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Susan Jane Pearce (1845-1928): Biography

Note: Written during the period August through October 2008, by W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah, and using all of the currently known documents and resources available relative to the often obscure activities of Susan Jane Pearce, this biography seeks to understand her life a bit better. A listing of sources appears at the end.

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Eventually spanning eight decades, two continents, two religions, two marriages—and nine children fathered by three different men—during her early years, Susan Jane Pearce’s life was difficult and checkered. As a result, like her soldier husband Patrick Hurley before her, these experiences led to different aliases, including Susan Pearce, Susan J. Harris, Susan Harris, Sarah Jane Harris, and Susan Hurley Pierce, all of which appear on various official documents. Indeed, as one of her oldest great-granddaughters, Leone Nelson Woodard (1922-2003) once observed about her in a 1974 letter to me:

I would like to know how many husbands Great Grandma Hurley had. I remember her very well. The one nice thing about being the oldest, you were there. I heard that she was a swinger when she was young. 1

Accordingly, as we now seek to better understand Susan Jane Pearce, reflecting on her early home life will yield useful insights regarding the course she later pursued.

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Susan Jane, the oldest of six children, was born 10 March 1845, to Henry Pearce (1813-1882) farm laborer, and Rachel Pearce (1825-1869) formerly 'Caddey', at Sandpitt, Broadwinsor, Beaminster, Netherburg, in the County of Dorset, England. 2 This date and place are further buttressed by the 1851 English Census for Broadwinsor, Dorset, England, where Susan Pearce, age 6, is shown residing with her parents. 3 However in the 1861 English Census for Broadwinsor, Dorset, England, at which time Susan Jane would have been 16 years of age, neither she nor her father are shown in the tally. Only her mother and five younger siblings are listed. 4 As will be subsequently shown, it is more than likely that Susan Jane and her father were away, employed elsewhere during the enumeration, for times were hard and they were of the agricultural laborer class.

Essentially, English agricultural land occupation in the mid-nineteenth century proceeded in a three-fold fashion, as follows: First, most of the land was under control of the landed nobility, or gentry, who inherited the property by right of birth. Second in line were the free-holder farmers, yeomen, who had either purchased their property from the gentry, or had tenancy on farm land, usually lifelong, for which they paid a yearly rent. Lastly, at the bottom of the social hierarchy were agricultural laborers, or farm workers. They owned no land; moreover, they were socially ostracized.

It was common in the nineteenth century to stereotype the agricultural laborer as ‘Hodge’, and to describe him and his life in terms which epitomized many of the ideas that the appellation was intended to convey. Like ‘Paddy’, the Irish immigrant of the famine years, and ‘Sambo’, the plantation slave in the United States, Hodge became a widely-used and usually derogatory label… ‘Hodge sounds like a cross between hedge (where he spent much of his time, especially in bad weather) and clod (the substance on his boots and in his brain).’ Hodge was heir to the ‘clown’ that was in common usage in the literature of the eighteenth century… Hodge was characterized pithily by one commentator as ‘unimaginative, ill-clothed, ill-educated, ill-paid, ignorant of all that is taking place beyond his own village, dissatisfied with his position and yet without energy or effort to improve it’. 5

This unequal distribution of wealth and position, plus their poor social status, eventually boiled over in the 1870’s, and the National Agricultural Laborer’s Union (NALU) was formed. In addressing the matter in 1874, an article, English Land and English Peasants appeared in Harpers New Monthly Magazine. Several astute points were put forth:

There are two reasons why Americans should be interested in the great uprising of the English agricultural laborers against the proprietors and farmer-tenants of English land. One is that it is stimulating the emigration to this country of a physically stalwart and tolerably skillful class, who will aid in filling up the fertile virgin expanses of the West, and will supply to the agricultural labor market material of an excellent quality. The other is that the wretched condition under which the English peasants exist, and have existed from a remote period…afford a very striking and suggestive contrast to the condition of the same class in the United States; and this contrast is calculated to impart contentment to the laborers who in this country find their situation to be one of comparative comfort and opportunity…. The most obtrusive fact in the English social system is the contrast which exists between the enormous wealth of the few and the desperate and hopeless poverty of the many…. What is unparalleled in the history of the world is the coexistence in England of so much suffering in one portion of the people with so much prosperity in another; of unbounded private wealth with unceasing public penury; of constant increase in the national resources with constant diminution in the comforts of a considerable portion of the community….in no country do so many live on the land of others without a lease, or with a terminable tenure; in no country are the prerogatives and delights of landed property vested in such a restricted number. 6

