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 DONORS DNA DATA
Group Study

Version 2.0

This page will allow you to view the DNA markers of each donor
for BARD, 
BAIRD, BEARD (and other surname variations).

DNA Man



Our DNA Y Study donor marker values are now posted in this public database (below).
This is the same information that can be found on the public
FamilyTree Y-DNA Results Page




Donors: Please click this link to access our new secure (https), collaborative, password-protected DNA database:

Private Database



The posting of DNA markers (below) has been superseded by our new databases (above).

Y-DNA Alleles - Donor Test Results
    DYS# CODES and COMMENTS
Earliest Known Ancestor
FT
DNA
Kit#

Other
Donor's
Surname
Ysearch
User ID


Project Link
H
a
p
l
o
3
9
3
3
9
0
1
9/
3
9
4
3
9
1
3
8
5
a
3
8
5
b
4
2
6
3
8
8
4
3
9
3
8
9
|
1
3
9
2
3
8
9
|
2
4
5
8
4
5
9
a
4
5
9
b
4
5
5
4
5
4
4
4
7
4
3
7



4
3
8

4
4
8
4
4
9
4
6
4
a
4
6
4
b
4
6
4
c
4
6
4
d
D = presumed from Documented sources.
C = presumed from Compiled sources.
O = presumed from Oral sources.
 G = confirmed from Genetic sources. (findings with a high degree of probability).
12147

BARD

8HH8M
Project
R1a
13 25 15 11 11 14 12 12 10 12 11 29              
            C
Archibald BEARD (BARD)
BAIRD spelling was also used in the US early days.
Believed to have Emigrated
ca 1740 from Ireland to Adams Cnty. later to Franklin Cnty., PA, USA.

Source(s):
The Bard Family by G.O. Seilhamer































23260

GenQuest


BAIRD

9Z7PS
Project


R1b


13


24


14


11


12


14


12


12


12


14


13


30








14


12







C
Samuel BAIRD
1801-1860
USA
Country of immigration unknown.
Source(s):


23730



BAIRD
97XHX



-


12


23


14


10


16


17


11


12


12


13


15


28














C
Samuel BAIRD
1814-1898
Ohio, USA
Country of immigration unknown.
Source(s):



GenQuest




BAIRD
BMUCZ



R1a


13


25


15


11


11


14




10


13


11


30








14


11






C
James BAIRD
1755-1820
USA
Country of immigration unknown.
Source(s):


GenQuest


BAIRD

7S9MV




13




22




14




10




13




15












11




12




11




29










16



10







C
John BAIRD
1765-1738
USA
Country of immigration unknown.
Source(s):


GenQuest


BAIRD
PQAZ3



13




22




14




10




13




15












11




12




11




29










16




10








C
John BAIRD
1765-1738
USA
Country of immigration unknown.
Source(s):






























































FtDNA

BEARD
MVP5V





13




25




15




11




11




15




12




12




10




13




11




30
















C
John BAIRD
1610 
Liberrton Scotland
Source(s):

































DYS 19 is also known as DYS 394

"-" in the Haplogroup column represents an undetermined Haplo.

Alleles #s displayed in red are more likely to show mutation than those displayed in green.

Markers 437 and 438 are specified in some higher level FamilyTreeDNA tests and in some tests done by other services.

IMPORTANT NOTE: If you click the ysearch User ID link associated with each donor, you will go to the Ysearch.org site and be able to send a message to the donor or their contact person. They will then decide if they wish to respond to that particular query.

The kit number, codes and values given above are the only data that will be shown on this page and on the FamilyTreeDNA.com Web site (unless a donor has agreed to release his or her data).



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Click the link below to see an example of the actual personalized
information that each donor will receive from FamilyTree DNA:

EXAMPLE OF ACTUAL DONOR MAILING

 
FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS, THEORIES AND COMMENTS
This is a group study which attempts to show the data for ALL available BARD, BAIRD, BEARD surname variations.

At the present time our Y group study sample is showing some diversity and 1 exact match (7S9MV and PQAZ3), but is considered to be too small to make any definitive conclusions concerning the BARD, BAIRD and BEARD surnames and their probable connections to other distant lines. Probability calculations and comparisons within our donor population, and between them and other individuals can be researched and reviewed on http://www.ysearch.org.

The more different the markers are between any two donors, the further back one has to go to assume a relatively high probability of having a common ancestor (and mutations can potentially affect and "disguise" the results and their conclusions), but if all 12 markers are exactly the same between any two doners, then one can say that there is a genetic probability of 50% that the two people in question had a common ancestor no later than 14.5 generations ago. To approach a higher probability of a most recent common ancestor with a 12 to 12 match, (let's say 95%), we can assume that they had a common ancestor no later than 62 generations ago. Somewhat more detailed explanations are here: Ysearch Frequently Asked Questions 2.

