levi Colby TAYLOR, Ella M. TAYLOR, Delora Arabell TAYLOR.

Spouse: Charlotte M. (TAYLOR). Erastus Day TAYLOR and Charlotte M. (TAYLOR) were married about 1865.


Erica Lynn TAYLOR was born date unknown. Parents: Terrance Adrian TAYLOR and Deborah PETERSON.


Erin Leeann TAYLOR was born date unknown. Parents: Terrance Adrian TAYLOR and Deborah PETERSON.


Ethel Maud TAYLOR was born about 1880 in Quebec, Canada.

Spouse: Dennis Ellsworth COATES. Dennis Ellsworth COATES and Ethel Maud TAYLOR were married about 1900 in Quebec, Canada. Children were: Carl COATES, Clinton COATES, Ardis COATES, Russell COATES.


Eva May (Peterson) TAYLOR was born on 30 AUG 1902 in Barre, Washington County, Vermont. She died on 29 OCT 1965 at Burlington, Chittenden County, Vermont. (SOURCE: Ancestry.com; Vermont Death Records, 1909-2008.) She was buried in the Hope Cemetery at Barre, Washington County, Vermont

Spouse: John Herbert COLBY. John Herbert COLBY and Eva May (Peterson) TAYLOR were married on 12 JAN 1936 in Barre, Washington County, Vermont. (SOURCE: Ancestry.com; Vermont Marriage Records, 1909-2008.) Children were: Frederick Readon COLBY, Robert John COLBY.


Frances TAYLOR. Parents: Oscar TAYLOR and Annie Pearl COLBY.


Frank TAYLOR. Parents: Oscar TAYLOR and Annie Pearl COLBY.


Frank Normon TAYLOR was born on 29 NOV 1905 in Springville, Utah County, Utah. He died on 23 APR 1990. He had Social Security Number 528-10-7157. Parents: Jabez TAYLOR and Mary Ruth TAYLOR.

Spouse: Eliza Ann THOMPSON. Frank Normon TAYLOR and Eliza Ann THOMPSON were married on 18 SEP 1924 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.


Fred Eugene TAYLOR was born on 8 JAN 1924 in Webster, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. He died in MAR 1924 at Webster, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. (BOOK SOURCE: "The History of Boscawen & Webster, New Hampshire, from 1878 to 1933." by Willis G. Buxton.) Parents: Charles TAYLOR and Louise Elmira COLBY.


Georgianna TAYLOR was born in 1844 in Maine. She appeared in the census in 1880 in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine. She died on 15 FEB 1883 at Portland, Cumberland County, Maine. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 9767; Index to vital records prior to 1892 for Maine.)

Spouse: Edward Francis COLBY. Edward Francis COLBY and Georgianna TAYLOR were married on 16 MAY 1859 in Portland, Cumberland County, Maine. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 9767; Index to vital records prior to 1892 for Maine.) Children were: May E. COLBY, Lideia COLBY, Clifford R. COLBY.


Hannah TAYLOR was born on 31 JAN 1782 in Sanbornton, Belknap County, New Hampshire. Daughter of William Taylor and Jenny Smith. She died on 5 SEP 1863 at Sanbornton, Belknap County, New Hampshire.

Spouse: Lieut. Isaac COLBY. Lieut. Isaac COLBY and Hannah TAYLOR were married on 6 MAR 1800 in Sanbornton, Belknap County, New Hampshire. SOURCE: FHL Number 1000976; Marriage: Hannah TAYLOR, Date: 06 Mar 1800; Recorded in: Birth and Marriage Index for New Hampshire. Children were: George Curwen Ward COLBY, Mahala COLBY, Ira COLBY, Rufus COLBY, Frederick William COLBY, John Taylor COLBY, Ira Taylor COLBY.


Hannah TAYLOR was born on 30 MAR 1824 in Belper, Derbyshire, England. Parents: Thomas TAYLOR and Ann BALL.


Hannah P. TAYLOR was born about 1838.

Spouse: Samuel TAYLOR. Samuel TAYLOR and Hannah P. TAYLOR were married on 7 SEP 1858.


Harriet TAYLOR was born on 11 OCT 1848 in Laund Hill, Belper, Derbyshire, England. She immigrated on 23 APR 1862 from England to Utah. She died on 18 SEP 1906. Parents: Abraham TAYLOR and Hannah (Walters) VARNEY.

Spouse: Morton Pardon CRANDALL. Morton Pardon CRANDALL and Harriet TAYLOR were married on 10 DEC 1864 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.


Harriet M. TAYLOR was born in 1838 in New York. She appeared in the census on 1 AUG 1860 in Union, Waupaca County, Wisconsin. She appeared in the census on 28 JUL 1870 in Union, Waupaca County, Wisconsin. She appeared in the census in JUN 1880 in Union, Waupaca County, Wisconsin.

Spouse: Alonzo W. JOHNSON. Alonzo W. JOHNSON and Harriet M. TAYLOR were married about 1857. Children were: Henry A. JOHNSON, Henrietta JOHNSON, Charles E. JOHNSON, Mary E. JOHNSON, Estella M. JOHNSON, Lena M. JOHNSON, Hattie May JOHNSON, Sylvia JOHNSON, Jesse Lorin JOHNSON.


Heath Michael TAYLOR was born date unknown. Parents: Charles Russel TAYLOR and Marilyn (---).


Helen M. TAYLOR was born on 10 AUG 1837 in Lempster, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. She died on 17 JAN 1841 at Lempster, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. Parents: Erastus Day TAYLOR and Mary COLBY.


Henry Afton TAYLOR was born on 23 DEC 1899 in Springville, Utah County, Utah. He died on 26 OCT 1900 at Springville, Utah County, Utah. Parents: Jabez TAYLOR and Mary Ruth TAYLOR.


Hyrum James TAYLOR was born on 12 MAY 1852 in Laund Hill, Belper, Derbyshire, England. He immigrated on 23 APR 1862 from England to Utah. He died on 6 DEC 1927 at Springville, Utah County, Utah. He was buried in the Evergreen Cemetery at Springville, Utah County, Utah Parents: Abraham TAYLOR and Hannah (Walters) VARNEY.

Spouse: Angeline EDWARDS. Hyrum James TAYLOR and Angeline EDWARDS were married on 6 JAN 1877.

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