Furthermore, regarding the desperate and hopeless poverty of the many, as noted above, whereas it is generally understood that with the advent of industrialization in England, the life of the poorer working class of urban dwellers was certainly bleak, the following particulars demonstrate that the situation of the rural poor was just as bad, or even worse.

…in 1851, nearly half the population of Britain lived in rural areas and many more had been born in the countryside or had experienced a rural life… Life in the country was every bit as harsh as that in towns…the density of occupation of rural housing was often as high or higher than that in towns….Although the quality of rural housing varied greatly, for the very poor it was often worse than its urban counterpart. Slums were not simply found in urban Britain….much rural housing was severely substandard when first built…cottages were often small, cold and wet…. For many rural families poor housing was combined with acute poverty…rural wages remained low and highly variable….
A survey of 1863 showed that most English rural laborers relied heavily on a diet of bread and potatoes, with meat consumption varying from season to season and area to area. Men were generally better fed than the rest of the family
. 7

In order to earn extra income, other work opportunities were regularly sought out:

It was an advantage to have ‘constant work, wet or dry’….
An important influence on farm laborer’s wages was the opportunity for alternative work, for industrial wages were always higher…manufactories…collieries…mines
… [along with other farm work, etc.]
The farm laborer’s wife and children could earn something to add to the family income….A laborer’s sons were generally taken off his hands (aged c.11) before they could earn, by being informally apprenticed (unpaid until perhaps the last years of service) to farmers who kept them until they could earn; then they were normally allowed to go, or they ran away. Girls went into farm service younger than their brothers, and owing (as one commentator remarked in 1869) to the ‘great evil’ of a want of female chastity, farm service often led to ‘bastardy’…. 8

This press of finding extra work led to hiring fairs, while the workers’ abject poverty led to cramped living quarters. Both conditions led to lax morals:

‘Hiring-day!’ wrote the Reverend John Eddowes in 1854, ‘It would seem to be the signal for the suspension of every law of virtue and morality: every restraint seems loosened, and every feeling of shame forgotten.’
‘Thousands have been ruined in this way’, wrote another clerical observer, ‘besides an initiation into the deadly sin of fornication, the foundation of drunken habits is frequently laid at these fairs.’

[Among the clergy, there was also]… the obsession with cottage overcrowding. Horrified pamphlets warned of the dangers of crowded and shared sleeping quarters, with family members of both sexes and even lodgers bedding down in the same room:’ it is not always that the tie of blood is respected…. And when the circumstances do not lead to such horrible consequences, the mind, particularly of the female, is wholly divested of that sense of delicacy and shame which, so long as they are preserved, are the safeguards of her chastity. She therefore falls an early and easy prey to the temptations which beset her beyond the immediate circle of her family.’ 9

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Consequently, with these aforementioned traditions, conditions, and mores in mind, in the 1871 English census, where we are next able to document Susan Jane’s exact whereabouts, it is not surprising to find her living away from home, employed at age 26 as a general servant, in Weymouth, Dorset, England, 20 miles south east of her parents’ residence in Broadwindsor. 10 Additionally, we learn that she was now the unwed mother of a 1 year old boy, Augustus Henry Pearce, then being cared for as a foster child by a family in Yeovil, Somerset, England, about 30 miles north of Weymouth. 11

(Augustus’s birth certificate 12 shows that he was born in Yeovil, but no father is listed. Moreover, Susan Jane was residing on Green Street in Yeovil at the time of his birth. Augustus later immigrated to Utah, married and worked in Tooele 13, and subsequently died in Salt Lake City at age 80 of coronary sclerosis. 14)

