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Samuel SMITH III was born on 2 OCT 1737 in Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts. SOURCE: 1. "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7
2. Family Tree Maker/World Family Tree Vol. 7, File #2296
Parents: Samuel SMITH II and Pricilla GOULD.

Spouse: Rebecca TOWNE. Samuel SMITH III and Rebecca TOWNE were married on 2 JAN 1760.


Samuel SMITH was born on 16 AUG 1758 in Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Essex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Haverhill.) He died on 17 JUL 1759 at Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Essex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Haverhill.) Parents: Timothy SMITH and Lydia COLBY.


Samuel SMITH was born on 31 DEC 1759 in Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Essex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Haverhill.) Parents: Timothy SMITH and Lydia COLBY.


Samuel SMITH IV was born on 15 SEP 1777. He died on 1 APR 1830. SOURCE: "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7
2. Family Tree Maker/World Family Tree Vol. 7, File #2296
Parents: Asael SMITH I and Mary DUTY.

Spouse: Francis WILCOX. Samuel SMITH IV and Francis WILCOX were married in FEB 1816. Children were: Charles SMITH, Laura SMITH, Horace Jay SMITH, Elizabeth SMITH, Sarah SMITH.


Samuel SMITH was born on 22 AUG 1785 in Plaistow, Rockingham County, New Hampshire. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 1001041; Index to births, early to 1900 New Hampshire. Registrar of Vital Statistics.) Parents: Joseph SMITH and Mary SAWYER.


Samuel SMITH VI was born on 3 OCT 1811. He died on 7 MAR 1826. Parents: Silas SMITH and Ruth STEVENS.


Samuel H. B. SMITH was born on 1 AUG 1838. Parents: Samuel Harrison SMITH V and Mary BAILY.


Samuel Harrison SMITH V was born on 13 MAR 1808 in Tunbridge, Orange County, Vermont. He died on 30 JUL 1844 at Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois.
Died of a fever occasioned by over-exertion in escaping from a mob when his brothers were killed.

