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Volume 3: The Newton County, Texas Stark Families

Part 5: The John Taylor Lewis & Sarah Mariah (Stark) Lewis Family

Copyright © July 2004, Clovis La Fleur

 

Page 74

 

Chapter 11

Biographies of Sarah Mariah (Stark) Lewis & John Taylor Lewis

 

Sarah Mariah Stark & John Taylor Lewis

A daughter, Sarah Mariah Stark, was born to Daniel R. Stark and Nancy Hawley in 1812 in Genesee County, New York.[1] She was their second born child and they were probably married before December of 1808. Her father purchased lots #13 & #14 in section zero of township #11, range #1 from the Holland Land Company on March 28, 1809. This property was located west of the township of Caledonia in Genesee County in an area that would later be divided into parts of Niagara County, Erie County, and Cattaraugus County. The original Genesee County was located in western New York west of the Genesee River.

Until the age of 3 or 4, Sarah lived with her family in Genesee County, New York. They were only a few miles from Niagara Falls and Lake Erie and her grandparents, Asahel and Sarah Stark, lived nearby in Caledonia township and later in Penfield, Ontario County, New York. Probably living with the family was her grandfather, Samuel Hawley, a veteran of the Revolutionary War who had lived in Massachusetts before the war. This western New York region was newly settled when Sarah was born and must have still been quite primitive and wild. Early in the year 1816, the family moved to West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, a trip of some 750 miles which was most likely made by boat. Imagine the logistics of transporting a family and household goods over such a vast distance around 1816. From Genesee County, one would move over land to the Allegheny River, located just south of the county on the New York and Pennsylvania border. The Allegheny then flows from north to south through western Pennsylvania and comes together with the Monongahela River near Pittsburgh to form the Ohio River, which then flows into the Mississippi and then south down the Mississippi to Louisiana.

The family settled on the west bank of the Mississippi River in a community called Port Allen, located directly across from the growing community of Baton Rouge. Property was purchased by Daniel R. Stark in 1817 which was described as "four acres front to the river Mississippi."[2] Sarah Mariah Stark’s Uncles named William, Samuel, and John R. were already living in the region when the family arrived and making the trip to Louisiana from New York was her grandfather, Samuel Hawley. The Mississippi River from the Gulf of Mexico to Baton Rouge by 1816 was a fairly well settled region, for Louisiana had been admitted as a State six years earlier and there was considerable commerce up and down the Mississippi River in the early part of the 19th century.

Tragedy struck the family within fours years of their arrival when Daniel R. Stark died suddenly on June 20th 1820. With assistance from her father, Samuel Hawley, and brother-in-law, William Stark, Sarah’s mother handled the probate proceedings which provided the names of the children of Daniel R. Stark. This is the first document to be found which shows the relationship of Sarah Mariah Stark and her siblings to Daniel R. Stark and Nancy Hawley which states "Know all men by these presents that where as Nancy Holly Stark has presented a petition to this court praying for tutorship in order to administer on the property in community between [?her?] and her children and whereas this Nancy Stark has come before this court and has fulfilled all the formalities in such case required by law, it.... [Not legible] ....children named William, Mariah, Prudence, Esahl, and Amanda, and fully authorized to act as such pertaining to [?the?] laws. Given by the hand and seal this [??] of July 1820. Signed: Ph. Favrot."[3]

On September 5, 1820, William Stark and his wife, Victoria Betencourt, provided a donation of $2,200 to the children of Nancy Hawley, widow of Daniel R. Stark, with the benefactors of this donation being named William, Muriah, Prudence, Esahl, and Amanda.[4] Clearly, this document reveals the names of the children of Daniel and Nancy and reveals the children received a substantial amount of money from their Uncle William Stark.

Nancy continued to live in Louisiana and is believed to have married a man named McGowan, although a record of this marriage has not been found but is suggested in her father’s Revolutionary Pension Application presented in court in 1826.[5] On May 31, 1826, Samuel Hawley, living in Floyd County, Indiana declared, "he is 68 years old ....That my occupation is that of a farmer, that I am weak, feeble and unable to labor, that I have one daughter only, her name is Nancy McGowan, aged 37 years, that she has five children, William, fifteen years of age, Maria, 13 years of age, Prudence, 10 years of age, Asahel, 8 years of age, and Matilda, 5 years of age - my daughter, her two oldest children, are able to support themselves by their labor the three others, Prudence, Asahel, and Matilda are not - all of which compose my family and looks to me for a support." From this, if this Nancy McGowan is the same Nancy Hawley Stark in Louisiana, we find she was married to someone named McGowan before this petition was made and note the declaration names the grandchildren of Samuel, which are very similar to the names in the previous two documents. Nancy Hawley probably moved to Indiana to live with her father, presumably after Mr. McGowan died or she obtained a divorce and to be near the Stark family, living nearby in Washington County, Indiana. This document records Sarah’s age as 13 on May 31, 1826 which would imply she was born in 1812 or 1813 depending on the month of her birth.

________

1)

"Western New York Land Transactions, 1804 - 1824"; Extracted from the Archives of the Holland Land Company, by Karen E. Livsey, page 45. Sarah's father, Daniel R. Stark, purchased land in Genesee County March 28, 1809.

2)

West Baton Rouge Parish Probate Packet #85 of Daniel R. Stark, deceased on the 20th June 1820. See Book E, page 77 of the Parish Deed Records for when the property was purchased in 1817.

3)

West Baton Rouge Parish Probate Packet #85 of Daniel R. Stark.

