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Hezekiah MACK was born on 20 JAN 1727/28 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Love BENNETT.


Jason MACK was born in 1760 in Marlow, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Parents: Solomon MACK and Lydia GATES.


Jemima MACK was born date unknown. Parents: Orlando MACK and Damaris DUTTON.


Johanna (Joana) MACK was born on 17 SEP 1703 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Sarah BAGLEY.

Spouse: Richard BOOGE. Richard BOOGE and Johanna (Joana) MACK were married on 12 MAR 1730/31 in Connecticut.


John MACK was born on 16 MAR 1653 in Inverness, Scotland. He signed a will on 5 JAN 1721 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. He died on 24 FEB 1721 at Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. He will was proved on 28 MAR 1721 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. John came from Scotland, 1669, and settled in Salisbury and Concord, Massachusetts and Lyme, Connecticut.

Spouse: Sarah BAGLEY. John MACK and Sarah BAGLEY were married on 5 APR 1681 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. Children were: John MACK, Sarah MACK, Elizabeth MACK, Lydia MACK, Josiah MACK, Orlando MACK, Jonathan MACK, Ebenezer MACK, Marah (Mary) MACK, Rebecca MACK, Johanna (Joana) MACK, Deborah MACK.


John MACK was born on 29 APR 1682 in Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. He died on 29 MAY 1734 at Amesbury, Essex County, Massachusetts. SOURCES: (1). Wm Sterling of Haverhill, MA & of Lyme, CT, and his descendents; (2). Ancestry of Charles Stinson Pillsbury & John Sargent Pillsbury, by Mary Lovering Holman, 1938. Parents: John MACK and Sarah BAGLEY.

Spouse: Love BENNETT. John MACK and Love BENNETT were married on 13 JAN 1703/4 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Children were: Sarah MACK, Phebe MACK, Elizabeth MACK, Patience MACK, Ebenezer MACK, Lydia MACK, John MACK, Ezra MACK, Nehemiah MACK, Esther MACK, Hezekiah MACK, Dorothy MACK.

Spouse: Abigail FOX. John MACK and Abigail FOX were married on 4 MAY 1733 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Children were: Elizabeth MACK.


John MACK was born on 26 APR 1720 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. He died on 2 OCT 1755 at Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Love BENNETT.

Spouse: Mehetable SMITH. John MACK and Mehetable SMITH were married on 20 FEB 1740/41 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut.


John Mudget MACK was born on 4 DEC 1802 in Tunbridge, Orange County, Vermont. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 0027619; General index to vital records of Vermont, early to 1870 Vermont. Secretary of State.) Parents: Stephen MACK and Temperance BOND.


Jonathan MACK was born on 21 FEB 1695 in Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Middlesex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Concord.) He died on 19 DEC 1768. Parents: John MACK and Sarah BAGLEY.

Spouse: Sarah BENNETT. Jonathan MACK and Sarah BENNETT were married on 24 AUG 1728 in Salisbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.


Josiah MACK was born on 16 DEC 1691 in Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Middlesex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Concord.) He died on 21 NOV 1769 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. Alternate dates and places:
Birth: December 16, 1693, Concord Middlesex, Conn.
Parents: John MACK and Sarah BAGLEY.

Spouse: Abigail PETERSON. Josiah MACK and Abigail PETERSON were married on 29 JAN 1720 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Children were: Mary MACK, Josiah John MACK, Elisha MACK.

Spouse: Elizabeth BOWLEY. Josiah MACK and Elizabeth BOWLEY were married in JUL 1767.


Josiah John MACK was born on 19 AUG 1721 in Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. He died on 24 MAY 1812. Married: April 21 1741
Parents: Josiah MACK and Abigail PETERSON.


Katharine MACK was born date unknown. Parents: Orlando MACK and Damaris DUTTON.


Louisa I. MACK was born on 6 MAY 1836 in Pecatonica, Winnebago County, Illinois. Parents: Stephen MACK and Hononegah.


Lovina MACK was born in 1762 in Marlow, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. She died in 1794 at Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Parents: Solomon MACK and Lydia GATES.

Spouse: Joseph TUTTLE. Joseph TUTTLE and Lovina MACK were married on 31 JAN 1780.


Lovina MACK was born on 13 SEP 1795 in Tunbridge, Orange County, Vermont. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 0027619; General index to vital records of Vermont, early to 1870 Vermont. Secretary of State.) She died on 6 JAN 1874. Parents: Stephen MACK and Temperance BOND.


Lovisa MACK was born in 1761 in Marlow, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. She died in 1794 at Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Parents: Solomon MACK and Lydia GATES.


Photo Lucy MACK was born on 8 JUL 1775 in Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. She was given a Patriartcal Blessing on 9 DEC 1834 in Kirtland, Lake County, Ohio. Officator: Joseph Smith, Sr. She died on 14 MAY 1856 at Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. John Mack a Scotch immigrant of 1860 came to Connecticut from Scotland. John Mack had a son named Ebenezer who was born in Lyme, Connecticut, 8 Dec 1697. Ebenezer had a son named Solomon, born at Lyme, Conn. 15 Sep 1732. After the Revolutionary war Solomon moved to Gilsum, NH where his daughter Lucy was born. About 1795 she went to Tunbridge, Vermont to visit her brother Stephen, There she met Joseph Smith. Lucy's mother was Lydia Gates Mack.

