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Chincoteaguers and Scandinavians


William Townsend

He had the following children:

  F i Mary Townsend

Scarburgh Tunnell [Parents] was born about 1690 in Accomack County, Virginia. He died on 1 Mar 1757 in Accomack County, Virginia. He married Elizabeth Matthews about 1728 in Accomack County, Virginia.

Scarburgh witnessed a will on 30 March 1727 at Accomack Co, VA. It was on this date that Scarburgh Tunnel, George Douglas, Samuel Welburne, Prisilia Watts & John Watts witnessed the will of Samuel Taylor, wife Sarah. He married Elizabeth Matthews about 1728 at Accomack Co, VA. Scarburgh was named as the executor of a will on 30 August 1734 at Accomack Co, VA. It was on this date that Solomon Ewell named his wife Comfort, Capt. Hancock Nickless, Mr. George Douglas, Scarburgh Tunnell & James Wishart as his executors. Scarburgh was security on the admin of an estate on 2 January 1738 at Accomack Co, VA. It was on this date that John Tankred & Scarburgh Tunnell were securities on the adminstartion of the estate of James Benston, which was granted to John Goutee.
He made a will on 1 March 1757 at Accomack Co, VA. To wife Elizabeth whole estate during her widowhood. To son Washpan (Washbourne) Tunnell land where I now live containing 150 acres. To son Jediah Tunnell. Son Scarburgh Tunnell. Son William Tunnell. Son Elias Tunnell. Son Ezekiel. Son Charles. Daughter Comfort. All my children residual legatees. Wife & son Washpan Extrs. Witt: Charles Stockley, Joseph Stockley and Sarah Ewell. Scarburgh died before 30 August 1757 at Accomack Co, VA. It was on this date that his will was probated. Washborn Tunnell was the heir at law to the testator.

Elizabeth Matthews [Parents] was born about 1697 in Accomack County, Virginia. She died after 1760 in Accomack County, Virginia. She married Scarburgh Tunnell about 1728 in Accomack County, Virginia.

They had the following children:

  M i Washburn Tunnell
  M ii William Tunnell
  M iii Jedidiah Tunnell
  M iv Scarburgh Tunnell
  M v Elias Tunnell
  M vi Ezekiel Tunnell was born about 1742 in Accomack County, Virginia.
  F vii Comfort Tunnell
  M viii Charles Tunnell

William Matthews.William married Rebecca.

Rebecca.Rebecca married William Matthews.

They had the following children:

  F i Elizabeth Matthews

Nathaniel Tunnell [Parents] was born in 1661 in Accomack County, Virginia. He died in May 1696 in Accomack County, Virginia. He married Mary Taylor about 1682 in Accomack County, Virginia.