For our purposes a "generation" is defined as 25 years before and during the dark ages (generally from about 476 to 1400, also called the Early Middle Ages), and as approximately 25 to 30 years after the Dark Ages. So in regard to our example above, 14.5 generations would equal about 360 years, and 62 generations would equal approximately 1700 years. *

You can do ysearch comparisons yourself by going here: Ysearch Research and entering any sequence of ID's. Such as: 97XHX, 9Z7PS, 8HH8M, BMUCZ, 7S9MV, MVP5V, PQAZ3, VXUA7

Some other surnames that have inexplicably shown relative genetic closeness are: BRANDON and ORR (and in regard to not one of their donors, but several different donors).

As you can see, this type of comparative research does not give us solid, exact, genealogy data such as individuals' names or birth dates, as we are used to finding in genealogy research. It is more wholistic; more global in nature. It shows us where to begin to look for probable connections in our distant old world past, and then hopefully, we may find verification of those probable connections with original source documentation. (And perhaps also find additional, and more precise, genetic verification and illumination of these issues, in the future.)

We hope to see some discernible groupings and trends as study participation increases.


News and Views

(Administrator's Corner)
Curtis: We don't have a large number of participants yet in our BARD, BAIRD, BEARD and other name variation group Y study, so any presumptions or comments are still somewhat speculative, but we are showing some closeness with two other surnames: ORR and BRANDON. Other surnames that match up closely with our BARDs, BAIRDs and BEARDs (probably) represent a more distant common anccestor. Of course there are some salient factors that can potentially effect or "disguise" expected results. Surname changes and variations (and complete lack of surnames at some point in history) were common back in the early days. Illegitimacy, adopion, and genetic mutation can also contribute to unexpected results. Here is part of what is offered on FamilyTreeDNA concerning Y study matches and surnames, which might help us understand how to view this situation:
When you compare a 12 Marker result to another 12 marker result of someone with the SAME surname, and the results match 12/12, there is a 99% probability that you two are related within the time frame included in the MRCA tables. If the match is 11/12, there's still a high probability that you are related IF the 11/12 match is within the same surname. If you compare a 25 Marker result to another 25 marker result for the SAME surname, and the results match 25/25, then there is also a 99% confidence that the two individuals are related…and at a much closer time interval then with the 12 marker test.
If you compare the 12 marker result to someone else who does not have the same surname, but the scores match, you are most likely NOT recently related. When we use the term recently related, we are talking about a time frame within the last 1000 years or 40 generations, a time depth that accommodates the earliest known use of surnames.
According to current theories, we are all related. The degree of relatedness depends on the time frame, or the number generations between the participants and the common ancestor.

Dr. Luigi Lucca Cavalli-Sforza, Professor Emeritus, Stanford University, in his fascinating book: The Great Human Diasporas: The History of Diversity and Evolutions says that the total population of Europe was 60,000 people at the end of the last Ice Age, about 10,000 years ago. Now Europe has a population of 300 million people. This increase in population is almost entirely due to a natural increase in population rather then immigration from other continents. Keeping this in mind it is reasonable that many people alive today in Europe will match with other Europeans from BEFORE the time that our ancestors began the adoption of surnames, and when you match someone who has a different surname your first thought should be that the ‘connection’ is distant rather then recent.

The only exceptions to this are if an unannounced adoption or false paternity has taken place, but that is difficult to prove, although certainly not impossible.

If two 12 marker results match for two participants with the same surname, and the genealogy research shows a common ancestor in 1835, the DNA test has validated the research and proven that the two descendents are related. In this example, you have two items of evidence to support that the individuals tested are related… a documented paper trail and the DNA results. In addition, the research provided a precise time frame for the common ancestor.

Without the genealogy research, and where 2 participants with the same surname match on the 12 marker test, then the scientific answer to the degree of relatedness is that 50% of the time the common ancestor would have occurred within 14.5 generations, or within approximately 360 years. The range of generations for the common ancestor extends to 76.9 generations, or almost 2000 years* for those cases where there is not a surname in common. Therefore the importance of a surname link is paramount to provide a comfortable conclusion of relatedness. Most of the time random matches with people with different surnames do not stand the test for extended DNA testing. - FamilyTreeDNA.

* There is still some disagreement, even among the experts, concerning the accurate length of a generation as used in the above texts. You can get a rough idea of this figure (for fairly modern times) for your own line by subtracting the birth year of your earliest known male ancestor from your (male) birth year, and dividing by the number of generations. I. e.: 1944-1736=208/7= 29.7 years per generation.

Bruce: Bruce feels that when other completely different surnames show genetic similarity to our Bard, Baird or Beard surname variations, it is probably because the common ancestor exists before the formal establishment of surnames. The use of Haplogroups and Haplotypes are a better measure of genetic closeness than surnames.

NEWS: FamilyTreeDNA has announced a general fund which allows for matching of funds that are donated to a certain surname Y study. (There are some limitations and conditions.) Find out more here: The Fund.


If you have any News or Views to be posted, or questions, or concerns
regarding this study or its findings, or if you wish to participate...

Contact www.FamilyTreeDNA.com
Or one of our Administrators:
Curtis Bard (cbard@adelphia.net)  |  Bruce Baird (bBairdsr@aol.com)  |  Fred Baird (ftBaird@juno.com)  |



(Feel free to copy and share this information via e-mail, and encourage others to participate.)


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