Places of Residence:
Palmyra, Wayne County, New York
Kirtland, Ohio
Nauvoo, Hancock, Ill

Comments: Mack, Lucy (Female)Lucy spent some time with relatives at Tunbridge, Vermont. Met and married Joseph Smith, 1796. Given wedding present of $1,000. Moved to Randolph to open store, 1802. Loss of property due to sepculation in China trade. Began to attend Methodist meetings. Dreams. Moved to Royalton. Moved to Sharon, Vermont. Rented farm. Moved back to Tunbridge, C. 1807. Moved to Royalton again. Husband's vision. Moved to Lebanon, New Hampshire. Illness of son Joseph. Moved to Norwich, Vermont. Moved to Palmyra, New York. Account of trip there. Son Joseph's religious experiences. Death of son Alvin, 1824. Lost farm. Martin Harris and wife. Lyman and Oliver Cowdery. Experiences with printing of Book of Mormon.
Organization of Church, 1830. Moved to Waterloo, New York. Account oftrip to Kirtland, Ohio, where family removed, 1831. Settled on farm purchased by son for the Church. Visited her brother in Detroit. Raised means to complete schoolhouse at Kirtland. Circumstances leading to building of Kirtland Temple. Division in the Church. Persecution. Moved to Caldwell County, Missouri. Troubles there. To Quincy, Illinois, 1839. Moved to Commerce, 1839. Illness and death of husband, 1840. Assassination of sons Joseph and Hyrum, 1844. The Twelve take charge of Church. Son William returned to Nauvoo and was ordained a patriarch of the Church, 1845.
Includes some extracts from Joseph Smith's history and other materials published in "Times and Seasons". Work is as much an autobiography of Lucy as it is a biography of Joseph. Cites also some letters and other written materials as well as reports of dreams, visions, conversations, etc.

Comments: #21. Lucy was the mother of Joseph Smith the Prophet. Lucy was the youngest of eight children, four of whom were girls. Her father, Solomon Mack, had just attained his majority when the war between France and England, which grew out of disputed North American territory, was proclaimed. He entered the British army, and had two teams in the service of King George II., employed in carrying General Abercrombie's baggage, and was present in 1758, at the engagement on the west side of Lake George. He was engaged more or less in military pursuits until 1759, when he was discharged, and married an accomplished school teacher, Lydia Gates, the mother of the subject of this memoir. She was the daughter of Nathan Gates, a wealthy man, living in East Haddam, Conn. She was of a truly pious disposition, and had an excellent education, which peculiarly fitted her for the duties of a preceptress to her children, especially at a period when schools were rarities in the half cleared and thinly settled districts. Lucy profited by the talents and virtues of her mother. Lucy and Joseph received from her brother, Stephen Mack, and John Mudget, his partner, in business, a marriage present of $1,000. Her husband owned a good farm at Tunbridge, on which they settled. The fruits of this marriage were seven sons and three daughters. In 1802, Lucy Smith, with her husband, moved to Randolph, Vermont, where they opened a mercantile establishment. Mr. Smith here embarked in an adventure of gensang, to China, but was robbed of the proceeds, and was much involved thereby. To liquidate his debts, he had to sell his farm at Tunbridge, to which he had then returned, and to use his wife's marriage present, which till then had remained untouched. From Tunbridge they removed to Royalton. They remained there a few months, and then went to reside at Sharon, Windsor county, where Joseph the Prophet was born. They again returned to Tunbridge and Royalton successively, but, in 1811, their circumstances having much improved, they quitted Vermont for Lebanon, in New Hampshire. Here their children were all seized with the typhus fever, though none fatally, and Jospeh was afflicted with a fever sore. When health was restored to the family their circumstances were very low, and they returned to Vermont, and began to farm in Norwich. The first two years the crops failed, and the third the frost destroyed them, which determined Mr. Smith to remore to the state of New York. His wife and family did not remove until he had made preparations for them in Palmyra. Here the whole family set themselves industriously to repair their losses. Mr. Smith and his sons to farming, and Mrs. Smith to painting oil cloth coverings for tables, and were so prospered that in two years.

Note 2:

Smith, Lucy, mother of Joseph Smith the Prophet, was born July 8, 1776, at Gilsum, Cheshire county, New Hampshire, the daughter of Solomon Mack and Lydia Gates. Lucy was the youngest of eight children, four of whom were girls. Her father, Solomon Mack, had just attained his majority when the war between France and England, which grew out of disputed North American territory, was proclaimed. He entered the British army, and had two teams in the service of King George II., employed in carrying General Abercrombie's baggage, and was present in 1758, at the engagement on the west side of Lake George. He was engaged more or less in military pursuits until 1759, when he was discharged, and married an accomplished school teacher, Lydia Gates, the mother of the subject of this memoir. She was the daughter of Nathan Gates, a wealthy man, living in East Haddam, Conn. She was of a truly pious disposition, and had an excellent education, which peculiarly fitted her for the duties of a preceptress to her children, especially at a period when schools were rarities in the half cleared and thinly settled districts. Lucy profited by the talents and virtues of her mother. Jan. 24, 1796, she was married to Joseph Smith, and received from her brother, Stephen Mack, and John Mudget, his partner, in business, a marriage present of $1,000. Her husband owned a good farm at Tunbridge, on which they settled. The fruits of this marriage were seven sons—Alvin, Hyrum, Joseph, Samuel H., Ephraim, William and Don Carlos: and three daughters—Sophrona, Catherine and Lucy. In 1802, Lucy Smith, with her husband, moved to Randolph, Vermont, where they opened a mercantile establishment. Mr. Smith here embarked in an adventure of gensang, to China, but was robbed of the proceeds, and was much involved thereby. To liquidate his debts, he had to sell his farm at Tunbridge, to which he had then returned, and to use his wife's marriage present, which till then had remained untouched. From Tunbridge they removed to Royalton. They remained there a few months, and then went to reside at Sharon, Windsor county, where Joseph the Prophet was born. They again returned to Tunbridge and Royalton successively, but, in 1811, their circumstances having much improved, they quitted Vermont for Lebanon, in New Hampshire. Here their children were all seized with the typhus fever, though none fatally, and Joseph was afflicted with a fever sore. When health was restored to the family their circumstances were very low, and they returned to Vermont, and began to farm in Norwich. The first two years the crops failed, and the third the frost destroyed them, which determined Mr. Smith to remove to the State of New York. His wife and family did not remove until he had made preparations for them in Palmyra. Here the whole family set themselves industriously to repair their losses, Mr. Smith and his sons to farming, and Mrs. Smith to painting oil cloth coverings for tables, and were so prospered that in two years they were again comfortably situated. After four years had elapsed, they removed to Manchester. In the alternate scenes of adversity and prosperity, the subject of religion was a constant theme with both Mr. and Mrs. Smith, though the former never subscribed to any particular sect. Both were occasionally favored of the Lord with dreams or visions of the approaching work which he was about to commence on the earth, which prepared them for the mission of their son Joseph, and the important part they were destined to take in it. Lucy Smith and several of her children joined the Presbyterian body, in the year 1819, but after Joseph had received the first visitation of the angel, and had communicated the matter to his parents, she manifested intense interest in it, and from that time her history became identified with the mission of her son. She and her husband were baptized in April, 1830, and she removed to Kirtland, Ohio, in 1831, with the first company of Saints, where she rejoined her husband who had previously gone there in company with his son Joseph. Bro. Smith was several times torn from his wife by the enemies of the Saints, and unjustly imprisoned, but she manifested on all such occasions a calm assurance that all would end well. In 1838, all the family set out for Far West, Mo., a tedious and unpleasant journey, mostly through an unsettled country. They remained in Missouri until the extermination of the Saints from the State, participating in their numerous trials. On the occasion of the last arrest of her sons Joseph and Hyrum in that State, by the mob, in October, 1838, and when a court martial had decided to shoot them and others, she and her husband could distinctly hear the horrid yellings of the mob, which was encamped at a short distance from their house. Several guns were fired, and the heart-broken parents supposed the bloody work was accomplished. Mother Smith thus describes these moments: "Mr. Smith, folding his arms tight across his heart, cried out, 'Oh, my God! my God! they have killed my son! they have murdered him! and I must die, for I cannot live without him!' I had no word of consolation to give him, for my heart was broken within me; my agony was unutterable. I assisted him to the bed, and he fell back upon it helpless as a child, for he had not strength to stand upon his feet. The shrieking continued; no tongue can describe the sound which was conveyed to our ears; no heart can imagine the sensations of our breasts, as we listened to those awful screams. Had the army been composed of so many blood-hounds, wolves and panthers, they could not have made a sound more terrible." Joseph and Hyrum were not shot at that time, but were carried to Richmond, by way of Independence, and thence to Liberty. At their departure from Far West, the heart-stricken mother pressed through the crowd to the wagon containing her sons, exclaiming: "I am the mother of the Prophet; is there not a gentleman here, who will assist me to that wagon, that I may take a last look at my children, and speak to them once more before I die?" With her daughter Lucy, she gained the wagon, and grasped Joseph's hand, which was thrust between the cover and the wag-on-bed, but he spoke not to her until she said: "Joseph, do speak to your poor mother once more, I cannot bear to go till I hear your voice." At this he sobbed out: "God bless you, mother;" and while his sister Lucy was pressing a kiss on his hand, the wagon dashed off. Mourning and lamentation now filled the old lady's breast, "but," says she, "in the midst of it I found consolation that surpassed all earthly comfort. I was filled with the Spirit of God." Shortly after this, Bro. Smith removed his family to Quincy, Illinois, to which place most of the Saints had previously fled, and in common with them suffered the hardships and privations which characterized the extermination from Missouri. From Quincy the family removed to Commerce (Nauvoo), where Bro. Smith, after blessing his children individually, closed his earthly career Sept. 14, 1840. Mother Smith was thus left a widow, worn out with toil and sorrow, her house having been filled with sick like a hospital, from the time of the expulsion from Missouri. Many of the sick owed the preservation of their lives to her motherly care, attention and skill, in nursing them, which she did without pecuniary consideration and the extent of which can only be appreciated by those who are personally acquainted with the dreadful scenes of sickness and distress which followed, in consequence of the Missouri expulsion. Aug. 7, 1841, she was called upon to part with her youngest son, Don Carlos, a promising young man who died suddenly in Nauvoo. In 1843 she took up her residence with her son Joseph, and was shortly afterwards taken very sick, and brought nigh to death. She had scarcely recovered when she was called to suffer almost overwhelming grief for the assassination of her sons Joseph and Hyrum in June, 1844. When she was permitted to see the corpses of her murdered sons, her sorrow knew no bounds. "I was," she says, "swallowed up in the depths of my afflictions; and though my soul was filled with horror past imagination, yet I was dumb, until I arose again to contemplate the spectacle before me. Oh! at that moment how my mind flew through every scene of sorrow and distress which we had passed together, in which they had shown the innocence and sympathy which filled their guileless hearts. As I looked upon their peaceful, smiling countenances, I seemed almost to hear them say, 'Mother, weep not for us, we have overcome the world by love; we carried to them the gospel, that their souls might be saved; they slew us for our testimony, and thus placed us beyond their power; their ascendancy is for a moment, ours is an eternal triumph.'" As if the blow had not been sufficient to crush a mother's heart, Samuel Harrison Smith, in escaping from the murderers of his brothers, overheated himself, which brought on a fever that terminated fatally, July 30, 1844. Of the six sons which she had reared to manhood, Mother Smith now had but one (William) left, and he was at the time of the martyrdom at a distance from Nauvoo. But recovering somewhat from the effect of her affliction, she composed a very interesting little work entitled "Biographical Sketches of Joseph Smith the Prophet and his Progenetors for many Generations," which was published in England some years afterwards, and which at the present time is being reprinted in serial form in the "Improvement Era." At the general conference of the Church held in Nauvoo, in October, 1845, Mother Smith addressed the Saints. She reviewed the scenes through which her son and the Church had passed and exhorted parents to exercise a proper care over the welfare of their children. She expressed her intention to accompany the Saints into the wilderness, and requested that her bones, after her death, should be brought back and be deposited in Nauvoo with her husband's, which Pres. Brigham Young, and the whole conference, by vote, promised should be done. Mother Smith, however, never came to Utah. From the time of the removal of the Church to the Rocky Mountains until her death, which occurred in Nauvoo, Ill., May 5, 1855, she mostly resided with her youngest daughter, Lucy Miliken, excepting the last two years, when she resided with her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Emma Bidamon, widow of her son Joseph.

