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Volume 4: Descendants of Jonathan Stark & Sarah Lacock; the Kentucky Stark Families
Chapter 3: The Life & Times of James Stark [1739-1821]  

 

Page 37

 

Chapter 3: The Life & Times of James Stark [1739-1821]

Prepared by Clovis LaFleur, January, 2002; See Copyright Notice

 

 

Introduction

James was born before 1739 to Jonathan Stark and Sarah Lacock, probably in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, their place of residence at that time. Because James was a witness to the 1760 Will of his grandfather, Joseph Lacock; he was probably over twenty-one years of age — this document establishing an approximate time of birth for James.[1] The Will of Joseph Lacock was made in Hardwick Township, Sussex County, New Jersey and the daughter named Sarah Lacock was probably the mother of James.

Just before New Year's day of 1765, Jonathan Stark of Hardwick Township, Sussex County, New Jersey, died. On January 29, 1765, named as administrators of his estate were his widow, Sarah Stark, and son, James Stark. Named as fellow bondsman was Joseph Lacock (Junior), Sarah's brother reported in the Will of Joseph Lacock (Senior) in 1760. These two probate records suggests the persons named were the same and that James Stark was a son of Jonathan Stark and Grandson of Joseph Lacock (Senior). [2]

As verified in Chapter 1, James and his brothers were found to be — genetically — descendants of Aaron Stark (1608-1685). Three participants in the Stark Family Y-DNA project were descendants of a son of James, Jonathan J. Stark (1778-1850). Two participants were direct line descendants of Moses Stark (1793-1860); while one participant was a direct line descendant of Enoch Stark (1794-1864). Moses and Enoch were sons of Jonathan J. and grandsons of James.

When compared to each other, the descendants of Moses had a genetic distance of zero — being a perfect genetic match over the DNA Markers Tested. The descendant of Enoch, when compared to the descendants of Moses; had a genetic distance of one. Genetic distance defines (as a probability value) the Time to a Most Recent Common Ancestor; referred to as TMRCA in the literature. These descendants of James Stark — when compared to others having different direct lines of descent to Aaron Stark — had probabilities greater than 97% Aaron was a common ancestor within the last 13 generations. Therefore, we can say with confidence, James Stark, the subject of this discussion, was a descendant of Aaron Stark (1608-1685).[3]

 

The Early Years

Between 1765 and 1767, James moved to Loudoun County, Virginia with his brothers Joseph, and William. James was named on James Hamilton's tithable list which reported Nathan Lacock, Joseph Stark, Abner Howell, and James Stark with two tithables, the other being William Stark between 16 and 21 years of age. Hamilton's list reported persons living within the area bounded by William's Gap to Vestal's Gap to the junction of Vestal's Gap and the Blue Ridge, and then to Kittocton Mountain.[4]

Because William Stark was living in the home of James and was sixteen to twenty years of age, he must have been a brother of James, the estimated age of James being too young to have had a son of sixteen or older. James may not have been married at this time, as the birth date of his first child known child, William Stark, was before August of 1771.[5] James probably married his spouse, Hannah, sometime between 1767 and 1769, this marriage certainly occurring in Loudoun County, Virginia. Many researchers believe Hannah Stark, named as the mother of Margaret Stark in a 1794 Shelby County, Kentucky Marriage Bond, was the daughter of Abner Howell. However, Abner Howell was born in 1744. Because the oldest child of James and Hannah was not born until 1770, Abner would not have been old enough to have a daughter of marrying age before 1770. There has been speculation Hannah was Ann Howell, daughter of Hugh Howell and his spouse Margaret. They were the parents of Abner Howell.

__________

1)

Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Vol. III, 1751-1760. Ancestry.com. Calendar of New Jersey Wills, 1670-1760. [database online] Provo, UT Ancestry.com, 2000. Original data New Jersey Historical Society. Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Administrations, etc. Newark, NJ New Jersey Historical Society, 1901. Quote: "Joseph Laycock of Hardwick, Sussex County, Will of... Wife [not named]. Children-- John, Nathan, Joseph, Sarah, Elizabeth, Henry, and William. Real and personal estate. Executors-- Sons Joseph and William. Witnesses-- Edward Pigot, Jeames Stark, Henry Crosley. Proved Oct. 8, 1760. Inventory 125 pounds, 9 shilling, & 3 pence. Inventory by Henry Crosley and Ephraim Darby, 23 September 1760."

2)

Sussex County, New Jersey Wills & Administrations, Libra (Book) 12, page 232; Year 1765.

