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Photo Carl Herbert COLBY was born on 14 APR 1892 in Shelton, Buffalo County, Nebraska. He appeared in the census in JUN 1900 in Shelton, Buffalo County, Nebraska. (living at home with father and mother.) He served in the military from JUL 1918 to FEB 1919. Sergeant Carl H. Colby, Son of Mrs. R. E. Colby, Shelton, Neb.
Entered the service at Kearney, Neb., July 21, 1918, and was trained at Camp Dodge, Ia., for duty with Co. 35. U. S. Infantry. Received his discharge papers February 13. 1919.

Parents: Frederick E. COLBY and Rebecca E. HILL.


Carl M. COLBY was born on 27 OCT 1879 in Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.
Name: Carl Colby
Birthdate: 27 Oct 1879
Birthplace: Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire, United States
Father's name: Milton Colby
Mother's name: Cynthia A Colby
Recording place: Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire, United States
Film number: 1000378
Digital GS number: 4243701
Image number: 01598
Collection: New Hampshire Birth Records, Early to 1900

He died on 6 FEB 1966 at San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas. He had Social Security Number 079-03-8142. SS# issued in: New York
Residence code: Texas
ZIP Code of last known residence: 78210
Primary location associated with this ZIP Code: San Antonio, Texas. (SOURCE: "A Genealogy of the Descendants of Abraham Colby and Elizabeth Blaisdell, his wife Who settled in Bow in 1768" By one of them, Concord, NH Printed by the Republican Press Association 1895.) Parents: Milton COLBY (twin) and Cynthia Ella BICKFORD.

Spouse: Mary L. GOODWIN. Carl M. COLBY and Mary L. GOODWIN were married on 24 JUN 1900 in New Hampshire. (SOURCE: FHL Number 1000976; COLBY, Carl M. Age: 20 years, Marriage: Mary L. GOODWIN Age: 26 years, Date: 24 Jun 1900; Recorded in: Birth and Marriage Index for New Hampshire.) Children were: Marion COLBY.


Carl N. COLBY was born on 24 APR 1942 in Franklin, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. He died on 9 FEB 2005 at Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida. He had Social Security Number 001-30-7248. Parents: Victor N. COLBY and Flora JOSLIN.


Carl Shutz COLBY was born on 16 JAN 1860 in Woodhull, Shiawassee County, Michigan. He appeared in the census in JUL 1860 in Woodhull, Shiawassee County, Michigan. (living at home with father and mother.) He appeared in the census in 1870 in Woodhull, Shiawassee County, Michigan. (living at home with father and mother.) He appeared in the census in 1880 in Woodhull, Shiawassee County, Michigan. (living with father) He died on 22 OCT 1944 at Woodhull, Shiawassee County, Michigan. He was buried in the Graham Cemetery at Woodhull, Shiawassee County, Michigan Parents: John M. COLBY and Orpha S. KELLY.


Carl W. COLBY was born in MAR 1895 in Sanbornton, Belknap County, New Hampshire. He appeared in the census in 1900 in Gilford, Belknap County, New Hampshire. (living at home with father and mother.) He appeared in the census in 1910 in Gilford, Belknap County, New Hampshire. He died on 28 MAR 1913 at Sanbornton, Belknap County, New Hampshire. (SOURCE: FHL Film 15,575; New Hampshire Cemetery Records.) He was buried in the New Bay/Union Cemetery at Sanbornton, Belknap County, New Hampshire Parents: Frederick Woodward COLBY and Jennie Olive WOODMAN.


Carl W. COLBY was born in 1906 in Lennington, Essex County, Vermont. He appeared in the census in 1910 in Lennington, Essex County, Vermont. (living at home with father and mother.) He appeared in the census in 1920 in Barton, Orleans County, Vermont. (living at home with father and mother.) Parents: William H. COLBY and Myrtie I. (COLBY).


Carl William COLBY was born on 29 DEC 1908 in Webster, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. He died in NOV 1975 at Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. (BOOK SOURCE: "The History of Boscawen & Webster, New Hampshire, from 1878 to 1933." by Willis G. Buxton.) Parents: Frank Eugene COLBY and Clara Belle STEVENS.

Spouse: Ruth Atwood FLANDERS. Carl William COLBY and Ruth Atwood FLANDERS were married on 18 DEC 1927. Children were: Richard Eugene COLBY, William Myron COLBY, Donald C. COLBY.

Spouse: Marion E. (Muse) OSGOOD. Carl William COLBY and Marion E. (Muse) OSGOOD were married on 3 JUL 1954.


Carl Winchester COLBY was born on 1 AUG 1875 in Plainview, Wabasha County, Minnesota. He appeared in the census in 1900 in Plainview, Wabasha County, Minnesota. (living at home with father and mother.) He appeared in the census on 25 APR 1910 in Sandstone, Pine County, Minnesota. He appeared in the census on 16 JAN 1920 in Sandstone, Pine County, Minnesota. In 1920 he was an Editor, Weekly Newspaper in Sandstone, Pine County, Minnesota. He appeared in the census on 5 APR 1930 in Sandstone, Pine County, Minnesota. He died on 10 MAR 1948 at Sandstone, Pine County, Minnesota. (SOURCE: Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002.) Parents: Loyal Dyke COLBY and Orilla AVERY.