4)

Transcription of West Baton Rouge Parish Court Document; William Stark & His Spouse give $2,200 to the Children of his Brother, Daniel R. Stark; Dated September 5, 1820; "Know all men by these presents that I, Nancy Hawley, widow of the late Daniel R. Stark, acting as mother and...[Not Legible]... [probably tutor meaning guardian] of the children of the said Daniel R. Stark, named William, Prudence, Muriah, Esahl, and Amanda, do hereby accept in the name of these children, the donation which has been made to them by William Stark and Victoria Betencourt, his wife, which donation is the sum of two thousand and two hundred dollars to be paid by the said Wm Stark and Victoria Betencourt in the month of March, eighteen hundred and twenty-two to me and any other person legally authorized to act in the name of ...[Not Legible]... children, their executors administrators. Signed: Nancy Stark." [Transcribed by Clovis LaFleur, December 2002 from copy of original in file]

5)

Samuel Hawley Service: Revolutionary War pension of a Samuel Hawley, S34916, National Archives Trust Fund. Record of this pension granted in Indiana July 27,1826. States: "Samuel Hawley of Floyd Co. in the State of Indiana…."

 

 

 

Page 75

 

Sarah Mariah lived for some period of time in Floyd County, Indiana with her mother and grandfather, Samuel Hawley, and probably had contact with her grandmother, Sarah Stark, and her Stark Uncles and Aunts living in nearby Washington County. However, the Washington County Stark family members began to move to Illinois starting in 1828 for Archibald Cass Stark had twin sons born in Indiana in April of 1828 and the next child, Jasper, was born in Illinois in 1830 indicating the family was on the move.

On April 22, 1828, the Mississippi Pension Agency in Natchez, Mississippi wrote a letter to James Barbon, Secretary of War, requesting "Samuel Hawley, a pensioner on the rolls of the Indiana Agency makes application as per affidavit enclosed for a transfer to my department in having removed to the state of Mississippi. The pensioner resides in a remote corner of our State and will call for his pay (which by his statement is ...[Not legible]... since 4 March 1827) in about two months [?hence?], at which time I expect to see notification of his transfer. Signed Most Respectfully, Your ...[Not legible]..."[1]

From this passage, we know a pensioner named Samuel Hawley had been living in Indiana until April of 1827. This document reveals he has moved and is now living in the jurisdiction of the Mississippi Pension Agency. If this is the same Samuel Hawley, then could his daughter and grandchildren have moved with him and where might they have been living? Possible proof of where they were living can be found in the Ouachita Parish, Louisiana Marriage Records. Sarah Mariah Stark, most likely the daughter of Nancy Hawley, married John T. Lewis on December 28, 1828. The Lewis family had moved from Orange County, Indiana to Louisiana at about the same time or earlier and records reveal Samuel S. Lewis, the father of John Taylor Lewis, served as Justice of the Peace in Ouachita Parish.[2]

In the 1830 census, John and Sarah (Stark) Lewis were living next door to William Herrin and his first spouse who had given birth to James Herrin in 1826. As will be revealed later, James Herrin married Nancy Jane Lewis who was the first daughter and child of John and Sarah Mariah. On page 191 of the 1830 Ouachita Parish Census, head of the house on line 10 was Martin B. Lewis, on line 12 was John Lewis, and on line 13 was William Herrin indicating they were neighbors.[3] After William Herrin’s first wife died, he married Prudence Jane Stark, the sister of Sarah Mariah Stark.

Samuel S. Lewis was also recorded in the 1830 Ouachita Parish Census which was enumerated on November 25, 1830.[4] It is believed Samuel may have already obtained land in Mexican Texas earlier for his certificate of character stated he came to Texas in March of 1832 but his servants had been in the province since January of 1830.[5] Mrs. Charles Martin published the following in the Kirbyville Banner in 1971: "In his (Col. Samuel S. Lewis) certificate of character, he states that he came to Texas in March 1832, but that his servants had been in the province since January 1830. This was probably to prepare fields and buildings for the arrival of the family. The Lewis Plantation was on Indian Creek between the communities of Bevilport and Peachtree, but his post office address was Zavalla in Angelina County. The other part of his grant was east of Cow Creek and south of the Biloxi community."[5]

From the above and other sources, the Lewis family most likely arrived in Texas between the 1st and 5th of March in the year 1832. The Mexican certificate of character made by Samuel Lewis stated his servants and other property had been in Texas since January of 1830 and he and his wife had two children still living at home. The certificate of character was dated in January of 1833 and signed by the local Alcalde, William McFarland.[6] Also moving to Texas at this time was Samuel’s sons, Martin Lewis and John Taylor Lewis.

