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Thibodaux Minerva newspaper articles about Yellow Fever, 1853

The Thibodaux Minerva was a newspaper in the City of Thibodaux, Louisiana. These are exact transcriptions, except for the first article (Died), where I cut out some extraneous words.

Died

August
Thursday, the 18th of August,Miss Mary Philipeaux, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 18th,Olivier Dubois, a native of Louisiana.
Friday, the 19th,L. E. Parant, a native of Quebec, Canada.
Monday, the 22nd,Joseph P. Bourg, Jr., a native of Louisiana.
Wednesday, the 24thDr. J. Dubertrand, a native of France.
Tuesday, 23rd of August,Jules Billard, a native of Switzerland.
Thursday, the 25th,Pierre Bouvier, a native of France.
Friday, the 26th,Miss Odelie Roth, a native of France.
Saturday, the 27th,Rodolphe Gautreau, a native of Louisiana.
Saturday, the 27th, Antoine Roth, a native of France.
Sunday, the 28th,Pierre Rousse, a native of France.
Sunday, the 28th,Miss Amanda Knobloch, a native of Louisiana.
Monday, the 29th,Eugene Meyeur, a native of France.
Monday, the 29th,Frederick Guedry, a native of Louisiana.
Tuesday, the 30th,Mrs. A. Bouis, a native of France.
Wednesday, the 31st,Mrs. A. M. Lathrop, a native of Ohio.
Wednesday, the 31st,Samuel Wakeman, a native of New York.
Wednesday, the 31st,Mrs. T. Richard, a native of Louisiana.
September
Thursday, the 1st,Tresimond Richard, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 1st Sept.,Mrs. J. Galabert, a native of France.
Thursday, the 1st,William Higgins, a native of Ireland.
Thursday, the 1st,Patrick McCue, a native of Ireland.
Thursday, the 1st, Washington Hebert, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 1st, Thomas S. Breen, a native of New York.
Friday, the 2nd, Robert Tanner, a native of Louisiana.
Friday, the 2nd, Mrs. Gustave A. Knobloch, a native of Louisiana.
Friday, the 2nd, John A. Bernard, a native of Louisiana.
Friday, the 2nd, Victor Richard, Sr., a native of Louisiana.
Friday, the 2nd, Jules Hoffman, a native of France.
Friday, the 2nd, Geo. S. Lawless, a native of Kentucky.
Friday, the 2nd, Joseph Baptiste, a native of Piedmont.
Saturday, the 3rd, Edward McCoy, a native of Ireland.
Saturday, the 3rd, Mrs. J. Louit, a native of France.
Saturday, the 3rd, John B. Smith, a native of Tennessee.
Saturday, the 3rd, David Carr, a native of New York.
Sunday, the 4th, Miss Ernestine Knobloch, a native of Louisiana.
Sunday, the 4th, Arestide Saunier, a native of Louisiana.
Sunday, the 4th, [stained]ene Babin, a native of Louisiana.
Monday, the 5th, Thomas Donnigan, a native of Ireland.
Monday, the 5th, Miss Nancy R. Blo[?]ce, a native of Tennessee.
Tuesday, the 6th, Robert Graham, a native of Virginia.
Tuesday, the 6th, A. Bouis, a native of France.
Tuesday, the 6th, Auguste Weber, a native of Germany.
Tuesday, the 6th, Auguste Faber, a native of Louisiana.
Tuesday, the 6th, John Rogers, a native of Pennsylvania.
Tuesday, the 6th, Miss Philomene Trone, a native of Louisiana.
Tuesday, the 6th, Miss Philomene Engeron, a native of Louisiana.
Wednesday, the 7th, Jean Charpentier, a native of Louisiana.
Wednesday, the 7th, A. G. Loftin, a native of Kentucky.
Wednesday, the 7th, Miss Margaret A. Guither, a native of Louisiana.
Wednesday, the 7th, Miss Justine Aubert, a native of Louisiana.
Wednesday, the 7th, Miss Susan Turner, a native of Louisiana.
Wednesday, the 7th, Martin Duffy, a native of Ireland.
Thursday, the 8th, George Hebert, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 8th, Mrs. L. Holmes, a native of Maine.
Thursday, the 8th, Benjamin Holmes, a native of Maine.
Thursday, the 8th, Jean Carcaut, a native of France.
Thursday, the 8th, Miss Leonore Faber, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 8th, Mrs. C. Riviere, a native of Louisiana.
Friday, the 9th, Mrs. J. St. Martin, a native of Louisiana.
Friday, the 9th, Mrs. T. Trone, a native of Louisiana.
Friday, the 9th, Louis Kientz, a native of France.