3)

URL: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~clovis/DNA-Program.htm; Table of Contents: Genetic Genealogy Analysis of Descendants of Aaron Stark [1608-1685]; by Clovis LaFleur, June 7, 2009.

4)

"James Stark of Stafford County, Virginia And His Descendants," Volume 1, page 1271. Compiled by Mary Kathryn Harris & Mary Iva Jean Jorgensen. Copyright 1985, Privately Printed Fort Worth.

5)

Image Source: Year: 1850; Census Place: Jackson, Spencer County, Indiana; Roll: M432_172; Page: 17; Image: 419. (Ancestry.com image database). Enumerated August 28, 1850. Reported age was 79 years.

6)

Shelby Co, Kentucky Bond for marriage; "We do hereby sartify ... consent to go in the bonds of marage with our Daughter margat ... this 21th day of December 1794. Signed James Stark, Hannah Stark..."

 

 

 

Page 38

 

Ann or Hannah Stark could have been a sister of Abner Howell. While the Stark and Howell families had a close association over about 30 years — the data is insufficient to state with confidence James married Ann Howell or anyone with the surname Howell. While some researchers report the surname of the wife of James was Howell; further research may be required to verify. Thus far, the available data has not suggested other possible surnames for the spouse of James Stark.

The 1768 James Hamilton Cameron Parish tithable list, compiled within the jurisdiction of Loudoun County, Virginia reveals William "Laycock", James Stark, William Stark, and Joseph Stark were living very close to each other. On the Hamilton list of tithables for 1769 was William Laycock and four lines below were Daniel Howell, Henry Harris, James Starke, and William Schooley. On the tithable list of Craven Payton were Hugh Howell, Andrew Howell, John Howell, Abner Howell, David Howell, Thomas Howell, Henry Oxley, Jr., James McLinsay, John Howell, John Howell, Sr., and Charles Howell.[4] The last record found recording James Stark as a resident of Loudoun County was in the County Court minutes dated September 13, 1769; reported as James Stark - vs - Elias John for a note of hand. The defendant did not appear and the plaintiff was awarded 3 pounds. James next appears in the record as having been paid at Fort Pitt for his participation in Dunmore’s War.

While the question of the residence of James Stark brothers 1770 and 1775 cannot be answered with certainty, speculation suggests he may have been squatting on Pennsylvania land warrants as early as 1771 or living in the region of Pigeon Creek, Fallowfield Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania with his brother-in-law, William Wood (married to Sarah Stark, the sister of James). For religious reasons, they may have left Loudoun County to join with their Sussex County, New Jersey Baptist neighbors, escaping the tithable system of Virginia.

 

Dunmore’s War

Relatives of Mingo Chief Logan were murdered at Baker's cabin on April 30, 1774 — this date marking the beginning of Dunmore’s War; a six month conflict between the western Pennsylvania settlers and Native American tribes. James Stark, Daniel Stark, Christopher Stark, and William Wood participated in Dunmore's War for there is documented evidence they were paid at Fort Pitt in October of 1775 for militia service in the companies of Captain Joseph Mitchell and Lieutenant David Enoch.[2]

At the beginning of hostilities, James may have been living near Pigeon Creek, at that time within Springhill Township created by Pennsylvania in March of 1771. William Wood, a brother-in-law of James, was reported as owning land on a tributary of Pigeon Creek in a 1780 Virginia Survey. This property was located about five miles west of the Monongahela River and half-way between Redstone and Pittsburgh.[3]

Records from Dunmore's War report Daniel Stark and Christopher Stark served in Colonel William Crawford's Frederick County, Virginia Regiment under Captain Joseph Mitchell, their company commander. The length of service of Captain Mitchell was 159 days.[2] Hostilities ended before the end of October 1774; and Mitchell's pay period probably ended about November 1, 1774, implying his pay period began about May 20, 1774. Therefore, Daniel and Christopher probably served in Colonel William Crawford's Regiment between May 20, 1774 and November 1, 1774. However, the records do not report James serving as a participant in this War during this time interval. What might he have been doing?

Historical accounts reveal the settlers living in the region between the Monongahela and Ohio Rivers had mostly evacuated their families by late May of 1774; to the relative safety of the east side of the Monongahela River. James may have stayed with the families while Daniel and Christopher returned to join the nearby militia Colonel William Crawford was calling to arms.

The records of payment for Dunmore's War reveal John Connolly was in Command of the West Augusta County, Virginia Battalion. After Lord Dunmore's return to Redstone November 17 and from there to Williamsburg, Connolly resumed command of the forces remaining in the District of West Augusta. Although a treaty had been signed and honored by the Shawnee, there were other Indian tribes that did not feel compelled to honor the treaty agreement made in October. Therefore, as a safety precaution, one would have to presume companies of men would have been garrisoned at forts on the Ohio River as a first line of defense in the event these tribes chose to renew their hostilities.