Spouse: Annetta M. ANDERSON. Carl Winchester COLBY and Annetta M. ANDERSON were married on 1 JAN 1901 in Minnesota. Children were: Vernon Loyal COLBY, Faye A. COLBY.


Carl Winchester COLBY was born in NOV 1934. Parents: Vernon Loyal COLBY and Daizie A. (COLBY).

Spouse: Beverly Alice FOSS. Carl Winchester COLBY and Beverly Alice FOSS were married on 17 JUL 1965. (SOURCE: Minnesota Marriage Collection, 1958-2001. Listed as Beverly A. Anderson.) Children were: Kyle Jon COLBY.


Carleton Lee COLBY was born on 5 APR 1881 in Waltham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: NEHGS, Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910.) He appeared in the census on 7 JUN 1900 in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. (living at home with father and mother.) He appeared in the census on 21 APR 1910 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. He appeared in the census on 5 JAN 1920 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. In 1920 he was a musician in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. He appeared in the census on 10 APR 1930 in Oak Park, Cook County, Illinois. In 1930 he was a music composer - radio station in Oak Park, Cook County, Illinois. He died on 23 JUL 1937 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. Parents: James Waldo COLBY and Ellen May MOORE.

Spouse: Jennie L. FITCH. Carleton Lee COLBY and Jennie L. FITCH were married about 1905. Children were: Dorothy COLBY.


Carlie Faye COLBY was born on 19 JUL 1878 in Alton, Madison County, Illinois. He appeared in the census in 1880 in North Alton, Madison County, Illinois. (living with father) He died on 17 MAR 1945 at Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois. He was also known as Carlos F. Colby. Parents: Carlos William COLBY and Anne Elizabeth ROWE.


Carlista A. COLBY was born on 7 OCT 1839 in Richmond, Lincoln County, Maine. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 873,925; History of Litchfield and an account of its centennial celebration, 1895. Pub. 1897.) She appeared in the census in 1850 in Litchfield, Kennebec County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother) She appeared in the census in 1860 in Litchfield, Kennebec County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother.) She appeared in the census in 1870 in Gardiner, Kennebec County, Maine. She appeared in the census in 1880 in Gardiner, Kennebec County, Maine. She appeared in the census in 1900 in Gardiner, Kennebec County, Maine. She appeared in the census in 1910 in Gardiner, Kennebec County, Maine. She appeared in the census in 1920 in Gardiner, Kennebec County, Maine. Parents: Rev. James COLBY and Mary FOSTER.

Spouse: Albert Franklin PLIMPTON. Albert Franklin PLIMPTON and Carlista A. COLBY were married on 26 MAY 1865 in Gardiner, Kennebec County, Maine.


Carlos COLBY was born on 31 JAN 1834 in Holland, Erie County, New York. He appeared in the census in 1850 in Holland, Erie County, New York. (living at home with father and mother.) He appeared in the census in 1860 in Holland, Erie County, New York. He appeared in the census in 1880 in Alexandria, Douglas County, Minnesota. Census Place: Alexandria, Douglas, Minnesota
Source: FHL Film 1254618 National Archives Film T9-0618 Page 495C
Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Carlos COLBY Self M M W 48 NY
Occ: Horse Farrier Fa: VT Mo: VT
Mary COLBY Wife F M W 40 NY
Occ: Housekeeping Fa: VT Mo: NY
===========================================================

He died on 7 NOV 1881 at Alexandria, Douglas County, Minnesota.
The Douglas County News
Alexandria, Douglas County, Minnesota
Thursday, November 10, 1881, page 4, col. 1.

Mr. Carlos Colby, an old and respected resident of this county, died at his residence in Alexandria Monday evening of Brights disease of the kidneys, aged 49 years. The funeral took place from the Baptist church yesterday afternoon, Rev. W. M. Wells officiating. An obituary of the deceased will appear next week.

Transcribed from microfilm copy of newspaper at Minnesota History Center, St. Paul, MN.

Parents: Col. Jonathan COLBY and Hannah COOPER.

Spouse: Mary HADLEY. Carlos COLBY and Mary HADLEY were married in 1851. Children were: Thura COLBY, Bradley Goodyear COLBY.


Carlos D. COLBY was born on 7 OCT 1904 in Plainfield, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. He appeared in the census on 19 APR 1910 in Cornish, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. (living at home with father and mother.) He appeared in the census on 12 JAN 1920 in St. Johnsbury, Caledonia County, Vermont. (living at home with father and mother.) He appeared in the census on 8 APR 1930 in Riverside, Riverside County, California. (living at home with father and mother.) He died on 3 DEC 1982 at Lake Forest, Orange County, California. He had Social Security Number 550-28-6975 . Parents: Morris William COLBY and Mary Florence JENNEY.