It is probable that Nathaniel was raised by Col. Southy Littleton at the latter's plantation at Nandua. Southy was undoubtedly Nathaniel's godfather. In his will dated September 16, 1679, Southy gave to Nathaniel Tunnell all his remaining interest in the farmland at Accocomson, the gift of his entire wardrobe, plus two cows and calves, plus a free year's service of one of the servants. Inside three weeks, Col. Southy Littleton was dead. He was 33. Nathaniel Tunnell was by now 19. Although technically still under the age of majority by two years, he would soon be planning to spruce up and restart the family farm at Accocomson. The year 1682 shows him as head of the household there, paying the taxes due. He also met and married his Mary. (Quite possibly she was Mary Taylor, the only daughter of neighboring farmer, Samuel Taylor.) Their union would produce five sons: Washbourne, Nathaniel Jr., Edmund, Scarburgh and Elias. On Dec. 28, 1682, Nathaniel Tunnell was named as a defendant in a lawsuit brought by one John Cole. The court determined the matter to be "without cause" and dismissed it (McKey, Vol. 6, p. 325.) The next month, January 1683 Nathaniel was hailed into court along with John Carey and charged with "Sabbath-breaking". (Vol. 6., 330). He served on a jury in November 1689, Feb 1692 and June 1695. Son Washbourne's godfather was Nathaniel's friend, the eminent Clerk of the Court of Accomack County, John Washbourne. Both Edmund and Scarburgh's godfather was, without a doubt, Col. Edmund Scarburgh, Jr., who was the dominating son of the equally indomitable, late Col. Edmund Scarburgh (d. 1671). Col. Edmond Scarburgh Jr. gave, in the year 1690, Nathaniel Jr. and Edmund, one mare each. Nathaniel Sr. was to keep the horses until Edmund turned 16, and for his trouble Col. Scarburgh provided that Nathaniel Sr. could keep any colts that were foaled in the interim by either mare. Nathaniel Tunnell Sr. took the document of gift down to John Washbourne and had him enter it on the record on June 10, 1690. On April 4, 1693, Nathaniel performed the solemn duty of going over to witness the will of his father's old friend and their neighbor, John Wallop. Another witness was neighbor Samuel Taylor. In the Spring of 1696, Nathaniel took ill. He was just 36, with five minor children. He decided to give his elder son, Washbourne, his gun, the home his father had built, and then split the 400-acre tract into five equal parts, one for each boy. Mary Tunnell buried him and then married Charles Stockley before she had even probated the will.
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Nathaniel was named as an heir on 16 September 1679 at Accomack Co, VA. He was shown as Nathaniel Tunnell and given all my land at Ockocomson in Accomack County and my wearing clothes in the will of Southy Littleton, Albany upon Hudson River. He married Mary circa 1680. Nathaniel witnessed a will on 29 April 1687 at Accomack Co, VA. It was on this date that Nathaniel Tunnell, John Wallp & Thomas Conaway witnessed the will of Tobias Bull, wife Rebeccah. Nathaniel witnessed a will on 4 April 1693 at Accomack Co, VA. It was on this date that Nathaniel Tunnell, Samuel Taylor, Will: Wright, James Glenn & Thomas Conway witnessed the will of John Wallop, alias Wadlow.
He made a will before 16 June 1696 at Accomack Co, VA. The will of Nathaniel Tunnill was not dated. To son Washbourn Tunnill house where I live & 1/5 part of 400 acres. To 4 youngest sons, Nathaniel, Edmond, Scarbrough & Elias the residue of my land. Wife Mary. Witt: Samuel Taylor, Jonathan Owen, James Glenn. Nathaniel died before 16 June 1696 at Accomack Co, VA. It was on this date that this will was probated. Mary "now wife of Charles Stockley" qualified.

Mary Taylor [Parents] was born in 1663 in Accomack County, Virginia. She died after 1712 in Accomack County, Virginia. She married Nathaniel Tunnell about 1682 in Accomack County, Virginia.

Other marriages:
Stockley, Charles

They had the following children:

  M i Washbourne Tunnell was born about 1683 in Accomack County, Virginia. He died about 1732 in Accomack County, Virginia.
  M ii Nathaniel Tunnell
  M iii Edmund Tunnell
  M iv Elias Tunnell was born about 1688 in Accomack County, Virginia. He died about 1732 in Accomack County, Virginia.
  M v Scarburgh Tunnell

Elias Taylor.Elias married Comfort A..

Comfort A..Comfort married Elias Taylor.

They had the following children:

  F i Mary Taylor

Thomas Tunnell was born about 1629 in England. He died about 1671 in Accomack County, Virginia.