Within Connolly's command was Lieutenant David Enoch. The length of service of Lieutenant Enoch was 132 days.[2] Serving in Enoch's Company was Sergeant Zophar Ball, a Sergeant who had served in Joseph Mitchell's Company. From the military records, there were a number of men who appeared on the rosters of both Joseph Mitchell’s company and David Enoch’s company, including Daniel and Christopher Stark. As reported above, James Stark was not on the roster of Mitchell’s company; but was later reported on the roster of Enoch’s company. The treaty having been signed in October, James probably returned the families to the region evacuated in April and then joined Enoch’s company.

__________

1)

Loudoun County, Virginia, 1765 Tithables and Voter List; Jean Jorgenson, 1983. [This is hand typed and bound, non-published work. Contributed by Pauline Stark Moore.]

2)

Warren Skidmore with Donna Kaminsky, Lord Dunmore's Little War of 1774 His Captains and Their Men Who Opened Up Kentucky & the West to American Settlement, published by Heritage Books, Inc., Westminster, Maryland, 2002;. Pages 42, 53-54, 66-67.

3)

Boyd Crumrine, Editor, History of Washington County, Pennsylvania with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent men, Philadelphia L.H. Everts and Co., 1882. Page 192 & 193, Illustration. Shows location and boundary of the property of William Wood.

 

 

 

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The participation of James and his brothers in Dunmore's War suggests they were living between the Monongahela and Ohio Rivers at the time of the massacre of Chief Logan's relatives at Baker's Cabin. A even more compelling reason for believing they lived in the region was their service under Lieutenant David Enoch. At the time of Dunmore’s War, the Enoch family was living on Ten Mile Creek — located southeast of present day Washington, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Historical accounts report they constructed a blockhouse only two miles from the Monongahela River on that same creek. David Enoch's men probably lived near the blockhouse, providing protection in that region against Indian attacks; many of these men having completed an earlier period of service in Joseph Mitchell's Company. If this were true, then the men in Enoch's command probably lived near the blockhouse — or were garrisoned at several forts built along the Ohio River.

What is known for certain is James Stark, Daniel Stark, Christopher Stark, and William Wood were paid at Fort Pitt for their service in Dunmore's War, suggesting they were living near present day Pittsburgh by October of 1775 — further more, their participation in Dunmore's War could certainly imply they were living over the mountains near Fort Pitt before April 30, 1774.

 

The Revolutionary War Years

Early in May of 1775, communication arrived form the east reporting that on April 19th a detachment of Royal troops under the command of General Gage at Boston, Massachusetts, had fired on provincial troops at Lexington. These were the opening shots of the Revolution. The boundary dispute between Virginia and Pennsylvania that had continued after Dunmore’s War, was temporarily set aside, but there were still hostile feelings on both sides of the argument.

Inhabitants living west of Laurel Hill and claiming allegiance to Augusta County met at Pittsburgh. The term "west of Laurel Hill" suggests the West District of Augusta claimed jurisdiction over the region on both sides of the Monongahela River as far east as Laurel Hill. Several familiar names chosen as members of a committee for the District of Augusta were William Crawford, Henry Enoch, and James Ennis, whom we will learn later was a neighbor of William Wood near Pigeon Creek. The appointed committee had the:

"... full power to meet at such times as they shall judge necessary, and in case of any emergency to call the committee of this district together, and shall be vested with the same power and authority as the other standing committee and committees of correspondence are in the other counties within this colony."

Colony in this instance meant Virginia, not Pennsylvania.

However, the Pennsylvania Archives report James Stark, Daniel Stark, Christopher Stark, and Joseph Stark served in the "Rangers of the Frontier," being paid for active service between 1777 and 1783. They served with Captain Abner Howell, Francis Vineyard, John Vineyard, and Thomas Vineyard.[1]

Virginia had approved William Wood’s claim to his property June 8, 1780, before the Pennsylvania and Virginia boundary dispute had been settled. Pennsylvania claims of land ownership in Washington County came from warrants issued by Pennsylvania from 1769 thru 1776. Conflicting with these claims were certificates issued by the Virginia authorities in 1779 and 1780 to persons, who, thinking they were citizens of Virginia, had made bona fide settlements (a corn crop or one year's residence) before January 1, 1778. William Wood's property was one of many surveys conducted by Yohogania County, Virginia related to these certificates of ownership.[2] A later deed (dated September 27, 1785) reports James owned property that shared a border with William Wood on Sugar Camp Run. However, as we will learn, James had abandoned this property and was living within the bounds of present day Kentucky by September of 1785.