Carlos Dyer COLBY was born on 11 MAY 1846 in Plainfield, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. He appeared in the census in 1850 in Plainfield, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. (living at home with father and mother) He appeared in the census in 1880 in Plainfield, Sullivan County, New Hampshire.
Census Place: Plainfield, Sullivan, New Hampshire
Source: FHL Film 1254768 National Archives Film T9-0768 Page 369C
Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Carlos D. COLBY Self M M W 34 NH
Occ: Farmer Fa: NH Mo: NH
Edith W. COLBY Wife F M W 33 NH
Occ: Keeping House Fa: NH Mo: NH
Mary E. COLBY Dau F S W 9 NH
Fa: NH Mo: NH
Bertha S. COLBY Dau F S W 8 NH
Fa: NH Mo: NH
Maurice W. COLBY Son M S W 5 NH
Fa: NH Mo: NH
Sarah C. COLBY Dau F S W 4 NH
Fa: NH Mo: NH
Ellen M. COLBY Dau F S W 10M NH
Fa: NH Mo: NH
Florence I. JORDAN Other F D W 28 NH
Occ: Servent Domestic Fa: NH Mo: NH
===========================================================

He appeared in the census in 1900 in Plainfield, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. He died on 13 JAN 1909 at Plainfield, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. Parents: William Davis COLBY and Sabrina SMITH.

Spouse: Edith Sarah WESTGATE. Carlos Dyer COLBY and Edith Sarah WESTGATE were married on 16 SEP 1869 in Plainfield, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. (SOURCE: FHL Number 1000976; COLBY, Carlos Dyer Age: 23 years, Marriage: Edith Sarah WESTGATE Age: 23 years, Date: 16 Sep 1869; Recorded in: Birth and Marriage Index for New Hampshire.) Children were: Mary E. COLBY, Bertha S. COLBY, Morris William COLBY, Sarah C. COLBY, Ellen M. COLBY, Grace E. COLBY, Earle Westgate COLBY.


Carlos H. COLBY was born on 18 SEP 1881 in Alexandria, Douglas County, Minnesota. He appeared in the census in 1900 in Alexandria, Douglas County, Minnesota. (living at home with father and mother.) He died from appendicitis on 8 OCT 1904 at Walla Walla, Walla Walla County, Washington. Parents: Royal Lee COLBY and Mary M. LATSKA.


Carlos Miller COLBY was born on 3 JAN 1924 in Manly, Worth County, Iowa. He died on 6 JAN 1924 at Manly, Worth County, Iowa. Parents: Henry Hastings COLBY and Ida Christine MILLER.


Photo Carlos William COLBY was born on 15 MAY 1837 in Hopkinton, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. He appeared in the census in 1850 in Hopkinton, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. (living with father) He appeared in the census in 1880 in North Alton, Madison County, Illinois.
Census Place: District 7, North Alton, Madison, Illinois
Source: FHL Film 1254233 National Archives Film T9-0233 Page 98C
Relation Sex Marr Race Age Birthplace
Carlos W. COLBY Self M M W 43 NH
Occ: Farmer Fa: NH Mo: NH
Annie E. COLBY Wife F M W 35 IL
Fa: ENG Mo: NC
Charles W. COLBY Other M S W 10 IL
Fa: --- Mo: ---
Florence M. COLBY Other F S W 7 IL
Fa: --- Mo: ---
Carlos F. COLBY Other M S W 1 IL
Fa: --- Mo: ---
Elizabeth ROWE Other F S W 74 IL
Fa: --- Mo: ---
Mary Ann ALLEN Other F S W 21 IL
Fa: --- Mo: ---
He died on 19 MAY 1922 at Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois. He was buried in the Cress Hill Cemetery at Hillsboro, Montgomery County, Illinois
Served in the Civil War from Madison County, Illinois, enlistment 11 August 1862, Corpl..
Burial: Cress Hill Cemetery, Hillsboro, Illinois
AWARDED THE MEDAL OF HONOR

"COLBY, Carlos W.

"Sergeant, Company G, 97th Illinois Infantry, at Vicksburg, Miss. 22 May
1863, for Gallantry in the charge of the "volunteer storming party."

Entered service at: Madison County, Illinois, birth, Merrimack, N.H.
Date of issue: 31 January 1896.

"Although it was created for the civil War, congress made the Medal of Honor a permanent decoration in 1863. almost 3,400 men and one woman have received the award for heroic action in the nation's battles since that time."