During the summer of 1832, José de las Piedras, Commander of the garrison at Nacogdoches, ordered all of the settlers in the area to surrender their arms. This was just a few months after the Lewis family had located in Texas from Ouachita Parish, Louisiana. As one would expect, this order clearly threatened the security of the settlers. The order was rejected and the settlers in the region organized a militia to prevent Piedras from enforcing it. Word was sent out in all directions from Nacogdoches to the other American colonies that this order must be resisted by force of arms.[7]

Samuel Lewis and his sons, Martin Baty Lewis, and John Taylor Lewis, answered the call to arms and joined with the insurgents against Piedras. John W. Bullock was elected Commander of the force which assembled near Nacogdoches on the 31st of July. The men were divided into companies and made preparations to attack the garrison. However, Piedras was considered to be a gallant man and a gentleman who was generally liked by the residents. A committee was formed consisting of Isaac W. Burton, Philip A. Sublett and Henry W. Augustin who visited Piedras and make known to him the views and intentions of their constituents, and ask his co-operation in sustaining Santa Anna and a free Republican government, with an intimation, unmistakable in tone, that, if he did not, be must evacuate his position and retire to the interior of Mexico. To the requests of the committee, Piedras delivered a gentlemanly but emphatic "No." The answer left but one of two courses to the armed citizens.[8]

In 1898, John Henry Brown wrote this account of the battle of Nacogdoches:[8]

 

"On the night of August 1st, these earnest men, about three hundred in number, camped a little east of Nacogdoches. During the night, in anticipation of bloody work on the morrow, the families evacuated the town. On the next the forces entered the suburbs, challenging attack; but, none being made, moved into the center of the town, whereupon they were charged by about a hundred Mexican cavalry, who were repulsed with some loss. Don Encarnacion Chirino, Alcalde, fell by the fire of his own countrymen. 

The Texians took position in houses and behind fences, and a random fire was kept up till night, in which time they lost three killed and five wounded, while the Mexican loss was stated at forty-one killed and about as many wounded. During the night Piedras retreated on the road to San Antonio. Colonel James Bowie, who seems to have arrived during the night, headed a party to out travel and got in front of Piedras, while the main body pursued in the rear. By taking the lower road Bowie succeeded and appeared in Piedras' front a little west of the Angelina, in crossing which the Mexican sergeant, Marcos, was killed by Bowie's men. 

Seeing his inevitable defeat, and resolved not to abandon the cause of his chief, Piedras surrendered the command to the next in rank, Don Francisco Medina, who at once declared for Santa Anna and the Republican constitution, and submitted himself to the colonists nominally yielding himself and command as prisoners. By agreement, Bowie escorted the Mexicans to San Antonio. Asa M. Edwards conducted Piedras to Velasco, whence he returned to Mexico. Among the volunteers at Nacogdoches, besides Bullock and Bowie, were Asa M. Edwards, Haden H. Edwards, Alexander Horton, Almanzon Huston, Isaac W. Burton, Philip A. Sublett, Henry W. Augustin, M. B. Lewis, Theophilus Thomas, Isaac D. Thomas, Thomas S. McFarland, Asa Jarman, and William Y. Lacy."

________

1)

Copy in Samuel Hawley Revolutionary War Records.

2)

"The Handbook of Texas Online", article titled "Samuel S. Lewis.

3)

Census Year: 1830 State: Louisiana Parish: Ouachita Page No: 16 Reel no: M19-44 Division: Western District Sheet No: 191 Enumerated by: Haywood T. Alford on November 25th, 1830 Reference: Source Used: Blue Roses Publishing images Transcribed by Karen Mabry Rice and Proofread by Shawn Martin for USGenWeb.

4)

Ibid; Page No: 9 Reel no: M19-44 Division: Western District Sheet No: 184 Enumerated by: Haywood T. Alford on November 25th, 1830 Reference: Source Used: Blue Roses Publishing images Transcribed by Karen Mabry Rice and Proofread by Shawn Martin for USGenWeb.

5)

Martin, Mrs. Charles; "Early Settlers of Jasper County; The First To Arrive." Kirbyville Banner, Kirbyville, Texas 75956, Wednesday 17, 1971.

6)

Benthall, Lillian Light, "Colonel Samuel S. Lewis, Early Texan Founder of Orleans, Indiana", June 13, 1966.

7)

Brands, H. W., "Lone Star Nation; How a Ragged Army of Volunteers Won the Battle For Texas Independence - And Changed America." Published by Doubleday, March 2004, First Edition; Pages 179 & 180.

8)

Brown, John Henry, "History of Texas, The Confrontation at Nacogdoches, August 1832"; Published 1898

 

 

 

Page 76

 

The Lewis family settled on Indian Creek in the region which later became Jasper County. Samuel Lewis and John Taylor Lewis probably encouraged others in Ouachita Parish to move to Texas where there was an abundance of land for the taking and it is believed William Hawley Stark followed his sister, Sarah Mariah Stark and her husband, to Texas, purchasing a league of land in 1835 at about the same time his brother-in-law and neighbor, William Herrin, by then married to Prudence Jane Stark, purchased land in November of 1835. By 1835, John Taylor Lewis and Sarah Mariah Stark had a son, William McFarland Lewis, born in Texas in 1833, and a daughter, Nancy Jane Lewis, born in Louisiana in 1831.[1]

From October 1, to October 6 of 1832, the American Settlements in Texas held a convention to ask the Mexican Government to address the issues which had been the cause of the insurgencies in Nacogdoches and Anahuac. Attending were fifty-six delegates from sixteen districts. Austin was elected President of the Convention and among those attending were William McFarland, representing Ayish Bayou District and Samuel Lewis, named to the Subcommittee of Safety, Vigilance, and Correspondence for the Snow River District (later became Bevil District).[2],[3],[4]

The convention adopted a series of resolutions such as; requesting an extension of the tariff exemption in Texas for three years; modification of the Law of April 6, 1830 which would permit more general immigration from the United States; the appointment of a commissioner to issue land titles in East Texas; donation of government lands for the maintenance of primary schools to be conducted in Spanish and English; and a request from the ayuntamiento (Town Council) of Nacogdoches to prevent white encroachment on lands guaranteed to Indians in East Texas. The convention also established a plan for organizing a militia and committees of vigilance, safety, and correspondence, which could disseminate news quickly in case of an emergency. In its most controversial decision, the convention adopted a motion to request separate statehood from Coahuila which, after some debate, was adopted.[4]