For a brief period after 1783, James Stark was listed as a private in the Washington County, PA Militia Battalion of Captain Abner Howell.[3] James service in the Commands of Abner Howell suggests he may have been Abner’s brother-in-law; but there is no documented evidence to verify. At the conclusion of the War, James Stark appears on the Washington Co., PA 1783 tax list; reporting he owned 140 acres in Fallowfield Township.[4] Sometime just before, or in the year 1785, James Stark removed from Pennsylvania — reported that year on the tithable list of James Rogers in Nelson County, Virginia (later Kentucky).

__________

1)

Pennsylvania Archives, 3rd Series, Volume 23. Page 214. Comment: Has a list of "Rangers of the Frontier" who were paid for active service between the years 1777 to 1783. On page 217 will be found James Stark, Captain Abner Howell, and James Stark (appearing twice on this page).

2)

History of Washington County, Pennsylvania: with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent men. Edited by Boyd Crumrine. Illustrated. Philadelphia: L.H. Everts and Co., 1882. Page 192 & 193, Illustration.

3)

Pennsylvania Archives 6th Series, Vol. 2:244

4)

Katherine K. Zinsser and Raymond M. Bell, The 1783 Tax Lists and the 1790 Federal Census for Washington County, Pennsylvania, Bowie, Md, Heritage Books, 1988; p. 16&48.

 

 

 

Page 40

 

Kentucky

Many families living in Washington County, Pennsylvania — loyal to Virginia during the boundary dispute with Pennsylvania — migrated to the tributaries of the Salt River (located south of present day Louisville, Kentucky). There could have been many motivations for this migration. James probably moved because his Virginia Certificate, issued under the authority of Virginia from 1779 to 1782, were probably not recognized when the region came under the jurisdiction of the Washington County, Pennsylvania courts and land office (which opened July 1, 1784).

James Rogers moved to the Nelson County region southeast of present day Bardstown about 1780; constructing a collection of cabins within a Picket wall; this small community known at the time as Rogers Station. Settlers and their families, upon first arriving, took up residence at the station. With their families protected at the station, the men were then able to locate, survey, and build on their properties, this process often requiring several years.[1]

The present State of Kentucky was under the jurisdiction Virginia before joining the Union in 1792. In an effort to better organize the region, Virginia created Nelson County which officially began operation January 1, 1785. Reported on the James Rogers 1785 Nelson County tithable list was James Stark and his son William Stark; being about 15 years of age. Also reported were 5 males and 3 females in the family group, the males being under the age of 15. Four of the males were probably sons named Daniel, Jonathan J., Aaron, and Elijah. The females were probably the wife of James, Hannah; and daughters named Margaret and Anne. James and his family had recently arrived in the region, temporarily locating at Roger's Station for protection from Indian attacks.

James had moved from Rogers Station by the time the tithable list was compiled in 1786 for he and his son William were on the list of David Cox in 1786. David Cox's district in 1786 was described as: "from where the County road crossed Salt River on the north side of said road including all the waters of Coxs Creek." James was living somewhere north of the County Road, east of or on Cox's Creek and south of the Salt River. He and his brothers — John and Joseph — were all reported living next to each other on this list and living with or near them was another brother, Christopher Stark. They may have all been living on the same property where John and Joseph had been recorded in 1785. Being a large family group probably provided them mutual protection against Indian attacks.

In July of 1786, James was the Plaintive in a case against Phillie Nicolas who did appear at Court when called. In December, James served on a jury in a case of Adam Shepard was the plaintive against Thomas Cunningham, the defendant. In the same month, James again served on a jury with his brother Joseph. He was reported on the tithable list of David Cox in 1787; Joshua Hobbs in 1788 thru 1791.

February 11, 1792, a bond of marriage was issued to Jonathan J. Stark, a son of James which stated:

Bond for Jonathan Stark m. Rachel Stark, dau of Danl. Stark. Surety, Jonathan Stark. Signed by Jonathan X Stark his mark, Jonathan Stark. Wit: Peter Grayson. Consent for Jonathan signed by his father, James Stark, and for Rachel by her father, Daniel Stark. Witness to both: Jonathan Stark by signature.