From: U.S. Army Center of Military History.
--------------------------------------------------------
THE "FORLORN HOPE" AT VICKSBURG

"Deeds of Valor" edited by W.F. Beyer and O.F. Keydel,
The Perrien-Keydel Company 1906, pages 190 to 197

For superb gallantry and reckless indifference to death and danger, there is nothing in military history to excel the conduct of the "forlorn hope" that led the general assault on Vicksburg on May 22, 1863. General Grant had encircled the city on three sides with a line of battle twelve miles long, and on the Mississippi, which formed the fourth side, were Admiral Porter's warships. The strength of the enemy had been greatly underestimated, and it was decided to make an attempt to carry the city by storm, in order to avoid the tedium of a siege. The enemy's lines ran along the top of a bluff, and the point of attack selected was to the south of one of the forts. This fort, which was protected by a ditch twelve feet wide and five or six feet deep, rose about ten feet above the level and sloped up gently towards the enemy's guns. The face of the fort was perpendicular, the earth having been tamped, instead of being allowed to adjust itself. The point of attack was in front of the Second Division of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and on the afternoon of May 21st, each regimental commander of the division explained the plan of operations to his men and called for volunteers. One hundred and fifty men were required for a "forlorn hope" to lead the general assault and prepare the way for the real attack. As these men would be certain to draw the enemy's fire, there was little probability of any of them returning alive, and on that account it was decided not to order any man to go, but to depend entirely on volunteers. Each regiment was to supply its quota, and in view of the terrible risk to be incurred, orders were given that none but unmarried men were to be accepted. The men responded promptly to the call, and in such numbers that twice as many volunteered as were required, those who had first offered their services being accepted.

The work assigned to the "forlorn hope" was to build a bridge over the ditch which protected the front of the enemy's fort, plant their scaling ladders against the embankment, and it was expected that by the time this was done, the supporting brigades would be ready to carry the works by a grand assault.

On the following morning the storming party was led through a ravine to the Jackson Road, which crossed the enemy's lines at right angles. In this ravine, out of sight of the enemy, was a pile of roughly hewn logs, another of lumber, and a. number of scaling ladders. The advance party was to carry the logs, two men to each log, make a dash for the enemy's entrenchments and throw the logs across the ditch to form the ground work of a bridge. The second detachment was to follow close up with the lumber, which was to be thrown across the logs to make sure footing for the stormers. The third detachment was to bring up the scaling ladders, rush across the bridge, and plant them against the enemy's works.

The moment the "forlorn hope" emerged from the ravine, they came within view of the enemy, who opened so heavy a fire on them that their works were covered with clouds of smoke. The gallant little band advanced at a dead run, but, in the eighty rods of open ground which lay between them and the fort, about half of them were shot down. When the survivors arrived at the ditch, they found it impossible to build a bridge, as so many of the logs had been dropped by the way, and it was equally impossible to remain where they were, exposed to the enemy's fire. There was nothing for it but to jump into the ditch, and seek shelter. Private Howell G. Trogden, who carried the flag of the storming party, planted it on the parapet of the fort, and dropped back into the ditch, where he kept up a fire on the Confederates whenever they attempted to reach it and take it in.

The other brigades advanced to the support of the stormers, but were driven back by the heavy fire, and all that reached the ditch were thirty men of the Eleventh Missouri with a colonel, major, and two lieutenants. They planted their flag along side that of the storming party, and sought shelter where they could, in the ditch, or in holes dug in the embankment. The Confederates finding it impossible to depress their guns sufficiently to reach them, dropped 12-pounder shells. among them, but the fuses were cut too long, and consequently did not explode for about ten seconds. This gave the stormers time not only to get out of the way, but even to toss some of the shells back over the parapet, otherwise not a man would have survived. As it was, the bottom of the ditch was strewn with mangled bodies, with heads and limbs blown off.

The Thirty-seventh Ohio Volunteers, who were advancing to the support, became panic-stricken and broke. The men lay down in the road, and sought shelter behind rocks and inequalities of the ground. They refused to either advance or retire, and lay there for hours, blocking the way of the regiments which were coming up behind, thus compelling them to make a long detour, and deliver their attack on the left of the enemy's position. While making this detour, they were exposed to the fire of the enemy for nearly the whole distance, and were so weakened in consequence, that they failed in their attack.

The assault had now failed at every point, although Admiral Porter's ships had kept up a heavy bombardment, and the Federal troops were obliged to withdraw and seek cover, from which they kept up a heavy and well sustained fire. All this time the men in the ditch, unable to either retreat or advance, held their position with the utmost tenacity and weakened the fire of the rebel guns by shooting down the gunners. In order to dislodge them, a gun loaded with grape was dragged to a position where it would enfilade the ditch, but sharpshooters shot down the gunners, before a single round could be fired. Others attempted to take their places, but it was certain death to approach the gun, and it was abandoned.

All day long, from 10 o'clock in the morning until darkness fell, the unequal fight went on; then the little body of survivors crept out of the ditch, carrying with them their flags, riddled with bullets, and made their way back to their own lines. Of the storming party eighty-five percent were either killed or dangerously wounded, and few of them escaped without a wound of some kind.

