Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   
  1. John Ray, Theft > theft from a specified place; John Ray, Royal Offences > coining offences, 18th February 1691.

    John Ray , was Indicted for Robbing one Bernard Chatfield , on the 9th of May last, and taking away several French Pistoles and other pieces of Gold, to a considerable value . The Evidence swore, That the Pr ...
  2. Robert Chatfield, Theft > animal theft; John Beamore, Theft > animal theft, 9th December 1691.

    Robert Chatfield and John Beamore, alias Pemore , were both Indicted for stealing a Barrow Hog, value 20 s. a Sow value 20 s. on the 9th. of November last, the Goods ...
  3. Supplementary material, 15th January 1692.

    ... is Bluck , Charles Trivert , John Friend , Robert Chatfield , Daniel Bransbury , Thomas Mercy , Richard Jackson , and Martha Walters alias Wilson. Then the Court was pleased to give them a most seasonable Exho ...
  4. Punishment summary, 15th January 1692.

    ... is Bluck , Charles Trivert , John Friend , Robert Chatfield , Daniel Bransbury , Thomas Mercy , Richard Jackson , and Martha Walters alias Wilson. Then the Court was pleased to give them a most seasonable Exho ...
  5. Elizabeth Chatfield, Theft > theft from a specified place, 3rd September 1766.

    458. (M) Elizabeth, wife of John Chatfield , was indicted for stealing one pair of linen sheets, value 4 s. one stuff curtain, value 1 s. three flat irons, one iron poker, one pair of iron ton ...
  6. JOHN WEBB, Theft > grand larceny; JOHN TAYLOR, Theft > grand larceny, 2nd December 1795.

    ... ur gallons of rum, value 3l. the property of John Chatfield , William Chatfield , and Robert Chatfield , November 28 .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.) RICHARD BUNCE sworn. (The witness cried.) Q. What is th ...
  7. JAMES BLAKELY, Deception > forgery; MICHAEL STACK, Deception > forgery; RICHARD CORNS, Deception > forgery, 9th January 1799.

    ... time. Mr. Gurney. Q. Who wrote that book? A. Mr. Chatfield. Q. Is he here? A. No. Q. You never saw Ford in your life? A. Not to my knowledge. Q. You know no more than these books tell you? A. No. Q. And these ...
  8. THOMAS RUSSELL, Theft > grand larceny, 16th September 1801.

    ... rth Count. Charging it to be the property of John Chatfield and William Chatfield .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys). JOHN HEARN sworn. Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am an assistant employed in the Excise ware ...
  9. WILLIAM WARNER, Theft > theft from a specified place, 6th June 1810.

    ... nd twenty deals, value 50 l. the property of John Chatfield , Thomas Arnott , Robert Mercer , and Thomas Arnott , jun. in a certain boat upon the navigable river Thames . And TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, ...
  10. JOHN HOLCOMB, Theft > grand larceny; JOHN PITKEATHLY, Theft > grand larceny, 8th April 1812.

    ... allon of rum, value 15 s. the property of William Chatfield and Samuel Chatfield . JOSHUA BRAY . I am a city constable. Q. On the 18th of January were you placed by Mr. Chatfield's cellar in Cooper's row A. Ye ...
  11. WILLIAM DAGNEASH, Theft > grand larceny; SIMEON DAGNEASH, Theft > grand larceny, 27th October 1813.

    ... get this timber; he then said, he purchased it at Chatfield and Arnott's. Before that I told him the property was mine, and it had been stolen; before that I said, if he purchased it of these people, I suppose ...
  12. JOHN YOUNG, Theft > grand larceny; JOHN FRANCIS, Theft > receiving, 6th December 1815.

    ... goods, knowing them to have been stolen . WALTER CHATFIELD . I am warehouse man to Mr. Bensley, of Bolt court, Fleet street ; John Young was in our employ during four years previous to last Christmas; he was ...
  13. JAMES DAKIN, Theft > grand larceny, 6th December 1820.

    ... ber , one grate, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Chatfield . THOMAS CHATFIELD . I live in Green lane, Tottenham . On the 8th of December, about half past twelve o'clock, I was told a man was gone out of my sh ...
  14. Front matter from Proceedings, 11th April 1821.

