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CASEBY

Notes


Alexander CASEBY

D. Shippey report 09/12/95, Births, Largo, Fife, 443/9 on 19/01/1898, Alexander Caseby at Bridge House, Lundin Mill, Largo, son of John Caseby, Master Shoemaker. Informant: father.


Willimina MACFARLANE

Early Memories of Williamina MacFarlane wife of Rev. Alexander Caseby.

I was born at Loanmouth, Carmyllie, Forfarshire on 26th May 1901. My father was Charles MacFarlane and mother Jemima Smith Raitt. Some of my earliest memories are connected with my two widowed Grannies. Anne Ormond and Anne Mollison. One lived in Forfar. She had a drawer of treasures that I loved to peep into. It contained small home-made objects. One I particularly remember was a pin-cushion in the shape of a frog. We used to go to visit her in a pony and trap borrowed from our other Granny, who lived in the country. Every week we used to walk across the fields to her house to ca' the kirn. That means churn the butter! I had as a reward a newly baked girdle scone with the new butter spread on it by granny using her thumb instead of a knife. I had buttermilk to drink with it.

At the age of five I started school at Carmyllie and was there for five years. Thereafter schools at Inverarity and Rescobie. I enjoyed all lessons but particularly Nature Study.

I spent long happy leisure hours with my father in the garden and knew weeds from flowers at an early age and school nature lessons only increased my interest. My dress for school was made of tweed with a cotton pinafore on top. Hand knitted woollen stockings with boots that sometimes buttoned. My mother made my underwear. There was a soup kitchen at school in which I could have a bowl of soup and a slice of bread for d. That also bought a slice of bread spread with syrup at the local village shop. The schools were between three and five miles distant and I walked in all kinds of weather along rough country roads and across fields to get to classes on time. In general school days were happy days until just before I was fourteen the current headmaster made offensive advances towards me and I went home and refused to return to school.

One cold day I was helping on top of a threshing mill and caught a chill which turned into rheumatic fever. I was very ill. As a result I was not too strong for a while, but I was always happily occupied at home with father in the garden, or in the evenings, as a child playing tiddlywinks, knitting, sewing or making cat's tails. Outside games with ball or skipping rope or a version of hopscotch called 'pallies'. I also had rag dolls. Father had an ear for music, and was also a good singer. He had a 'squeeze box' or melodeon on which he could play all the popular dance tunes, also many of Burn's songs. Our Cousins and friends would join us and we would have many happy evenings with father entertaining us.

At the time of my birth father was Gardener and Farm Manager at Drumyellow for a period and employed by Mr Falconer the MP. for Forfarshire. Dad never stayed very long in one place. I can remember eighteen flittings mostly made by farm carts. His last post where he remained for some considerable time was as Gardener at a mansion house at North Dron, Dairsie, Fife. In the country we had no grocery vans of any kind. Father had a good allowance of flour, oatmeal and milk with which mother made scones, bannocks and oatcakes. Hens in a run provided plenty of eggs. Rabbits and hares were always plentiful.

One of the great highlights of the year was when someone cam to kill a pig. Then we lived high! Black and white puddings, potted meat, liver, kidney, heart and trotters. Large joints were salted and put in a barrel. Hams were hung from the rafters. The bladder was blown up by a bicycle pump and lots of games were played using it as a large ball.

With the garden full of vegetables and fruit we lived well. When Dad went to market at weekends he brought back treats of peppermints, chocolate or oranges. My mother cared for us so well. Baking, cleaning, knitting, mending, feeding the hens she was always busy. There were cats as pets but later in life she had a little Pomeranian called Tottie who was her dear companion. She used to take Tottie for a walk, carrying her in her arms at times on other occasions strolling along slowly knitting a sock with Tottie at her heels.

In reading some of Charles Dicken's books stories are told of children aged six onwards working. Up to 1915 many children from ten years old onwards worked in shops, gardens and factories. The usual age was fourteen. At that age my eldest sister Annie went into service. My brother, George Grant had farming in his blood at which he worked until enlisting on his nineteenth birthday in the Black Watch. Two months later he was killed at Ypres. Mother never got over the loss of her only son. Sister Maggie started work before she was fourteen, in Forfar. Father bought us bicycles and though I was still not fully recovered from rheumatic fever I was enrolled as a dressmaker with an apprenticeship of five years in Lindsays of Forfar. Wages to start with were 2/6d weekly for the first year rising to 5/-, 7/6 10/- and 12/6d each year thereafter. In fine weather Maggie and I cycled to work. When it was stormy we stayed with an aunt in town.

Flower Show time brought excitement as my father exhibited there regularly and gained awards and cups in many classes. Competition was intense and before shows the family all took turns to guard the garden for crops were often plundered, by jealous competitors.