Jonathan J. Stark was under the age of 21 and required the consent of his parents to marry his cousin, Rachel Stark, daughter of James’ brother, Daniel Stark. Daniel’s son, Jonathan D. Stark, was a witness and over twenty-one years of age. Note that Jonathan J. could not write his name, while Jonathan D. did sign his name. In later Chapters, this will be one way of distinguishing these young men from each other. James was reported on the tax list of Gabriel Cox in 1792 and 1793. From 1794 until his death in late 1820, James lived in Shelby County, Kentucky near are on Elks Creek.

 

The Final Years of James Stark

James appeared on the tax rolls of Shelby County from 1794 through 1815. In 1794, we find the following bonds of marriage records in Shelby County:

• Aug. 30; Shelby Co, Kentucky Bond for marriage: We Jacob Stark & Jonathan Stark are bound unto his Excellency Isaac Shelby Esq. Governor of … Kentucky … whereas a marriage is shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bounded Jacob Starke and Margaret Stark, Daughter of James Stark. Signed: Jacob Stark, Jonathan Stark Test: Jas. Craig?

• We do hereby sartify that we give unto Jacob Stark our free and volentery consent to go in the bonds of marage with our Daughter margat given under our hand this 21st day of December 1794. Signed James Stark, Hannah Stark; Test: Jonathan Stark, Aaron Stark.

• 1794 Dec 22 Shelby Co, Kentucky Bond for marriage: We Jacob Stark & Jonathan Stark are bound unto his Excellency Isaac Shelby Esq. Governor of … Kentucky … whereas a marriage is shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bounded Jacob Starke and Margaret Stark Daughter of James Stark. Signed Jacob Stark, Jonathan Stark Test: Jas. Craig?

This was the marriage of James’ oldest daughter to her cousin, Jacob Stark, son of James’ brother, Daniel Stark. Jonathan was Jonathan D. Stark, son of Daniel. Aaron Stark was a son of James Stark and his wife, Hannah. Earlier, we mentioned Hannah may have been Anna Howell, daughter of Hugh and Margaret Howell. James and Hannah named their first daughter Margaret and the recorder of this record may have mistakenly entered Hannah instead of Anna. However, without supporting records, this can only be considered as the Author’s speculation.

__________

1)

David Hall article entitled Rogers Station Grew from Early Land Deal. Published in The Kentucky Standard, April 17, 1985.

 

 

 

Page 41

 

This has been the only record reporting the given name of the first wife of James. Later probate records will reveal James had a Wife named Nancy, clearly not the Hannah of this record, indicating Hannah had died after December of 1794. Probably sometime after this record, and before his death in 1820 or early 1821, James may have married a second wife with the given name Nancy, her surname not known; or Nancy was another version of the given names Ann and Hannah.

The Shelby County Marriage bonds document a bond taken by John Gonterman and James Stark reporting the impending marriage of Anne Stark to the same John Gonterman.

John Gonterman & James Stark are held & firmly bound unto his Excellency James Gerrard Esqr. Governor of the Commonwealth under the penal Sum of L50 which payment will & truly to be made We bind ourselves our heirs &c truly to be made We bind ourselves our heirs &c in witness Whereof we have here unto Set our hands & Seals this 4th day of Decr 1800. With Condition that there shall be no lawful cause to obstruct the marriage between the above bound John Gonterman & Anne Stark. Signed by John Gonterman, James X Stark his mark. Teste: Jno? Crecy?

The surname Gonterman is the same as the surname Countryman often found in the Kentucky records of this period. In November of 1801, James, with several ofter men, was ordered to appraise the estate of Isaac Pennington, deceased.

James next appears in the 1810 Shelby County, Census; living next door to his son-in-law, John Gonterman.

Head of the House: James Stark

Males: [10 & less than 16 = 1] [16 & less than 26=1] [45 & Older = 1]

Females: [10 & less than 16=1] [45 & Older =1]

[Source: Year: 1810; Census Place: Shelby, Kentucky; Roll: 8; Page: 202; Image: 192.00.]

The youngest male in the home of James was probably Adin Stark, born February 16, 1795. The female 45 & older must have been the wife of James, her given name in previous records recorded as Hannah. A later record dated in May of 1821 reported her given name as Nancy. A still later record in 1831 reported she was Anna Stark.[1]

James was reported living in the 1820 Shelby Census[2] and in that year sold 115 acres to Thomas Forman and 2 acres to William Jewell October 28, 1820. Both of these properties were located on Elks Creek in Shelby County. When the Shelby County Court met in May of 1821, The following matter was on their court agenda

A writing purporting to be the relinquishment of Nancy Stark of the right to administer on the estate of her husband James Stark decd was this day produced in Court & ordered to be filed. Therefore on motion of Frederick Dayhoff he having taken the oath as required by law & entered into bond with Charles Baiad? His Security in the penalty $5000 Conditioned as the law Directs letters of Administration granted him on said Estate in due form of Law.