Saturday, the 10th, James Brown, a native of Ohio.
Saturday, the 10th, Mrs. Mary A. Daunis, wife of T. J. Daunis, aged 20, La.
Saturday, the 10th, Miss Sarah Corbit, a native of Louisiana.
Saturday, the 10th, Joseph Oslet, a native of Louisiana.
Saturday, the 10th, Malcomb McDonald, a native of South Carolina.
Saturday, the 10th, Elenore Engeron, a native of Louisiana.
Saturday, the 10th, J. Galabert, a native of France.
Saturday, the 10th, Pierre Lede, a native of Louisiana.
Sunday, the 11th, Miss Victorine Faber, a native of Louisiana.
Sunday, the 11th, Alexander McLeod, a native of South Carolina.
Sunday, the 11th, Dinwiddie McEvers, a native of Louisiana.
Sunday, the 11th, E. Jackson Harvey, a printer-- native of New York.
Sunday, the 11th, Narcisse Bergeron, a native of Louisiana.
Monday, the 12th, Charles Faber, a native of Louisiana.
Monday, the 12th, Miss Dorothia Faber, a native of Louisiana.
Monday, the 12th, Mrs. M. P. Zills, a native of Louisiana.
Tuesday, the 13th, William Tuxworth, a native of Ohio.
Tuesday, the 13th, Mrs. ZenGuillot, a native of Louisiana.
Tuesday, the 13th, Miss Caroline Faber, a native of Louisiana.
Tuesday, the 13th, Pierre Roulo, a native of France.
Tuesday, the 13th, Mrs. F. Caze, a native of Switzerland.
Tuesday, the 13th, Etienne Grille, a native of France.
Wednesday, the 14th, Mrs. E. Corcoran, a native of Ireland.
Wednesday, the 14th, Miss Catharine McBride, a native of Louisiana.
Wednesday, the 14th, Charles Yates, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 15th, Mrs. J. Voris, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 15th, Mrs. J. Davis, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 15th, Mrs. E. Whitaker, a native of Pennsylvania.
Thursday, the 15th, Mrs. P. Knobloch, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 15th, F. T. Scarborough, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 15th, Eldridge Lofton, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 15th, James Frost, a native of Pennsylvania.
Thursday, the 15th, Jean M. Dutus, a native of France.
Thursday, the 15th, Joseph Monson, a native of Louisiana.
Thursday, the 15th, Michael Fitzgerald, a native of Ireland.
Thursday, the 15th, John Corren, a native of Ireland.
Friday, the 16th, Miss Mary Rouan, a native of Ireland.
Saturday, the 17th, W. W. Oglesby, from Missouri.
-Same page, Column 6-
Sunday, the 18th, Mrs. Justin Aubert, from Louisiana.
Sunday, the 18th, Mrs. Zephirin Bagque, from Louisiana.
Sunday, the 18th, Pierre Perron, from France.
Sunday, the 18th, Auguste Auryo, from France.
Sunday, the 18th, Patrick Munn, from Ireland.
Sunday, the 18th, John Hays, from Ireland.
Sunday, the 18th, Francois Duvergne, from France.
Sunday, the 18th, ClgerLavalleur, from Louisiana.
Monday, the 19th, Mary A., daughter of J. A. and M. V. Guither, La.
Monday, the 19th, Caroline, daughter of J.A. and M. V. Guither, La.
Monday, the 19th, E. A. Badeaux, from Louisiana.
Monday, the 19th, William Mercer, from Scotland.
Monday, the 19th, John Daugherty, from Ireland.
Monday, the 19th, Jourdan Charpentier, from Louisiana.
Monday, the 19th, John Bellanger, from Louisiana.
Monday, the 19th, Thomas W. Johnson, from Maryland.
Monday, the 19th, Dr. Wm. P. Rouanet, from Louisiana.
Monday, the 19th, Mrs. J. Dantin, from Louisiana.
Monday, the 19th, Miss Louisiana Voris, from Louisiana.
Tuesday, the 20th, Miss Eliza C. Smith, from Louisiana.
Tuesday, the 20th, Emile Richer, from France.
Tuesday, the 20th, Pierre Engeron, from Louisiana.
Tuesday, the 20th, Desire Gravaux, from Louisiana.
Tuesday, the 20th, An Unknown, aged 21, from France.
Wednesday, the 21st, Jacob Weber, from Pennsylvania.
Thursday, 22nd, Mrs. Cleophas Gaurteau, from Louisiana.
Thursday, the 22nd, Miss Celina Charpentier, from Louisiana.
Thursday, the 22nd, Mrs. A. G. Lofton, from Louisiana.
Friday, the 23rd, Mrs. H. Hoffman, from France.
Saturday, the 24th, Elie, son of J. B. Charpentier, from Louisiana.