Thomas came to the New World in August 1649, landing at St. Mary's City, the provincial capital of Maryland. As an indentured servant, he labored in the tobacco fields on the plantation of William and Ann Johnson near St. Mary's City for five years to pay for his passage. In 1655, aged 25, he gained his freedom and his own property of 50 acres plus a bolt of cloth. Political events were about to assert influence over his life. Factions had formed long since between those who held with the "Proprietaries" (the proprietor being, of course, Lord Baltimore), and the "Parliamentarians", who considered Oliver Cromwell and Parliament to be supreme. Cromwell had received his powers back in late 1653 and was on the ascendancy; affairs in the Province of Maryland began to reflect those in the Commonwealth of England. Thomas Tunnell was of the view that the agrarian life could now keep for awhile, and he would take up soldiering in the cause of what he believed to be the rightful government in Maryland under the yellow and black striped banner of Cecil Calvert, the second Lord Baltimore. He received a commision as a Lieutenant in the local militia from ex-Governor Stone. In St. Mary's City, Stone completed his strategy to rid Provincetown of the traitorous Parliamentarians. The Civil War of England was about to cause blood to be shed in a battle on American soil. Stone and his lieutenants assembled about 200 soldiers and began to move them north by land and by sea in twelve shallops (sloops). The approach of the Loyalists was discovered and so they pulled on their oars, heading up the mouth of Ferry Creeke adjacent to Provincetown in Anne Arundel County. One of the Parlimentarian's ships, armed with two bow cannons, pulled in behind them and anchored at the mouth of Ferry Creeke, effectively blocking the Loyalists' escape over water. The soldiers of Anne Arundel were clad in Venice red, the uniforms of the Parliamentary Army - they represented the first appearance of the "Red Coats" in America. They marched as a company six files deep over the six miles to meet the Loyalist Proprietary army. The flag of the Commonwealth of England was handed to young William Ayres, about 8:00 o'clock in the morning of March 26, 1655. Before 9:00, he would be dead. Captain Stone had deployed Lieutenant Thomas Tunnell and Lieutenant Richard Banks with a few men to take one of the three outlying forts and act as sentries with respect to the approach of the enemy. This they did. The battle was joined on a spit of land called Burle's Towne Land. The Loyalists, assembled under the yellow and black striped colors of Lord Baltimore, got off the first shots. The Parliamentarian's front rank fired, then crouched and reloaded, and the file immediately behind them stood and fired, then crouched and reloaded, while the first rank fired again. It was the tactic of the New Model Army in England. Many of Stone's men fell. The will of the Loyalist men to fight on was already broken, except for three or four sheltered and firing from behind a huge fallen tree. They were soon flanked and eliminated. In less than half an hour, the Battle of the Severn was over. Tunnell and Banks surrendered the fort they had taken when it was demanded of them by the Parlimentarian forces. On April 24, 1655, Thomas Tunnell was tried in Patuxent Provincial Court for being "in armes" against the lawful, present government. His defense was that he was misled and confused by Captain Stone who, Tunnell testified, had stated to him that he had power from the Lord Protector himself (Oliver Cromwell). Tunnell escaped with his life, but was fined 1,000 lbs. of tobacco. This was, at the time, to one in his financial position, an absolutely confiscatory measure that caused him to forfeit any estate he had nor hope to readily raise and thus ended Tunnell's dreams of staying on in Maryland. After Lord Baltimore's full restoration of powers the following year, in 1656, Lord Baltimore remembered Thomas Tunnell's services and directed his new representative, Governor Josiah Fendall, to show Tunnell favor. His exact language was as follows: "That they cherish & comfort in what they can all such persons as have approved themselves faithful to his LoP and don good service in the late troubles there: that his LoP's said Lieut. preferre those persons before any others to such places & employments of trust and profitt as they may be respectively capable of & and in particular Mr. Thomas Truman, Mr. George Thompson, Lieut. Thomas Tunnell & Mr. Barton & that his said Lieut. and Counsell lett his Lordship understand from time to time wherein he can upon any occasion requite them & others who have been faithful to his Lordship as aforesaid….." (Archives of Maryland, Vol. III, p. 326) By this time, however, Thomas had fled across the Chesapeake Bay to the Eastern Shore of Virginia, and found work in Accomack County. He married and began farming. The main cash crop was tobacco, followed by corn, when Thomas was starting on his own in the upper seaside. Thomas Jr. was born in 1658 or 1659 and Nathaniel in 1660 or early 1661. On Oct 17, 1667 Thomas Tunnell received a certificate for 200 acres for transporting people into Accomack County. By now such certificates in his possession totaled 700 acres. He received a confirming patent deed dated October 30, 1669 for 700 acres at Accocomson (Va. Land Office Patent and Grants, Patent Book 6, p. 258), a locality near present day Oak Hall. **A curious court entry for 16 February 1665 states that "Thomas Tunnill and Richard Johnson" posted security to support an illegitimate child born to one Mary Vincent. (McKey, "Accomack County Va. Court Order Abstracts" Vol. 1, p. 91b of the original court entries) as the result of a liason with Aminidab, a black farm hand of Southy Littleton's. The son was also named Aminidab. The father had died by early 1665, and a memo is preserved dated April 14, 1665 in which Southy gave to "ye sonne of my servant Aminidab, negro, deceased and Mary Vincent, three cows and their female increase which were formerly given to my said servant"; P. Heinegg, Free African Americans of North Carolina and Virginia. Mary Vincent subsequently married John Oke (Oakey) on Oct 2, 1666 in Somerset County, MD, whither they and her son Aminidab were transported; Somerset Co. Marriages Liber IKL; Somerset Co. Liber 16, Folio 308). Why Thomas was mixed up in this matter remains uncertain.** In 1669 Thomas paid his tax for having a tithable that year, which would have been himself. In 1670, he paid for two tithables. But as of the next year, in 1671, Thomas Tunnell vanished from the records. Death must have overtaken him quickly for he left no will. No wife came forward to administer his estate nor claim the protection of a dower interest, either. It would seem she had predeceased him. Thomas died at 42 years of age.
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"Lieutenants Richard Banks and Thomas Tunnell being found in Armes against the present Government & pleading that they were Misled by the protestation of Capt. Stone who Said he had power from the Lord Protector and also did Surrender a ffort upon the first Summons are discharged from further trouble in the action upon their Submission and Good forbearance to the present Government."
SOURCE: Archives of Maryland: Judiciary and Testamentary Business of the Provincial Court, 1649/50 - 1657; Volume 10, page 414
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"... 5. That they cherish & comfort in what they can all such persons as have approved themselves faithfull to his Lordship and don good service in the late troubles there: that his Lordship's said Lieutenant preferre those persons before any others to such places & imployments of trust & profitt as they may be respectively capeable of & in particular Mr. Thomas Truman Mr. George Thomson Lieutenant Thomas Tunnell & Mr. Barton & that his said Lieutenant & Counsell lett his Lordship understand from time to time wherein he can upon any occasion requite them & others who have bin faithfull to his Lordship as aforesaid with any thing there for theyr advantage according to theyr respective meritts assureing them that his Lordship will be very ready & willing to gratify them in any thing that shall be reasonably desired of him & in his power to doe. ...
Given under his Lordships seale at Armes 23rd of October 1656
C: Baltemore"
SOURCE: Archives of Maryland: Proceedings of the Council of Maryland, 1636 - 1667; Volume 3, page 326