    ... ant , William Johnston , John Valentine , Charles Chatfield , William Stevens , Benjamin Wilson , John Southgate , Joseph Sadler , John Paton , John Simpson , Richard Henry Poulton , William Russell . First Mi ...
  15. WILLIAM CHATFIELD, Theft > grand larceny; JOHN ALLEN, Theft > grand larceny, 19th February 1823.

    425. WILLIAM CHATFIELD and JOHN ALLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February , a pillow, value 18 d. , the goods of Benjamin Lamb . BENJAMIN LAMB . I am a brok ...
  16. WILLIAM CHATFIELD, Theft > theft from a specified place, 19th May 1825.

    988. WILLIAM CHATFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , a tea caddy, value 2 l. 2 s., the goods of John Dark , in his dwelling house . JOHN DARK. I am a ca ...
  17. ANN WALKER, Theft > simple larceny, 4th December 1828.

    ... d 2 handkerchiefs, value 6d. , the goods of James Chatfield . ARABELLA CAMPBELL . I am single, and live in Old Compton street . I lost a tea caddy and some other things from the drawers in the parlour, on the ...
  18. JOHN PRIZEMAN, Theft > simple larceny, 16th September 1830.

    ... 0 pieces of timber, value 20l., the goods of John Chatfield and others . MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution. WILLIAM TEMPEST MERCER . I am in the employ of Messrs. John Chatfield and others, who live in Up ...
  19. WILLIAM BENJAMIN BRAY, Theft > receiving; CHARLES JOHN WALMSLEY, Theft > receiving, 7th April 1831.

    ... 9 sticks of timber, value 40l., the goods of John Chatfield and others, well knowing them to have been stolen ; to which they both pleaded. GUILTY . Confined Six Months .
  20. Front matter from Proceedings, 11th April 1833.

    ... omas Hope John Carter . Second Joseph Sawyer John Chatfield John Benningfield Edmund Manning Thomas Gates William Tomlin Joseph Meck Thomas Taylor John Flowers Thomas Eldred Richard Lake John Capey . Third Sam ...
  21. Front matter from Proceedings, 15th May 1834.

    ... . Peter Crumb Richard Chitty Wm. Clapperton James Chatfield Thomas Cross James Cooper George Cross John Chapman John Churchill Edward Curtis Francis Chambers James Creswick Fifth. Edmund Cross Richard Chaffer ...
  22. GEORGE WILLIAMS, Theft > pocketpicking, 14th May 1838.

    ... May, 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; the goods of John Chatfield, from his person. JOHN CHATFIFLD . About half past seven o'clock on the evening of the 1st of May I was walking up Leadenhall street—I felt a p ...
  23. WILLIAM JOHNSON, Theft > shoplifting, 26th November 1838.

    ... the goods of Edward Chatfieid and another. EDWARD CHATFIELD . I live in the City road, and am a linen draper. At a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening of the 24th of October, I had a cloak at the shop do ...
  24. Front matter from Proceedings, 4th February 1839.

    ... e James Godwin Richard Haynes William Harper John Chatfield Fourth Jury. Henry Faulkner James Crossley John Blake Hugh Lang Robert Archer Charles James George Henry Ive John Ring Thomas John Ellis William Grif ...
  25. JANE REEVES, Killing > murder, 4th February 1839.

    ... prisoner—I was in the service of Jones and Chatfield, in January, as housemaid—the prisoner was cook—I had been there two months, within two or three days—I slept in the same bed with ...
  26. CHARLES PRICE, Theft > simple larceny, 23rd August 1841.

    ... of July, 1 coat, value 2l., the goods of Charles Chatfield; to which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined One Year.
  27. BENJAMIN EVERETT, Theft > simple larceny, 23rd August 1841.

    ... e 2l. 5s. and 1 bag, value 6d.; the goods of John Chatfield. THOMAS ISRAEL BUNDY . I am servant to Mr. John Chatfield, who lives in Aldgate. On the 12th of August I put this bag of coffee at his door, inside&# ...
  28. JOHN LAMPERD, Theft > stealing from master, 25th October 1841.