Smith, Samuel Harrison, one of the Eight Witnesses to the Book of Mormon, was the fourth son of Joseph Smith and Lucy Mack, and was born March 13, 1808, in the town of Tunbridge, Orange county, Vermont. In his early life he assisted his father in farming. He possessed a religious turn of mind, and at an early age joined the Presbyterian church, to which sect he belonged until he visited his brother Joseph in Pennsylvania in May, 1829, when Joseph informed him that the Lord was about to commence His latter-day work. He also showed him that part of the Book of Mormon which he had translated, and labored to persuade him concerning the gospel of Jesus Christ, which was about to be revealed in its fulness. Samuel was not, however, very easily persuaded of these things, but after much inquiry and explanation he retired and prayed that he might obtain from the Lord wisdom to enable him to judge for himself; the result was, that he obtained revelation for himself sufficient to convince him of the truth of the testimony of his brother Joseph. May 15, 1829, having been commanded of the Lord, Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery were baptized, and as they were returning from the water to the house, they overheard Samuel engaged in secret prayer. Joseph said that he considered that a sufficient testimony of his being a fit subject for baptism; and as they had now received authority to baptize, they spoke to Samuel upon the subject, and he went straightway to the water with them, and was baptized by Oliver Cowdery, he being the third person baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ in the last dispensation. He was present at the organization of the Church, April 6, 1830, and was one of the six who at that time constituted the members of the same. He was ordained to the Priesthood on that day. On the 30th of June following he took some copies of the Book of Mormon and started out on his mission, to which he had been set apart by his brother Joseph and on traveling twenty-five miles, which was his first day's journey, he stopped at a number of places in order to sell his books, but was turned out of doors as soon as he declared his principles. When evening came on, he was faint and almost discouraged, but coming to an inn, which was surrounded with every appearance of plenty, he called to see if the landlord would buy one of his books. On going in, Samuel inquired of him, if he did not wish to purchase a history of the origin of the Indians. "I do not know," replied the host, "how did you get hold of it?" "It was translated," rejoined Samuel, "by my brother from some gold plates that he found buried in the earth." "You d—d liar," cried the landlord. "get out of my house—you shan't stay one minute with your books." Samuel was sick at heart, for this was the fifth time he had been turned out of doors that day. He left the house, and traveled a short distance, and washed his feet in a small brook, as a testimony against the man. He then proceeded five miles further on his journey, and seeing an apple tree a short distance from the road, he concluded to pass the night under it; and here he lay all night upon the cold, damp ground. In the morning he arose from his comfortless bed, and observing a small cottage at no great distance, he drew near, hoping to get a little refreshment. The only inmate was a widow who seemed very poor. He asked her for food, relating the story of his former treatment. She prepared him some victuals, and after eating, he explained to her the history of the Book of Mormon. She listened attentively, and believed all that he told her, but, in consequence of her poverty, she was unable to purchase one of the books. He presented her with one, and proceeded to Bloomington, which was eight miles further. Here he stopped at the house of one John P. Greene, who was a Methodist preacher, and was at that time about starting on a preaching mission. He, like the others, did not wish to make a purchase of what he considered at that time to be a nonsensical fable; however, he said that he would take a subscription paper, and if he found any one on his route who was disposed to purchase, he would take his name, and in two weeks, Samuel might call again, and he would let him know what the prospect was of selling. After making this arrangement, Samuel left one of his books with him and returned home. At the time appointed, Samuel started again for the Rev. John P. Greene's, in order to learn the success which this gentleman had met with, in finding sale for the Book of Mormon. This time his father and mother accompanied him, and it was their intention to have passed near the tavern, where Samuel was so abusively treated a fortnight previous, but just before they came to the house, a sign of smallpox intercepted them. They turned aside, and meeting a citizen of the place, they inquired of him to what extent this disease prevailed. He answered, that the tavern-keeper and two of his family had died with it not long since, but he did not know that any one else had caught the distemper, and that it was brought into the neighborhood by a traveler who stopped at the tavern over night. Samuel performed several short missions with the books, and gave the following account of his third mission to Livonia: "When I arrived at Mr. Greene's, Mrs. Greene informed me that her husband was absent from home, that there was no prospect of selling my books, and even the one which I had left with them, she expected I would have to take away, as Mr. Greene had no disposition to [p.280] purchase it, although she had read it herself, and was much pleased with it. I then talked with her a short time, and binding my knapsack upon my shoulders, rose to depart; but as I bade her farewell, it was impressed upon my mind to leave the book with her. I made her a present of it, and told her