He had the following children:

  M i Thomas Tunnell Jr. was born about 1659 in Accomack County, Virginia. He died before 1680 in Accomack County, Virginia.
  M ii Nathaniel Tunnell

Charles Stockley.Charles married Mary Taylor before 16 Jun 1696 in Accomack County, Virginia.

Mary Taylor [Parents] was born in 1663 in Accomack County, Virginia. She died after 1712 in Accomack County, Virginia. She married Charles Stockley before 16 Jun 1696 in Accomack County, Virginia.

Other marriages:
Tunnell, Nathaniel


Nathaniel Tunnell [Parents] was born about 1684 in Accomack County, Virginia. He died before 31 Jul 1739 in Accomack County, Virginia. He married Sarah Venelson about 1728 in Accomack County, Virginia.

Nathaniel made a will on 5 April 1739 at Accomack Co, VA. To son William 170 acres where I now live. Wife Sarah to have use of same for life. Wife & 3 children Comfort, William & Mary Tunnell residual legatees. Children under age. Wife Exec. Witt: Nathaniel Morgan, Catherine McKenny, William Beavans, Jr. Nathaniel died before 31 July 1739 at Accomack Co, VA. It was on this date that his will was probated.

Sarah Venelson died after 1758 in Accomack County, Virginia. She married Nathaniel Tunnell about 1728 in Accomack County, Virginia.

They had the following children:

  M i William Tunnell
  F ii Comfort Tunnell was born about 1732 in Accomack County, Virginia.
  F iii Mary Tunnell was born about 1736 in Accomack County, Virginia.

Edmund Tunnell [Parents] was born about 1686 in Accomack County, Virginia. He died before 28 Aug 1750 in Accomack County, Virginia. He married Comfort in 1710 in Accomack County, Virginia.

Other marriages:
Warrington, Susanna

Accomack County, VA: will of Edmund Tunnel dated Aug 9 1750, was probated Aug 28, 1750, and is witnessed by Charles Stockly, Philip Fisher and Mary Fisher (p. 110)

Comfort was born about 1695. She died in 1724 in Accomack County, Virginia. She married Edmund Tunnell in 1710 in Accomack County, Virginia.


Edmund Tunnell [Parents] was born about 1686 in Accomack County, Virginia. He died before 28 Aug 1750 in Accomack County, Virginia. He married Susanna Warrington in 1726 in Accomack County, Virginia.

Other marriages:
, Comfort

Accomack County, VA: will of Edmund Tunnel dated Aug 9 1750, was probated Aug 28, 1750, and is witnessed by Charles Stockly, Philip Fisher and Mary Fisher (p. 110)

Susanna Warrington [Parents] was born in 1691 in Accomack County, Virginia. She died before 1750 in Accomack County, Virginia. She married Edmund Tunnell in 1726 in Accomack County, Virginia.

They had the following children:

  F i Scarburg Tunnell
  M ii Joseph Tunnell
  F iii Naomi Tunnell was born about 1732 in Accomack County, Virginia.

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