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Descendants of: 
Milesius of Spain, King of Braganza 
Father of the Irish Race
The High Kings of Ireland 

Sixty-six Generations

First Generation  next


1. Milesius of Spain, King of Braganza, Father of the Irish Race, son of Bille mac Galicia King of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia and Castile, was born in Brigantia, Corunna, Galicia,Spain and died in Braganza, Spain.

Milesius, in his youth and in his father's life-time, went into Scythia, where he was kindly received by the king of that country, who gave him his daughter in marriage, and appointed him General of his forces. In this capacity Milesius defeated the king's enemies, gained much fame, and the love of all the king's subjects. His growing greatness and popularity excited against him the jealousy of the king; who, fearing the worst, resolved on privately dispatching Milesius our of the way, for, openly, he dare not attempt it.

Admonished of the king's intentions in his regard, Milesius slew him; and thereupon quitted Scythia and retired into Egypt with a fleet of sixty sail. Pharaoh Nectonibus, then king of Egypt, being informed of his arrival and of his great valour, wisdom, and conduct in arms, made him General of all his forces against the king of Ethiopia then invading his country. Here, as in Scythia, Milesius was victorious; he forced the enemy to submit to the conqueror's own terms of peace.

By these exploits Milesius found great favour with Pharaoh, who gave him, being then a widower, his daughter Scota in marriage; and kept him eight years afterwards in Egypt. During the sojourn of Milesius in Egypt, he employed the most ingenious and able persons among his people to be instructed in the several trades, arts, and sciences used in Egypt; in order to have them taught to the rest of his people on his return to Spain. 

The original name of Milesius of Spain was "Galamh" (gall: Irish, a stranger; amh, a negative affix), which means, no stranger: meaning that he was no stranger in Egypt, where he was called "Milethea Spaine," which was afterwards contracted to "Miló Spaine" (meaning the Spanish Hero), and finally to "Milesiius" (mileadh: Irish, a hero; Lat. miles, a soldier.

At length, Milesius took leave of his father-in-law, and steered towards Spain; where he arrived to the great joy and comfort of his people; who were much harassed by the rebellion of the natives and by the intrusion of other foreign nations that forced in after his father's death, and during his own long absence from Spain. With these and those he often met; and, in fifty-four battles, victoriously fought, he routed, destroyed, and totally extirpated them out of the country, which he settled in peace and quietness.

In his reign a great dearth and famine occurred in Spain, of twenty-six years' continuance, occasioned, as well by reason of the former troubles which hindered the people from cultivating, and manuring the ground, as for want of rain to moisten the earth - but Milesius superstitiously believed the famine to have fallen upon him and his people as a judgment and punishment from their gods, for their negligence in seeking out the country destined for their final abode, so long before foretold by Cachear their Druid or magician, as already mentioned - the time limited by the prophecy for the accomplishment thereof being now nearly, if not fully, expired.

To expiate his fault and to comply with the will of his gods, Milesius, with the general approbation of his people, sent his uncle Ithe, with his son Lughaidh [Luy], and one hundred and fifty stout men to bring them an account of those western islands; who, accordingly, arriving at the island since then called Ireland, and landing in that part of it now called Munster, left his son with fifty of his men to guard the ship, and with the rest travelled about the island.

Informed, among other things, that the three sons of Cearmad, called Mac-Cuill, MacCeacht, and MacGreine, did then and for thirty years before rule and govern the island, each for one year, in his turn; and that the country was called after the names of their three queens - Eire, Fodhla, and Banbha, respectively: one year called "Eire," the next "Fodhla," and the next "Banbha," as their husbands reigned in their regular turns; by which names the island is ever since indifferently called, but most commonly "Eire," because that MacCuill, the husband of Eire, ruled and governed the country in his turn the year that the Clan-na-Milé (or the sons of Milesius) arrived in and conquered Ireland.

And being further informed that the three brothers were then at their palace at Aileach Neid, in the north part of the country, engaged in the settlement of some disputes concerning their family jewels, Ithe directed his course thither; sending orders to his son to sail about with his ship and the rest of his men, and meet him there. When Ithe arrived where the (Danann) brothers were, he was honourably received and entertained by them; and, finding him to be a mail of great wisdom. and knowledge, they referred their disputes to him for decision.

That decision having met their entire satisfaction, Ithe exhorted them to mutual love, peace, and forbearance; adding much in praise of their delightful, pleasant, and fruitful country; and then took his leave, to return to his ship, and go back to Spain. No sooner was he gone than the brothers; began to reflect on the high commendations which Ithe gave of the Island; and, suspecting his design of bringing others to invade it, resolved to prevent them, and therefore pursued him with a strong party, overtook him, fought and routed his men and wounded himself to death (before his son or the rest of his men left on ship-board could come to his rescue) at a place called, from that fight and his name, Magh Ithe or "The plain of Ithe" (an extensive plain in the barony of Raphoe, county Donegal); whence his son, having found him in that condition, brought his dead and mangled body back into Spain, and there exposed it to public view, thereby to excite his friends and relations to avenge his murder.

[Note: that all the invaders and planters of Ireland, namely, Parthalonians, Neimhedh, the Firbolgs, Tuatha-de-Danann, and Clan-na-Milé, where originally Scythians, of the line of Japbet, who had the language called Bearla-Tobbai or Gaoidhilg [Gaelic] common amongst them all; and consequently not to be wondered at, that Ithe and the Tuatha-de-Danann understood one another without an Interpreter - both speaking the same language, though perhaps with some difference in the accent].

The exposing of the dead body of Ithe had the desired effect; for, thereupon, Milesius made great preparations in order to invade Ireland - as well to avenge his uncle's death, as also in obedience to the will of his gods, signified by the prophecy of Cachear, aforesaid. But, before he could effect that object, he died, leaving the care, and charge of that expedition upon his eight legitimate sons by his two wives before mentioned. Milesius was a very valiant champion, a great warrior, and fortunate and prosperous in all his undertakings: witness his name of "Milesius," given him from the many battles (some say a thousand, which the word "Milé" signifies in Irish as well as in Latin) which he victoriously fought and won, as well in Spain, as in all the other countries and kingdoms be traversed in his younger days.

The eight brothers were neither forgetful nor negligent in the execution of their father's command; but, soon after his death, with a numerous fleet well manned and equipped, set forth from Breoghan's Tower or Brigantia (now Corunna) in Galicia, in Spain, and sailed prosperously to the coasts of Ireland or lnis-Fail, where they met many difficulties and various chances before they could land: occasioned by the diabolical arts, sorceries, and enchantments used by the Tuatha-de-Danann, to obstruct their landing; for, by their magic art, they enchanted the island so as to appear to the Milesians or Clan-na-Milé in the form of a Hog, and no way to come at it (whence the island, among the many other names it had before, was called "Muc-Inis or "The Hog Island"); and withal raised so great a storm, that the Milesian fleet was thereby totally dispersed and many of them cast away, wherein five of the eight brothers, sons of Milesius, lost their lives.

That part of the fleet commanded by Heber, Heremon, and Amergin (the three surviving, brothers), and Heber Donn, son of Ir (one of the brothers lost in the storm), overcame all opposition, landed safe, fought and routed the three Tuatha-de Danann Kings at Slieve-Mis, and thence pursued and overtook them at Tailten, where another bloody battle was fought; wherein the three (Tuatha-de-Danann) Kings and their Queens were slain, and their army utterly routed and destroyed: so that they could never after give any opposition to the Clan-na-Milé in their new conquest; who, having thus sufficiently avenged the death of their great uncle Ithe, gained the possession of the country foretold them by Cachear, some ages past, as already mentioned.

Heber and Heremon, the chief leading men remaining of the eight brothers, sons of Milesius aforesaid, divided the kingdom between them (allotting a proportion of land to their brother Amergin, who was their Arch-priest, Druid, or magician; and to their nephew Heber Donn, and to the rest of their chief commanders), and became jointly the first of one hundred and eighty-three Kings or sole Monarchs of the Gaelic, Milesian, or Scottish Race, that ruled and governed Ireland, successively, for two thousand eight hundred and eighty-five years from the first year of their reign), Anno Mundi three thousand five hundred, to their submission to the Crown of England in the person of King Henry the Second; who, being also of the Milesian Race by Maude, his mother, was lineally descended from Fergus Mór MacEarca, first King of Scotland, who was descended from the said Heremon - so that the succession may be truly said to continue in the Milesian Blood from before Christ one thousand six hundred and ninety-nine years down to the present time.