Another convention was held in San Felipe on April 1, 1833, the same day Antonio López de Santa Anna became President of Mexico by popular demand. The convention included about fifty participants including Austin, representing San Felipe, Sam Houston, representing Nacogdoches, and most likely William McFarland, representing Ayish Bayou District, and although the list of names of the attendees has been lost, men like Samuel Lewis probably attended representing their regions. The resolutions adopted by this convention were much the same as the Convention of 1832. The convention petitioned again for repeal of the anti-immigration section of the Law of April 6, 1830 and in addition asked for more adequate Indian defense, judicial reform, and improvement in mail service. They sought tariff exemption as before, and passed resolutions prohibiting African slave traffic into Texas which agreed with the Mexican Constitution of 1824. The delegates proposed the Mexican Government split the Mexican State of Coahuila allowing a new Mexican State of Texas to be created. Assuming that the petition for statehood would be granted, a committee, of which Houston was chairman, prepared a constitution for submission to the Mexican Congress. Stephen Austin was chosen to present the petition to the Mexican government in Mexico City and the Convention adjourned on April 13.[5]

In early October of 1835, there was an altercation at Gonzales on the Guadalupe River. The empresario, Green Dewitt had been given a cannon by the Mexican authorities several years earlier to protect the settlement from Indians. When General Cos ordered the Texans to disarm, Colonel Ugartechea sent a small detachment of troops from San Antonio to Gonzales to retrieve the cannon. The colony refused to turn over the cannon after many Texan volunteers arrived in Gonzales. While the Texan Commander, John Moore, chosen in an election of the men who had assembled, parleyed with the Mexican commander, a banner was unfurled by the cannon with the words, "Come And Take It." Moore returned to the Texan side of the Guadalupe River and the cannon was fired, discharging metal scraps toward the Mexicans. Musket fire was exchanged and the Mexican officer retreated to San Antonio. Casualties were light on both sides, but hostilities were escalating beyond insurgency and now becoming open rebellion which would rapidly lead to revolution.

The Texans had still not had a general consultation as suggested by Austin in early September of 1835. The skirmish in Gonzales left no doubt the Texans needed to meet and get organized soon, which would not happen until November. Because of the events in Gonzales, the communities of Gonzales, San Felipe, and Nacogdoches raised companies of volunteers naming as their commanders, John Moore, Stephen Austin, and Sam Houston, respectively. Once the commanders were named, they chose Austin as the Commander of the Texan Army.

Now that the Texan Army was organized, Austin ordered a march towards San Antonio de Béxar to attempt to engage General Cos. James Bowie was in Nacogdoches when news of the Gonzales battle arrived and with some friends from Louisiana and perhaps John Taylor Lewis, Martin Baty Lewis, and other volunteers from Bevil District, caught up with Austin’s army near Cibolo Creek, about 25 miles east and north of San Antonio. In a stunning victory which became known as the Battle of Concepción, Bowie and Fannin routed four times their number, inflicting sixty casualties on the Mexican troops while having one of their owned killed. Austin arrived shortly after the battle concluded and wrote: "The overwhelming superiority of force, and the brilliancy of the victory gained over them, speaks for themselves in terms too expressive to require from me any further eulogy."[6]

________

1)

The 1835 Mexican Census Of Texas; Bevil District or Municipality

2)

"The Handbook of Texas Online", MCFARLAND, WILLIAM (1774-1840); by McXie Whitton Martin; BIBLIOGRAPHY: George L. Crocket, Two Centuries in East Texas (Dallas: Southwest, 1932; facsimile reprod., 1962). Texas House of Representatives, Biographical Directory of the Texan Conventions and Congresses, 1832-1845 (Austin: Book Exchange, 1941).

3)

Martin, Mrs. Charles, "Early Settlers of Jasper County, The First to Arrive," Kirbyville Banner, Kirbyville, Texas 75956, 1971.

4)

Ibid; "Convention of 1832"by Ralph W. Steen; BIBLIOGRAPHY: Eugene C. Barker, The Life of Stephen F. Austin (Nashville: Cokesbury Press, 1925; rpt., Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1949; New York: AMS Press, 1970). Hans Peter Nielsen Gammel, comp., Laws of Texas, 1822-1897 (10 vols., Austin: Gammel, 1898).

5)

"The Handbook of Texas Online"; "Convention of 1833"; by Ralph W. Steen. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Stephen F. Austin, "Explanation to the Public Concerning the Affairs of Texas, by Citizen Stephen F. Austin," Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association 8 (January 1905). Eugene C. Barker, The Life of Stephen F. Austin (Nashville: Cokesbury Press, 1925; rpt., Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1949; New York: AMS Press, 1970). Eugene C. Barker, ed., The Austin Papers (3 vols., Washington: GPO, 1924-28). Holland Edwards Bell, The Texas Convention of 1832 (M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1907). John Henry Brown, History of Texas from 1685 to 1892 (2 vols., St. Louis: Daniell, 1893). E. W. Winkler, "Membership of the 1833 Convention of Texas," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 45 (January 1942). Henderson K. Yoakum, History of Texas from Its First Settlement in 1685 to Its Annexation to the United States in 1846 (2 vols., New York: Redfield, 1855).