that the Spirit forbade my taking it away. She burst into tears, and requested me to pray with her. I did so, and afterwards explained to her the most profitable manner of reading the book which I had left with her; which was, to ask God when she read it for a testimony of the truth of what she had read, and she would receive the Spirit of God, which would enable her to discern the things of God. I then left her and returned home." In December, 1830, Samuel was sent to preach in Kirtland, Ohio, and the surrounding country. In the beginning of 1831, Joseph, the Prophet, went to Kirtland to preside, accompanied by Hyrum and many of the Saints, and soon after Joseph Smith senior's family, and the Saints who were located in Fayette, near Waterloo, also moved to Kirtland. At a conference held at Kirtland June 3, 1831, Samuel was ordained a High Priest under the hands of Lyman Wight. In June, 1831, Samuel was called by revelation to go to Missouri on a mission, in company with Reynolds Cahoon. They immediately started, and while on their way called upon William E. McLellin, and preached the gospel to him and a large assembly, in a room which he procured. William being troubled about the things he heard, closed up his business and proceeded after the brethren to Missouri, where he was baptized before they arrived. This was the McLellin who afterwards became one of the Twelve Apostles. On their route to Missouri they preached the gospel, traveling without purse or scrip, and enduring much for the want of food and rest. When they started for Missouri, about fifty brethren set out for the same place, and when they all arrived they met on the spot for the Temple in Jackson county, aud dedicated the ground unto God. Brothers Smith and Cahoon spent several days in Jackson county, attended several meetings and were with Joseph when he received several revelations. While in Missouri they were required to remain together on their return mission until they reached home, which was in September following. Soon after their arrival in Kirtland, they took a mission into the southern townships and counties of Ohio. Brother Cahoon returned after laboring about six weeks, but Samuel continued preaching through the winter, strengthening the branches and comforting the Saints. In a revelation given in January, 1832, Orson Hyde and Samuel H. Smith were called to go on a mission to the Eastern country; accordingly they started in March, and traveled and preached the gospel through the States of Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusets and Maine; they baptized several in Spafford, N.Y., in Boston and Lynne, Mass., in Providence, R.I., and in Saco, Maine, preaching much from house to house, as well as in public congregations, and returning to Kirtland in November or December. During the year 1833, Samuel preached among the churches as he had opportunity, and spent a good portion of his time laboring with his hands. Feb. 17, 1834, he was ordained and set apart as one of the High Council in Kirtland, in which office he officiated until he went to Missouri in 1838. August 13, 1834, he married Mary Bailey, who was born in Bedford, Hillsborough county, New Hampshire, Dec. 20, 1808. Sept. 16. 1835, he was appointed, in company with David Whitmer, as a committee and general agent to act in the name of, and for the Literary Firm. In the winter of 1835-36 he chopped cord wood for Lorenzo D. Young. In 1838 he traveled in company with his brother Joseph from Kirtland to Missouri. He passed through the mobbings of that year, in Far West and Adam-Ondi-Ahman, Missouri, and his family suffered nigh unto death from exposure, as they were driven about by the mob. He was in the Crooked river battle, and immediately after, by the counsel of Pres. Brigham Young, together with Brothers Charles C. Rich, Benjamin L. Clapp, Lorenzo D. Young and about twenty others, they fled for Illinois by the wilderness through the north part of Missouri, and the southern part of Iowa. Messengers overtook them and informed them that General Clark had sent a company of fifty well armed men to follow them, with strict orders not to return until they had brought back the company either dead or alive. When this word came a halt was called and Samuel asked what they should do in case the enemy overtook them; after a few moments' consultation the whole company covenanted with uplifted hands to heaven that if they were overtaken they would fight till they died, and not a man would fall into the hands of the enemy alive. They then traveled on ten miles and camped on the edge of some timber on the north side of a four mile prairie, and they afterwards learned that their enemies camped on the south edge of the same prairie, and would have overtaken them next day, had not the Lord sent a heavy snow storm during the night; and when the brethren arose in the morning, Phineas H. Young remarked, that that snow storm was their salvation. The air was so full of snow that they could hardly find their horses to saddle them, but they soon mounted them and continued their journey as fast as they could. The storm was from the north, and in their faces; it filled their tracks in a few moments, so that Clark's men could not follow. It was reported that this company of men on their return informed the general that they could not overtake the d—d Mormons, for they were stopped by a snow storm. After they had got some distance on their journey, the company divided into three parts, the three brethren named fell in company with Samuel; their provisions gave out, and after spending several days without food, except eating lynne buds and slippery elm bark, they camped upon a small stream, and the company, numbering eight, held a council, and appointed Samuel president, that they might receive the world of the Lord in relation to the situation of Joseph the Prophet