SOURCES: (1). "History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Period I"., History of Joseph Smith, the Prophet by Himself, Volume I. Published by the Church, The Deseret Book Company, SLC 1946; (2). Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996, Family History Library, 35 North West Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah 84150; (3). "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7; (4). "LDS Family History Suite", The LDS Vital Records Library. Parents: Solomon MACK and Lydia GATES.

Spouse: Joseph SMITH Sr.. Joseph SMITH Sr. and Lucy MACK were married on 24 JAN 1796 in Tunbridge, Orange County, Vermont. Children were: Infant SMITH, Alvin SMITH, Hyrum SMITH, Sophronia SMITH, Joseph SMITH Jr., Samuel Harrison SMITH V, Ephraim SMITH, William SMITH, Katherine SMITH, Don Carlos SMITH, Lucy SMITH.


Lucy (Louise) MACK was born date unknown. Parents: Orlando MACK and Damaris DUTTON.


Lydia MACK was born on 28 MAY 1689 in Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Middlesex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Concord.) She died in FEB 1715/16 at Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Sarah BAGLEY.

Spouse: Peter (Pearson) PERSON. Peter (Pearson) PERSON and Lydia MACK were married in 1709 in Connecticut.


Lydia MACK was born on 4 JUN 1718 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Love BENNETT.

Spouse: John WOOD. John WOOD and Lydia MACK were married on 8 FEB 1736/37 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut.


Lydia MACK was born in 1764 in Marlow, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. She died on 8 JUL 1826 at Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Parents: Solomon MACK and Lydia GATES.

Spouse: Samuel BILL. Samuel BILL and Lydia MACK were married in 1786.


Marah (Mary) MACK was born on 10 NOV 1699 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Sarah BAGLEY.

Spouse: John PETERS. John PETERS and Marah (Mary) MACK were married on 3 APR 1717 in Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut.


Mary MACK was born about 1719 in Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. Married: Jul 14 1741
Parents: Josiah MACK and Abigail PETERSON.


Mary MACK was born on 4 SEP 1793 in Tunbridge, Orange County, Vermont. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 0027619; General index to vital records of Vermont, early to 1870 Vermont. Secretary of State.) Parents: Stephen MACK and Temperance BOND.

Spouse: David DORT. David DORT and Mary MACK were married on 2 JUN 1813.


Mary F. MACK was born on 15 JUL 1832 in Pecatonica, Winnebago County, Illinois. She died in 1915. Parents: Stephen MACK and Hononegah.


Matilda MACK was born on 26 NOV 1843 in Pecatonica, Winnebago County, Illinois. Parents: Stephen MACK and Hononegah.


Merrill Elmaren MACK was born on 14 SEP 1812 in Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 1001017; Index to births, early to 1900 New Hampshire. Registrar of Vital Statistics.) He died on 25 MAR 1844 at Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois. He was buried in the Greenwood Cemetery at Rockford, Winnebago County, Illinois Parents: Captain Solomon MACK II and Esther HAYWARD.

Spouse: Vienna DART. Merrill Elmaren MACK and Vienna DART were married on 2 SEP 1841. Children were: Virginia Rispah MACK.