    ... weight of currants, value 2s., the goods of John Chatfield, his master. JOHN CHATFIELD . I live in Aldgate High street—the prisoner was in my employ. In consequence of information I sent for a policeman ...
  29. Front matter from Proceedings, 22nd August 1842.

    ... a George Thomas Dearberg William Challis Benjamin Chatfield William Atwater J. Chipperfield W. Cottrell CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT. PIRIE, MAYOR. TENTH SESSION. A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previous ...
  30. ELIZABETH MUNRO, Theft > simple larceny, 1st January 1844.

    ... o show to a lady, and to have returned it. EDWARD CHATFIELD . I am the principal assistant to Mr. Howitt—the prisoner came to the shop on the 13th of Dec.—I was not standing by during the early par ...
  31. STEPHEN WILLIAM PERRY, Theft > embezzlement, 20th September 1852.

    ... t. MR. HUDDLESTON conducted the Prosecution. JOHN CHATFIELD . I am a grocer, and live in Aldgate High street. The prisoner was in my employ on 31st Aug. and had been so for five or six weeks previous—in ...
  32. JOHN ANDREWS, Violent Theft > robbery, 13th December 1852.

    ... m in the habit of going to the Wheatsheaf. PHCEBE CHATFIELD . I am married and keep a stall outside my door, No. 2, Harlington street. On 15th Nov. I was standing at my door about 5 o'clock, or a little after, ...
  33. WILLIAM TURNER, Theft > stealing from master, 27th November 1854.

    ... r goods, and 1 10l. note; the property of Richard Chatfield, his master. RICHARD CHATFIELD . I am a master shipwright, in the Dockyard, at Greenwich; the prisoner had been in my service five months; he had bee ...
  34. EDWARD CHATFIELD, Breaking Peace > assault; JAMES MICHAEL BUTTON, Breaking Peace > assault; THOMAS NORRIS, Breaking Peace > assault, 24th November 1856.

    2. EDWARD CHATFIELD, JAMES MICHAEL BUTTON , and THOMAS NORRIS , were indicted for an assault upon Sarah Parker. (The prosecutrix did not appear.) NOT GUILTY .
  35. CATHERINE ROWE, Theft > burglary; ANN MORGAN, Theft > burglary, 4th April 1859.

    ... s no pattern here that I had not in stock. PHOEBE CHATFIELD . I am the wife of William Chatfield, of 9, Newman street, Portman market—I did keep a coffee stall up against Messrs. Goodman's shop, but I ha ...
  36. CHARLOTTE WINTLAND, Sexual Offences > bigamy, 11th July 1864.

    ... NTLAND (30) , Feloniously marrying William Bailey Chatfield, her husband, John Wintland, being then alive. MR. THOMPSON conducted the Prosecution, and MR. COLLINS the defence. GEORGE BROWN . I live at Southsea ...
  37. JOHN LAKEMAN, Violent Theft > robbery; DANIEL BARLEY, Violent Theft > robbery, 12th July 1869.

    ... closet—the prisoners are the two men. JAMES CHATFIELD . On the morning of 16th June I saw the two prisoners running—I was with the last witness—we ran after them, and ran them into a water cl ...
  38. FREDERICK CARTER, Theft > theft from a specified place, 13th January 1873.

    ... aling one barrow, the property of Frederick James Chatfield. MR. MEAD conducted the Prosecution. FREDERICK JAMES CHATFIELD . I am a wood hawker, of Deptford—on 26th December I saw my wheelbarrow safe in ...
  39. THOMAS LEWIS, Deception > forgery, 21st October 1878.

    ... ud, also to unlawfully obtaining 2s. from Herbert Chatfield with intent to raud.— [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.] Twelve Monty Imprisonment .
  40. THOMAS CHATFIELD, Violent Theft > robbery, 23rd May 1881.

    580. THOMAS CHATFIELD (18) PLEADED GUILTY to a robbery on. Edward Comber and stealing a felt hat and other articles, having been before convicted.— Four Months Hard ...
  41. JOHN DOLBY, Killing > manslaughter, 13th December 1897.

    ... Inquisition only with the manslaughter of George Chatfield. MR. SIMMONDS, for the prosecution, offered no evidence, as the GRAND JURY found no bill. NOT GUILTY .
  42. JOHN SULLIVAN, Royal Offences > coining offences, 29th February 1904.