Heber and Heremon reigned jointly one year only, when, upon a difference between their ambitious wives, they quarrelled and fought a battle at Ardeath or Geshill (Geashill, near Tullamore in the King's County), where Heber was slain by Heremon; and, soon after, Amergin, who claimed an equal share in the government, was, in another battle fought between them, likewise slain by Heremon.

Thus, Heremon became sole Monarch, and made a new division of the land amongst his comrades and friends, viz.: the south part, now called Munster, he gave to his brother Heber's four sons, Er, Orba, Feron, and Fergna; the north part, now Ulster, he gave to Ir's only son Heber Donn; the east part or Coigeadh, Galian, now called Leinster, be gave to Criomthann-sciath-bheil, one of his commanders; and the west part, now called Connaught, Heremon gave to Un-Mac-Oigge, another of his commanders; allotting a part of Munster to Lughaidh (the son of Ithe, the first Milesian discoverer of Ireland), amongst his brother Heber's sons.

From these three brothers, Heber, Ir, and Heremon (Amergin dying without issue), are descended all the Milesian Irish of Ireland and Scotland, viz.: from Heber, the eldest brother, the provincial Kings of Munster (of whom thirty-eight were sole Monarchs of Ireland), and most of the nobility and gentry of Munster, and many noble families in Scotland, are descended. From Ir, the second brother, all the provincial Kings of Ulster (of whom twenty-six were sole Monarchs of Ireland), and all the ancient nobility and gentry of Ulster, and many noble families in Leinster, Munster, and Connaught, derive their pedigrees; and, in Scotland, the Clan-na-Rory - the descendants of an eminent man, named Ruadhri or Roderick, who was Monarch of Ireland for seventy years (viz., from Before Christ 288 to 218).

From Heremon, the youngest of the three brothers, were descended one hundred and fourteen sole Monarchs of Ireland: the provincial Kings and Hermonian nobility and gentry of Leinster, Connaught, Meath, Orgiall, Tirowen, Tirconnell, and Clan-na-boy; the Kings of Dalriada; all the Kings of Scotland from Fergus Mór MacEarea, down to the Stuarts; and the Kings and Queens of England from Henry the Second down to tile present time. The issue of Ithe is not accounted among the Milesian Irish or Clan-na-Milé, as not being descended from Milesius, but from his uncle Ithe; of whose posterity there were also some Monarchs of Ireland, and many provincial or half provincial Kings of Munster: that country upon its first division being allocated to the sons of Heber and to Lughaidh, son of Ithe, whose posterity continued there accordingly.

This invasion, conquest, or plantation of Ireland by the Milesian or Scottish Nation took place in the Year of the World three thousand Ova hundred, or the next year after Solomon began the foundation of the Temple of Jerusalem, and one thousand six hundred and ninety-nine years before the Nativity of our Saviour Jesus Christ; which, according to the Irish computation of Time, occurred Anno Mundi five thousand one hundred and ninety-nine: therein agreeing with the Septuagint, Roman Martyrologies, Eusebius, Orosius, and other ancient authors; which computation the ancient Irish chroniclers exactly observed in their Books of the Reigns of the Monarchs of Ireland, and other Antiquities of that Kingdom ; out of which the Roll of the Monarchs of Ireland, from the beginning of the Milesian Monarchy to their submission to King Henry the Second of England, a Prince of their own Blood, is exactly collected.

As the Milesian invasion of Ireland took place the next year after the laying of the foundation of the Temple of Jerusalem by Solomon, King of Israel, we may infer that Solomon was contemporary with Milesius of Spain; and that the Pharaoh King of Egypt, who gave his daughter in marriage to Solomon, was the Pharaoh who conferred on Milesius of Spain the hand of another daughter Scota.

Milesius of Spain bore three Lions in his shield and standard, for the following reasons; namely, that, in his travels in his younger days into foreign countries, passing through Africa, he, by his cunning and valour, killed in one morning three Lions; and that, in memory of so noble and valiant an exploit, he always after bore three Lions on his shield, which his two surviving sons Heber and Heremon, and his grandson Heber Donn, son of Ir, after their conquest of Ireland, divided amongst them, as well as they did the country: each of them. bearing a Lion in his shield and banner, but of different colours; which the Chiefs of their posterity continue to this day: some with additions and differences; others plain and entire as they had it from their ancestors.

Milesius married Scota Tephi Princess of Egypt, daughter of Nectonibus, Pharoah of Egypt and Scota was born in Egypt and died in Clahane Townland, Annagh Parish, Troughanacmy Barony, Kerry, Munster, Ireland.

Their children were:

Héremón King of Munster, 2nd Monarch of Ireland was born in Braganza, Iberia or Spain and died in 1683 B.C. in Rath-Beothaight, Argat-Ross,Ireland.

Héremón married Tea Tephi, Queen of Ireland.

Heber
Ir

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2. Héremón, King of Munster, 2nd Monarch of Ireland was born in Braganza, Iberia or Spain and died in 1683 B.C. in Rath-Beothaight, Argat-Ross, Ireland.

Heremon and his eldest brother Heber were, jointly, the first Milesian Monarchs of Ireland; they began to reign, A.M. 3,500, or, Before Christ, 1699. After Heber was slain, B.C. 1698, Heremon reigned singly for fourteen years; during which time a certain colony called by the Irish Cruithneaigh, in English "Cruthneans" or Picts, arrived in Ireland and requested Heremon to assign them a part of the country to settle in, which he refused; but, giving them as wives the widows of the Tuatha-de-Danans, slain in battle, he sent them with a strong party of his own forces to conquer the country then called "Alba," but now Scotland; conditionally, that they and their posterity should be tributary to the Monarchs of Ireland. Heremon died, B.C. 1683, and was succeeded by three of his four sons, named Muimne, Luigne, and Laighean, who reigned jointly for three years, and were slain by their Heberian successors.

"Irish Pedigrees or the Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation", by John O'Hart

Héremón married Tea Tephi, Queen of Ireland, daughter of Zedekiah, Last King of Judah and Tea was born in Spain and died in Odhbha, Meath, Leinster, Ireland.

Their children were:

  Iarél Fáith, 10th Monarch of Ireland died in 1670 B.C. in Magh Muaagh, Galway, Connaught, Ireland.

Iarél married Tea.

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5. Iarél Fáith, 10th Monarch of Ireland died in 1670 B.C. in Magh Muaagh, Galway, Connaught, Ireland. 

Irial Faidh ("faidh": Irish, a prophet) was the 10th Monarch of Ireland. Irial was a very learned King; could foretell things to come; and caused much of the country to be cleared of the ancient forests. He likewise built seven royal palaces, Rath Ciombaoith, Rath Coincheada, Rath Mothuig, Rath Buirioch, Rath Luachat, Rath Croicne, and Rath Boachoill. 

He won four remarkable battles over his enemies, Ard Inmath, at Teabtha, where Stirne, the son of Dubh, son of Fomhar, was slain; the second battle was at Teanmhuighe, against the Fomhoraice, where Eichtghe, their leader, was slain; the third was the battle of Loch Muighe, where Lugrot, the son of Moghfeibhis, was slain; and the fourth was the battle of Cuill Martho, where the four sons of Heber were defeated. Irial died in the second year after this battle, having reigned 10 years, and was buried at Magh Muagh.

Iarél married Tea. Tea was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Ethrél, 11th Monarch of Ireland died in 1650 B.C. in the battle of Soirrean, Leinster, Ireland, and was buried in Tinnahinch Barrony, Leinster, Ireland.

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6. Ethrél 11th Monarch of Ireland died in 1650 B.C. in the battle of Soirrean, Leinster, Ireland, and was buried in Tinnahinch Barrony, Leinster, Ireland.

Eithrial was the 11th Monarch; reigned 20 years; and was slain by Conmaol, the son of Heber Fionn, at the battle of Soirrean, in Leinster, B.C. 1650. Eithrial was a learned King, he wrote with his own hand the History of the Gaels (or Gadelians); in his reign seven large woods were cleared and much advance made in the practice of agriculture.

• Slain: by Conmaol, the son of Heber Fionn, 1650 B.C..