and those that were with him, also in relation to their families and what they were to do to obtain food; they all knelt down in a circle, and each one prayed; then the Spirit of the Lord came upon Samuel, and being filled with the Holy Ghost, he arose and said: "Thus saith the Lord, my servant Joseph is not injured, nor any of his brethren that are with him, but they will all be delivered out of the hands of their enemies; your families are all well, but anxious about you. Let your hearts be comforted, for I the Lord will provide food for you on the morrow." They went to bed with glad hearts, and arose in the morning and prayed again and went out two by two to hunt for food. Brother Clapp saw several squirrels and shot at them, but could not hit them; they were only to stay one hour; at the end of that time they all returned, except Charles C. Rich and Samuel. Feeling very faint, one of the brethren proposed killing a horse. Brother Clapp said that when Brothers Rich and Samuel returned they would have food, as he never knew the Lord to give a false revelation to his servants; and while conversing upon the matter, the brethren made their appearance with two silk handkerchiefs tied up full of bread and dried meat. Samuel's mind was led in a certain direction, and following it they came to an Indian camp; they made known to the Indians by signs, that they were hungry; upon this the squaw with all possible speed baked them some cakes, and gave each of them two, sending two to each of the six brethren in camp, giving them to understand that she would be glad to send more, but she had but little flour, and her papooses (children) would be hungry. When they arrived in camp all felt to rejoice; they formed a circle around the food, and asked a blessing upon it. The bread was very good, being shortened with racoon's oil. After eating they started upon their journey and obtained food sufficient, so that none perished. Samuel arrived in Quincy, and was there to assist his father and mother over the river on their arrival, and hired a house for them, into which he also assisted four other families of the Saints; and according to the word of the Lord unto him, his brothers, Joseph and Hyrum, were delivered, and they arrived in Quincy in April, 1839. He moved, in company with Don Carlos, on to a farm which he rented, near Macomb, McDonough county Ill., where he spent the season farming. Elders Wilford Woodruff and John Taylor called upon them as they went on their missions to England, and held a meeting with the Saints in that place (Oct. 11, 1839). Don Carlos preached and was followed by Samuel, who enjoyed much of the Holy Spirit and bore a strong testimony to the truth of the work of God; he assisted the brethren upon their journey. [p.282] In September, 1840, Samuel received the following blessing from under the hands of his father, Joseph Smith, sen., upon his dying bed: "Samuel, you have been a faithful and obedient son. By your faithfulness you have brought many into the Church. The Lord has seen your diligence, and you are blessed, in that he has never chastised you, but has called you home to rest; and there is a crown laid up for you which shall grow brighter and brighter unto the perfect day. When the Lord called you, he said, 'Samuel, I have seen thy sufferings, have heard thy cries, and beheld thy faithfulness; thy skirts are clear from the blood of this generation. Because of these things, I seal upon your head all the blessings which I have heretofore pronounced upon you; and this my dying blessing I now seal upon you. Even so: Amen." Samuel's wife Mary died Jan. 25, 1841, after bearing to him four children, namely, Susannah B., Mary B., Samuel Harrison B. and Lucy B. In April, 1841, he was sent on a mission to preach the gospel in Scott and adjoining counties, Illinois. May 3, 1841, he married Levira Clark, daughter of Gardner and Delecta Clark, born in Livonia, Livingston county, New York, July 30, 1815. She bore to him three daughters, viz., Levira A. C., Louisa C. and Lucy J. C. He preached during the summer and fall of 1841, his wife remaining with his father-in-law. In the month of November he returned to Nauvoo, taking his family with him. Here he remained during the winter, and also the summer of 1842, during which time he worked mostly for Joseph, and harvested in the country. In the fall of 1842 he removed to his brother William's tavern at Plymouth. In the summer of 1843 he was often at Nauvoo. In the fall he chopped wood, and prepared his farm by making fences and clearing off the timber, preaching the gospel in the vicinity as he had the opportunity. In the spring of 1844 he cultivated his farm, and upon hearing of the imprisonment of his brothers in Carthage jail, he repaired thither on horseback to see them. While on the way he was pursued by the mobocrats; but in consequence of the fleetness of his horse, he was enabled to reach Carthage in safety, from whence he went to Nauvoo in company with the bodies of his martyred brothers, Joseph and Hyrum. He was soon after taken sick of billious fever, and died July 30, 1844, aged 36 years. The following extract is from his obituary notice, published in the "Times and Seasons," "The exit of this worthy man, so soon after the horrible butchery of his brothers, Joseph and Hyrum, in Carthage jail, is a matter of deep solemnity to the family, as well as a remediless loss to all. If ever there lived a good man upon the earth, Samuel H. Smith was that person. His labors in the Church from first to last, carrying glad tidings to the eastern cities, and finally his steadfastness as one of the Witnesses to the Book of Mormon, and many saintly traits of virtue, knowledge, temperance, patience, godliness, brotherly kindness and charity, shall be given of him hereafter, as a man of God."
Parents: Joseph SMITH Sr. and Lucy MACK.