When the storming party withdrew, they left behind them William Archinal, who had been stunned by a fall, and who was afterwards captured by the enemy. Archinal and another man had been carrying a log between them, and had neared the ditch, when his comrade was shot. His sudden fall and the consequent dropping of his end of the log, threw Archinal to the ground, where he struck his head against a stone and he became unconscious. His adventure is best told in his own words; he says:

"When I came to my senses, I was lying on my face with the log across my body and showers of bullets whistling through the air and dropping all around me. These bullets I found, came from my own division, and to save myself from being shot by my own comrades, I wriggled from under the log, and got it between me and them. It was providential for me that I did so, for I could hear the bullets striking the log in dozens. Sometime during the afternoon one of our cannon balls struck the log close to my head; the log bounded in the air and fell a little way from me, but I crawled up to it again and hugged it close. The firing continued incessantly all day until nightfall, when it gradually slackened, and finally died away altogether. I thought I could make my way back to my regiment, but as I was rising the butt of my gun which was slung on my back, attracted the attention of the enemy above me. Half a dozen rifles were pointed at me, and I was ordered to surrender, which I did, considering discretion the better part of valor.

"When I was taken into the fort, a rebel officer came up to me, slapped me on the shoulder, and said: 'See here, young man, weren't you fellows all drunk when you started this morning?' I replied: 'No Sir. Well, they gave you some whiskey before you started, didn't they?' he said, and I answered: 'No Sir, that plan is not practised in our army.'"

"Didn't you know it was certain death, he asked me again, and I replied:"Well, I don't know, I am still living."

"'Yes", he said, "You are living, but I can assure you that very few of your comrades are!"

"I was then placed in charge of a guard, taken to the city and put into the yard of the jail where I met some fifty or sixty of our men, taken at different points during the day. The jail yard was enclosed by a high brick wall with large sycamore trees growing inside. I was nearly dead from fatigue, so immediately crawled into one of the tents put up for our accommodation, and was on the point of dropping off to sleep, when our mortar boats on the Louisiana shore opposite Vicksburg, opened fire on the city, throwing their 450-pound fuse shells promiscuously all over. Of course, there was no sleep for us that night, and just about daylight one of those shells struck the jail, the roof of which was covered with slate. I made a jump for one of the sycamore trees, but before I reached it, a piece of slate from the roof cut the rim of my hat in front of my face as clean as though it had been done by a razor.

"A southern man, suspected of being in sympathy with the Union cause, was located in one of the cells, and when this shell burst in the lower part of the jail, the poor fellow was nearly scared to death. He clung to the iron grating of the window and prayed to God that Grant might come that very minute, and take the God-forsaken city and everybody in it.

"About nine o'clock A.M. an officer came and took our parole, and then with a small detachment, of rebel guards, we were marched down to the river in front of the city. The guard intended to escort us to the Louisiana side and deliver us to our own men, but our mortar boats, suspecting this to be merely a ruse of the rebels, and fearing an attack, opened fire on us, dropping big shells all around us into the river. We pushed off in yawls as quickly as possible, and after getting out a little way we did not fear them, as they could not elevate the mortars sufficiently to do us any harm. Thus after many narrow escapes I reached our own lines in safety, a paroled prisoner, having been under fire ten hours and in captivity about twelve."

Uriah H. Brown, was one of the section that carried the logs. His captain was shot dead at his side and his lieutenant dangerously wounded, but he kept on till he reached the ditch. He threw his log across, but found it too short to reach to the other side. While considering what he could do he was shot down and tumbled into the ditch. When he came to his senses and found the enemy dropping shells into the ditch among the wounded men, he set to work to drag them into sheltered positions. He had got three of the wounded into a safe place, when one of the officers forbade him to expose himself any longer. He lay quiet for a time, but the longing to get back came over him and he climbed out of the ditch and crawled for fifty yards exposed to the terrible fire, till he found a place of safety behind a little knoll. Two wounded men were lying near by, moaning in pain, and he crept out and dragged them under cover, gave them water and lay down beside them till nightfall, when he assisted them back to their own lines.

Corporal Robert Cox, Company K, Fifty-fifth Illinois Infantry, gives a humorous description of his experience at the assault:

"After Trogden had planted his flag on the parapet, the Confederates tried to capture it by hooking it in with the shanks of their bayonets, but failed, owing to the hot fire kept up by the sharpshooters. Thereupon Trogden asked me for my gun to give the enemy a thrust. This was a very foolish request, for no soldier ever gives up his gun, but I concluded to try it myself. I raised my head again about as high as the safety of the case would permit, and pushed my gun across the intervening space between us and the enemy, gave their bayonets a swipe with mine, and dodged down just in time to escape being riddled. I did not want any more of that kind of amusement, so did not undertake to force the acquaintance any further. After we had been in this predicament about two hours, they sent over a very pressing invitation to 'Come in, you Yanks. Come in and take dinner with us.' We positively declined, however, unless they would come out and give us a chance to see if the invitation were genuine. This they refused to do, but agreed to send a messenger. By and by it arrived in the shape of a shell, which went flying down the hill without, however, doing us any damage."