6)

Brands, H. W. text, page 274. Brands source: Austin Papers, Vol. 3, page 217

 

 

 

Page 77

 

At the conclusion of this battle, the "Siege of Béxar" began and ended after a four day attack from December 4 to December 8, 1835 resulted in the surrender of the army of General Cos. Apparently, during or after the Siege of Béxar, the Lewis men returned to their families. After Santa Anna recaptured San Antonio and the Alamo and the fate of the men defending spread through the communities, large numbers of settlers left their homes behind and began to move towards the Sabine River and the United States. The Retreating Texas Army burned crops, buildings, and anything that would aid the enemy soldiers as they advanced towards the United States border, hoping to deprive them of the ability of living off the land.

The exodus from Texas by the refugees became known as the "Runaway Scrape" and most likely, the Lewis Family, along with the Stark and Herrin families, removed to their previous homes in Ouachita Parish, Louisiana until the war ended. No further records have been found indicating the participation of members of these families in the Texas Revolution after the siege at Béxar further supporting the probability the families and their men became refugees after Santa Anna captured the Alamo.

At the conclusion of hostilities after Houston was victorious at the Battle of San Jacinto, Samuel S. Lewis became a prominent member of the Jasper County community and served in the Texas Republic as a representative from Jasper County until his death February 10, 1838, at his plantation in the Bevil district.

John T. Lewis was elected Justice of the Peace April 9th, 1840 for Belgrade as was Bennett Hiram Zachary. This was the first election held in Belgrade and a statement of the results of the polls was returned to M. B. Lewis, Chief Justice of the County of Jasper.[1] Bennett Hiram Zachary was the brother-in-law of William Hawley Stark and M. B. Lewis was the brother of John Taylor Lewis. The 1850 census for Newton County revealed John T. Taylor was a farmer, age 43, born in Indiana. Maria was reported to be 39 years old and was born in New York. Children listed were William McFarland, age 16, George W., age 14 Asa, age 9, Sarah, age 5, Elizabeth, age 3, and Napoleon, age 1, all born in Texas.[2] Nancy Jane Lewis had married James Herrin in 1846 and would not have been listed living in the home. However, from the 1835 census for the Bevil District, Nancy Jane Lewis was reported to be the four year old daughter of John T. Taylor, born in Louisiana and William M. Lewis was John's two year old son, born in Texas.[3]

In 1860, the same persons reported in the 1850 census were still living in the home of John Taylor Lewis, their ages changed by approximately ten years and three additional children were added who had been born after the 1850 census. These children were Martin B. Lewis, age 8, Catherine E. Lewis, age 5, and Robert E. Lewis, age 2, all born in Texas.[4] This was Dwelling #162, Family #162 reported in the census and living next door in Dwelling #163, family #163 was James "Herring" and his spouse, Nancy J, daughter of John Taylor Lewis.[5]

The family was not reported in the 1870 census and in 1880, Robert Edward Lewis and his spouse, Maranda Smith, were living in the home with two cousins of John's named John T. Stivener [Probably misspelled and should be Stivender) and Elizabeth Stivender. John Taylor Lewis died in 1892 and Sarah Mariah Stark died in 1895. Both were buried in the Sandridge Cemetery in Newton County, Texas.

 

The Lewis Family, From Virginia to Texas

Colonel Samuel S. Lewis was born July 4, 1784 in Virginia and married Sarah Lemaster in Henry County, Kentucky August 7, 1804, born in Virginia March 12th 1785.[6] Soon after the marriage, about 1806, the couple moved to Clark County in the Indiana Territory, which was across the Ohio River from Henry County, Kentucky, a distance of about 30 to 40 miles. While living in Clark County, Samuel and Sarah had two sons named Martin Baty Lewis, born June 16, 1806, and John Taylor Lewis, born February 14, 1808. John Taylor Lewis later married Sarah Mariah Stark on December 28th, 1828 in Ouachita Parish, Louisiana.

Samuel Lewis was most likely living in Clark County when he met William McFarland. Together, with Samuel Alexander, they surveyed and laid out the town of Orleans in Orange County. The town was named Orleans to commemorate Jackson’s victory over the British in the Battle of New Orleans on January 8th of 1815. Indiana became a State in December of 1816 one and a half years after the town was founded. The first house on the present site of the town is said to have been built by Samuel Lewis and was made of logs because sawmills had not yet been erected in the region. This house later operated as a tavern where many of the pioneers traveling west were told marvelous tales of the new country's wonders and advantages in the evenings. Samuel Lewis built the first brick house in Orleans in the year 1817.[7]

________

1)

Glimpses of Newton County History; by The Newton County Historical Commission; Quote: "Monday 13th. April 1840; We had an election the 9th. April for two magistrates and one constable, ----- the election was well conducted and unattended with any quarreling or contention. B.H. Zachary, of Belgrade, and Mr. John L. Lewis of Cow Creek was elected Justices of the Peace and Mr. Robert Laws, Constable. I returned a statement of the polls to M.B. Lewis, Chief Justice of the county. This was the first election ever held in Belgrade."

2)

Newton County, Texas 1850 Census.

3)

The 1835 Mexican Census Of Texas; Bevil District or Municipality

4)

Newton County, Texas 1860 Census; Transcribed by Newton County Historical Commission, page 29, Dwelling #162, Family #162

5)

Ibid; page 30, dwelling #163, family #163

6)

"The Handbook of Texas Online", LEWIS, SAMUEL S. (1784-1838); by Roland Mack Lewis, Sr; BIBLIOGRAPHY: C. K. Chamberlain, "East Texas," East Texas Historical Journal 4 (October 1966). Mrs. Harry Joseph Morris, comp. and ed., Citizens of the Republic of Texas (Dallas: Texas State Genealogical Society, 1977). Texas House of Representatives, Biographical Directory of the Texan Conventions and Congresses, 1832-1845 (Austin: Book Exchange, 1941).