Spouse: Mary BAILY. Samuel Harrison SMITH V and Mary BAILY were married on 13 AUG 1834. Children were: Susanna B. SMITH, Mary B. SMITH, Samuel H. B. SMITH, Lucy B. SMITH.

Spouse: Levira CLARK. Samuel Harrison SMITH V and Levira CLARK were married on 30 MAY 1841. Children were: Levira A. C. SMITH, Lovias C. SMITH, Lucy J. C. SMITH.


Sarah SMITH was born in Potsdam, St. Lawrence County, New York. SOURCE: "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7
Parents: Samuel SMITH IV and Francis WILCOX.


Sarah SMITH was born date unknown. Parents: James SMITH and Elizabeth MOODY.


Sarah SMITH was born date unknown. Parents: James SMITH and Elizabeth NOYES.


Sarah SMITH was born about 1620/21. She died on 11 MAR 1697/98 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. Her surname is unknown.
(BOOK SOURCE: "The Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury Massachusetts" by David W. Hoyt.)

Spouse: Roger EASTMAN. Roger EASTMAN and Sarah SMITH were married about 1639 in Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. Children were: John EASTMAN, Nathaniel EASTMAN, Philip EASTMAN, Thomas EASTMAN, Timothy EASTMAN, Joseph EASTMAN, Benjamin EASTMAN, Sarah EASTMAN, Samuel EASTMAN, Ruth EASTMAN.


Sarah SMITH was born on 25 JUN 1670 in Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts. She died on 28 AUG 1673 at Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts. Many discrepancies between the fanily group sheets filed and accepted for the multi-generation project and the book "Life of Joseph F. Smith"

The book states that the birth year for Sarah is 1670, the group sheet lists 1668 which would put the birth of Sarah 2 months before Amy. 1670 would be a more reasonable date. Parents: Robert SMITH and Mary FRENCH.


Sarah SMITH was born on 23 NOV 1690 in Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. Original entry shows Chebacco, Ipswich, Essex County, Mass. Cann't fined a Chebacco in any reference, must be a Parish. Changed name to Ipswich, Exxex County, Mass.
She died at Scarborough, Cumberland County, Maine. She has Ancestral File Number 2KQK-S0. Parents: Samuel SMITH and Martha A. SMITH.

Spouse: Jonathan ANDREWS. Jonathan ANDREWS and Sarah SMITH were married on 16 DEC 1718 in Scarborough, Cumberland County, Maine. Scarboro, Maine and Scarborough, Maine are one in the same.
Collier's World Atla and Gazetteer, 1939, uses Scarboro.
1997 Rand McNally Road Atlas uses Scarborough.
Children were: Deacon Amos ANDREWS, Johathan ANDREWS, Margaret ANDREWS, Nathab ANDREWS, Nathab ANDREWS, Nathan ANDREWS, Sarah ANDREWS.


Sarah SMITH was born on 19 MAR 1755 in Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Essex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Haverhill.) Parents: Timothy SMITH and Lydia COLBY.


Photo Sarah SMITH was born on 10 FEB 1785 in Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Essex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Salisbury. Daughter of Col. Jonathan Smith and Dolly Gove.) She appeared in the census in 1850 in Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: 1850 Massachusetts Census. Salisbury, Essex County, page 20. Age 65.) She died on 17 JUN 1859 at Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: NEHGS, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910.)

Spouse: Capt. Abraham COLBY. Capt. Abraham COLBY and Sarah SMITH were married on 26 NOV 1807 in Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: FHL film 0599730 Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah; marriage.) Children were: Mary Odeorne COLBY, Capt. Samuel Smith COLBY.


Sarah SMITH was born in JUL 1787 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. Parents: James SMITH and Prudence LITTLE.

Spouse: David EMERY. David EMERY and Sarah SMITH were married on 22 APR 1811 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.


Sarah SMITH was born on 27 FEB 1787 in Hopkinton, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. (Daughter of Moody Smith and Hannah Quimby.) She died on 19 MAR 1883 at Hopkinton, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She was buried in the Old Hopkinton Cemetery at Hopkinton, Merrimack County, New Hampshire

Spouse: Philip FLANDERS. Philip FLANDERS and Sarah SMITH were married on 11 APR 1815 in Hopkinton, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. Children were: Parker Merrill FLANDERS, Hannah FLANDERS, Sarah Ann FLANDERS, Jonathan FLANDERS, Philip FLANDERS.


Sarah SMITH was born on 16 MAY 1789. She died on 27 MAY 1824. SOURCE: 1. "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7
2. Family Tree Maker/World Family Tree Vol. 7, File #2296
Parents: Asael SMITH I and Mary DUTY.

Spouse: Joseph SANFORD. Joseph SANFORD and Sarah SMITH were married on 15 OCT 1809.


Sarah SMITH was born on 23 MAR 1798 in Francestown, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. She died on 7 APR 1798 at Francestown, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. Parents: John SMITH and Lucretia COLBY.


Sarah SMITH was born on 16 DEC 1810. Parents: Jesse SMITH I and Hannah PEABODY.


Sarah SMITH was born on 2 OCT 1837. She died on 6 NOV 1876. Parents: Hyrum SMITH and Jerusha BARDEN.


Sarah SMITH was born in DEC 1861 in Pennsylvania. She appeared in the census on 21 JUN 1900 in South Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York. She died on 10 APR 1906 at Marion, Grant County, Indiana.