Jacob Sanford, commissary-sergeant, Fifty-fifth Illinois Infantry, tells that while with the storming party, he came out with no injury more serious than a sprained hip caused by grape shot striking the plank he 'was carrying. He had been very near death more than once, however, for he had two bullet holes through his hat, nine through his blouse. The bullets in passing through his hat, had carried away locks of hair with them in their course.

The names of the surviving heroes whose courage and bravery was fittingly recognized by a grateful country by the award of the Medal of Honor are as follows:

........
CARLOS N. COLBY,
Sergeant, Co. G, 97th Ill. Inf.

They have his middle initial as "N" although it is actually "W".

Parents: James COLBY and Abigail Bailey LONG.

Spouse: Anne Elizabeth ROWE. Carlos William COLBY and Anne Elizabeth ROWE were married on 20 DEC 1866 in Alton, Madison County, Illinois. Children were: John Rowe COLBY, Charles Wills COLBY, James Rowe COLBY, Florence Mae COLBY, Cora Lee COLBY, Carlie Faye COLBY, Stella Long COLBY, Henry Hastings COLBY.


Carlton Carrol COLBY was born on 16 MAY 1935 in Colchester, Chittenden County, Vermont. (SOURCE: Ancestry.com; Vermont Birth Records, 1909-2008.) Parents: Enos Edward COLBY and Wilma Madaline BROWN.


Carlton Howard COLBY was born on 8 AUG 1916 in Iron River, Bayfield County, Wisconsin. He appeared in the census on 5 JAN 1920 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. (living at home with father and mother.) He died on 27 FEB 1969 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. Parents: George William COLBY and Flora Belle ROLFE.


Carlton Wesley COLBY was born on 3 JUL 1927 in Newport, Orleans County, Vermont. He appeared in the census on 16 APR 1930 in Newport, Orleans County, Vermont. (living at home with father and mother.) He died on 16 MAY 1999 at Newport, Orleans County, Vermont. (SOURCE: Ancestry.com; Vermont Death Records, 1909-2008.) He was buried on 19 MAY 1999 in the Pleasant View Cemetery at Orleans, Orleans County, Vermont He had Social Security Number 009-16-6655. Parents: Wesley Carlton COLBY and Minnie Mae LIBERTY.

Spouse: Betty Lou WHEELER. Carlton Wesley COLBY and Betty Lou WHEELER were married on 15 DEC 1949 in Newport, Orleans County, Vermont. (SOURCE: Ancestry.com; Vermont Marriage Records, 1909-2008.) Children were: Linda Lou COLBY.

Spouse: Bonnie Lee PHILLIPS. Carlton Wesley COLBY and Bonnie Lee PHILLIPS were married on 2 JUL 1988 in Brownington, Chittenden County, Vermont. (SOURCE: Ancestry.com; Vermont Marriage Records, 1909-2008.)


Carma H. COLBY was born in 1901 in Edgecomb, Lincoln County, Maine. She appeared in the census in 1910 in Edgecomb, Lincoln County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother.) She appeared in the census in 1920 in Edgecomb, Lincoln County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother.) Parents: Capt. Allie Manzo COLBY and Edna C. HUFF.


Carma Ora COLBY (twin) was born on 19 JAN 1914 in Burrville, Sevier County, Utah. She appeared in the census in 1920 in Sigurd, Sevier County, Utah. (living at home with father and mother) She appeared in the census in 1930 in Sigurd, Sevier County, Utah. (living at home with father.) She died on 29 MAY 1984 at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. She had Social Security Number 528-40-6922 . Parents: Isaac Ransford COLBY Jr. and Carrie Victoria NELSON.

Spouse: Bert Howd GREENWOOD. Bert Howd GREENWOOD and Carma Ora COLBY (twin) were married on 10 MAY 1931 in Denver, Denver County, Colorado. Children were: Ardella GREENWOOD.


Carmen Elinor COLBY was born on 3 MAY 1914 in Shasta County, California.
California Birth Index, 1905-1995 Record
Name:
Carmen E Colby
Birth Date: 3 May 1914
Gender: Female
Mother's Maiden Name: Hill
Birth County: Shasta

She appeared in the census on 19 JAN 1920 in Round Mountain, Shasta County, California. (living at home with father and mother.) She appeared in the census on 11 APR 1930 in Shasta County, California. (living at home with father and mother.) She died on 4 FEB 2007 at Oak Run, Shasta County, California. She was buried in the Millville Cemetery at Millville, Shasta County, California She had Social Security Number 554-02-8601 .
Social Security Death Index
Name:
Carmen E. Webber
SSN: 554-02-8601
Last Residence: 96069 Oak Run, Shasta, California
Born: 3 May 1914
Died: 4 Feb 2007
State (Year) SSN issued: California (1970 )

Parents: Charles Edwin COLBY and Lizzie May HILL.

Spouse: Mr. WEBBER. Mr. WEBBER and Carmen Elinor COLBY were married about 1934. Children were: Gerald Kenneth WEBBER, Donald Edward WEBBER, Gary Lee WEBBER.