Sometime before May of 1821 and after October 28, 1820, James Stark died. In January of 1824, Spencer County, Kentucky was created from parts of Shelby, Bullitt, and Nelson Counties. The region along Elks Creek where James had lived was within the jurisdiction of Spencer County after it’s creation. The following Spencer County deed provides the names of children of James and Hannah:

This indenture made this fifth day of January 1826 between William Stark, Jonathan Stark, Jacob Stark, Aaron Stark, Daniel Stark, Elijah Stark, Adin Stark, John Gonterman and John Kester the legatees of James Stark decd of Spencer Co., to Joseph Bennett, for $768.95, tract of land lying on Elk Creek a branch of Salt River containing 84 ½ acres, corner to Jewels Mill tract. Wit: Henry Randal, Thomas Frasure, Aaron Stark Elijah Stark, Stephen Stark. Signed in this order: Wm. Stark, Jonathan J his mark Stark, Jacob Stark, Daniel Stark, Elijah Stark, Adin Stark, John Gonterman, John Kester, Aaron Stark. Proved 16 May 1826, recorded 30 May 1827 Spencer Co, Kentucky Deeds B:35

Let us now turn to the Children of James.

__________

1)

Spencer County, Kentucky order Books; Book B, P. 138. 11 Jul. 1831. Quote: Motion of John Gonterman with John Kester his security, certificate granted John Gonterman for administration of the estate of Anna Stark.

2)

Source Information: Ancestry.com. 1820 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.  Source Citation: 1820 U S Census: Shelby County, Kentucky, Page: 131; NARA Roll: M33_24; Image: 143. Enumerated August 7, 1820. Head of the Family: James Starke / Males: [45 & Over = 1] / Females: 45 & Over = 1] / Male Slaves: [Under 14 = 1] / Female slaves: [26 thru 44 = 1].

 

 

Page 42

 

Descendant Register, Generation No. 1

 

Author's Comment: Click on this phrase to go to a searchable online genealogical database entitled, "Descendants of Aaron Stark [1608-1685]. In the surname search window, enter first the surname, then comma, then given name. Clicking on "List" will take you to a list of persons in the database with that surname and given name. Look down the list for birth and death dates. When they match the person on this web site, click on the name in the list. This will take you to the data page of the person of interest. You can then navigate from that page to the ancestors or descendants of that individual.

 

1.

James Stark (Jonathan Stark [The Elder]4, William Stark (Junior)3, William Stark (Senior)2, Aaron Stark [1608-1685]1) was born before 1739 in Probably Woodbridge, New Jersey, and died before MAY 1821 in Shelby, Kentucky, USA. He married Hannah Unknown before MAR 1770 in Loudoun County, Virginia. She was born before 1755 in Virginia, and died after DEC 1794. He married Nancy Unknown between 1794 AND 1821 in Kentucky.

 

 

Children of James Stark and Hannah Unknown are:

+

2

  i.

Elijah Stark was born 1784 in Washington, Pennsylvania, USA, and died 10 SEP 1847 in Clark, Illinois, USA.

 

3

  ii.

Aaron Stark was born before 1776 in Probably Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, and died 1837 in Bullitt County, Kentucky. He married Anne Gonterman 20 FEB 1800 in Nelson County, Kentucky.

+

4

  iii.

Daniel Stark was born about 1771 in Probably Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, and died 18 MAR 1840 in Bullitt County, Kentucky.

 

5

  iv.

Anne Stark was born 1780 in Yohogania County, Virginia (later Washington County, PA). She married John Gonterman 11 DEC 1800 in Shelby, Kentucky, USA.

+

6

  v.

William Stark was born 23 NOV 1770 in Loudoun County, Virginia, and died 23 DEC 1853 in Spencer County, Indiana.

 

7

  vi.

Mary "Polly" Stark was born 1790 in Nelson County, Virginia (later Kentucky). She married John Kester 30 OCT 1810 in Shelby, Kentucky, USA.

 

8

  vii.

Adin Stark was born 16 FEB 1795 in Shelby, Kentucky, USA, and died 1884 in Clark, Illinois, USA. He married Eleanor Stillwell 27 JAN 1818 in Shelby, Kentucky, USA.

+

9

  viii.

Margaret Stark was born after 1774 in Probably Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, and died about 1808 in Nelson County, Kentucky.

+

10

  ix.

Jonathan J. Stark was born about 1773 in Probably Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, and died after 1850 in Clay, Indiana, USA.