The seasons brought joys of searching the hedgerows for bird's nests, or picking blueberries and brambles with which mother made jellies to join the jams made from garden fruits. I was familiar with the cries of corncrake and cushie-doos, could spot owls and flying bats in starlight.

As I grew older I became interested in crochet and many examples of my work are still in use. My largest piece of work was a table-cloth of crocheted lace inset into linen. It took three years to make. It was given to the Queen on the occasion of her marriage as a wedding gift by a friend of mine who had purchased it from me. In her letter of acknowledgement the then Princess Elizabeth said it would be kept at Holyrood House for her use there.

I had attended and become a member of Rescobie Church throughout my growing up years. After my apprenticeship I gained a position as a coat maker in Carmichael's Fashion shop and life was passing happily and busily by with work on weekdays and Church on Sundays. Into my life at this time came a young man. His name was Alexander Caseby. He was four years my senior, and intending to go to Africa to be a missionary. We became engaged on the 21st March 1922 before he went to Nyasaland. Originally it was intended that he would come home to marry me but plans were altered and I travelled out to Africa - the journey being a story in itself - and we were married on the 30th April 1924. At the time of writing this we have celebrated our Diamond Wedding.
bioc04/rrc/06/04/1992.

Some locations, Mum and Dad.
Nyasaland (now Malawi) Africa,1922 to 1929.
Lundin Links, Fife, Scotland, 1929 to 1933.
Newmills, Fife, Scotland, 1933 to 1947.
Blackridge, West Lothian, Scotland, 1947 to 1954.
Drumoak, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, 1954 to 1959.
Carlops, Mid Lothian, Scotland, 1959 to 1965.
Balhouffie, Anstruther, Fife, Scotland, 1965 to 1976,
4, Macduff Road, Glenrothes, Fife, Scotland, 1976 to (Dad died14/05/1991),
Mum on her own, 15/05/1991 to February 1995.
Nursing Home, Kirkaldy, Fife, Scotland, March 1995 to 1996,
Clashfarquhar House, C of S Nursing Home, Robert Street, Stonehaven,Aberdeenshire, Scotland, March 1996 to ????

Cyril mentioned the following in a letter to Ronnie dated 17/01/2000. " Visited Mum today and she had just received your flowers and chocs. (Sent in memory of Dad's Birthday on 19/01/2000.) Naturally, she was delighted. She has a chest infection and we asked that the doctor should see her. This has been arranged for tomorrow."

I phoned Mum on 19/01/2000 in the morning and we chatted about Dad. Mum said the doctor called but did nothing. She said "It was like talking to the man on the Moon."


Cyril MacFarlane CASEBY

RELIGION.: CHURCH OF SCOTLAND
When very young I (Ronald R CASEBY) made a sailing ship from wood andthread and painted it gold. Grandfather Macfarlane always admired it andso when he broke his hip in 1951, and I was going with Mum and Charlie tosee him at Spinky Den, Kennoway, Fife, I took my precious ship and gaveit to him, as I loved him so and overheard my parents say he wouldprobably die. In 1983 Auntie Meg told me that Grandad had appreciated thegift and so she had it be buried with him in his coffin, for that was hiswish. He had asked that I be given some return momento from hispossessions at the time I made the gift which Meg had forgotten to do.In 1988, Meg presented me with a Macfarlane tartan tie which she said hadbeen fathers and said she thought it, or one similar, had belonged to hisbrother who was killed at the Battle of Arras in 1917. (My young memoryrecalls Grandad Macfarlane wearing his tie as I kissed his cold, deadface in his coffin before his funeral. For this reason I suspect that Megbought a newer version of the tie to present to me. I think this becausethe materials seemed to be modern ones which may not have existed in theearly 1900's. Perhaps the tie gift had been Grandad's idea and it hadbeen accidentally buried with him.) Mum recognised the tie which I waswearing when I visited her at Clashfarquhar House, Stonehaven on20/03/1998 and suggested that as Cyril was the only son with Macfarlanein his name he should have the tie. I presented the tie to Cyril on theevening of 21/03/1998 as a gift and told those present at the Athol Hotelthe story behind it. Mum had also asked that Cyril wear the tie when hevisited her on Mother's Day (22/03/1998) to have lunch with her and Sandywhilst Jane and I visited Charlie but she did not recognise or comment onit when Cyril brought it to her attention. Cyril is wearing the tie inthe Scrapbook picture with Mum, Sandy and me which was taken by Jane.