There have been 13 deaths among our colored population since the first appearance of the epidemic.

Recapitulation
Total number of deaths 147
Sexes and Colors
White Males 85
White Females 49
Colored, of both sexes 13
Total 147
Where Born
Louisiana 69
Other States of the Union 23
France 24
Ireland 12
Switzerland 2
Piedmont 1
Germany 1
Scotland 1
Canada 1
Blacks 13
Total 147
Countries
Natives of the United States 92
Natives of Foreign Countries 42
Colored 13
Total 147

Source:
Thibodaux Minerva
Saturday September 24, 1853
Page 2, Columns 5 & 6

Deaths in the Country

The following deaths by the prevailing epidemic, have occurred in the parish of Lafourche (out of the Corporation of Thibodaux), from the 21st of August up to date.

August
21 - Pierre Boute, aged 40 years, of France.
22 - Etienne Perilloux, aged 19 years, La.
22 - Clara Portier, aged 4 years, from La.
24 - Mde. Auseline Boudreaux, aged 40 years, La.
25 - Son of H. Hymel, aged 2 days, La.
30 - Mrs. J. P. Bourg, aged 48 years, La.
31 - A child of J. Laisne, aged 18 months, La.
31 - Mrs Henry Traigle, aged 37 years, La.
September
1 - Cleophas Toups, aged 15 years, La.
5 - Mrs. Hermogene Ayot, aged 22 years, La.
6 - A child of Trasimond Richard, aged 1 year, La.
8 - Adam Perilloux, Jr., aged 33 years, La.
8 - A child of D. Triche, aged 15 months, La.
8 - Mary Olymphe Naquin, aged 10 years, La.
8 - Mr. Ovile Triche, aged 40 years, La.
8 - F. Portier, aged 2 years, La.
8 - Valmont Portier, aged 10 years, La.
10 - Victorine Portier, aged 18 years, La.
10 - Azelia Portier, aged 16 years, La.
10 - Miss M. Bourgeois, aged 20 years, La.
10 - A child of Aug. Aucoin, aged 1 year, La.
11 - Mrs. Emile Juge, aged 25 years, La.
11 - Mary O. Portier, aged 5 years, La.
13 - Mrs. J. Haydel, aged 28 years, La.
13 - Mrs. J. J. Rousseau, aged 35 years, La.
13 - Mrs. Vlleor Levert, aged 22 years, La.
13 - Mrs. Theodule Morillon, aged 22 years, La.
14 - Mr. Victorin Portier, aged 45 years, La.
14 - J. C. Richard, aged 61 years, La.
14 - J. M. LeBlanc, aged 45 years, La.
15 - Wm. Vicnner, aged 35 years, Germany.
16 - Mrs. Vincent Levront, aged 48 years, La.
16 - Mr. Urbain Poche, aged 50 years, La.
17 - Antoine Hacman, aged 60 years, La.
17 - Miss Melasie Himel, aged 16 years, La.
17 - Olesi Bourgeois, aged 18 years, La.
17 - Mrs. Valery Roger, aged 38 years, La.
18 - Thomas Kenny, aged 42 years, Ireland.
19 - Mrs. Jacques Toups, aged 22 years, La.
19 - Miss Anastasie Deslattes, aged 20 years, La.
20 - Chas. Richard, aged 30 years, France.
21 - Euselien Bergeron, aged 26 years, La.
22 - J. B. Boudreaux, dit Blaise, aged 50 years, La.
22 - Mrs. Arcene Boudreaux, aged 23 years, La.
22 - Miss Eliza Prejean, aged 10 months, La.
22 - An Unknown, Ireland.
23 - Mrs. F. Maronge, aged 35 years, La.
23 - Thimothe Gerrety, aged 34 years, Ireland.
24 - Patrick Nugent, aged 33 years, Ireland.
24 - Valere Bourg, aged 26 years, La.
24 - Mrs. David Besson, aged 50 years, La.
24 - Louis Allens, aged 45 years, Unknown
25 - A child of L. Leloresque, aged 20 days.
26 - Mrs. J. P. Doucet, aged 48 years, La.
26 - Mrs. J. J. Rousseau, aged 55 years, La.
27 - Leufroy Robichaud, aged 32 years, La.
28 - Mr. Arcene Prejean, aged 35 years, La.
28 - Mrs. Valere Bourg, aged 25 years, La.
28 - Mrs. Francois Leloresque, aged 54 years, La.
28 - John Connely, aged 20 years, Ireland.
28 - A child of T. Haydel, aged 15 days, La.
29 - Miss Azelie Maronge, aged 14 years, La.
October
1 - L. P. Thibodaux, aged 54 years, La.
1 - Mary F. daughter of J. Dantin, aged 18 months.