 

Descendant Register, Generation No. 2

 

2.

Elijah Stark (James Stark5, Jonathan Stark [The Elder]4, William Stark (Junior)3, William Stark (Senior)2, Aaron Stark [1608-1685]1) was born 1784 in Washington, Pennsylvania, USA, and died 10 SEP 1847 in Clark, Illinois, USA. He was buried in Clark, Illinois, USA. He married Gertrude Blackburn 07 JAN 1811 in Shelby, Kentucky, USA. She was born about 1790 in Maryland, and died 19 NOV 1857 in Clark, Illinois, USA. She was buried in Westfield Township, Clark County, Illinois.

 

 

Children of Elijah Stark and Gertrude Blackburn are:

+

11

  i.

Adin D. Stark was born 1812 in Kentucky, and died 16 FEB 1884 in Kansas Township, Edgar County, Illinois.

 

12

  ii.

John W. Stark was born 1822 in Kentucky, and died 26 SEP 1852 in Clark, Illinois, USA.

 

13

  iii.

Rebecca A. Stark was born 1825, and died 03 JAN 1842 in Clark, Illinois, USA.

 

4.

Daniel Stark (James Stark5, Jonathan Stark [The Elder]4, William Stark (Junior)3, William Stark (Senior)2, Aaron Stark [1608-1685]1) was born about 1771 in Probably Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, and died 18 MAR 1840 in Bullitt County, Kentucky. He was buried in Old Mount Moriah Cemetery, Old Boston, Nelson County, Kentucky. He married Margaret Gunterman 30 DEC 1803 in Bullitt County, Kentucky. She was born 18 OCT 1778 in Sussex County, New Jersey, and died 17 SEP 1862 in Bullitt County, Kentucky. She was buried in Old Mount Moriah Cemetery, Old Boston, Nelson County, Kentucky. Click on Thumbnail photos below to see enlarged photograph. Use Back button to return to this text.

 

 

 

danielstark17711840ts.jpg (100637 bytes)

 

margaretgonterman17781862ts.jpg (109650 bytes)

Daniel Stark [1771-1840]

Photo & comment by Chris Breen - 11/24/2008

This stone has broken diagonally, and repaired with a metal brace. The broken top half of the stone is very dark. The epitaph in the lower half of the stone is very difficult to read (half is on the top piece).

Margaret (Gunterman) Stark [1778-1862]

Photo & comment by Chris Breen - 11/24/2008

The stone has been broken in half right along the date of death. It has been repaired, but the last number in the year of death has broken off. Close inspection makes me think it is a 2, 3, or 8. I used 2 (1862) from other research data. 

 

Children of Daniel Stark and Margaret Gunterman are:

+

14

  i.

Aaron Stark [1804 - 1855] was born DEC 1804 in Bullitt County, Kentucky, and died 27 MAR 1855 in Bullitt County, Kentucky.

+

15

  ii.

William Stark was born 20 DEC 1809 in Railroad Junction, Bullitt, Kentucky, and died 11 JUL 1859 in Nelson County, Kentucky.

 

16

  iii.

Amon Stark was born 28 FEB 1811 in Kentucky, Bullitt, Kentucky, and died 07 JUL 1858 in Kentucky, Kentucky. He married Nancy Duvall 19 NOV 1835 in Nelson, Kentucky. She was born about 1815.

+

18

  v.

Mary Stark was born 12 OCT 1814 in Bullitt, Kentucky, and died 22 NOV 1881 in ,Nelson, Kentucky.

 

19

  vi.

Elizabeth Stark was born about 1808 in Bullitt, Kentucky, and died before 1854 in Kentucky.

 

20

  vii.

Anna Stark was born about 1806 in Bullitt, Kentucky, and died about 1845 in Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

 

21

  viii.

Emily Stark was born about 1819 in Bullitt, Kentucky.

 

22

  ix.

Sophia Stark was born 20 OCT 1826 in Bullitt, Kentucky, and died 27 NOV 1893 in ,,Kentucky.

+

23

  x.

Perry Stark was born 04 JAN 1824 in Bullitt, Kentucky, and died 28 JUL 1875 in ,Nelson, Kentucky.

 

24

  xi.

John Stark was born about 1820 in Bullitt, Kentucky.

 

 

 

Page 43

 

6.

William Stark (James Stark5, Jonathan Stark [The Elder]4, William Stark (Junior)3, William Stark (Senior)2, Aaron Stark [1608-1685]1) was born 23 NOV 1770 in Loudoun County, Virginia, and died 23 DEC 1853 in Spencer County, Indiana. He married Mary Gonterman 02 MAY 1792 in Nelson County, Kentucky. She was born 02 MAY 1771 in Newton, Sussex County, New Jersey, and died 19 MAR 1865 in Spencer County, Indiana.