Spouse: Elmer COLBY. Elmer COLBY and Sarah SMITH were married about 1890. Children were: Glen Leslie COLBY, Dessie Electa COLBY, Elma Nina COLBY, Perl E. COLBY, Millie M. COLBY, Eunice COLBY.


Sarah Frances SMITH was born about 1828. She has Ancestral File Number B769-SS.

Spouse: Jeremiah STRINGHAM. Jeremiah STRINGHAM and Sarah Frances SMITH were married on 25 OCT 1893.


Sarah T. SMITH was born in OCT 1852 in New York. She appeared in the census on 4 JUN 1880 in Ontario, Wayne County, New York. She appeared in the census on 1 JUN 1900 in Ontario, Wayne County, New York. She died between 1900 and 1910 at Ontario, Wayne County, New York.

Spouse: Sherman COLBY. Sherman COLBY and Sarah T. SMITH were married about 1877. Children were: Howard Elias COLBY, Dana COLBY, Blanche T. COLBY.


Sargent SMITH was born about 1715.

Spouse: Sarah BARTLETT. Sargent SMITH and Sarah BARTLETT were married on 5 FEB 1754 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Essex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Newbury.)


Silas SMITH was born on 1 OCT 1779. He died on 13 SEP 1839. SOURCE: 1. "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7
2. Family Tree Maker/World Family Tree Vol. 7, File #2296
Parents: Asael SMITH I and Mary DUTY.

Spouse: Ruth STEVENS. Silas SMITH and Ruth STEVENS were married on 29 JAN 1806. Children were: Charles SMITH, Charity SMITH, Curtis S. SMITH, Samuel SMITH VI, Stephen SMITH, Susan SMITH, Asael SMITH III.

Spouse: Mary AIKENS. Silas SMITH and Mary AIKENS were married on 4 MAR 1828. Children were: Silas L. SMITH, John A. SMITH, Jesse Nathaniel SMITH.


Silas SMITH II was born on 6 JUN 1822. He died on 6 JUN 1892. Parents: Asael SMITH II and Elizabeth (Betsy) SHELLENGER.


Silas L. SMITH was born on 26 OCT 1830. Parents: Silas SMITH and Mary AIKENS.


Sophronia SMITH was born on 16 MAY 1803 in Tunbridge, Orange County, Vermont. She died in 1876 at Hancock County, Illinois. Parents: Joseph SMITH Sr. and Lucy MACK.

Spouse: Calvin STODDARD. Calvin STODDARD and Sophronia SMITH were married on 2 DEC 1828 in Palmyra, Wayne County, New York. Children were: Eunice STODDARD, Maria STODDARD.

Spouse: William MCCLEARY. William MCCLEARY and Sophronia SMITH were married on 11 FEB 1838 in Ohio.


Sophronia C. SMITH was born in 1838. Parents: Don Carlos SMITH and Agnes COOLBRITH.


Stephen SMITH was born date unknown. Parents: James SMITH and Elizabeth MOODY.


Stephen SMITH was born on 23 APR 1785. He died on 25 JUL 1802. SOURCE: 1. "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7
2. Family Tree Maker/World Family Tree Vol. 7, File #2296
Parents: Asael SMITH I and Mary DUTY.


Stephen SMITH was born on 2 MAY 1803. SOURCE: "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7
Parents: Jesse SMITH I and Hannah PEABODY.


Stephen SMITH was born on 8 JUN 1815. He died on 20 FEB 1891. Parents: Silas SMITH and Ruth STEVENS.


Stephen SMITH was born on 16 DEC 1873. He died on 1 JUL 1930. (BOOK SOURCE: "The Fourteen of Us, A History of the COLBY Family of Lunenburg, Vermont", by Ruby Colby Beecher. Copyright 1985.) Parents: Cornelius SMITH and Anjeanette Jeanine DOANE.

Spouse: Ada GEE. Stephen SMITH and Ada GEE were married on 12 NOV 1897. Children were: Veima SMITH.


Susan SMITH was born on 19 OCT 1817. She died in NOV 1846. Parents: Silas SMITH and Ruth STEVENS.


Susanna SMITH was born on 2 MAY 1726 in Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts. She died on 5 MAY 1741. SOURCE: 1. "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7
2. Family Tree Maker/World Family Tree Vol. 7, File #2296
Parents: Samuel SMITH and Rebecca CURTIS.