There have been about 12 negroes interred in the Catholic Cemetery.

Source:
Thibodaux Minerva
Saturday October 1, 1853
Page 2, Column 5

Yellow Fever

All our city contemporaries agree in representing the raging epidemic in New Orleans, as extremely severe and fatal, and advise all such as are unacclimated or have no pressing business in the city, to keep away. This is acting as become public journalists, and although the advice may act injuriously to the property of New Orleans for a time to come, still, to seek to hide the truth, and thereby jeopardize the lives of thousands, would be persuing a course which would subject them to the censure of the world, and be inimical to the calls of humanity.

Source:
Thibodaux Minerva
Saturday August 6, 1853
Page 2, Column 2

Facing Death

During the week, some fifty or sixty laborers, principally Irish and Germans, who have been employed on the Opelousas railroad, passed through here on their way to New Orleans. We endeavored by all our reasoning powers to dissuade them from going, but our efforts were fruitless and without effect. It really did appear as though Providence had destined them as food for the yellow fever- so obstinate were they in refusing to profit by our advice.

Source:
Thibodaux Minerva
Saturday August 13, 1853
Page 2, Column 2

Health of New Orleans

The reports of the interments in all the cemeteries of New Orleans, for the twenty-four hours ending at six o'clock on Tuesday last, the 22nd inst., was two hundred and eighty-three, 254 of which were from yellow fever. Comment is unnecessary.

Source:
Thibodaux Minerva
Saturday August 27, 1853
Page 2, Column 1

Sickness

The people of Mobile, says the New Orleans Bulletin, repudiating the dishonest course of concealing the truth and the still more reprehensible conduct of misrepresenting, they boldly and manfully announce the fact that the yellow fever had made its appearance among them. Conceiving it to be the imperative duty of public journalists to keep their readers advised in matters of public importance, and more particularly in times of sickness and great distress, we feel that we are called upon, regardless of all secondary considerations, to say to our readers that sickness is now among us. Up to the issuing of our last number, the health of both town and country was unexceptionable. We now feel it our duty to say upon the authority of a number of our medical friends, that there has been three deaths from yellow fever during the week, but in every instance the patient had contracted the disease in New Orleans. At the present writing twenty odd persons are confined to their beds from a disease resembling in its premonitory symptoms the yellow fever, but which yields very readily to medical treatment. All those now confined to their beds are doing well and bid fair to recover. We are pleased to observe that the people manifest little or no alarm, and that there is no apprehensions on the part of our citizens that the disease will prevail among us as an epidemic. With prudence and attention at the incipient stage of the fever, no danger need be apprehended.