Their children were:

Foll-Aich

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7. Foll-Aich

Was kept out of the Monarchy by Conmaol, the slayer of his father, who usurped his place

Their children were:

Tigernmas, 13th Monarch of Ireland died in 1543 B.C. in Ballymagauran, Tullhaw Barony, Cavan, Ireland, and was buried in Magh Sleaght, Field of Adoration, Ballymagauran.

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8. Tigernmas, 13th Monarch of Ireland died in 1543 B.C. in Ballymagauran, Tullhaw Barony, Cavan, Ireland, and was buried in Magh Sleaght, Field of Adoration, Ballymagauran.

Tigernmas was the 13th Monarch, and reigned 77 years; according to Keating, he reigned but 50 years; he fought twenty-seven battles with the followers of the family of Heber Fionn, all which he gained. In his reign gold was mined near the Liffey, and skilfully worked by Inchadhan. 

This King also made a law that each grade of society should be known by the number of colours in its wearing apparel. The clothes of a slave should be of one colour; those of a soldier of two; the dress of a commanding officer to be of three colours; a gentleman's dress, who kept a table for the free entertainment of strangers, to be of four colours; five colours to be allowed to the nobility, the chiefs, and the King, Queen, and Royal Family, as well as the Druids, historians, and other learned men to wear six colours. 

Tigernmas died B.C. 1543, on the Eve of 1st of November, with two-thirds of the people of Ireland, at Magh Sleaght (or Field of Adoration), in the county of Leitrim, as he was adoring the Sun-God, Crom Cruach (a quo Macroom). Historians say this Monarch was the first who introduced image worship in Ireland.

Their children were:

Enboath

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9. Enboath

It was in this prince's lifetime that the Kingdom was divided in two parts by a line drawn from Drogheda to Limerick.

Their children were:

Smiomghall

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10. Smiomghall

In his lifetime the Picts in Scotland were forced to abide by their oath, and pay homage to the Irish Monarch; seven large woods were also cut down.

Their children were:

Fiacha Labhrainn, 18th Monarch of Ireland died in 1448 B.C. in the Battle of Bealgadain, Ireland.

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11. Fiacha Labhrainn 18th Monarch of Ireland died in 1448 B.C. in the Battle of Bealgadain, Ireland.

Reigned 24 years; slew Eochaidh Faobharglas, of the line of Heber, at the battle of Carman. During his reign all the inhabitants of Scotland were brought in subjection to the Irish Monarchy, and the conquest was secured by his son the 20th Monarch. Fiacha at length (B.C. 1448) fell in the battle of Bealgadain, by the hands of Eochaidh Mumho, the son of Moefeibhis, of the race of Heber Fionn.

• Slain: by the hands of Eochaidh Mumho, the son of Moefeibhis, of the race of Heber Fionn, 1448 B.C..

Their children were:

Aongus Olmucach, 20th Monarch of Ireland died in 1409 B.C. in the Battle of Carman.

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12. Aongus Olmucach 20th Monarch of Ireland died in 1409 B.C. in theBattle of Carman.

In his reign the Picts again refused to pay the tribute imposed on them 250 years before, by Heremon, but this Monarch went with a strong army into Alba and in thirty pitched battles overcame them and forced them to pay the required tribute.

• Slain: by Eana in the battle of Carman.

Their children were:

Main was born in Ancient Ireland.

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13. Main was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Rotheachtach 22nd Monarch of Ireland died in 1357 B.C.

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14. Rotheachtach, 22nd Monarch of Ireland died in 1357 B.C.

• Slain: by Sedne of the line of Ir, 1357 B.C..

Their children were:

Dein

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15. Dein

In his time gentlemen and noblemen first wore gold chains round their necks, as a sign of their birth; and golden helmets were given to brave soldiers.

Their children were:

Siorna "Saoghalach" King of Ireland died in 1030 B.C. in Aillin, Ireland.

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16. Siorna "Saoghalach" King of Ireland died in 1030 B.C. in Aillin, Ireland.

• Slain: by Rotheachta, of the line of Heber Fionn, who usurped the Monarchy, thereby excluding Olioll Aolcheoin from the throne., 1030 B.C..

Their children were:

Olioll Aolcheoin

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17. Olioll Aolcheoin

Their children were:

Gialchadh 37th Monarch of Ireland died in 1013 B.C. in Moighe Muadh.

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18. Gialchadh, 37th Monarch of Ireland died in 1013 B.C. in Moighe Muadh.

• Slain by Art Imleach, of the line of Heber Fionn, 1013 B.C..

Their children were:

Nuadhas Fionnfail 39th Monarch of Ireland died in 961 B.C.

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19. Nuadhas Fionnfail, 39th Monarch of Ireland died in 961 B.C.

• Slain: by Breasrioghacta, his successor, 961 B.C..

Their children were:

Aedan Glas, King of Ireland  

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20. Aedan Glas, King of Ireland .

In his time the coast was infested with pirates; and there occurred a dreadful plague (Apthach) which swept away most of the inhabitants.

Their children were:

Simeon Breac, 44th Monarch of Ireland died in 903 B.C.

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21. Simeon Breac, 44th Monarch of Ireland died in 903 B.C.

He inhumanly caused his predecessor to be torn asunder; but, after a reign of six years, he met with a like death, by order of Duach Fionn, son to the murdered King, B.C. 903.

• Slain by order of Duach Fionn, son to the murdered King, 903 B.C..

Their children were:

Muredach Bolgach, 46th Monarch of Ireland was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 892 B.C.

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22. Muredach Bolgach, 46th Monarch of Ireland was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 892 B.C.

• Slain by Eadhua Dearg, 892 B.C..

Their children were:

Fiacha Tolgrach, 55th Monarch of Ireland died in 795 B.C.

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23. Fiacha Tolgrach, 55th Monarch of Ireland died in 795 B.C.

• Slain by Oilioll Fionn, of the line of Heber Fionn,, 795 B.C..

Their children were:

Duach Ladhrach, 59th Monarch of Ireland died in 737 B.C.

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24. Duach Ladhrach, 59th Monarch of Ireland  

• Slain by Lughaidh Laighe, son of Oilioll Fionn, 737 B.C.

Their children were:

Eochaidh Buadhach was born in Ireland.

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25. Eochaidh Buadhach was born in Ireland.

In his time the kingdom was twice visited with a plague.

Their children were:

Ugaine Mor 66th Monarch was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 593 B.C.

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26. Ugaine Mor, 66th Monarch was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 593 B.C. Another name for Ugaine was "Hugony the Great".

Ugaine "the Great" was the 66th Monarch of Ireland. Was called Mór on account of his extensive dominions, being sovereign of all the Islands of Western Europe. Was married to Cæsair, daughter. to the King of France, and by her had issue, twenty-two sons and three daughters. 

In order to prevent these children encroaching on each other he divided the Kingdom into twenty-five portions, allotting to each his (or her) distinct inheritance. By means of this division the taxes of the country were collected during the succeeding 300 years. All the sons died without issue except two, Laeghaire Lorc, ancestor of all the Leinster Heremonians; and Cobthach Caolbhreagh, from whom the Heremonians of Leath Cuinn, Meath, Ulster, and Conacht derive their pedigree. 

In the early ages the Irish Kings made many military expeditions into foreign countries. Ugaine Mór, called by O'Flaherty, in his Ogygia, "Hugonius Magnus," was contemporary with Alexander the Great; and is stated to have sailed with a fleet into the Mediterranean, landed his forces in Africa, and also attacked Sicily; and having proceeded to Gaul, was married to Cæsair, daughter of the King of the Gauls. 

Hugonius was buried at Cruachan. The Irish sent, during the Punic wars, auxiliary troops to their Celtic Brethren, the Gauls; who in their alliance with the Carthaginians under Hannibal, fought against the Roman armies in Spain and Italy. 

Ugaine was at length, B.C. 593, slain by Badhbhchadh, who failed to secure the fruits of his murder, the Irish Throne, as he was executed by order of Laeghaire Lorc, the murdered Monarch's son, who became the 68th Monarch.

• Slain: by Badhbhchadh, he was executed by order of Laeghaire Lorc.

Ugaine married Caesair Cruthach Queen of Ireland. Caesair was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Colethach Caol-Bhreagh, 69th Monarch of Ireland died in 593 B.C.

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27. Colethach Caol-Bhreagh, 69th Monarch of Ireland died in 593 B.C.

• Assassinated his brother Laeghaire to secure the Throne.

• Slain by Maion, his nephew, 541 B.C..