Nehemiah MACK was born on 5 JAN 1723/24 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Love BENNETT.


Orlando MACK Jr. was born date unknown. Parents: Orlando MACK and Damaris DUTTON.


Orlando MACK was born on 16 DEC 1693 in Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Middlesex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Concord.) He died on 28 JAN 1768 at Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Alternate dates and places:
Marriage: March 4, 1713/14
Birth: Salisbury, Essex County, Mass.
Death: Hebron, Tolland County, Conn.
Parents: John MACK and Sarah BAGLEY.

Spouse: Damaris DUTTON. Orlando MACK and Damaris DUTTON were married on 14 MAR 1718 in Connecticut. Children were: Phebe MACK, Lucy (Louise) MACK, Katharine MACK, Daniel Cary MACK, Orlando MACK Jr., Jemima MACK, Abner MACK, Rachel MACK, Damaris MACK, Stephen MACK.


Orlando MACK was born on 23 SEP 1799 in Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 1001017; Index to births, early to 1900 New Hampshire. Registrar of Vital Statistics.) Parents: Captain Solomon MACK II and Esther HAYWARD.


Patience MACK was born on 3 APR 1714 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 0002934; Barbour collection : Connecticut vital records prior to 1850 Barbour, Lucius B. (Lucius Barnes) , 1878-1934.) She died at Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Love BENNETT.

Spouse: Richard HAYES. Richard HAYES and Patience MACK were married on 14 APR 1735 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Children were: Silas HAYES, Seth HAYES, Richard HAYES, John HAYES, Catherine HAYES, Titus HAYES, Philemon HAYES, Joseph HAYES.


Phebe MACK was born on 28 JUN 1707 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Love BENNETT.

Spouse: James LEWIS. James LEWIS and Phebe MACK were married on 5 FEB 1735/36 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut.


Phebe MACK was born on 20 JAN 1728 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: Ebenezer MACK and Hannah HUNTLEY.


Phebe MACK was born on 2 MAY 1729 in Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. She died on 26 FEB 1769. Parents: Orlando MACK and Damaris DUTTON.

Spouse: Joseph CARY. Joseph CARY and Phebe MACK were married on 1 JUL 1747. Children were: Elizabeth CARY, Hannah CARY, Phebe CARY, Mary CARY, Joseph CARY Jr., Jemina CARY, Richard CARY, Abner CARY, Triphena CARY, Asa CARY.


Rachel MACK was born date unknown. Parents: Orlando MACK and Damaris DUTTON.


Rebecca MACK was born on 4 OCT 1701 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Sarah BAGLEY.

Spouse: Caleb BENNETT Jr.. Caleb BENNETT Jr. and Rebecca MACK were married about 1727. Children were: Sarah BENNETT, Thankful BENNETT, Caleb BENNETT.


Rizpah MACK was born on 5 JUN 1818 in Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Parents: Captain Solomon MACK II and Esther HAYWARD.


Rosa MACK was born on 14 NOV 1830 in Pecatonica, Winnebago County, Illinois. Parents: Stephen MACK and Hononegah.


Roxanna MACK was born on 17 OCT 1832 in Bradford, Orange County, Vermont. (Daughter of Samuel Mack and Ann.) She appeared in the census on 15 AUG 1850 in Bradford, Orange County, Vermont. (living at home with father and mother.) She appeared in the census on 21 JUN 1870 in Bradford, Orange County, Vermont. She appeared in the census in 1880 in Corinth, Orange County, Vermont. She appeared in the census on 1 JUN 1900 in Topsham, Orange County, Vermont. (Children 6, living 4.) She died on 22 JUN 1906 at Topsham, Orange County, Vermont.

Spouse: George W. COLBY. George W. COLBY and Roxanna MACK were married on 3 JUL 1852 in Bradford, Orange County, Vermont. Children were: Orissa Ann COLBY, Ruth Jane COLBY, Edwin Roger COLBY, Nellie R. COLBY, Henry G. COLBY, Dora R. COLBY.


Samuel MACK was born on 15 NOV 1736 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. He died on 10 OCT 1783 at Queen's County, Nova Scotia. Parents: Ebenezer MACK and Hannah HUNTLEY.


Sarah MACK was born on 22 JUL 1684 in Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Middlesex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Concord.) She died on 18 JAN 1775 at East Haddam, Middlesex County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Sarah BAGLEY.

Spouse: Matthew SMITH. Matthew SMITH and Sarah MACK were married on 28 NOV 1706 in Connecticut.


Sarah MACK was born on 10 OCT 1704 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. She died on 6 AUG 1762 at Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: John MACK and Love BENNETT.

Spouse: Joseph STERLING. Joseph STERLING and Sarah MACK were married on 2 JUL 1730 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut.


Solomon MACK was born on 15 SEP 1732 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. He died on 23 AUG 1820 at Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire.
Soloman Mack was a son of misfortune. Although Soloman came from a line of Scotch clergymen, poverty has kept him from the seminary, and he had grown up on a farm without schooling of religion-- to use his own words, "like a wild ass's colt." He had fought in the French and Indian War and then in the revolution with his two sons, Jason and Stephen. But when his daughter Lucy was married, Soloman was an impecunious and rheumatic old man who rode about the countryside on a side-saddle and talked about writing a memoir of his trials and misadventures.