Source:
Thibodaux Minerva
Saturday August 27, 1853
Page 2, Column 2

The Fearful Scourge

In our issue of Saturday last, we stated that the yellow fever, of a disease much resembling it, in its incipient stage, had made its appearance among us, and that three persons had died who had contracted the disease in New Orleans. It now becomes our painful duty to announce that a malady of the most malignant character is raging in our midst, and which has created a panic among our citizens verging on frenzy. All our stores, coffee houses, work shops, and public offices, are closed. Our streets, so deserted are they, look more like paths in a wilderness than the public thoroughfares of a thriving commercial town of over fifteen hundred inhabitants. Our citizens are flying in every direction, to get, if possible, beyond the pestiferous atmosphere that seems to hang over and surround our before salubrious village. Already has the Fell Destroyer been busy at work- thirty of our citizens having died since the first apparition of the disease, on the 16th ult., and many more are now lying at the gates of death, and will be numbered with the dead, before the rising of to-morrow's sun.

Up to the hour we put our last edition to press, at noon, on Friday, the 27th ult., the number of cases reported, was twenty-two. Before night, however, the number had greatly increased- our associate, Mr. L. F. Anderson, was attacked while engaged in making the form ready for press and immediately confined to his bed, where he still remains, though in a convalescent state. All of our compositors have fled for safety. During the day, on Saturday last, the disease spread like wild-fire and before nightfall, the number of cases had nearly doubled. The total number of cases up to this time, (Saturday evening,) exceeds one hundred and sixty. Never have we witnessed scenes of greater distress, and abandonment to fear. Parents forsake their offspring, and children abandon their parents, and leave them to the protection of the philanthropic stranger.

Amidst the surrounding woe and gloom we have, so far, proved invulnerable to the attacks of the disease, and trust that we shall be able, ere long, to announce that Hygeia has again reared her temple in our midst. Our physicians now better understand the treatment of the disease; nor are the deaths as great in proportion to the number of cases under treatment, as they were at the commencement of the week. None of those who have contracted the malady within the last three days are considered dangerous. We shall conclude this melancholy article by conjuring absent friends to prolong their stay until the fearful scourge shall have run it's destined course; for to come here, at this time, would be, as it were, rushing into the very jaws of death.

Source:
Thibodaux Minerva
Saturday September 3, 1853
Page 1, Column 1

The Epidemic

Upwards of a month has now elapsed since the fearful pestilence first made its appearance in our heretofore healthy town, and still it continues its ravages. The deaths already amount to the enormous number of One Hundred and Forty-seven, being ten per cent. on our total population, and about fifteen per dent. on the actual population at this time. In the selection of its victims, it has paid no respect to age, sex, or condition, the old and the young, the rich and the poor, the temperate and the inebriate-- man in the plenitude of his strength, and woman, blooming in youth and loveliness, are alike victims to its insatiate thirst. The number of cases, taking for a basis that one fifth of the number who contract the disease die, amount to 735, which is rather under, than over the mark. Within the last four days the number of deaths have greatly diminished, nor has there been as many new cases reported as for the same number of days previous to Wednesday last. Let not our country or absent friends imagine that this results from an abatement of the disease, but is entirely owing to the want of the more material to work upon. It is true that the present cool and bracing atmosphere, together with he abatement in the number of deaths and new cases, have inspired our citizens with new life, for the time being; but we are fearful that when the warm weather shall again set in, that the fell destroyer will again commence his work of destruction. We hope, however, for the better, and that in arriving at this conclusion, we may greatly err. Prudence, should dictate to all, to keep clear of our town for two weeks to come, at least.

Source:
Thibodaux Minerva
Saturday Sept 24, 1853
Page 2, Column 2