7)

"History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington Counties Indiana"; Chicago, Goodspeed Bros. & Co., Publishers, 1884; History of Orange County: Chapter 6; Town of Orleans. Transcription of the record dated March 11, 1815: "Plan of the town of Orleans, Indiana Territory, as laid out within the county of Washington, upon the southwest quarter of Section 30, of Township 3 north, of the base line in Range 1 east, of the second principal meridian line, of the lands directed to be sold at Jeffersonville. References: Each lot in the town of Orleans, Indiana Territory, is 80 x 160 feet, and each street 60 feet wide, and each alley 10 feet wide. Congress Square is composed of Lots Nos. 167, 168, 169, 170, 195, 196, 197 and 198 to remain for the purpose of erecting any building for county, Territory or State, or deemed necessary by citizens of the town. The streets and alleys to remain as open and common highways forever, excepting where they pass within the limits of Congress Square where they become a part. No part of Congress Square ever to be appropriated as a burying-ground. March 11, 1815. Test: SAMUEL ALEXANDER, WILLIAM Mc FARLAND. Surveyor.: SAMUEL LEWIS."

 

 

 

Page 78

 

William McFarland was born May 8th, 1774, in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, the son of Thomas and Hannah (Stuart) McFarland. He married Ann Singer, the daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Singer. Six children were born to the union, three of whom died young. McFarland became a surveyor and moved to Ohio in 1799, where he began laying out towns, including an addition to Cincinnati that bears his name. By 1810 he was a resident of Indiana, where he surveyed and laid out Lexington in Scott County.[1]

In early 1816, soon after assisting in the survey of Orleans, William McFarland and his family moved to Ouachita Parish, Louisiana where his spouse, Ann Singer, died March 30, 1816.[1],[2] The 1820 census for Ouachita Parish, Louisiana reports "William Macfarlane" had three sons under 10 years old and one daughter 10 to 26 years old. He had either four or five male slaves of which one was under 14 years old, one was 10 to 26 years old (Could also have been under 14), and two who were over 45, and he had one female slave who was 10 to 26 years old.[3] He moved to Texas about 1830 from Ouachita Parish for William McFarland was not reported living in the Parish in the 1830 census.

The area that became Ouachita Parish, Louisiana was ceded to Spain from France in 1763 at the close of the French & Indian War. About 1780, the Spanish Government appointed Don Juan Filhiol Commandant of Fort Miro, built on the Ouachita River to protect the settlers living in the area against Indian raiders. The site of this fort later became Monroe, Louisiana. July 14, 1795, the Spanish Government granted land to the Marquis de Maison Rouge, a Knight of St. Louis and French Royalist, allowing him to bring 30 families to the grant, which included land in the then County of Ouachita and Parish of Catahoula and which later became Ouachita Parish and Caldwell Parish.[4] June 20, 1796, Baron de Bastrop was granted land by Governor Carondelet for the purpose of building a mill to process wheat. Carondelet sent a decree to Don Juan Filhiol to designate 12 leagues square for Bastrop’s settlers on Bayou de Siard for the cultivation of wheat.

Philip Hendrik Nering Bögel (alias Baron de Bastrop) was born in Dutch Guiana November 23, 1759 and moved to Holland with his parents in 1764. He enlisted in the cavalry of Holland and married Georgine Wolffeline Françoise Lijcklama à Nyeholt. He settled his family in Leeuwarden where he served as collector of general taxes for the province of Friesland. His military service, marriage, and appointment as tax collector suggest that he was a supporter of the aristocracy and he later claimed the French invasion of Holland was his reason for leaving the country. However, contrary to his stated reasons, he was accused of embezzlement of tax funds in 1793 and he most likely fled the country to avoid being brought to trial. After the Court of Justice of Leeuwarden offered a reward of 1,000 gold ducats to anyone who brought him back, Bögel adopted the title Baron de Bastrop.[5]

Baron de Bastrop arrived in Spanish Louisiana in April of 1795 and represented himself as a Dutch nobleman. As already mentioned, the Spanish government permitted him to establish a colony in the Ouachita Valley where over the next decade he engaged in several business ventures in Louisiana and Kentucky. After Spain ceded Louisiana to France in 1803 and the region was sold to the United States in 1803, the Baron moved to Spanish Texas and was permitted to establish a colony between the community of Béxar and the Trinity River. In 1806 he settled in San Antonio, where he had a freighting business and gained influence with the inhabitants and officials. By 1810 he was appointed second alcalde[6] in the ayuntamiento[6] of Béxar.[5]

The Ouachita region was part of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. As one would expect, ownership of the land became a major issue and December 23, 1824, a select committee of the United States Congress found the original contract did not grant the Marquis de Maison Rouge land to the Marquis but to the emigrants that he was to introduce, which never happened. Because there were no immigrants, the land was open for public sale. This event was most likely noted by McFarland and he informed his old friend, Samuel Lewis, of the opportunity to purchase land at relatively low cost. Samuel Lewis probably moved to Ouachita Parish at about this time, for his last daughter, Melinda Lewis, was born March 30, 1824 in Green County, Indiana and his son, John Taylor Lewis, married Sarah Mariah Stark in Ouachita Parish December 28, 1828. June 5, 1830, the sale of public lands, which included the Maison Rouge and Baron de Bastrop grants, was authorized and then withdrawn by the General Land Office.[4]

________

1)

"The Handbook of Texas Online", MCFARLAND, WILLIAM (1774-1840); by McXie Whitton Martin; BIBLIOGRAPHY: George L. Crocket, Two Centuries in East Texas (Dallas: Southwest, 1932; facsimile reprod., 1962). Texas House of Representatives, Biographical Directory of the Texan Conventions and Congresses, 1832-1845 (Austin: Book Exchange, 1941).