The surprising thing about Joseph Smith's materinal grandfather is that he actually suceeded, when he was seventy-eight years old, in getting out his chapbook: A Narrative of the Life of Soloman Mack, containing an account of the severe accidents he met with during a long series of years, together with the extraordinary manner in which he was converted to the Christian Faith. To which is added a number of hymms, composed on the death of several relations. (printed at the expense of the author, 1810, Windsor)

Actually the Mack family was marked neither by psychoses nor by literary talent, but rather by a certian nonconformity in thinking and action. As religious dissenters they believed more in the integrity of individual religous experience than in the tradition of any organised sect. Soloman in his old age fell into a kind of senile mysticism, with lights and voices haunting his sickbed. Jason Mack, Lucy's eldest brother, ran sharply counter to the religous and economic traditions of New England when he became a "Seeker."

Jason, however, did not receive the attention from Morman historians that has been devoted to another of Lucy's brothers. When stock from which the Morman prophet sprang is called idle, thriftless, and degenerate, Stephen Mack is cited triumphantly to the contrary. He made a fortune in Detroit and left an estate worth fifty thousand dollars at his death. He had prospered even before he left Vermont, for he furnished Lucy with a dowry which her father could not provide. The thousand dollars he and his partner gave her just after her marriage made the girl (considering that this was Vermont in 1796) a virtual heiress.

Soloman Mack enlisted in the service of his country in 1755, in Col. Whitings' regiment at Ft. Edwards, NY. He fought in the French and Indian War. He fought in the battle at Halfway Brook in 1755 and at Lake George in 1758. (This is the battle in which Lord Howe was killed) He was discharged at Crowpoint in 1759. In 1776 he reenlisted in the land forces, in Isreal Putnam's Company. In 1780 he and his sons, Jason (age 20) and Stephen (age 14) joined a privateer commanded by Capt. Havens. Stephen Mack served until he was 17, but served his country again in the War of 1812.

Note 2:
Solomon Mack

Solomon Mack was born at Lyme, Connecticut, September 15th, 1732. When misfortune befell his father's family, Solomon was but four years of age. He was apprenticed to a farmer of the neighborhood, and experienced the hardships of an "apprenticed hand"--all too common in New England in those times, and afterwards--long hours of incessant toil, cold neglect, with no schooling, and but little opportunity for self improvement. Not until he attained his majority was Solomon Mack set free from this semi-bondage. Then he entered the service of his majesty, King George II, the French and Indian War being at its height. He saw active service during the next four years, being in a number of important engagements with the French and Indians about Lake George; at Fort Edward, Fort William Henry, Ticonderoga and Crown Point. At the last named place in the spring of 1759 Solomon Mack received his discharge; and the same year he married Lydia Gates, the daughter of Nathan Gates of East Haddam, Connecticut. Lydia was a school teacher. Solomon speaks of her as an "accomplished young woman;" and later in his Narrative justifies the description by a further reference to her in the most complimentary terms, in connection with the rearing of their family. The money that accumulated in Solomon's hands by four year's service in the army was invested in lands in Grandville, Washington county, New York, east of Lake George, and near the Vermont line. Part of the settler's contract was to build a number of log houses on the land he had purchased. About this time Solomon had the misfortune to cut his leg and he was disabled for work throughout the summer. The man whom he employed to build the aforesaid log houses, and whom he paid in advance, absconded with the money the part of the contract pertaining to building the houses was not fulfilled, and consequently the land with the investment was lost. After this the family settled in Marlow, Cheshire county, New Hampshire. "No other than a desolate, dreary wilderness," is Solomon's description of it, "only four families within forty miles." But here the talents and virtues of Lydia, his wife, shone out. The pair now had four children, and the husband says:

"Here I was thrown into a situation to appreciate more fully the talents and virtues of my excellent wife; for, as our children were deprived of schools, she assumed the charge of their education, and performed the duties of an instructress as none, save a mother, is capable of. Precepts accompanied with examples such as hers, were calculated to make impressions on the minds of the young, never to be forgotten. She, besides instructing them in the various branches of an ordinary education, was in the habit of calling them together both morning and evening, and teaching them to pray; meanwhile urging upon them the necessity of love towards each other, as well as devotional feeling towards him who made them. In this manner my first children became confirmed in habits of piety, gentleness, and reflection, which afforded great assistance in guiding those who came after them, into the same happy channel. The education of my children would have been a more difficult task if they had not inherited much of their mother's excellent disposition."

This lady, it should be remembered, was the maternal grandmother of Joseph Smith, the Prophet.

In 1776 Solomon Mack enlisted in the American army, serving for some time in the land forces, but subsequently with his two sons, Jason and Stephen, he served in a privateering expedition under Captain Havens. After serving his country for four years he returned to Gilsum, New Hampshire. Owing to exposure and the hardships of his early life Solomon Mack's health failed him in his later years; he was feeble and much afflicted with rheumatism. In making journeys about the country in those days he rode on horseback, and for his greater comfort used a woman's saddle--a circumstance pressed into service to emphasize the existence of an "abnormality" in one of the ancestors of Joseph Smith!