    ... 2;she made no purchase—I handed the coin to Chatfield—he made a mark on it—I fallowed the woman to the door—I saw the prisoner standing on the opposite side of the road—there are ...
  43. ELLEN SULLIVAN, Royal Offences > coining offences, 29th February 1904.

    ... found it bad—I afterwards handed it over to Chatfield—he marked it—I returned into the shop and told the prisoner I should keep the coin—she said, "I would rather you keep it than that ...
  44. ALFRED STRATTON, Killing > murder; ALBERT ERNEST STRATTON, Killing > murder, 2nd May 1905.

    ... neighbours came into my room, Mrs. Bayne and Mrs. Chatfield—I knew Mrs. Bayne as Mrs. Wood—they came into my room about 9.15, and stayed a little time—they were going away, but I called them ...
  45. ERNEST BAILEY CHATFIELD, Breaking Peace > wounding, 20th October 1908.

    CHATFIELD, Ernest Bailey (26, labourer) ; shooting at Mabel Elizabeth Smith with a revolver loaded with powder and leaden shot, with intent to kill and murder ...
  46. FREDERICK GEORGE TIBBEY, Damage to Property > arson; FREDERICK GEORGE TIBBEY, Theft > theft from a specified place, 20th April 1909.

    ... when prisoner was brought in by Police constable Chatfield. Prisoner had in his possession the four keys (produced); I asked him where he got them; he said, "I stole them a fortnight ago from Messrs. Pooley's ...
  47. JAMES RYAN, Breaking Peace > wounding, 7th September 1909.

    ... ers—Detective sergeant Hancock and Sergeant Chatfield—and took him to the station. At the station I pointed out George Hudson, the prosecutor, to him, and said, "This in the man you stabbed." He re ...
  48. ERNEST BRADY, Breaking Peace > wounding, 15th November 1910.

    ... Home interfere with him. Police constable WILLIAM CHATFIELD, 113 City Police. I saw prisoner strike Home twice, not hard blows; he then struck him hard and Home fell backwards on his head. I went across and sa ...

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey involving Chatfields'


Links: Chatfield Genealogy   Green = victim  Red = defendant  Blue = juror  Purple = witness

Updated 18 Jan 2017 with 48 cases at bottom of page.


1. John Ray, Theft > theft from a specified place; John Ray, Royal Offences > coining offences, 18th February 1691.

  • John Ray, was Indicted for Robbing one Bernard Chatfield, on the 9th of May last, and taking away several French Pistoles and other pieces of Gold, to a considerable value. The Evidence swore, That the Prisoner was a Servant to him, being an Apothicary in the Minories, and the House was Robbed of the Gold; but there was no possitive proof against him, besides the Fact being committed before the 16th of May, he was Acquitted by vertue of Their Majesties most Gracious Pardon.

  • The same John Ray was a second time Indicted for Coyning' of several Pieces of false Mony, on the 21st of January last, viz. Half Crowns, &c. The Evidence swore, that Stamps to Coyn Mony were found in the Prisoner's House, which were produced in Court; and although the Prisoner denied it, yet being lookt upon to be a Notorious Offender, he was found Guilty.

2. Robert Chatfield, defendant, theft: animal theft, 09 Dec 1691.

  • Robert Chatfield and John Beamore, alias Pemore, were both Indicted for stealing a Barrow Hog, value 20 s. a Sow value 20 s. on the 9th. of November last, the Goods of Simon Newel; Mr. Newel said that he lost 9. Hogs in all, which were stole out of his Yard, at Hornchurch in Essex; and afterwards he found them all again, where the Prisoner had sold them, and they were taken as they were driving some of the Hogs along the Road, the Prisoners could not gainsay it, so they were both found Guilty of Felony.