While obviously looking for something more stable in her life, it was at this time that she met her first husband, Patrick Hurley, a gunner in the Royal Artillery, who was also stationed in Weymouth. 15 It is not known how or when the two of them became acquainted. Nevertheless, they married in Weymouth, on 26 June 1871. 16 Then, between them, over the next fourteen years, they had seven children, one of whom died at 18 months of age. Patrick subsequently died 2 May 1887. The reader is directed to Patrick Hurley’s biography on this website for further details regarding this important time in Susan Jane’s life. 17

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Left alone in Cardiff to raise their six living children at the time of Patrick’s death, Susan Jane was 42 years old. As indicated on the death certificate at the time of his death, the family resided at 25 Daniel Street, Roath, Cardiff. However, in the 1891 Wales Census, they were shown living at 8 Dalton Street, Cathays, Cardiff. 18 Evidently they resided at this address for the next several years.

Eventually Susan Jane met another man, Frank Harris Drouard, a French-Canadian seaman, by whom, on 6 March 1890, she bore a daughter, Lily Mae Harris, as is recorded on Lily’s 1898 baptism certificate. 19 The birth date is further substantiated by the 1891 Wales Census for Cardiff, where Lily M. Harris is listed as being age 1. 20 Interestingly, like her mother, Lily Mae had a number of aliases during her lifetime, as well: Ethyl May (1903 Passenger Arrival list in New York, for the SS Teutonic 21); Lillian M. Harris (1910 United States Census for Salt Lake City, Utah 22 and 1919 California Death Certificate 23); Lillian Marion Harris (1913 San Francisco, California Marriage Certificate 24); and Lillian Harris (her Tombstone 25).

Susan Jane and Frank Harris Drouard were married in the Register’s Office at Cardiff, on 16 August 1890. 26 But, evidently, as a seaman, he did not spend much time at home. According to Rose Mary Herlihy Middleton, Patrick’s and Susan Jane’s youngest daughter, who died in 1976:

Frank dropped the Drouard surname from his original name, then while on a voyage, he died of yellow fever, possibly in India, only 1-2 years after marrying Susan Jane. He was not a member of the Church. The couple had no other children. 27

Consequently, as already referred to, the 1891 Wales Census for Cardiff shows Sarah (not Susan) Jane Harris, age 47, living at 8 Dalton Street, Cathays Cardiff, with seven children: the six living children fathered by her first husband, Patrick, and her one-year old daughter, Lily May, fathered by her second husband, Frank Harris (Drouard). 28

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Further documentation for the history picks up again in 1892, at which time Susan Jane’s oldest daughter, Annie Matilda Hurley first heard the Gospel preached. Her autobiography records:

I must have been quite religiously inclined, because I joined several different churches, but did not feel satisfied. I always felt like there was something more to religion than I had yet been able to find. Then, one evening I was looking through the ads in the evening paper, and I happened to see an ad which read: A young lady wanted in the ladies and children’ shoe department. So, I said to my mother, “Look here,” and read the ad to her and told her, “I am going right down in the morning and apply for it.” She said, “You might just as well spare yourself the trouble, because that ad has been in the papers several times.” “Well,” I said, “I’m going anyway.” I don’t know yet what made me so determined to go, because I had never had experience in clerking whatever. But somehow, I just seemed to have the urge to go and apply for it.

Well, I went down. It was only about seven blocks from my mother’s home. I went in, and there was a kindly, nice looking man named Mr. Forsey, busy dusting off and shining some shoes to put in the window. “Good morning,” I said. “I read your ad in the paper and just thought I would drop in and see if you were suited with someone yet.” “Well now,” he said. “My wife has a niece who has a lot of experience in this business and wants to work for us.” “Thank you,” I said, “that is all that is necessary to know.” I was bidding him good day, when he said, “Won’t you wait a minute?” So, we talked for a few minutes. Then, I said, “I must be going.” This was a Saturday morning, and he asked me if I would mind coming back on Monday morning.