Their children were:

Meig Molbhthach, 71st Monarch of Ireland died in 541 B.C.

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28. Meig Molbhthach, 71st Monarch of Ireland died in 541 B.C.

• Slain by Modhchorb, son of Cobhthach Caomh, of the Line of Heber Fionn, 541 B.C..

Their children were:

Iaran Gleofathach, 74th Monarch of Ireland was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 473 B.C.

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29. Iaran Gleofathach 74th Monarch of Ireland was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 473 B.C.

• Slain by Fear-Chorb, son of Modh-Chorb, 473 B.C..

Their children were:

  Conla Caomb, 74th Monarch of Ireland was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 442 B.C.

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30. Conla Caomb, 74th Monarch of Ireland was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 442 B.C.

Their children were:

Olioll Cas-fiachlach 77th Monarch of Ireland .

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31. Olioll Cas-fiachlach, 77th Monarch of Ireland .

Their children were:

Eochaidh Alt-Leathan, 79th Monarch of Ireland died in 395 B.C. in Tara,Ireland.

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32. Eochaidh Alt-Leathan, 79th Monarch of Ireland died in 395 B.C. in Tara, Ireland.

• Slain: by Feargus Fortamhail, his successor, 395 B.C..

Their children were:

Aongus "the Prolific" 81st Monarch of Ireland died in 324 B.C. in Tara,Ireland.

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33. Aongus "the Prolific" 81st Monarch of Ireland died in 324 B.C. in Tara, Ireland. Another name for Aongus was Aongus Tuirmeach-Teamrach.

Aongus (or Æneas) Tuirmeach-Teamrach was the 81st Monarch; his son, Fiacha Firmara (so called from being exposed in a small boat on the sea) was ancestor of the Kings of Dalriada and Argyle in Scotland. This Aongus was slain at Tara (Teamhrach), B.C. 324.

Their children were:

Enna 84th Monarch of Ireland died in 292 B.C. in Tara,Ireland.

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34. Enna 84th Monarch of Ireland died in 292 B.C. in Tara, Ireland.

Enna Aigneach: the legitimate son of Aongus; was the 84th Monarch; was of a very bountiful disposition, and exceedingly munificent in his donations. This King lost his life by the hands of Criomthan Cosgrach, B.C. 292.

Their children were:

Assaman Eamhna was born in Ancient Ireland.

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35. Assaman Eamhna was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Roighen Ruadh was born in Ancient Ireland.

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36. Roighen Ruadh was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Fionnlogh was born in Ancient Ireland.

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37. Fionnlogh was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Fionn was born in Ancient Ireland.

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38. Fionn was born in Ancient Ireland.

Fionn married Benia, daughter of Crimthann-Niadh-Nar 100th monarch of Ireland

Their children were:

Eochaidh Feidlioch "The Melancholy" 93rd monarch of Ireland was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 130 B.C. in Tara Castle, Meath, Leinster, Ireland.

Eochaidh married Clothfionn.

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39. Eochaidh Feidlioch "The Melancholy" 93rd monarch of Ireland was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 130 B.C. in Tara Castle, Meath, Leinster, Ireland.

Eochaidh Feidliochwas the 93rd Monarch Married Clothfionn, daughter of Eochaidh Uchtleathan, who was a very virtuous lady. By him she had three children at a birth - Breas, Nar, and Lothar (the Fineamhas), who were slain at the battle of Dromchriadh. 

After their death, a melancholy settled on the Monarch, hence his name "Feidhlioch." This Monarch caused the division of the Kingdom by Ugaine Mór into twenty-five parts, to cease; and ordered that the ancient Firvolgian division into Provinces should be resumed, two Munsters, Leinster, Conacht, and Ulster. 

He also divided the government of these Provinces amongst his favourite courtiers. Conacht he divided into three parts between Fiodhach, Eochaidh Allat, and Tinne, son of Conragh, son of Ruadhri Mór. Ulster he gave to Feargus, the son of Leighe.  Leinster he gave to Ros, the son of Feargus Fairge and the two Munsters he gave to Tighernach Teadhbheamach and Deagbadah. 

After this division of the Kingdom, Eochaidh proceeded to erect a Royal Palace in Conacht; this he built on Tinne's government in a place called Druin-na-n Druagh, now Craughan (from Craughan Crodhearg, Maedhbh's mother, to whom she gave the palace), but previously, Rath Eochaidh. 

About the same time he bestowed his daughter the Princess Maedhbh on Tinne, whom he constituted King of Conacht; Maedhbh being hereditary Queen of that Province. After many years reign Tinne was slain by Maceacht at Tara. 

After ten years' undivided reign, Queen Maedhbh married Oilioll Mór, son of Ros Ruadh, of Leinster, to whom she bore the seven Maine; Oilioll Mór was at length slain by Conall Cearnach, who was soon after killed by the people of Conacht. Maedhbh was at length slain by Ferbhuidhe, the son of Conor MacNeasa, but in reality this Conor was the son of Fachtna Fathach, son of Cas, son of Ruadhri Mór, of the Line of Ir. 

Eochaidh married Clothfionn, daughter of Eochaidh Uchtleathan. Clothfionn was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Their children were:

Fineamhnas was born in Leinster,Ireland.

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40. Fineamhnas was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Fineamhnas married Clothra. Clothra was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Their children were:

Endae Niae mac Bressal Belach was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Fineamhnas next married (name unknown).

Their children were:

Lughaidh Sriabh n Dearg, 98th Monarch of Ireland died in 8 B.C. in Tara, Ireland.

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41. Endae Niae mac Bressal Belach was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Their children were:

Dunlaing mac Endae Niae was born in Leinster, Ireland.
42. Lughaidh Sriabh n Dearg, 98th Monarch of Ireland died in 8 B.C. in Tara, Ireland.

Their children were:

  Crimthann-Niadh-Nar, 100th monarch of Ireland was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 9 B.C. in Dun-Crimthann, Bin Edar, Ireland.

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44. Crimthann-Niadh-Nar, 100th monarch of Ireland was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 9 B.C. in Dun-Crimthann, Bin Edar, Ireland. Another name for Crimthann-Niadh-Nar was 'Niadh Nar', 'the heroic'.

Died 9 B.C. from a fall off a horse. He and Conaire Mor, the 97th Monarch, respectively made expeditions to Britain and Gaul, and assisted the Picts and Britains in their wars with the Romans. Crimthann brought back from his Britain campaign, a highly ornamented, gilded war chariot, gold-hilted swords, a table studded with 3OO brilliant gems, a pair of greyhounds coupled with a splendid silver chain estimated to be worth 1OO cumal (cumal: "a maid servant"), or 3OO cows.

Their children were:

Benia was born in Ancient Ireland.

Benia married Fionn, son of Fionnlogh. Fionn was born in Ancient Ireland.

Feredach Fionn-Feachtnach, 102nd Monarch of Ireland was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 36 in Tara, Ireland.

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46. Feredach Fionn-Feachtnach, 102nd Monarch of Ireland was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 36 in Tara, Ireland.

The epithet "feachtnach" was applied to him due to his truth and sincerity

Their children were:

Fiacha Fionn Ola, 1O4th Monarch of Ireland died in 56 in Tara, Ireland.

Fiacha married Eithne daughter of the King of Alba.

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47. Fiacha Fionn Ola, 1O4th Monarch of Ireland died in 56 in Tara, Ireland.

• Slain by his successor, of the race of Ir, 56.

Fiacha married Eithne daughter of the King of Alba. Eithne was born in Alba (Scotland).

Their children were:

Tuathal Teachtmar, 106th Monarch of Ireland was born in 56 in Ancient Ireland and died on 1 Oct 106.

Tuathal married Baine.


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48. Tuathal Teachtmar 106th Monarch of Ireland was born in 56 in Ancient Ireland and died on 1 Oct 106.

With the help of his Grandfather, the King of Alba, and his friends, he went into Ireland and after scores of battles, restored the true royal blood and heirs to their respective provincial kingdoms. He imposed a tremendous fine or "eric" upon the province of Leinster for the death of his only two daughters, Fithir and Darina, to be paid forever to the Monarchs of Ireland. This fine was collected each year through the reigns of forty Monarchs, sometimes by sword and fire, until at last remitted at the pleading of St. Moling. Tuathal married Baine, daughter of Sgaile Balbh, King of England.

• Slain by his successor, Mal 106.