3. Robert Chatfield, defendant, 15 Jan 1692.

  • Then the Court Adjourn'd till Tuesday Four a Clock in the Afternoon: And then being met, the Proceedings were as followeth; that is to say, These following persons being called over by their Names; and being asked, Why Execution should not be awarded agai...  (Transported)

4. John Chatfield, defendant, theft: specified place, 03 Sep 1766.

  • 458. (M) Elizabeth, wife of John Chatfield , was indicted for stealing one pair of linen sheets, value 4 s. one stuff curtain, value 1 s. three flat irons, one iron poker, one pair of iron tongs, one iron fire-shovel, one copper quart pot, one pewter See original bason, and one iron trevet, the property of John Vaughan , in a certain lodging-room left by contract, &c. April 15. *

  • John Vaughan . The prisoner is a married woman; she and her husband lodged at my house between two and three years; after her husband left her, and was gone away. I left her a room of a lesser rent; she worked for an upholsterer in Clerkenwell at 7 s. a week; her husband has left her about two years: I lost nothing while he was with her: on the 15th of April she went off, and took the key with her, and the things mentioned in the indictment were missing; she returned the 19th of August; I charged her with taking the things; she told me, if I would not punish her, she would punish me for scandalizing her; I took her before the Justice; she confessed voluntarily to taking all the things; we have found all again but the sheets and curtain.
  • Prisoner's defence.
  • Mr. Vaughan promised me, if I had any body that would join in a note to pay a shilling a week, he would make a debt of it. I did not take them in order to steal them, it was upon an emergency.
  • Mr. Godfrey. I am foreman to Mess. Mallet and Gomm, upholsterers; I have known the prisoner between fourteen and fifteen years; she worked there some years; we have often things of value lying about, we never missed any thing; she is the last person I should have mistrusted; was she to find favour, I believe she might come to work with us again.
  • Dennis Mullen . I have known her about seven years; she has worked for Mess. May and Eades in the upholstery way; she behaved very sober and well, both there and in several other places.  ACQUITTED.

5. John Chatfield, victim in trial of JOHN WEBB, JOHN TAYLOR, theft: simple grand larceny, 02 Dec 1795.

  • JOHN WEBB and JOHN TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously stealing four gallons of rum, value 3l. the property of John Chatfield, William Chatfield, and Robert Chatfield, November 28.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

  • RICHARD BUNCE sworn.
  • (The witness cried.) - Q. What is the reason of your being frightened; is there any reason for it? - A. I dont know that there is. I am a carpenter by trade, and live with my father, No. 49, in the Little Minories.
    See original
    Q. Do you know Messrs. Chatsield's cellar, in Sheepy-yard? - A. Yes; on Saturday I saw Taylor, Mr. Chatsield's servant, open the door and go in.
  • Q. Don't be frightened, there is nothing to frighten you? - A. Perhaps there will be.
  • Q. Had Taylor any light? - A. No; it was between three and four in the afternoon; on his going into the cellar, I went and told Wade, the other witness, as I was ordered to do; I returned to the cellar, and Wade followed me; I then saw a man, with a basket on his shoulder, come out of the cellar that Taylor had gone into.
  • Q. How long was that after Taylor went in? - A. About eight minutes, not longer.
  • Q. Do you know who that man was? - A. Yes; the other prisoner that stands by Taylor.
  • Q. What makes you so frightened? - A. Because I am brought here to condemn these men.  (Web and Taylor were convicted)

6. William Chatfield, victim in trial of JOHN WEBB, JOHN TAYLOR, theft: simple grand larceny, 02 Dec 1795.  see above

7. Robert Chatfield, victim in trial of JOHN WEBB, JOHN TAYLOR, theft: simple grand larceny, 02 Dec 1795.  see above

10. John & William Chatfield, victims in trial of THOMAS RUSSELL, theft: simple grand larceny, 16 Sep 1801.

  • THOMAS RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July, a gallon of brandy, value 10s. twenty glass phials, value 10s. and a wooden box, value 6d. the property of our Lord the King.