I went back on Monday morning, and he said, “My wife and I like your appearance very much. So, you will consider yourself engaged for the position.” I thanked him very much, and asked if he would be pleased to put me to work. This was Monday. And Wednesday morning, I said to him, “You hired me to work, and so far I haven’t done a thing but listen to what you have been saying. I must say that I am very interested in what you are talking about. It is a religion of some kind, isn’t it? If it is, it is surely the very thing I have been waiting to hear for a long, long time.” Then he asked me if I had ever heard of the Latter-day Saints. “They call them Mormons,” he said. No, I never had.

Then he said, “What I have been talking about, or telling you about, is ‘Mormonism’ as taught by the Latter-day Saints.” “Well,” I said, “that sounds very wonderful and very convincing. Tell me, where do they hold forth? Do they have a church where a person can go and hear them preach?”

Well, in a day or two, there were two fine looking men that came to the store. They were introduced to me as Brother Rich and Brother Joe Wilde, and they were two of the Mormon missionaries from Utah. It was the religion that they were teaching that Mr. Forsey had been trying to tell me about. Finally, they asked me if I would care to go to one of their meetings with them, as one of the Elders was leaving to return home to Utah, and he was to give his farewell sermon on Sunday. I said I would surely be happy to, so they stopped by to pick me up prior to the meeting.

Of course, we had no transportation of any kind, and, naturally, I wondered how far it was. It proved to be just a half block from our home. But, if I live to be one hundred, I’ll never forget the experience of that meeting. It was just like a film had been removed from my eyes, and I could see clearly now and knew that this was the religion I had been looking for. I have never had the least desire to look further for any proof, for I know it is not to be found.

Of course, then it was that the Adversary got busy. And don’t think that I didn’t have plenty of opposition to fight at home. I was determined that they should hear before they condemned. So, anyway, with patience and long suffering, I finally persuaded mother and the others at home to go to a meeting or two. And, also, I invited the Elders to call the others at the home and talk to the family. Finally, they all came into the church, except one brother. He did come to Utah, and did very well. He had two daughters when he came to Utah, and his only son was born here. 29

Annie Matilda was the first of the family to be baptized into the Church, on 24 February 1892, in Cardiff, while residing at her mother’s home at 8 Dalton Street. 30 Thereafter, as mentioned in her autobiography, other family members followed. Susan Jane was baptized on 15 April 1892. 31

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The two oldest daughters, Annie Matilda and Ellen Jane immigrated to the United States in April 1893. 32 Subsequently, Susan Jane, again a widow as well as a member of the Church looking for direction and wanting to be reunited with her children who had already moved to Utah, prepared to do similarly. We don’t have all of the details regarding what she did or how she supported herself in the ensuing decade (it is assumed that she again periodically hired out as a domestic servant as well as received benefits from Patrick's small government pension), but in 1903, following Lily May’s baptism in 1898 33, the two of them permanently departed England for the United States, once again using assumed names. 34 We know that 1903 was the year of their immigration, because it is so recorded in the 1910 United States Federal Census for Salt Lake City, Utah. 35

From this same census record we also learn that Susan J. and Lillian M. (Lily May) initially lived together on the west side of Salt Lake City. But as already indicated, Lillian Marion (Lily May) eventually moved to San Francisco, California, where she then married, in 1913 36, and also died, in 1919. 37

Nevertheless, Susan Jane resided in Salt Lake City for the next 25 years before her death on Monday, 10 September 1928. At the time she passed away, she was living in the city with her son-in-law and daughter, Earl G. and Ellen Jane Griggs, at 809 West 8th South Street. 38, 39, 40 She was interred at Mount Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah, in the same grave site as her daughter, Lillian Harris (Lily May Harris). 41

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To conclude, once again evidence concerning Susan Jane’s activities during the last 25 years of her life in Utah is spotty at best. Still, we do have some information. Sharon Griggs Stewart, granddaughter of Rose Mary Herlihy Griggs, recalls an informative conversation with her grand cousin, Edna Griggs Raymond, daughter of Earl G. and Ellen Jane Herlihy Griggs. Among other things, Edna, now deceased, remembered that her grandmother, while residing at her parents' home, on occasion sent her to the store to procure the latest copy of Modern Romance Magazine. On the other hand, she also remembers that Susan Jane became quite religious before she passed on, attending Church meetings every Sunday. 42

To be sure then, Susan Jane’s life covered much in the way of time and locale, hardship and sorrow. And yet having joined the Church and embraced the Gospel at an earlier time in her life, in the end it appears that she finally appreciated what her conversion really meant and came to accept the Savior’s promise offered to each one of us:

Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.