Tuathal married Baine, daughter of Sgaile Balbh King of England. Baine was born in England.

Their children were:

Fedhlimidh Rachtmar, 108th of Monarch Ireland died in 119 in Tara, Ireland.

Fedhlimidh married Ughna Ollchrothach of Denmark.


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49. Fedhlimidh Rachtmar, 108th of Monarch Ireland died in 119 in Tara, Ireland. Another name for Fedhlimidh was 'the Lawgiver'.

St. Bridgid was descended from his son Eocha, and St. Ite was a descendant of his son Fiacha. A nine year reign of peace and plenty.

• Died of thirst 119.

Fedhlimidh married Ughna Ollchrothach of Denmark, daughter of Indearg King of Denmark. Ughna was born in Denmark.

Their children were:

Conn Ceadcathach "Conn of the Hundred Fights" 110th Monarch of Ireland died in 157 in Tara, Ireland.

Conn married Aífe of Scotland.


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50. Conn Ceadcathach "Conn of the Hundred Fights" 110th Monarch of Ireland died in 157 in Tara, Ireland. Another name for Conn was "Conn of 100 Battles".

• Slain: 157.

Conn married Aífe of Scotland, daughter of Alpin mac Eochaid King of Dalriada 839-84. Aífe was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Art Eanfhear, 112th Monarch of Ireland died in 190 in County Galway, Ireland.

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51. Art Eanfhear, 112th Monarch of Ireland died in 190 in County Galway, Ireland.

• Slain in battle: 195.

Their children were:

Cormac Ulfhada 115th Monarch of Ireland died in 266 in Tara,Ireland.

Cormac married Eithne Thaebfhota.

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52. Cormac Ulfhada, 115th Monarch of Ireland died in 266 in Tara,Ireland.

He was the wisest, most learned, and the best of any of the Milesian race before him, that ruled the country. He had a retinue of 115O persons, in daily attendance at Tara. The great hall was 3OO feet long. He ordained that there be 1O persons in constant attendance to him and all future Kings: A nobleman as companion; a judge; an historian to declare and preserve the genealogies, acts, and occurrences of the nobility and gentry; a Druid to offer sacrifice, and presage good or bad omens; a poet to praise or dispraise everyone; a physician; a musician; and three stewards. Seven years before his death, he became a Christian and forbade his Druids to worship their gods.

• Choked on a fish bone: 266.

Cormac married Eithne Thaebfhota. Eithne was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Cairbre Niadh, 117th Monarch of Ireland died in 284 in Gabhra,Ireland.

Cairbre married Aine.

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53. Cairbre Niadh, 117th Monarch of Ireland died in 284 in Gabhra,Ireland.

• Slain at the battle of Gabhra: 284.

Cairbre married Aine, daughter of Updar King of Alba. Aine was born in Alba (Scotland).

Their children were:

Art Corp was born in Ancient Ireland.
Fiacha Strabhteine, King of Ireland 120th Monarch of Ireland was born in Ireland and died in 322 in Dubhcomar, Criogh Rois, Meath, Ireland.

Fiacha married Aífe Galli of Gaul.


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54. Art Corp was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Adnach was born in Ancient Ireland.
55. Fiacha Strabhteine, 120th Monarch of Ireland was born in Ireland and died in 322 in Dubhcomar,Criogh Rois,Meath,Ireland. Other names for Fiacha were Fiachu Sraiptine, Friacha Srabhteine, Fiacha Strabhteine, Emain Macha, Strabhein.

Third son of Caibre. King of Conacht, and 12Oth Monarch of Ireland. Married Aoife, daughter of the King of Gall, Gaodhal. Slain by the Three Collas in 322 A.D. His Mother was Alechia, daughter of the King of Alba 

• Slain by the Three Collas: the battle of Dubhchomar, 322.

Fiacha married Aífe Galli of Gaul, daughter of Gaodhal King of Gaul. Aífe was born in Belgic Gaul. Another name for Aífe was Aifi ingen rig Gall-gaeidelu, mathair Muireadaig Thirig.

Their children were:

  Muiredach Tírech, 112th Monarch of Ireland was born in Ireland and died in 356.

Muiredach married Muiron.


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56. Adnach was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Cathbad was born in Ancient Ireland.
57. Muiredach Tírech 112th Monarch of Ireland was born in Ireland and died in 356.

Muiredeach Tireach, High King at the beginning of the fourth century. It was when Muiredeach Tireach was High King of Ireland that Ulster was despoiled and broken by his nephews, the three Collas, who, on the ruins of the old kingdom of Uladh, founded a new kingdom, Oirgialla (Oriel) which was henceforth for nearly a thousand years to play an important part in the history of Northern Ireland. He was son of Fiacha Srabhteine. He defeated his father's slayers, the Collas, and banished them to Scotland in 326 A.D. He reigned for 3O years.

Muiredach married Muiron. Muiron was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

  Eochaid Mugrnedón, 124th Monarch of Ireland was born in Connachta, Ireland and died in 365 in Tara, Ireland.

Eochaid married Mong Finn (d. 365).


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58. Cathbad was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

  Iar was born in Ancient Ireland.
59. Eochaid Mugrnedón, 124th Monarch of Ireland was born in Connachta, Ireland and died in 365 in Tara, Ireland.

Uí Fiachrach were a Connachta dynasty whose eponymous ancestor, Fiachra, was the eldest son of Eochaid Mugrnedón and step-brother to Niall Noígiallach. Medieval writers claimed they provided the only two Connachta kings of Tara in the 5th century. The Uí Fiachrach Aidne branch (in the diocese of Kilmacduagh) are said to have attained the kingship of Connacht in the early 7th century, notably under Guaire Aidne mac Colmáin (fl. 627-63), whose generosity was legendary. The northern Uí Fiachrach Muaide (around the river Moy) held the provincial kingship in the late 7th and 8th centuries. 

Other branches of the family included the Uí Fiachrach Muirsce of Tireragh barony, Co. Sligo, the Cenél Maic Ercae of Carra barony, Co. Mayo, and the Uí Amolngid of Tirawley and Erris. The northern Uí Fiachrach kings became known in the 11th century as the Uí Dubda (O'Dowds), the southern as Uí hEidin (Hynes).

Eochaid married Mong Finn, daughter of Fidach. Mong Finn was born in Ireland and died in 365 in Tara, Ireland.

Their children were:

Brian, King of Connaught was born in Ireland.

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60. Iar was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Fiacha was born in Ancient Ireland.
61. Brian, King of Connaught was born in Ireland.

aka Báed Han Crobaing mac Echach

Their children were:

Erc Derg was born in Leinster, Ireland.
Dui Tenga, King of Connaught was born in 502 in Ireland.
Colman mac Cormac O' Cheinnselaig was born in Leinster, Ireland.

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62. Fiacha was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Ninneadh was born in Ancient Ireland.
63. Erc Derg was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Their children were:

Áengus was born in Leinster,Ireland.
64. Dui Tenga King of Connaught was born in 502 in Ireland.

Their children were:

Senach was born in Ireland.
65. Colman mac Cormac O' Cheinnselaig was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Their children were:

Eoghan was born in Ireland.

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66. Ninneadh was born in Ancient Ireland. Another name for Ninneadh was Nannid, Ninneadh.

Their children were:

Báeth was born in Ancient Ireland.
67. Áengus was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Their children were:

Ona was born in Leinster,Ireland.
68. Senach was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Son of Senach was born in Ireland.
69. Eoghan was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Blathmac was born in Ireland.

Blathmac married Etain of Dalriada.


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70. Báeth was born in Ancient Ireland. Another name for Báeth was Báeth, Bath.

Their children were:

Eochaid Buid King of Dalriata was born in Ancient Ireland.
71. Ona was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Their children were:

Flaithnia was born in Leinster,Ireland.
72. Son of Senach was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Colgu was born in Ireland.
73. Blathmac was born in Ireland.

Blathmac married Etain of Dalriada, daughter of Morgan. Etain was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Almath was born in Ireland.

Almath married Murchad mac Bran, King of Leinster (b. 670, d. 727).

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74. Eochaid Buid King of Dalriata was born in Ancient Ireland.
Their children were:
Ronan was born in Ancient Ireland.

Domnall Brecc King of Dalriata was born before 621 in Ancient Ireland and died in Dec 642 in Strathcarron, Lochcarron, Scotland, killed in battle.