  • Second Count. Charging it to be the property of the Commissioners of Excise.
  • Third Count. Charging it to be the property of Joseph Chipperfield.
  • Fourth Count. Charging it to be the property of John Chatfield and William Chatfield.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).
  • JOHN HEARN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am an assistant employed in the Excise warehouse, at Porter's Quay, for receiving condemned goods: On the 27th of July last, Mr. Keylock left the warehouse for a few minutes; the door was chained within side when he and I were together; he went out, and the door was pulled to, only I did not follow him to fasten the door, as I expected him back every minute; after he was gone, I heard the door go all of a sudden against a cask; it was a noise I was not accustomed to hear; I turned round, and saw a man dressed in soldier's clothes go out of the warehouse with a box under his arm; I went after him, and he dropped the box, which split the bottom right in half; the box contained twenty samples of brandy, marked C in a diamond; they were in half-pint phials.
  • Q. What had the prisoner to do in the warehouse See original ? - A. He had no sort of business there.
  • Q. Where was the box taken from? - A. From a bench about a yard and a half, or two yards, from the door.
  • Q. Do you know to whom it belonged? - A. Yes, Messrs. John and William Chatfield.
  • Mr. Knapp. Q.Was not the prisoner very drunk at the time? - A. He was.
  • Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor.
  • The prisoner called Mr. William Crowther, a goldsmith, in Bunhill-row, who had known him nine years, and gave him a good character.
  • GUILTY, aged 24.  Confined one month in Newgate

13. John Chatfield, victim in trial of WILLIAM WARNER, theft: specified place, 06 Jun 1810.

  • WILLIAM WARNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of April, one hundred and twenty deals, value 50 l. the property of John Chatfield, Thomas Arnott, Robert Mercer, and Thomas Arnott, jun. in a certain boat upon the navigable river Thames. And

  • TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging him.
  • CHARLES POTLIDOE. Q. Do you live with Messrs. Chatfield and Co. - A. Yes.  See link 13 for full extended details.

15. William Chatfield, victim in trial of JOHN HOLCOMB, JOHN PITKEATHLY, theft: simple grand larceny, 08 Apr 1812.

  • JOHN HOLCOMB and JOHN PITKEATHLY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January, a gallon of rum, value 15 s. the property of William Chatfield and Samuel Chatfield.  Found guilty and transported for seven years.

18. WALTER CHATFIELD, appears in trial of JOHN YOUNG, JOHN FRANCIS, theft: simple grand larceny, theft: receiving stolen goods, 06 Dec 1815.

  • JOHN YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November, three hundred pounds weight of printed paper, value 10l. the property of Thomas Bensley. And JOHN FRANCIS, for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen.

  • WALTER CHATFIELD. I am warehouse-man to Mr. Bensley, of Bolt-court, Fleet-street; John Young was in our employ during four years previous to last Christmas; he was a reading boy.  See link 18 for full extended details.  YOUNG, GUILTY, aged 16. Transported for Seven Years. FRANCIS, NOT GUILTY.

19. Thomas Chatfield, victim in trial of JAMES DAKIN, theft: simple grand larceny, 06 Dec 1820.

  • JAMES DAKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of December, one grate, value 4 s., the goods of Thomas Chatfield.

  • THOMAS CHATFIELD. I live in Green-lane, Tottenham. On the 8th of December, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was told a man was gone out of my shed with something. I followed and secured him with the grate in his apron. There were three persons, and each had a donkey - I had followed them to Southgate. They behaved very impudent.  (Property produced and sworn to.)  GUILTY. Aged 18.  Transported for Seven Years.

21. Charles Chatfield, juror in Front Matter from Old Bailey Proceedings; John Thomas Thorp, Session Fourth, Wednesday 11th April 1821, 159-256

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 11th of APRIL, 1821, an...

22. WILLIAM CHATFIELD, defendant, theft: simple grand larceny, 19 Feb 1823.

  • WILLIAM CHATFIELD and JOHN ALLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of February, a pillow, value 18 d., the goods of Benjamin Lamb.

  • BENJAMIN LAMB. I am a broker, and live in Brick-lane, St. Luke's. On the 12th of February, I lost a pillow, my wife sent for me; I went in pursuit round Old-street, and caught Allen with it in his apron - and as I returned from Worship-street, I took Chatfield. Cox spoke to them both.
  • HARRIET COX. I am ten years old, and live next door to Lamb, in Brick-lane, Old-street. I was going for some milk, between six and seven o'clock in the afternoon, it was nearly dark. I saw Chatfield get on a step, and take the pillow - Allen stood waiting at the corner of Mitchell-street, two doors off; they both went down there together. I told Mrs. Lamb of it, and at night Mr. Lamb took one of them. I saw them at Worship-street next morning, and am sure of them.  (Property produced and sworn to.)  CHATFIELD - GUILTY.  Whipped and Discharged.  ALLEN - GUILTY.  Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

23. WILLIAM CHATFIELD, defendant, theft: specified place, 19 May 1825.

  • WILLIAM CHATFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, a tea-caddy, value 2 l. 2 s., the goods of John Dark, in his dwelling-house.