The circumstance that he was subject to occasional lapses into unconsciousness is made to do service in the same manner. This defect was occasioned by a severe injury in the head caused by a falling tree upon him in middle life; so, too, some hallucinations of extreme old age attended with failing health. Yet this old, Revolutionary soldier, bequeathed to the country, whose liberties and institutions he had risked his life to establish, a noble family. His two sons, Jason and Stephen, both served their country in the American Revolution. Jason, who is described as "a studious and manly boy," was of a religious turn of mind, even in his youth, and became a preacher of the gospel and a social reformer. The chief scene of his activities was in New Brunswick, where he purchased a tract of land upon which he settled some thirty families of the poorer class, and taught them how to become self-supporting; supervising their temporal labors as well as ministering to their spiritual comfort. In such labor the greater part of his life was spent.

SOURCES: (1). "History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Period I"., History of Joseph Smith, the Prophet by Himself, Volume I. Published by the Church, The Deseret Book Company, SLC 1946; (2). Ancestral File (TM), data as of 2 January 1996, Family History Library, 35 North West Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah 84150; (3). "History of Joseph Smith By His Mother", Edited by Scot Facer Proctor & Maurine Jensen Proctor, 1996 Bookcraft, Salt Lake City, Utah. ISBN I-57008-267-7; (4). "LDS Family History Suite", The LDS Vital Records Library.
Parents: Ebenezer MACK and Hannah HUNTLEY.

Spouse: Lydia GATES. Solomon MACK and Lydia GATES were married on 4 JAN 1759 in East Haddam, Middlesex County, Connecticut. Children were: Jason MACK, Lovisa MACK, Lovina MACK, Lydia MACK, Stephen MACK, Daniel MACK, Captain Solomon MACK II, Lucy MACK.


Captain Solomon MACK II was born on 28 JAN 1773 in Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. He died on 12 OCT 1851 at Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Parents: Solomon MACK and Lydia GATES.

Spouse: Esther HAYWARD. Captain Solomon MACK II and Esther HAYWARD were married on 29 AUG 1797 in Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Children were: Calvin MACK, Orlando MACK, Chilion MACK, Solomon MACK III, Amos MACK, Dennis MACK, Merrill Elmaren MACK, Esther MACK, Rizpah MACK.


Solomon MACK III was born on 23 MAY 1805 in Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 1001017; Index to births, early to 1900 New Hampshire. Registrar of Vital Statistics.) Parents: Captain Solomon MACK II and Esther HAYWARD.


Stephen MACK was born date unknown. Parents: Orlando MACK and Damaris DUTTON.


Stephen MACK was born on 15 JUN 1742 in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Stephen MACK died on 25 SEP 1762 at Lyme, New London County, Connecticut. Parents: Ebenezer MACK and Hannah HUNTLEY.


Stephen MACK was born on 15 JUN 1766 in Marlow, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. He died on 11 NOV 1826 at Pontiac, Oakland County, Michigan. Stephen Mack

Stephen Mack who, as we have already seen, was engaged in the mercantile and tinning business at Tunbridge, Vermont, finally extended his enterprises westward as far as Detroit, Michigan. He was in Detroit in 1812 at the time of Hull's surrender, and had been appointed to the command of a company of troops as captain, although generally called "Major Mack." When subsequently--and shortly after his appointment as captain--he was ordered by his superior officers to surrender, he was so highly indignant that he broke his sword across his knee and threw it into the lake, saying he would never submit to the disgraceful compromise. By the year 1820, according to the written statement of Horace Stanley, Stephen Mack was the proprietor of a large mercantile establishment in Detroit--large for those days, employing six clerks. Besides this establishment he had a number of stores in various parts of Michigan and Ohio. At his own expense he built a turn-pike road from Detroit to Pontiac where he owned a large farm upon which he lived. In 1828 he was a member of the council of the territory of Michigan. All this would indicate that Stephen Mack was a man of intelligence, judgment, enterprise, and successful withal. When he died he left his family an estate of $50,000, without incumbrance, which, in those days, was a large fortune.
Parents: Solomon MACK and Lydia GATES.

Spouse: Temperance BOND. Stephen MACK and Temperance BOND were married in 1788 in Gilsum, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Children were: Fanny MACK, Mary MACK, Lovina MACK, Stephen MACK, Harriet MACK, John Mudget MACK, Almira MACK, Almon MACK.


Stephen MACK was born on 2 FEB 1798 in Tunbridge, Orange County, Vermont. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 0027619; General index to vital records of Vermont, early to 1870 Vermont. Secretary of State.) He died on 10 APR 1850 at Rockton, Winnebago County, Illinois.
Life on Illinois' Last Frontier

Anna Elizabeth Carlson
Heritage School, Rockford

In the 1830s much of northern Illinois was wilderness. Ten years later the entire area was settled except for a few small prairies short of timber. Because of the Black Hawk War, people learned about the good land in the Rock River Valley. The first wave of settlers arrived in 1833. Over the next three years, the greatest land craze that the United States had ever seen occurred in the Rock River Valley. The story of Macktown captures this time.

Stephen Mack, a fur trader, had traveled in the Rock River Valley since the early 1820s. He was born in Poultney, Vermont, on February 20, 1798. When he left Moors Charity School, he joined his father, who owned a fur company called Mack and Conant.