75. Flaithnia was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Their children were:

Nuadu was born in Leinster, Ireland.
76. Colgu was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Cennfaelad King of West Connaught was born in 682 in Ireland.
77. Almath was born in Ireland.

Almath married Murchad mac Bran King of Leinster, son of Bran Mutt mac Conail King of Leinster Murchad was born in 670 in Leinster, Ireland and died in 727.

Their children were:

Faelan King of Leinster was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 738.

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78. Ronan was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Finan was born in Ancient Ireland.
79. Domnall Brecc,  King of Dalriata was born before 621 in Ancient Ireland and died in Dec 642 in Strathcarron, Lochcarron, Scotland, killed in battle.

Their children were:

Domangart II King of Dalriata was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 673.
80. Nuadu was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Their children were:

Máel Míchíl was born in Leinster,Ireland.
81. Cennfaelad, King of West Connaught was born in 682 in Ireland.

Their children were:

Amalgaid, King of West Connaught was born in Ireland.

82. Faelan, King of Leinster was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 738.

Their children were:

Ruaidri, O' Faelain King of Leinster was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 785.

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83. Finan was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

  Máenach was born in Ancient Ireland.
84. Domangart II King of Dalriata was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 673.

Their children were:

  Eochaid "Crook-Nose" King of Dalriata was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 697, killed by Cenel Loairn.
85. Máel Míchíl was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Their children were:

Uroman was born in Leinster, Ireland.
86. Amalgaid King of West Connaught was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Flann was born in Ireland.
87. Ruaidri O' Faelain King of Leinster was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 785.

Their children were:

Muirecán mac Diarmait O' Faelain, King of Leinster was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 863.

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88. Máenach was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Fergus King of Fotharta was born in Ireland and died in 738 in Ireland.
89. Eochaid "Crook-Nose" King of Dalriata was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 697, killed by Cenel Loairn.

Their children were:

Eochaid mac Eochaid, King of Dalriata 726-733 was born in Ancient Ireland and died about 733.
90. Uroman was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Their children were:

Aidit was born in Leinster, Ireland.
91. Flann was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Fiangalach was born about 760 in Ireland.
92. Muirecán mac Diarmait O' Faelain, King of Leinster was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 863.

Their children were:

Máel Mórda mac Muirecán O' Faelain was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 917.

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93. Fergus King of Fotharta was born in Ireland and died in 738 in Ireland.

Their children were:

Congal was born in Ireland.
94. Eochaid mac Eochaid, King of Dalriata 726-733 was born in Ancient Ireland and died about 733.

Their children were:

Aed "find the white" King of Dalriata 739-778 was born in Ancient Ireland.
95. Aidit was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Their children were:

Echthigern was born in Leinster, Ireland.
96. Fiangalach was born about 760 in Ireland.

Their children were:

Flaithnia was born about 790 in Ireland.
97. Máel Mórda mac Muirecán O' Faelain was born in Leinster,Ireland and died in 917.

Their children were:

Finn mac Máel Mórda O' Faelain was born in Leinster,Ireland and died in 923.

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98. Congal was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Dungus was born in Ireland.
99. Aed "find the white" King of Dalriata 739-778 was born in Ancient Ireland.

Their children were:

Eochaid "the Venemous" King of Dalriada 781 was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 826.

Eochaid married Fergusa, Princess Royal of the Picts (b. Abt 755).

100. Echthigern was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Their children were:

Gilla Críst was born in Leinster,Ireland.
101. Flaithnia was born about 790 in Ireland.

Their children were:

Maennach was born about 820 in Ireland.
102. Finn mac Máel Mórda O' Faelain was born in Leinster,Ireland and died in 923.

Their children were:

Morugh mac Finn King of Leinster was born in Ireland and died in 972.

Morugh married Daughter of O' Ruarc.

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103. Dungus was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Dunan was born in Ireland.
104. Eochaid "the Venemous" King of Dalriada 781 was born in Ancient Ireland and died in 826.

Eochaid married Fergusa Princess Royal of the Picts, born about 755 in Ireland.

Their children were:

Alpin mac Eochaid King of Dalriada 839-841 was born in Ancient Ireland and died on 20 Jul 841 in Pitalpie, Near Dundee (Tayside) Scotland.
105. Gilla Críst was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Their children were:

Murchad was born in Leinster,Ireland.
106. Maennach was born about 820 in Ireland.

Their children were:

Murchad, King of West Connaught was born about 850 in Ireland and died in 896.
107. Morugh mac Finn King of Leinster was born in Ireland and died in 972.

Morugh married Daughter of Fergal O' Ruarc and Daughter of Tadg Mac Cathal. Daughter was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Gormflaeth Ingen Murchada mac Finn was born in 1030 in Naas, Ireland and died in 1030.

Gormflaeth married Brian Bóruma mac Cenneidigh King of Ireland, born Abt 941, died 23 Apr 1014

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108. Dunan was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Folloman was born in Ireland.
109. Alpin mac Eochaid King of Dalriada 839-841 was born in Ancient Ireland and died on 20 Jul 841 in Pitalpie, Near Dundee (Tayside) Scotland.

Their children were:

Kenneth I mac Alpin King of Alba 841-859 was born about 810 in Gaelic Kingdom of Dal Riata, Scotland and died on 6 Feb 859 in Fortevoit, Tayside, Scotland.
Aífe of Scotland was born in Ancient Ireland.

Aífe married Conn Ceadcathach "Conn of the Hundred Fights" 110th Monarch of Ireland, son of Fedhlimidh Rachtmar 108th of Monarch Ireland and Ughna Ollchrothach of Denmark. Conn Ceadcathach "Conn of the Hundred Fights" 110th Monarch of Ireland died in 157 in Tara, Ireland. Another name for Conn was "Conn of 100 Battles".

• Slain: 157.

Their children were:

111. Murchad King of West Connaught was born about 850 in Ireland and died in 896.

Their children were:

Urchad mac Murchada King of West Connacht was born in 875 in Connaught,Ireland

Donn Sithe was born in Leinster,Ireland.

112. Gormflaeth Ingen Murchada mac Finn was born in 1030 in Naas,Ireland and died in 1030.

Mael Morda, king of Leinster, rose in revolt in 1012, refused to acknowledge Brian's rule, and allied with the Dublin Norse in defiance of the Ard Ri. Brian attempted to diffuse that political alliance by marrying the legendary Gormlaith, Sigtrygg's mother and Mael Morda's sister who had been previously married to Malachi    (Mael Sechnaill), but this political alliance had too many powerful personalities involved to be successful. Irish folklore tells a tale of intrigue, pride, and murder that led to events quickly out of control as the factions let loose the simmering angers kept in check during a decade of Brian's rule.

While transporting tree tribute (a tax in the form of masts for ships), Mael Morda, according to Irish chroniclers, had broken a button off his tunic, a gift from his brother-in-law Brian. Mael asked his sister Gormlaith to mend it, whereby she scolded and shamed him for accepting anything from her husband, much less being subordinate to his rule.

Brian, incensed by Gormlaith's meddling and intrigues, had her imprisoned while he marched to Osraige, raising havoc for three months in the lands of his enemies before dispatching his son Murchad to raid the lands around Dublin. This strategy would prove to be decisive as Brian managed to keep his adversaries on the defensive and split up, defending their own lands.

Gormlaith, probably fifty years of age and still considered beautiful, had managed to retain her charms and had little trouble enticing Sigurd, the earl of the Orkney Isles (who was half Irish), to come to her rescue. Sigurd not only desired Gormlaith, but he wished to sit in Brian's seat as Ard Ri as well, as his countrymen Svein and Cnut in England. Knowing Sigurd's mind, Sigtrygg sent a personal appeal to the earl, not only promising Gormlaith's hand in marriage but also sup- porting his claim to the Irish throne in return for a guarantee of Sigtrygg's continued rule over Dublin. The fact that Gormlaith currently remained married to Brian did not seem to matter. Sigtrygg did a bit of double-dealing as well. Attempting to garner as much military strength as possible, the wily Dubliner promised Gormlaith to yet another renowned warrior as well, Brodir of Man.

Gormflaeth married Brian Bóruma mac Cenneidigh King of Ireland, son of Cenneidigh mac Lorcan King of Thomond and Be Bind ingen Urchada. Brian was born about 941 in Munster, Ireland and died on 23 Apr 1014 in Battle of Clontarf, Dublin.