Susanna SMITH was born on 24 JAN 1741/42 in Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts. SOURCE: 1. "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7
2. Family Tree Maker/World Family Tree Vol. 7, File #2296
Parents: Samuel SMITH II and Pricilla GOULD.

Spouse: Isaac HOBBS. Isaac HOBBS and Susanna SMITH were married on 13 MAY 1766.


Susanna SMITH was born on 18 MAY 1783. She died in 1849. SOURCE: 1. "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7
2. Family Tree Maker/World Family Tree Vol. 7, File #2296
Parents: Asael SMITH I and Mary DUTY.


Susanna B. SMITH was born on 27 OCT 1835. Parents: Samuel Harrison SMITH V and Mary BAILY.


Sybel C. SMITH was born in 1878 in Maine. She appeared in the census in 1920 in Westport, Lincoln County, Maine. She appeared in the census in 1930 in Westport, Lincoln County, Maine.

Spouse: Ernest Ellsworth COLBY. Ernest Ellsworth COLBY and Sybel C. SMITH were married on 16 SEP 1906 in Westport, Lincoln County, Maine. Children were: Ethel M. COLBY, Willis C. COLBY, Francena May COLBY, Ernest Ellsworth COLBY Jr., Etta M. COLBY, Evelyn L. COLBY.


Tabatha SMITH was born date unknown. She has Ancestral File Number 117F-KR9.

Spouse: Charles STRINGHAM. Charles STRINGHAM and Tabatha SMITH were married on 15 MAY 1723 in Newtown, Suffolk County, New York.


Tabitha SMITH was born on 4 APR 1801 in Franklin, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She appeared in the census in 1850 in Franklin, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She appeared in the census in 1860 in Franklin, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She died on 12 NOV 1869 at Franklin, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

Spouse: Ezekiel COLBY. Ezekiel COLBY and Tabitha SMITH were married on 2 FEB 1825 in Franklin, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. Children were: Charles COLBY, Hiram COLBY, Infant COLBY, Martha A. COLBY.


Thaddeus SMITH (twin) was born on 30 APR 1831 in Kirtland, Lake County, Ohio. He died on 30 APR 1831 at Kirtland, Lake County, Ohio. Parents: Joseph SMITH Jr. and Emma HALE.


Thomas SMITH was christened/baptized on 24 MAY 1618 in Flitton w/Silsoe, Bedfordshire, England. He has Ancestral File Number 8VZF-KR. He died at England. Parents: William (Wm.) SMITH and Joan BETTS.


Thomas SMITH was born on 14 SEP 1606 in England. He died on 22 APR 1666 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. Thomas Smith came from Romsey, England, with his wife Rebecca, in the ship 'James', to Ipswich, Mass. in 1635, thence to Newbury in 1638, and settled on the farm now owned by David Smith.

SOURCE: "Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian" Sarah Anna Emery, Newburyport, 1879.

Spouse: Mrs Rebecca SMITH. Thomas SMITH and Mrs Rebecca SMITH were married date unknown. Children were: Thomas SMITH, Rebecca SMITH, James SMITH, John SMITH, Mathias SMITH, Thomas SMITH.


Thomas SMITH was born in 1639 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. He died on 6 DEC 1648 at Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. SOURCE: "Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian" Sarah Anna Emery, Newburyport, 1879.
Parents: Thomas SMITH and Mrs Rebecca SMITH.


Thomas SMITH was born on 7 JUL 1654 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. He died in 1696 at Bloody Brook, Essex County, Massachusetts. SOURCE: "Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian" Sarah Anna Emery, Newburyport, 1879.
Parents: Thomas SMITH and Mrs Rebecca SMITH.


Thomas SMITH was born about 1656 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. He died Est 1686-1747 at Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. Will probated 25 Feb 1725 Many discrepancies between the fanily group sheets filed and accepted for the multi-generation project and the book "Life of Joseph F. Smith"

Group Sheets: Birth, circa 1656, Book: Birth, circa 1657
Birth place, Boston Birth place, Ipswich
Wife, Martha Gilbert Wife, Martha Knowlton Will Probated, 25 Feb 1725 Death, 25 Feb 1726 =+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+= Extraction from LDS Ancestrial File gives birthplace as Ipswich, Essex, MA. Parents: Robert SMITH and Mary FRENCH.

Spouse: Martha KNOWLTON. Thomas SMITH and Martha KNOWLTON were married in 1680.

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