Carmen Kay COLBY was born on 17 NOV 1944 in Santa Clara County, California. (SOURCE: California Birth Index, 1905-1995.) Parents: Elmo Easter COLBY and Pauline SHINN.


Carmine M. COLBY was born in MAY 1890 in Kittery, York County, Maine. She appeared in the census in 1900 in Kittery, York County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother.) She appeared in the census on 27 APR 1910 in Kittery, York County, Maine. (living at home with father and mother.) She appeared in the census on 15 JAN 1920 in Kittery, York County, Maine. In 1920 she was a servant in Kittery, York County, Maine. Parents: Henry Francis COLBY and Lavina Jane MAYHEW.


Carol Anne COLBY was born on 16 MAR 1955 in Burlington, Chittenden County, Vermont. Parents: Lee Otis COLBY and Doris Josephine LINCEORANT.


Carol Elizabeth COLBY was born on 1 JUN 1942 in Chittenden, Rutland County, Vermont. (SOURCE: Ancestry.com; Vermont Birth Records, 1909-2008.) Parents: George Woodman COLBY and Marjorie Florina LADUE.


Carol Hope COLBY was born on 20 DEC 1938 in Price, Carbon County, Utah. Parents: Stanley George COLBY and Ana Birdella TIDWELL.


Carol Jean COLBY was born on 28 MAR 1946 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota. (SOURCE: Minnesota Birth Index, 1935-2002.) Parents: Arthur Raymond COLBY and Margaret Eleanor DANIELSON.


Carol Lynn COLBY was born on 18 APR 1946 in Blue Earth City, Faribault County, Minnesota. Parents: Floyd Burdette COLBY (twin) and Vera M. STOLTE.


Carol Maye COLBY was born on 12 MAY 1929 in Pueblo, Pueblo County, Colorado. She appeared in the census in 1930 in Pueblo, Pueblo County, Colorado. (living at home with father and mother.) Parents: Marcus Wilder COLBY and Melva YARBERRY.


Carol R. COLBY was born on 18 APR 1942 in Bath, Sagadahoc County, Maine. Parents: Perley R. COLBY and Margaret K. WEATHERBEE.


Carolin Molly COLBY was born in 1926. Parents: Franklin Hornor COLBY and Mildred Verne HOYT.

Spouse: Fred Z. TROESCHER. Fred Z. TROESCHER and Carolin Molly COLBY were married about 1950. Children were: Frederick Scott TROESCHER, David Lin TROESCHER.

Spouse: Jake JANZEN. Jake JANZEN and Carolin Molly COLBY were married about 1955. Children were: Melissa Jean JANZEN.


Caroline COLBY was born on 30 APR 1808 in Bradford, Essex County, Massachusetts. (SOURCE: Early Vital Records of Essex County, Massachusetts to 1850 for Bradford.) She appeared in the census on 15 SEP 1850 in Pittsfield, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She appeared in the census on 15 JUN 1860 in Pittsfield, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She appeared in the census on 6 JUN 1870 in Pittsfield, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. Parents: Thomas Chellis COLBY and Abigail KENDRICK.

Spouse: Perley C. TUCK. Perley C. TUCK and Caroline COLBY were married on 28 DEC 1831. Children were: Catherine M. TUCK, Justus N. TUCK, Infant Daughter TUCK, Betsey A. TUCK, Thomas J. TUCK, Thomas P. TUCK, Charlotte A. TUCK, Adoniram J. TUCK, Jonathan M. TUCK, Caroline J. TUCK.


Caroline COLBY was born on 18 JUL 1809 in Goshen, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. She died on 18 JUN 1896 at Epsom, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.
Name: Caroline Sanders
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Death Date (Original): 18 Jun 1896
Death Date (Standardized): 18 Jun 1896
Death Place: Epsom
Gender: Female
Race (Original): W
Race (Standardized): White
Age: 86
Estimated Birth Year: 1810
Birthplace: Goshen, , New Hampshire
Marital Status: Widowed
Spouse:
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Spouse's Titles & Terms (Standardized):
Father: Abner Colby
Father's Titles & Terms (Original):
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Father's Birthplace:
Mother: Deborah Gunnison
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Mother's Birthplace:
Burial Place:
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Clerk's Locality: Epsom, , New Hampshire
Informant's Locality:
Film Number: 1001108
Digital Folder Number: 4244240
Image Number: 03421
Reference Number:
Collection: New Hampshire Death Records, 1654-1947

She was buried in the New Rye Cemetery at Epsom, Merrimack County, New Hampshire Parents: Abner COLBY and Deborah GUNNISON.

Spouse: Simon L. SANDERS. Simon L. SANDERS and Caroline COLBY were married on 6 APR 1837. Children were: Sarah S. SANDERS, Caroline Augusta SANDERS, Mary Augusta SANDERS, Infant SANDERS, Nancy L. SANDERS.


Caroline COLBY was born in 1811 in Franklin, Merrimack County, New Hampshire.