For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light. 43

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Bibliography:

1. Letter to WBC, Jr. from Leone Nelson Woodard, dated 14 February 1974, in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

2. Certified Copy of an Entry of Birth, 10 Mar 1845, given at the General Register Office, Somerset House, London, #BX 563631, PAS 135426/68/44, No. 248, Susan Jane, girl, to Henry Pearce, labourer, and Rachel Pearce, formerly 'Caddey', of Sandpitt, 'Broadwinser', Beaminster, Netherburg, in the County of Dorset. The certified copy is in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

3. 1851 England Census for Broadwindsor, Beaminster, Dorset, England: Source Citation: Class: HO107; Piece: 1860; Folio: 193; Page: 1; GSU roll: 221008. http://ancestry.com.

4. 1861 England Census for Broadwindsor, Beaminster, Dorset, England: Source Citation: Class: RG9; Piece: 1364; Folio: 77; Page: 1; GSU roll: 542801. http://ancestry.com.

5. Mark Freeman, The Agricultural Laborer and the ‘Hodge’ Stereotype, c. 1850-1914. http://www.bahs.org.uk/49n2a3.pdf.

6. George M. (George Makepeace) Towle, English Land and English Peasants, Harpers New Monthly Magazine; Vol. 49; Issue 291; August 1874; p. 430. http://harpers.org/archive/1874/08/0044452.

7. History Zone, Work in the Countryside. http://richardjohnbr.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!CE8351513DFB560!820.entry.

8. Domesday Book, 1750-1875, A History of the County of Shropshire, Volume 4. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=22844.

9. Barry Reay, The English Rural Poor, 1850-1914. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2005/is_2_41/ai_n24221684.

10. www.Ancestry.com Database: 1871 English Census Detail; Class: RG10; Piece: 2001; Folio: 77; Page: 23; GSU Roll: 831751.

11. www.Ancestry.com Database: 1871 English Census Detail; Class: RG10; Piece: 2417; Folio: 9; Page: 9; GSU Roll: 835175.

12. Certified Copy of an Entry of Birth, 2 January 1870, given at the General Register Office, Somerset House, London, #BX 569285, PAS 135426/68/C: Augustus Henry, boy, to (no father listed) and Susan Pearce, of Green Street, Yeovil, in the County of Somerset. The certified copy is in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

13. Marriage License, the State of Utah, County of Salt Lake, License No. 34451: for Augustus H. Pearce and Hulda Lang… marriage performed 28 April 1920, in Tooele, Salt Lake, Utah… copy in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

14. The State of Utah, Department of Public Health, Certificate of Death, State File No. 50-180873. Register’s No. 927: Augustus Henry Pearce died 10 May 1950, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, at age 80, from coronary sclerosis. A copy is in the possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

15. www.Ancestry.com Database: 1871 English Census Detail; Class: RG10; Piece: 2004; Folio: 64; Page: 3; GSU Roll: 831752.

16. Certified Copy of an Entry of Marriage, MA 799598, No. 141, solemnized at the Church of the Holy Trinity, in the Parish of Weymouth, in the County of Dorset, 26 June 1871, between Patrick Herlihy, age 38, bachelor, gunner Royal Artillery, and Susan Jane Pearce, age 26, spinster… in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

17. freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~chrisandhowellsfam/hurleypj.html.

18. www.Ancestry.com Database: 1891 Wales Census Detail; Class: RG12; Piece: 4393; Folio: 61; Page: 9; GSU Roll: 6099503.