While in the Green Bay area he met fur traders who told him of the Rock River Valley's potential for trading. He traded for several years near a Potawatomi village, which today is Grand Detour. In 1829 he married Hononegah. No wedding ceremony - he gave her family two fine horses, two saddles and two blankets for her. Later on, he became concerned that his heirs might not inherit his estate, so on 14 September 1840, they were legally married by a Winnebago County J.P.

Stephen Mack had the advantage of knowing the area. As settlers poured into the lands, he needed to make his claim. In 1835 he selected section 23 on a bluff above the Rock River, just below the mouth of the Pekatonica River. This was a natural crossroad. Here, he plotted his town of Pekatonica, which settlers later called Macktown. Mack acquired about a thousand acres. When Mack was told it was too hilly here he said, "It is far better than Milwaukee." Native Americans had used this site for ten thousand years.

Stephen Mack intentionally chose his claim for its position on the rivers. He wanted to make a river town, since travel by road was slow and difficult. At this time, Chicago and Galena were the two developed towns in northern Illinois. Lead from the mines in Galena took eleven days by wagon to reach Dixon's Ferry. Traveling by road was inefficient. For growth to occur, farmers had to deliver their grain and produce to Chicago, and the mines had to ship their lead. Mack judged the Rock River navigable for 150 miles and the Pekatonica River for 100 miles. The state of Illinois agreed, and in 1837 the Illinois General Assembly declared the Rock River navigable and directed that $100,000 be spent for improvements.

Stephen Mack built a double cabin, and in 1839 he constructed the largest frame house west of Chicago. Mack also established a store called a mercantile. He soon founded a school. Later, Mack built a second school with a large stone fireplace and chimney. Mack paid the teacher's salary. Mack's double cabin became a tavern for travelers. Records show that people were continually arriving.

Mack was a generous man. He allowed the settlers to borrow money from him to buy their lots. Between 1836 and 1845, he sold property to H.M. Bates, David Jewett, L.W. Osgood, Robert Gilmour, Darius Adams, Isaac Adams, and John Spafford. At the same time, he continued to purchase additional land. It is interesting to note that beside his signature for the sale of the lots was Hononegah's mark. Their joint ownership of land shows his respect for her, which was unusual for the time. Stephen Mack plotted his entire property, which covered all of section 23. Most early towns were never plotted this large. He felt his lots were a bargain. He created ten lots to a block instead of the usual twelve. He claimed that a corner lot by his store was worth a thousand dollars.

Pekatonica attracted numerous craftsmen, including a tailor, W.M. Halley. He sewed the latest fashions; however the residents of Pekatonica did not need these fashions. So the Talcott family paid him to stay. John Jewett was a blacksmith, and Thomas Farmer was a stone mason. Other craftsmen in Pekatonica were a saw miller, a wagon maker, a carpenter, a cabinetmaker, a boot maker, and a maker of holloware.

In 1837 Stephen Mack established a ferry that carried people across the Rock River. Because of the ferry, the main road north passed through Pekatonica. Between 1842 and 1843, Mack built a bridge to replace the ferry, largely with his own funds. It was the first bridge across the Rock River and had a draw of thirty-six feet to allow for steamboats. When the rival city of Rockford decided to build a bridge with state funds, Stephen Mack wrote to legislator Robert Cross. He argued that it was unjust for the state to build a bridge with public money when Illinois had refused to fund his structure.

On April 4, 1840, Mack made his first will for his nine children. Five months later, Hononegah and Stephen Mack were remarried in a Christian ceremony. This remarriage was to prevent confusion in his will.

In spite of being the first settlement in the Rock River frontier, Pekatonica failed. Its population peaked at about three hundred people. Stephen Mack placed M. E. Mack, his cousin, in charge of his store. However, the store lost two thousand dollars. It turned out that M.E. Mack was stealing money. When M.E. Mack died, Stephen Mack was responsible for his debts. Stephen Mack called in the sheriff, but nothing could be done.

In 1836 General Chiopicki—a hero of the Polish War for Independence—claimed land in section 23 under the Polish Claim Act of 1834. This prevented secure title to property until an act of Congress in 1842.

Sadly, another cause of the town's failure was Mack's marriage to a Native American. When settlers arrived in Pekatonica and saw an Indian, they left. New settlers from the East did not want to live with Indians. William Talcott, the founder of Rockton across the Rock River from Pekatonica, had a son Thomas who kept a journal. In it, Thomas Talcott referred to Hononegah as "that squaw."

Stephen Mack was one of the first white settlers in the Rock River Valley. His town Pekatonica failed, but the region grew and prospered.—[From Edson J. Carr, The History of Rockton; Janice Schmang, Stephen Mack and the Early Settlement of Macktown and Rockton; Stephen Mack, Early Letter from Rockford and Winnebago County; Original Federal Land Survey Notes; Winnebago County Deeds.]

Parents: Stephen MACK and Temperance BOND.

Spouse: Hononegah. Stephen MACK and Hononegah were married about 1829. They were married on 14 SEP 1840 in Winnebago County, Illinois. They were legally married by a Winnebago County J.P. Children were: Rosa MACK, Mary F. MACK, William H. MACK, Louisa I. MACK, Thomas H. MACK, Henry Clay MACK, Edward MACK, Matilda MACK, Caroline E. MACK.

Spouse: Mrs. Isabella DANIELS. Stephen MACK and Mrs. Isabella DANIELS were married on 24 FEB 1848 in Winnebago County, Illinois.

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