 

 

Children of William Stark and Mary Gonterman are:

+

25

  i.

James Stark was born 22 APR 1793 in Kentucky, and died 13 OCT 1855 in Bullitt County, Kentucky.

 

26

  ii.

John Stark was born about 1800 in Bullitt County, Kentucky.

 

9.

Margaret Stark (James Stark5, Jonathan Stark [The Elder]4, William Stark (Junior)3, William Stark (Senior)2, Aaron Stark [1608-1685]1) was born after 1774 in Probably Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, and died about 1808 in Nelson County, Kentucky. She married Jacob Stark 22 DEC 1794 in Shelby, Kentucky, USA, son of Daniel Stark and Elizabeth Unknown. He was born about 1771 in Loudoun County, Virginia, and died 28 DEC 1828 in Washington County, Indiana.

 

 

Children of Margaret Stark and Jacob Stark are:

+

27

  i.

Elizabeth Stark was born about 1803 in Nelson County, Kentucky, and died 1840 in Grandview, Edgar County, Illinois.

+

28

  ii.

William Stark was born 09 NOV 1795 in Shelby, Kentucky, USA, and died 07 APR 1874 in Mt. Airy, Randolph County, Missouri.

+

29

  iii.

Aaron Stark was born about 1808 in Kentucky.

+

30

  iv.

Caleb Stark was born 27 JUN 1818 in Washington County, Indiana, and died after 1880.

+

31

  v.

Abner Stark was born 1792 in Kentucky, and died 18 JUN 1843 in Clark, Indiana, USA.

+

32

  vi.

Mahlon Stark was born about 1798 in Kentucky, and died 1859 in Mercer County, Missouri.

+

33

  vii.

Mary "Polly" Stark was born about 1799 in Kentucky, and died after 1860 in Gentry County, Missouri.

 

34

  viii.

Anna Stark was born 25 JAN 1800 in Nelson, Kentucky, and died 03 APR 1887 in Clark, Indiana, USA. She married Thomas Frazier 20 MAR 1821 in Shelby, Kentucky, USA. He was born 01 FEB 1796 in Virginia, and died 10 APR 1897 in Clark, Illinois, USA.

 

35

  ix.

Margaret Stark was born about 1802 in Nelson, Kentucky. She married Nathaniel Noland 22 OCT 1823 in Washington County, Indiana. He was born about 1802.

 

10.

Jonathan J. Stark (James Stark5, Jonathan Stark [The Elder]4, William Stark (Junior)3, William Stark (Senior)2, Aaron Stark [1608-1685]1) was born about 1773 in Probably Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, and died after 1850 in Clay, Indiana, USA. He married Rachel Stark 11 FEB 1792 in Nelson County, Kentucky, daughter of Daniel Stark and Elizabeth Unknown. She was born about 1772 in Loudoun County, Virginia, and died about 1820. He married Mary "Polly" Unknown before 1817. She was born about 1788 in Kentucky, and died after 1860.

 

 

Children of Jonathan J. Stark and Rachel Stark are:

+

36

  i.

Moses Stark was born 09 JAN 1793 in Nelson County, Kentucky, and died 24 OCT 1860 in Texas County, Missouri.

+

37

  ii.

Enoch Stark was born 24 JAN 1794 in Kentucky.

Children of Jonathan J. Stark and Mary "Polly" Unknown are:

+

38

  i.

Joshua Carman Stark Senior was born 1820 in Scott, Indiana, USA, and died after 1880 in Probably Illinois.

+

39

  ii.

Nancy Stark was born about 1817 in Indiana, USA, and died 07 NOV 1888 in Louisville, Clay County, Illinois.

+

40

  iii.

Jonathan Merrill Stark was born 1823 in Scott, Indiana, USA.

 

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Copyright

Other than that work created by other acknowledged contributors or sources, the articles presented were authored and edited by Clovis LaFleur and the genealogical data presented in this publication was derived and compiled by  Pauline Stark Moore; Copyright © 2003. All rights are reserved. The use of any material on these pages by others will be discouraged if the named contributors, sources, or Clovis LaFleur & Pauline Stark Moore have not been acknowledged.

Disclaimer

This publication and the data presented is the work of Clovis LaFleur & Pauline Stark Moore. However, some of the content presented has been derived from the research and publicly available information of others and may not have been verified. You are responsible for the validation of all data and sources reported and should not presume the material presented is correct or complete.

 

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