19. Baptismal Certificate for Lily May Harris baptized and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in Cardiff, Glamorgan, Great Britain, 18 May 1898. She is listed as having been born in Cardiff, St. John Parish, Glamorgan, Great Britain, 6 March 1890. A photocopy of the original document is in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

20. Op. cit.: www.Ancestry.com Database: 1891 Wales Census Detail

21. www.Ancestry.com New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 Database: 1903, S.S. Teutonic, Arrival Date: 7 May 1903, showing Sarah Jane Harris and Ethyl May Harris. Source Citation: Year: 1903; Microfilm Serial: 15; Microfilm Roll: T715…352; Line: 12.

22. www.Ancestry.com Database: 1910 United States Federal Census; Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Salt Lake City Ward 2, Salt Lake, UT, USA.

23. California State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Standard Certificate of Death, City and County of San Francisco, No.19-043032, State Index Number: 1005-7204. Lillian M. Harris, white female, married, non-resident, died 9 November 1919 of acute nephritis, associated with a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. A photocopy of the original document is in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

24. California State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Certificate of Marriage, City and County of San Francisco, No. 13-023256, State Index Number: 559-2881. John Harris, white single male, elevator operator, age 21, and Lillian Marion Harris, white single female age 20, (no occupation listed) were civilly married, 1 July 1913. A photocopy of the original document is in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

25. http://history.utah.gov/apps/burials/execute/viewburial?cemeteryid=SL2101&id=56364: Lillian Harris was buried 13 November 1919, in Section B, Lot 132, Grave 8M5, in the Mount Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah. Picture of the Tombstone is in the possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

26. 1890 Marriage solemnized at the Register Office in the District of Cardiff, in the Counties of Cardiff, Glamorgan, and Monmouth on 16 August 1890: between Frank Harris Drouard, bachelor, mariner, and Susan Jane Hurley, widow. Book No. 174, Entry No. 43. A photocopy of the original document is in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

27. Based on information gleaned from letters and several personal interviews, 1968-1972, with Patrick’s and Susan Jane’s youngest daughter, Rose Mary Herlihy Middleton (who died 31 Jan 1976), then residing at 1981 Richards Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, by W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

28. Op. cit.: www.Ancestry.com Database: 1891 Wales Census Detail; Class: RG12

29. freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~chrisandhowellsfam/hurleyam.html.

30. Baptismal Certificate for Annie Matilda Hurley baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in Cardiff, Glamorgan, Great Britain, 24 February 1892. She was confirmed 29 February 1892. A photocopy of the original document is in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

31. Baptismal Certificate for Susan Jane Harris Drouard baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in Cardiff, Glamorgan, Great Britain, 15 April 1892. She was confirmed 17 April 1892. A photocopy of the original Document is in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

32. freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~chrisandhowellsfam/hurleyam_arizona.html.

33. Op. cit.: Baptismal Certificate for Lily May Harris

34. Op. cit.: www.Ancestry.com New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 Database…

35. Op. cit.: www.Ancestry.com Database: 1910 United States Federal Census…

36. Op. cit.: California State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Certificate of Marriage, City and County of San Francisco, No.13-023256

37. Op. cit.: California State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Standard Certificate of Death, City and County of San Francisco, No.19-043032

38. The Deseret News, Monday 10 September 1928, p. 8. Found at the BYU-HBL-Utah Valley FHL, in the Deseret Evening News, September 1928-October 1928.

39. www.Ancestry.com Utah Death Index, 1905-1951: Name: Susan Harris; Death Date: 10 Sep 1928; State File Number: 1928003563; Gender: Female; Age: 84; County of Death: Salt Lake.

40. State of Utah—Death Certificate, State Board of Health File No. 1462-620: Susan Harris, age 84 ½, died, 10 September 1928, in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, from apoplexy contributed to by hypertension… copy in possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

41. http://history.utah.gov/apps/burials/execute/viewburial?cemeteryid=SL2101&id=56366: Susan Harris was buried 12 September 1919, in Section B, Lot 132, Grave 5F, in the Mount Olivet Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah. Picture of the Tombstone is in the possession of W. Bart. Christenson, Jr., Provo, Utah.

42. From numerous personal visits and telephone conversations between Sharon Griggs Stewart, Meadow, Utah, stewps@gmail.com and WBC, Jr., extending through October 2008.

43. New Testament: Matthew 11: 28-30.

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