Their children were:

Donnchad O' Brien, King of Munster was born in Munster, Ireland and died in 1064 in San Stefano Rotondo Church, Rome, Italy.

Donnchad married Driella of Wessex.

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113. Folloman was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Nuallain was born in Ireland.
114. Kenneth I mac Alpin King of Alba 841-859 was born about 810 in the Gaelic Kingdom of Dal Riata, Scotland and died on 6 Feb 859 in Fortevoit, Tayside, Scotland.

Kenneth MacAlpine - Born to be King?

Kenneth was born around 800AD in the Gaelic Kingdom of Dal Riata - it was a time when the Gaels were dominated by the more powerful Pictish kingdom. His father, Ailpín, was beheaded fighting for a Pictish king and historical sources suggest that his mother was a Pictish princess.

In the confusion and terror caused by the ferocious ninth century Viking raids, the Pictish kingship was almost completely destroyed. Wrad, a Pictish warlord, eventually became King of the Picts at the same time as Kenneth became King of Dal Riata.

When Wrad died in 842 his kingship was contested. Wrad’s sons believed they were the rightful heirs, whilst Kenneth, through royal Pictish descent on his mother’s side, claimed the kingship for himself - his claims were heard all the louder with the backing of his Gaelic and Pictish followers. The matter was settled seven years later when Kenneth invited Drest, last of the sons of Drest, to a truce meeting at Scone, a meeting at which Kenneth treacherously slew his rival.

Dunadd Hillfort was the royal centre for the Gaelic Kingdom of Dal Riata, where Kenneth MacAlpine first ruled before moving to Pictland.

Picts and Gaels United

As Kenneth MacAlpine triumphed in Pictland, he faced a new challenge. A Viking fleet of 140 ships intent on destruction attacked Dal Riata. It spelled doom for the Gaelic kingdom; the Gaels collected the relics of their saints and moved them to Kenneth’s new Pictish kingdom. Dal Riata vanishes from the chronicles and we only hear of Pictland from this point.

Kenneth was able to reward his Gaelic followers with lands taken from the men who supported the sons of Wrad, but he no doubt faced resentment from the Picts over their new Gaelic overlords. Unity was needed: something the Picts and Gaels had in common, to define them as a single people, and, as is so often the case throughout history, this came in the form of a common enemy. Kenneth raided the Angles of Northumbria for booty.

The Dupplin Cross, which would have been visible from the Pictish royal palace of Forteviot, where King Kenneth MacAlpine ruled and died.

The cross is thought to have been erected for an earlier Pictish King, who would have ruled whilst Kenneth was a child in Gaelic Dal Riata.

Kenneth died in 858 at the Palace of Forteviot. For the Gaels he was the conqueror of the Picts and their bards lamented his passing:

‘That Kenneth with his host is no more brings weeping to every home.
No king of his worth under heaven is there, to the bounds of Rome.’

What the Picts thought is unrecorded. They must have believed the Gaels and Kenneth’s successors would adopt Pictish ways, but - as is apparent from the story of King Constantine II - it is the Picts who vanish from history.

Constantine mac Aed, King of Alba 900-943

Constantine mac Aed (Constantine II), the grandson of Kenneth MacAlpine, began his life as an exile. In 878 AD his father, Aed, had been slain by a Giric, son of Dungal, and Constantine, a young boy at the time, fled to Ireland where he was brought up by monks surrounded in Gaelic culture.

In 889 AD he returned with his cousin Domnall to wreak revenge on Giric. Domnall took the kingship of the Picts initially, but shortly afterwards was slain by the Vikings - Dark Age kingships were often painfully short! So it was that in his early twenties, Constantine mac Aed became King of Pictland.

The kingdom had been nearly destroyed by the Vikings, but its peoples, Picts and Gael, faced with the prospect of Viking conquest, had drawn together. In 902 AD, the Vikings, under Ivar the Younger of Dublin, returned to seize Dunkeld, where St Columba’s relics were kept, and the rich farmlands around the River Tay. Constantine caught up with Ivar at Strathcarron in 904 AD, and, in a bitter struggle, Ivar and his Viking army were massacred.

With the defeat of the Vikings, regeneration of the kingdom was Constantine’s top priority. He remodelled the church along Gaelic lines and brought in a system of mormaers (earls) to defend the kingdom more efficiently. He also renamed the territory, Alba, which is actually means Britain in Gaelic. Pictland was remade in a Gaelic image and the Scottish nation was launched.

Constantine continued to extend Alba’s influence across Scotland. The east coast, south of the river Forth and modern-day Edinburgh, was Angle territory and often very hostile at that, until 918 AD, when Constantine led his army into Northumbria. At the Battle of Corbridge, he forced Ragnall, the Viking King of York, to withdraw from the Angle earldom of Northumbria that stretched from Lothian to the Tyne. In return the restored earl, Eadred, recognised Constantine as his overlord. For the first time much of the land in modern-day Scotland was either under the direct kingship of the King of Alba or was under his rule as overlord.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history

Their children were:

Constantine I King of Alba 863-977 was born about 836 in Inverdoval, Fife, Scotland died in 877 in Black Cove, Angus, Scotland in battle with the Danes, and was buried in Iona Island, Highlands, Scotland.

116. Donn Sithe was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Their children were:

Branán was born in Leinster, Ireland.

117. Urchad mac Murchada, King of West Connacht was born in 875 in Connaught, Ireland.

Their children were:

Be Bind ingen Urchada was born in Ireland.

Be Bind ingen Urchada  married Cenneidigh mac Lorcan King of Thomond (d. 951).

118. Donnchad O' Brien King of Munster was born in Munster, Ireland and died in 1064 in San Stefano Rotondo Church, Rome, Italy.

• Pilgrimage to Rome 1064.

Donnchad married Driella of Wessex, daughter of Godwin of Wessex and Gytha. Driella was born in Wessex, England.

Their children were:

Dearbforgail O' Brien was born in 1005 in Leinster, Ireland and died in 1080.

Dearbforgail married Dermait MacMail na mBo King of Ireland & Leinster 1042 to 1072 (born 974, died 7 Feb 1072)


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119. Nuallain was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Murchadh was born in Ireland.
120. Constantine I King of Alba 863-977 was born about 836 in Inverdoval, Fife, Scotland died in 877 in Black Cove, Angus, Scotland in battle with the Danes, and was buried in Iona Island, Highlands, Scotland.

Their children were:

Donald I King of Alba 859-863 was born in 862 in Inverdoval, Fife, Scotland died in 900, Killed at Forres, Moray, Scotland, and was buried in Iona Island, Highlands, Scotland.
121. Branán was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Their children were:

Echmarcach was born in Leinster,Ireland.
122. Be Bind ingen Urchada was born in Ireland.

Be Bind ingen Urchada  married Cenneidigh mac Lorcan King of Thomond, son of Lorcan mac Lachtnae Cenneidigh was born in Munster, Ireland and died in 951.

Their children were:

Brian Bóruma mac Cenneidigh, King of Ireland was born about 941 in Munster, Ireland and died 23 Apr 1014 in the Battle of Clontarf, Dublin.

Brian married Gormflaeth Ingen Murchada mac Finn 

123. Dearbforgail O' Brien was born in 1005 in Leinster, Ireland and died in 1080.

Dearbforgail married Dermait MacMail na mBo, King of Ireland & Leinster 1042 to 1072, son of Donnchad Na Mbó mac Mael King Ui Cheinnselaig and Aife Ingen Gilla Patraic. Dermait was born in 974 in Leinster, Ireland and died on 7 Feb 1072.

Their children were:

Murchad mac Diarmata King of Leinster 1052 to 1070 was born in Leinster, Ireland and died on 21 Nov 1070 in Dublin, Leinster, Ireland.

Murchad married Sadb Ingen mac Bricc, born about 1050


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124. Murchadh was born in Ireland.

Their children were:

Dunlong was born in Leinster,Ireland.
125. Donald I King of Alba 859-863 was born in 862 in Inverdoval, Fife, Scotland died in 900, Killed in Forres, Moray, Scotland, and was buried in Iona Island, Highlands, Scotland.

Their children were:

Malcolm I King of Alba 943-954 was born in 897 in Scotland and died in 954 in Fetteresso, Dunnottar, Scotland, Killed in Battle.

126. Echmarcach was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Their children were:

Gilla Michil O' Braenain was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Gilla married Uchdelb O' Gairbita.