2)

Rootsweb.com WorldConnect Project, #20856, e-mail address lrjtj@tyler.net. Source of date of death. The notes state: "William McFarland was a colonel in the Texas Revolution. William McFarland laid out the town of Belgrade, prior to the beginning of the Newton County Records. One deed dated March 30, 1837, in which he sold the "Reserved Square" to his son Thomas McFarland. An affidavit made by R. E McFarland, states that William McFarland married Ann Singer in the year 1800, and she died 1816. William never married again. Samuel Patterson McFarland, son of William and Ann died prior to 1859, and left as his only heirs, his brother Thomas S and sister Eliza S. Lawhorn. That Thomas S. McFarland married Elizabeth Eubank in the year 1838: she died 1872, and he died 1880. R. E. McFarland is Robert E, the son of Thomas S. McFarland. This information was given to me by Lou McFarland Rogers, daughter of Thomas Eubank McFarland.

3)

Census Year: 1820 State: Louisiana Parish: Ouachita Page No: 11 Reel no: M33-31 Sheet No: 112A.

4)

The Marquis de Maison Rouge, the Baron de Bastrop, and Colonel Abraham Morehouse- Three Ouachita Valley

Soldiers of Fortune: The Maison and Bastrop Spanish Land "Grants"; Jennie O' Kelly Mitchell & Robert Dabney Calhoun. New Orleans, LA: 1937.

5)

"The Handbook of Texas Online", Bastrop, Baron De (1759-1827) by Richard W. Moore. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Charles A. Bacarisse, The Baron de Bastrop: Life and Times of Philip Hendrik Nering Bögel (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas, 1955). Charles A. Bacarisse, "Baron de Bastrop," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 58 (January 1955). Eugene C. Barker, ed., The Austin Papers (3 vols., Washington: GPO, 1924-28). Baron de Bastrop Documents, Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin. Baron de Bastrop Papers, Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin. Richard Woods Moore, The Role of the Baron de Bastrop in the Anglo-American Settlement of the Spanish Southwest (M.A. thesis, University of Texas, 1932). Vertical Files, Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin.

6)

Alcalde: The chief administrative and judicial officer of a Spanish town. Ayuntamiento: Town Council

 

 

 

Page 79

 

In the 1830 census, John and Sarah (Stark) Lewis were living next door to William Herrin and his first spouse who had given birth to James Herrin in 1826. As will be revealed later, James Herrin married Nancy Jane Lewis who was the first daughter and child of John and Sarah Mariah. On page 191 of the 1830 Ouachita Parish Census, head of the house on line 10 was Martin B. Lewis, on line 12 was John Lewis, and on line 13 was William Herrin indicating they were neighbors.[9] After William Herrin’s first wife died, he married Prudence Jane Stark, the sister of Sarah Mariah Stark.

Samuel S. Lewis was also recorded in the 1830 Ouachita Parish Census which was enumerated on November 25, 1830.[1] It is believed Samuel may have already obtained land in Mexican Texas earlier for his certificate of character stated he came to Texas in March of 1832 but his servants had been in the province since January of 1830.[2] Mrs. Charles Martin published the following in the Kirbyville Banner in 1971: "In his (Col. Samuel S. Lewis) certificate of character, he states that he came to Texas in March 1832, but that his servants had been in the province since January 1830. This was probably to prepare fields and buildings for the arrival of the family. The Lewis Plantation was on Indian Creek between the communities of Bevilport and Peachtree, but his post office address was Zavalla in Angelina County. The other part of his grant was east of Cow Creek and south of the Biloxi community."[2]

From the above and other sources, the Lewis family most likely arrived in Texas between the 1st and 5th of March in the year 1832. The Mexican certificate of character made by Samuel Lewis stated his servants and other property had been in Texas since January of 1830 and he and his wife had two children still living at home. The certificate of character was dated in January of 1833 and signed by the local Alcalde, William McFarland.[3] Also moving to Texas at this time was Samuel’s sons, Martin Lewis and John Taylor Lewis.

________

1)

Year: 1830 State: Louisiana Parish: Ouachita Page No: 9 Reel no: M19-44 Division: Western District Sheet No: 184 Enumerated by: Haywood T. Alford on November 25th.

2)

Martin, Mrs. Charles; "Early Settlers of Jasper County; The First To Arrive." Kirbyville Banner, Kirbyville, Texas 75956, Wednesday 17, 1971.

3)

Benthall, Lillian Light, "Colonel Samuel S. Lewis, Early Texan Founder of Orleans, Indiana", June 13, 1966.

 

 

 

 

Page 80

 

Sarah Mariah (Stark) Lewis Family Group

 

If you would like to see more, click HERE to download PDF Formatted Three Generation Descendants Report for Sarah Mariah Stark.

 

Click on Thumbnail photos below to see enlarged photographs. Use Back button to return to this text.