  • JOHN DARK. I am a cabinet-maker, and live in Leather-sellers'-buildings, London-wall. On Wednesday, the 20th of April, when I went out in the morning, this caddy was safe; I returned at three o'clock, and it was gone. The materials it is made with did not cost me 40 s. On the Friday following the officer produced it - the prisoner was then in custody.
  • (Property produced and sworn to.)
  • BRIDGET SIMMS. I live with Mr. Dark. On the 20th of April I had been out about three o'clock, and as I came to the end of my master's window, I saw the prisoner come out of the shop, with the tea-caddy under his arm; I did not follow him: I saw him again on the Monday following, and think he is the man - he had a light fustian jacket and blue trowsers on. Nobody was in the shop.
  • SAMUEL BRIDGES. I am a constable of St. Luke's. I was coming down Chiswell-street on Wednesday, the 20th of April, at twenty minutes past three o'clock, and met the prisoner with something wrapped in a handkerchief; I let him pass, and saw him turn down Whitecross-street, into a narrow passage, and then into Red Lion-market-place - he then put the bundle into his apron; I collared him, and asked what he had there - he said a tea-caddy, which a gentleman gave to him in Finsbury-square, to carry; I asked where to - he said to some street in Oxford-street: I detained him, and on the Friday following I found the owner. I found two skeleton keys on him; one of which opens Dark's door; he had a fustian jacket and blue trowsers on.
  • GUILTY. Aged 19. Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.  Transported for Seven Years.

24. James Chatfield, victim in trial of ANN WALKER, theft: simple grand larceny, 04 Dec 1828.

  • ANN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of November, 1 tea-caddy, value 1s.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 pinafore, value 6d., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 6d., the goods of James Chatfield.

  • ARABELLA CAMPBELL. I am single, and live in Old Compton-street. I lost a tea-caddy and some other things from the drawers in the parlour, on the 27th of November; I had seen them about an hour before - the shirt and handkerchiefs were James Chatfield's, my sister's husband; all the things were brought back: I know nothing of the prisoner.
  • ANN MURPHY. I am a servant to Mr. Chatfield. On the 27th of November my mistress sent me for change for a shilling, and when I went out the prisoner was sitting in the shop; my mistress came after me to the shop, and told me to watch the prisoner - I did not see her come out of my mistress', but I watched her into Church-street; I saw her open a shirt, and she had the other things under her arm; I took hold of her, and asked what she was going to do with them - she said to sell them; I asked where she got them - she said it was no odds to me; I took her back, and my mistress sent for the officer - she begged my mistress to forgive her; the things had been in the parlour - I had left the shop about half an hour; she dropped the shirt when I came up.
  • JAMES HODGES. I produce the articles which I got from the prosecutrix - I took the prisoner.
  • Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person who took them - I went in with a woman to buy a bonnet-shape.
  • GUILTY. Aged 15. Transported for Seven Years.

25. John Chatfield, victim in trial of JOHN PRIZEMAN, theft: simple grand larceny, 16 Sep 1830.

  • JOHN PRIZEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of July, 10 pieces of timber, value 20l., the goods of John Chatfield and others.

  • MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.
  • WILLIAM TEMPEST MERCER. I am in the employ of Messrs. John Chatfield and others, who live in Upper Ground-street, Blackfriar's-road. On the 5th of July we missed ten sticks of timber, which I had seen safe at Battersea on the 1st of July - on the 6th I went to Smallwood's, and found five whole pieces, and one piece partly cut; there was the ship's name, the number of the float, and the contents of the piece on them.
  • Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. What was the mark on them? A. The ship's name was the Latona; we did not have the entire cargo, but several pieces; the rest would have the same ship's name on it, but the number would be different - there might be some others of the same contents; I did not see it from the 1st to the 5th of July - the dock they See original were in is secured by a boom, which goes across; the timber generally floats at high water - it can be removed without loosing the boom.
  • Re-examined. Q. Did you find the locks of it broken? A. One was a little damaged - the same feet of timber may be in one stick as another, but the number would not agree.
  • WILLIAM SUMMERSELL. I am a waterman, and live at Hammersmith - the prisoner is a waterman. On the 3rd of July, about twelve o'clock at noon, I saw him with ten pieces of timber, which he was hauling into a dock at Lane's-end; I afterwards saw Smallwood and the prisoner at the Cannon public-house; the prisoner put on a canvas-frock - I saw the same timber there on the Sunday, but I did not see it taken away; I afterwards saw Prudent speak to the prisoner the same day, and then Prudent rowed the boat down to Hungerford.
  • Cross-examined. Q. Did you always state the same time? A. At Bow-street I said three o'clock, but it was twelve- I was not aware of any thing coming of it; I judge now by the state of the tide - I was in the Old Court as a prisoner; I had done the same as others, nothing, but I went to New South Wales, and staid there seven years - I was charged at Horsemonger-lane, but not in the Court; I was a prisoner at Croydon, but the bill was thrown out.
  • WILLIAM PRUDENT. I am a waterman, and live at Hammersmith. I saw the prisoner there as I was going to London, and I saw Summersell; it was on a Saturday in July - I was an apprentice at the time, and I asked the prisoner to give me a cast down in his boat; he said he was going to stop a little while, but I might row his boat down, leave it in charge of somebody, and he would call for it in the morning - I rowed myself down, and left it alongside the others.
  • WILLIAM EDWARDS. I am a carman to George Cook, a coal-merchant. I received charge of some timber on the Saturday, from Smallwood, for whom I was at work - there were one or two persons present; I will not say whether the prisoner was, or no - I took the timber from Mr. Smallwood's premises.
  • COURT. Q. Was the prisoner present, or not? A. I believe he was, but I never saw him but that once.
  • MR. CLARKSON. Q. Upon your oath, did you not say he was? A. I believe he was; I received ten sticks of timber - I took eight to Black Lion-lane, and two to Mr. Cook's, my employer; I kept those two for expences till they were taken away - I began to deliver them at eight o'clock in the morning, and might finish about twelve or one; the timber I carted on Monday was that I received charge of on Saturday.
  • SAMUEL TAUNTON. I took Smallwood into custody - I did not take the prisoner; I went to Smallwood's premises on the 7th of July; I found five logs and one piece - they were behind some houses; I saw Edwards there.
  • MR. MERCER. I accompanied the officer to Smallwood's; I did not see Edwards there - I found five sticks there; I then went to Cook's, where I had been the preceding evening, but Edwards was not at home - I found the two sticks there through the people on Smallwood's premises; the two I found at Cook's, and the five at Smallwood's, are part of the ten that were lost.
  • NOT GUILTY.

26. John Chatfield, victim in trial of WILLIAM BENJAMIN BRAY, CHARLES JOHN WALMSLEY, theft: receiving stolen goods, 07 Apr 1831.

  • WILLIAM BENJAMIN BRAY and CHARLES JOHN WALMSLEY were indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 9th of February, 9 sticks of timber, value 40l., the goods of John Chatfield and others, well knowing them to have been stolen; to which they both pleaded.

  • GUILTY. - Confined Six Months.

27. John Chatfield, juror in Front Matter from Old Bailey Proceedings; Sir PETER LAURIE, Session Fourth, Thursday 11th April 1833, 327-454

  • SESSIONS' PAPER. THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR PETER LAURIE , KNT., MAYOR. FOURTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 11th DAY OF APRIL, 1833, AND FOLLOWING DAYS. TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON...

28. James Chatfield, juror in Front Matter from Old Bailey Proceedings; Sir CHARLES FAREBROTHER, Session Fifth, Thursday 15th May 1834, 431-512

  • SESSIONS' PAPER. THE RIGHT HONOURABLE CHARLES FAREBROTHER , MAYOR, FIFTH SESSION HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, On THURSDAY, THE 15th DAY OF MAY, 1834, AND FOLLOWING DAYS. TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON...

©2003 The Old Bailey Proceedings Online 1694-1913