Spouse: Hiram FELLOWS. Hiram FELLOWS and Caroline COLBY were married on 12 AUG 1839 in Franklin, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. Children were: Alice H. FELLOWS, Andrew J. FELLOWS, Gilbert G. FELLOWS, Samuel W. FELLOWS.


Caroline COLBY was born in 1814 in Brownfield, Oxford County, Maine. (SOURCE: FHL Film 0010605; Brownfield, Maine, families Bean, Eli.) Parents: Asa COLBY and Sarah MILLER.


Caroline COLBY was born on 19 OCT 1815 in Chester, Rockingham County, New Hampshire. (SOURCE: FHL Film: 1000378; Index to births, early to 1900 New Hampshire. Registrar of Vital Statistics.) Parents: Daniel COLBY and Lydia DEARBORN.


Caroline COLBY was born on 7 JUN 1822 in Avon, Lorain County, Ohio. She died on 9 MAY 1907 at Ohio. Parents: Benjamin COLBY and Hannah Sophia ROWELL.

Spouse: Francis CHAMBERLIN. Francis CHAMBERLIN and Caroline COLBY were married on 29 DEC 1844 in Geauga County, Ohio.


Caroline COLBY was born about 1824 in Warner, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. She died on 7 JUN 1854 at Warner, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. (BOOK SOURCE: "The Colby Family in Early America" by Frederick Lewis Weis, Caledonia, The Colonial Press, pub 1970.) Parents: Barnard S. COLBY and Deborah DOWLING.


Caroline COLBY was born about 1829 in Westport, Lincoln County, Maine. Parents: William G. COLBY and Pamelia PLUMMER.


Photo Caroline COLBY was born on 24 JUN 1831 in Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts. She died on 30 AUG 1831 at Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was buried in the Highland Cemetery at Newburyport, Essex County, Massachusetts SOURCES: (1) "History of Sanbornton, New Hampshire" Vol II.-Genealogies, by Rev. M. T. Runnels, 1881; (2) "The Colby Family in Early America" by Frederick Lewis Weis, Caledonia, The Colonial Press, pub 1970; (3) Early Vital Records of Essex County, Massachusetts to 1850. Newburyport, death. Parents: George Curwen Ward COLBY and Dorothy B. PHILBROOK.


Caroline COLBY was born on 3 APR 1833 in Taunton, Bristol County, Massachusetts. She was baptized on 21 JUL 1833 in Taunton, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Now a resident of Charlestown, Massachusetts; unmarried.
SOURCES: (1) "History of Sanbornton, New Hampshire" Vol II.-Genealogies, by Rev. M. T. Runnels, 1881; (2) Early Vital Records of Bristol County, Massachusetts to 1850. Taunton, bapt.; (3) "The Colby Family in Early America" by Frederick Lewis Weis, Caledonia, The Colonial Press, pub 1970. Parents: Hon. Harrison Gray Otis COLBY and Jane Standish PARKER.


Caroline COLBY was born in SEP 1837 in Claremont, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. She died in MAR 1838 at Claremont, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. She was buried in the Pleasant Street Cemetery at Claremont, Sullivan County, New Hampshire Parents: Ira COLBY and Polly FOSTER.


Caroline COLBY was born in 1840 in Alden, Erie County, New York. She appeared in the census in 1850 in Alden, Erie County, New York. (living at home with father and mother.)
Parents: Amos COLBY and Rena STICKNEY.

Spouse: Daniel F. BATES. Daniel F. BATES and Caroline COLBY were married about 1862.


Caroline COLBY was born in 1840 in Whitefield, Coos County, New Hampshire. She appeared in the census in 1850 in Whitefield, Coos County, New Hampshire. (living with father) She appeared in the census in 1860 in Whitefield, Coos County, New Hampshire. (living at home with father and mother.) She appeared in the census in 1870 in Whitefield, Coos County, New Hampshire. (living with brother Ira M. Colby,) Parents: Col. Joseph COLBY and Sally KING.


Caroline COLBY was born in 1843 in Ohio. She appeared in the census on 22 JUL 1860 in Shalersville, Portage County, Ohio. (living at home with father and mother.) Parents: Daniel COLBY and Cordelia NEWELL.


Caroline COLBY was born on 3 JUL 1845 in Ohio. She appeared in the census on 17 JUL 1860 in Painesville, Lake County, Ohio. (living at home with father and mother.) She died on 1 SEP 1909 at Painesville, Lake County, Ohio. She was buried in the Evergreen Cemetery at Painesville, Lake County, Ohio Parents: Moses Harvey COLBY and Shuah FIFIELD.

Spouse: Mr. BROWN. Mr. BROWN and Caroline COLBY were married about 1875. Children were: Willie R. BROWN.


Caroline COLBY was born about 1847 in Henniker, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. (BOOK SOURCE: "The Colby Family in Early America" by Frederick Lewis Weis, Caledonia, The Colonial Press, pub 1970.) Parents: John Langdon COLBY and Sarah COLBY.

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