 

Author's Comment: Click on this phrase to go to a searchable online genealogical database entitled, "Descendants of Aaron Stark [1608-1685]. In the surname search window, enter first the surname, then comma, then given name. Clicking on "List" will take you to a list of persons in the database with that surname and given name. Look down the list for birth and death dates. When they match the person on this web site, click on the name in the list. This will take you to the data page of the person of interest. You can then navigate from that page to the ancestors or descendants of that individual.

 

 sarahmariahstarkts.jpg (55901 bytes)johntaylorlewists.jpg (56661 bytes)Sarah Mariah Stark (Daniel R. Stark6, Asahel Stark5, Christopher Stark (Junior)4, Christopher Stark (Senior)3, William Stark (Senior)2, Aaron Stark [1608-1685]1) was born 1812 in New York, USA, and died 1895 in Newton, Texas, USA. She was buried in Sand Ridge Cemetery, Newton County, Texas. She married John Taylor Lewis 28 DEC 1828 in Ouachita Parish, Louisiana. He was born 14 FEB 1808 in Clark, Indiana, USA, and died 12 OCT 1892 in Newton County, Texas,. He was buried in Sand Ridge Cemetery, Newton County, Texas.

Children of Sarah Mariah Stark and John Taylor Lewis are:

  i.

jamesherrintb.jpg (70790 bytes)nancyjanestarktb.jpg (189706 bytes)Nancy Jane Lewis was born ABT 1831 in Oauchita Parish, Louisiana, and died ABT 1868 in Newton, Texas, USA. She was buried in DeHart Cemetery, Newton County, Texas. She married James Herrin ABT 1845 in Probably Jasper County, Texas, son of William "Bill" Herrin Sr.. He was born ABT 1826 in Louisiana, and died AFT AUG 1863 in Newton, Texas, USA. Both were buried in DeHart Cemetery, Newton County, Texas. Photos on Find a Grave; by SnL Roots 9/13/2006; URL: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=15704574&PIpi=4036564

  ii. willmlewists.jpg (45228 bytes)William McFarland Lewis was born ABT 1834 in Texas, and died 1905 in Newton, Texas, USA. He was buried in Sand Ridge Cemetery, Newton County, Texas. He married Amanda A. M. Moore 06 JUN 1861 in Newton, Texas, USA. He married Widow Mary E. Wisdom 14 MAR 1883 in Newton, Texas, USA. She was born 1858.
  iii. georgelewists.jpg (54390 bytes)George W. Lewis was born 1836 in Texas, and died 1918 in Newton, Texas, USA. He married Ellen Wilkerson 03 JUL 1865 in Newton, Texas, USA. She was born 1842 in Texas. He was buried at the Sand Ridge Cemetery, Newton County, Texas.

 

  iv. asaslewists.jpg (36239 bytes)Asa S. Lewis was born NOV 1841 in Probably [In 1841] Jasper County, Texas, and died 1907 in Newton, Texas, USA. He was buried in Sand Ridge Cemetery, Newton County, Texas. He married Sara "Sab" Page 09 JUN 1861 in Newton, Texas, USA. She was born 1836 in Mississippi, USA, and died 1910 in Newton, Texas, USA. She was buried in Sand Ridge Cemetery, Newton County, Texas.
  v. Sarah M. Lewis was born ABT 1845 in Texas. She married 1st, Henry H. Kirkum 06 JUN 1861 in Newton, Texas, USA. She married 2nd, Asa Herrin 12 APR 1863 in Newton, Texas, USA, son of William "Bill" Herrin Sr. and Prudence Jane Stark. He was born 1846.
  vi. Elizabeth V. Lewis was born ABT 1847 in Texas. She married William J. Inman 02 FEB 1862 in Newton, Texas, USA. He was born 1842 in Missouri, USA, and died ABT 1908 in Newton, Texas, USA. He was buried in Odom Cemetery, Howards, Newton County, Texas.
  vii. Napoleon B. Lewis was born MAR 1850. He married Matilda Herrin 02 FEB 1869 in Newton, Texas, USA, daughter of William "Bill" Herrin Sr. and Prudence Jane Stark. She was born ABT 1852.
  viii. Martin Baty Lewis II was born OCT 1852 in Newton, Texas, USA, and died 1935. He married Nancy E. Smith 07 FEB 1873 in Newton, Texas, USA. She was born APR 1855 in Louisiana, and died 1938.
  ix. Catherine E. Lewis was born ABT 1855 in Texas.
  x. Robert Edward (Ed) Lewis was born 01 OCT 1857 in Newton, Texas, USA, and died 15 JAN 1940 in Newton, Texas, USA. He was buried in Sand Ridge Cemetery, Newton County, Texas. He married Marinda Smith 09 JUN 1875 in Newton, Texas, USA. She was born 01 MAR 1859 in Tyler County, Texas, and died in Newton, Texas, USA.

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Copyright

Other than that work created by other acknowledged contributors or sources, the articles presented were authored and edited by Clovis LaFleur and the genealogical data presented in this publication was derived and compiled by  Pauline Stark Moore; Copyright © 2003. All rights are reserved. The use of any material on these pages by others will be discouraged if the named contributors, sources, or Clovis LaFleur & Pauline Stark Moore have not been acknowledged.

Disclaimer

This publication and the data presented is the work of Clovis LaFleur & Pauline Stark Moore. However, some of the content presented has been derived from the research and publicly available information of others and may not have been verified. You are responsible for the validation of all data and sources reported and should not presume the material presented is correct or complete.

 

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