127. Brian Bóruma mac Cenneidigh, King of Ireland was born about 941 in Munster, Ireland and died on 23 Apr 1014 in the Battle of Clontarf, Dublin.

Brian mac Cenneidigh, born in the province of Munster, circa A.D. 941, was the youngest of twelve brothers, all but two of whom would be killed in battle. Members of the Dal Caissan tribal clan, the brothers fought continuous wars against the Danes and Leinstermen until Brian's brother Mahon routed the Viking armies at the Battle of Sulchoid in 968. The resulting sack of Limerick, recorded by the author of the Cogadh, found the fort and the good town reduced to a cloud of smoke and to red fire afterwards. The whole of the captives were collected on the hills of Saingel. Every one of them that was fit for war was put to death and every one that was fit for a slave was enslaved.

Brian Boru's rise to power was swift, beginning with the Ostmen (Vikings) of Limerick, King Imar and his sons, who assassinated Brian's brother. In three years time both Limerick and Munster were in his hands. He came into conflict with the Ui Neill when he tried to conquer Ossory (Osraighe) in the year 980. Allied with the Ostmen of Waterford, Brian pushed his armies into Connacht and Leinster. Mael Sechnaill's attempts to contain Brian were not successful, and in 997 Brian and Mael Sechnaill met at Clonfert and divided Ireland between them.

Late in 999 Brian brought the king of Dublin, Sitric Silkenbeard, into submission. By 1011 he dominated much of Ireland. He had shattered the Ui Neill monopoly and had made the kingship of Ireland a prize to be fought for. About 1012, relations between Brian and Leinster became strained and he was killed at the battle of Clontarf on Good Friday 1014. Although he won the battle, Brian was stopped short just when he seemed to be about to make the kingship of Ireland a reality, and the possession of his dynasty. The death of Brian and the subsequent weakness of his dynasty allowed Mael Sechnaill II to be 'high-king' of Ireland until his death in 1022.

Brian married Gormflaeth Ingen Murchada mac Finn, daughter of Morugh mac Finn King of Leinster and Daughter of O' Ruarc. Gormflaeth was born in 1030 in Naas,Ireland and died in 1030.

Their children were:

  Donnchad O' Brien King of Munster was born in Munster, Ireland and died in 1064 in San Stefano Rotondo Church, Rome, Italy.

Donnchad married Driella of Wessex.

Their children were:

Slani was born in Ireland.

Slani married Sitric "of the Silken Beard" Norse King of Dublin, died 1042.

128. Murchad mac Diarmata King of Leinster 1052 to 1070 was born in Leinster, Ireland and died on 21 Nov 1070 in Dublin, Leinster, Ireland.

Murchad married Sadb Ingen mac Bricc, daughter of Muirchertach mac Bricc King of Deisi Muman. Sadb was born about 1050 in Munster Province, Ireland.

Their children were:

Donnchad mac Murchada King of Leinster 1098 to 1115 was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 1115 in Dublin, Ireland.

Donnchad married Orlaith ingen O' Braenain (d. 1080).


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129. Dunlong was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Their children were:

Máelmuaid O' Nuallain was born in Leinster,Ireland.
130. Malcolm I, King of Alba 943-954 was born in 897 in Scotland and died in 954 in Fetteresso, Dunnottar, Scotland, Killed in Battle.

Their children were:

Kenneth II King of Alba 971-995,King of Lothian was born in 932 in Scotland died in 995 in Murdered, Finela's Castle, Fettercairn, Kincardineshire, Scotland, and was buried in Isle of Iona, Scotland.

Kenneth married Lady of Leinster (b. 920).

131. Gilla Michil O' Braenain was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Gilla married Uchdelb O' Gairbita, daughter of Cearnachan O' Gairbita King Ui Feilmeda.  Uchdelb was born in Leinster, Ireland.

Their children were:

Orlaith ingen O' Braenain was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 1080.

Orlaith married Donnchad mac Murchada King of Leinster 1098 to 1115, son of Murchad mac Diarmata King of Leinster 1052 to 1070 and Sadb Ingen mac Bricc. Donnchad was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 1115 in Dublin, Ireland.

132. Slani was born in Ireland.

Slani married Sitric "of the Silken Beard" Norse King of Dublin. Sitric died in 1042 in Ireland.

• Pilgrimage to Rome: 1028.

Their children were:

Olaf

133. Donnchad mac Murchada, King of Leinster 1098 to 1115 was born in Leinster, Ireland and died in 1115 in Dublin, Ireland.

Donnchad married Orlaith ingen O' Braenain, daughter of Gilla Michil O' Braenain and Uchdelb O' Gairbita. Orlaith was born in Leinster,Ireland and died in 1080.

Their children were:

Diarmait na-nGall MacMurchada King of Leinster 1126 to 1171 was born in 1100 in Leinster, Ireland and died on 1 May 1171 in Ferns, Leinster, Ireland.

Diarmait married Mor Ingen Muirchertaig O'Toole (b. Abt 1114, d. 1164) about 1140 in Lough Carmen,Wexford, Kingdom of Leinster, Ireland.

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134. Máelmuaid O' Nuallain was born in Leinster,Ireland.

Their children were:

Cele O' Nuallain was born in Leinster, Ireland.
135. Kenneth II King of Alba 971-995, King of Lothian was born in 932 in Scotland. Murdered in 995 Finela's Castle, Fettercairn, Kincardineshire, Scotland, and was buried in Isle of Iona, Scotland.

Kenneth married Lady of Leinster. Lady was born in 920 in Ireland.

Their children were:

   Malcolm II, King of Alba 1005-1034 was born on 5 Oct 958 in Scotland and died on 25 Nov 1035 in Glamis Castle, Angus, Scotland.

• Murdered By His Kinsmen: 1035.

Malcolm married Edith de Orkney Queen of Scotland. Edith was born in 962 in Ossery, Orkney Isles, Scotland.

Malcolm next married Aefgifu, daughter of Sigurd. Aefgifu was born in 962 in Fordoun, Kincardineshire, Scotland.

137. Olaf

Their children were:

Ragnhildir (Ranhult)

Ragnhildir married Cynan ap Iago, son of Iago ap Idwal Prince of Gwynedd, King of Wales and Afrandreg verch Gweir. Cynan was born about 1060 in Powys, Montgomeryshire, Wales.

138. Diarmait na-nGall MacMurchada King of Leinster 1126 to 1171 was born in 1100 in Leinster, Ireland and died on 1 May 1171 in Ferns, Leinster, Ireland.

In 1166, the King of Leinster, Diarmait MacMurchada was forced to flee from Dublin and from his kingdom by an alliance of Irish enemies, including the new high King, Ruaidri Ua Conchobair. 'Awful the deed done in Ireland today', wrote the chronicler of Leinster, 'the expulsion overseas by the men of Ireland of Diarmait…'.

And awful were its consequences. For Diarmait landed in Bristol and asked for help from King Henry II to get his throne back. Now what happens when you ask the Godfather for a favour? He expects something, some day, done in return. And the Song of Dermot, made it clear, from the beginning what that something was:

To you I come to make my plaint, good sire In the presence of the barons of your empire. Your liege-man I shall become henceforth all the days of my life, On condition you be my helper so that I do not lose at all You I shall acknowledge as sire and lord… Then the King promised him, the powerful king of England That willingly would he help him as soon as he should be able.

Diarmait married Mor Ingen Muirchertaig O'Toole, daughter of Muirchertach of Muiredaig O'Toole King of Ui Muiredaig and Cacht Ingen Loigsig O' Morda, about 1140 in Lough Carmen, Wexford, Kingdom of Leinster, Ireland. Mor was born about 1114 in Leinster, Ireland and died in 1164 in Ferns, Leinster, Ireland.

Their children were:

Aoife Eva MacMurchada Princess of Leinster was born about 1141 in Leinster, Ireland died in 1177 in Wales, and was buried in Tintern Abbey, Chapel Hill, Monmouthshire, Wales.

Aoife married Richard "Strongbow" Fitzgilbert de Clare, son of Gilbert "Stongbow" Fitzgilbert de Clare and Isabel Elizabeth de Beaumont, on 28 Aug 1170 in Waterford, Ireland. Richard was born in 1130 in Tunbridge, Kent, England, christened in Clare, Suffolk, England, died about 20 Apr 1176 in Abergavenny, Monmouthshire,Wales, and was buried in Holy Trinity Church, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland.


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