I was Bestman at Gladys and Cyril's wedding and so was invited to the40th Anniversary Celebrations at the Athol Hotel, Aberdeen, Scotland, on21/03/1998. Afterwards we gathered at G&C's house (17 Broaddykes Drive,Kingswells, Aberbeen) for Champagne, cake and coffee and here I was askedto make a speech. I used as the basis for what was said 1st Samuel 16:7(RSV) ".. the Lord sees not as man sees; a man looks on the outwardappearance, but the Lord looks on the heart." I quoted Paul Sheppy whocommented on this passage "When God measures a man or woman he puts thetape round the heart instead of the head!" Then I commented on thecouples big hearts and generosity over the years to all near and dear tothem and said that it would be difficult to find a tape long enough tomeasure their hearts. I commented that marriages, like theirs, may bemade in heaven but the maintenance had to be done on earth and Gladys hadto be complimented on always being a support to Cyril in his career andfor producing such a lovely family. We toasted the couple and thoseabsent, especially Mum, Charlie and Grant and recalled all loved ones bythen passed to Glory who had been at the wedding 40 years ago.

On Monday, 23/03/1998, when I was with Gladys and Sandy at Cyril's housein preparation for my overnight sleeper train journey south from Aberdeenthat night, Gladys said how pleased Cyril was with his Macfarlane tie.She also said he had no momentoes of John Caseby, our other Grandfather,or of Alexander Caseby, our father. On returning home I packed up andsent Cyril my copy of "Dewar's Divinity," published in 1841 by Fullertonand Co, Edinburgh and Glasgow and sold by Robert Mather's Bookshop ofChapelshade, Dundee, in 1848. This book was gifted by Grandfather JohnCaseby to his son Alexander Caseby on the occasion of his wedding toWilliamina Macfarlane and was taken by her to Africa with her luggage.The book was probably bought by John Caseby's father, also named John,around 1850 and bequeathed by him to his son. The book was used by allthree men for their Biblical studies, Grandfather John whilst at StAndrew's University and at the Free Church Biblical College in Edinburgh,and by Alexander Caseby for his Theological studies leading to hisOrdination as a Minister of the Church of Scotland in 1946, by specialorder of the Church of Scotland Assembly in Edinburgh. Alexander Casebygifted the book to me in 1978 and I used it to prepare many sermons andto help me understand the beliefs and theology my parents andGrandparents were brought up to respect. It was the most precious book inmy collection because of its genealogical connections with the Casebyancestors. Cyril was delighted with the gift and said it would be wellpreserved and bequeathed to Derek in his will.
When Cyril knew that I was spending another 200 on research into CASEBYdocuments at The Guildhall, London, at the beginning of August 1998 hesent me a cheque for 25 to help with the costs.

Alison, Gordon, Aaron and Hayley went to Oman for two years from March1998 and Cyril and Gladys went there for a holiday from 03/11 to20/11/1998 and Cyril sent me a postcard which is included with thephotographs.[Testing98.ftw]

RELIGION.: CHURCH OF SCOTLAND
When very young I (Ronald R Caseby) made a sailing ship from wood andthread and painted it gold. Grandfather Macfarlane always admired it andso when he broke his hip in 1951, and I was going with Mum and Charlie tosee him at Spinky Den, Kennoway, Fife, I took my precious ship and gaveit to him, as I loved him so and overheard my parents say he wouldprobably die. In 1983 Auntie Meg told me that Grandad had appreciated thegift and so she had it be buried with him in his coffin, for that was hiswish. He had asked that I be given some return momento from hispossessions at the time I made the gift which Meg had forgotten to do.In 1988, Meg presented me with a Macfarlane tartan tie which she said hadbeen fathers and said she thought it, or one similar, had belonged to hisbrother who was killed at the Battle of Arras in 1917. (My young memoryrecalls Grandad Macfarlane wearing his tie as I kissed his cold, deadface in his coffin before his funeral. For this reason I suspect that Megbought a newer version of the tie to present to me. I think this becausethe materials seemed to be modern ones which may not have existed in theearly 1900's. Perhaps the tie gift had been Grandad's idea and it hadbeen accidentally buried with him.) Mum recognised the tie which I waswearing when I visited her at Clashfarquhar House, Stonehaven on20/03/1998 and suggested that as Cyril was the only son with Macfarlanein his name he should have the tie. I presented the tie to Cyril on theevening of 21/03/1998 as a gift and told those present at the Athol Hotelthe story behind it. Mum had also asked that Cyril wear the tie when hevisited her on Mother's Day (22/03/1998) to have lunch with her and Sandywhilst Jane and I visited Charlie but she did not recognise or comment onit when Cyril brought it to her attention. Cyril is wearing the tie inthe Scrapbook picture with Mum, Sandy and me which was taken by Jane.

I was Bestman at Gladys and Cyril's wedding and so was invited to the40th Anniversary Celebrations at the Athol Hotel, Aberdeen, Scotland, on21/03/1998. Afterwards we gathered at G&C's house (17 Broaddykes Drive,Kingswells, Aberbeen) for Champagne, cake and coffee and here I was askedto make a speech. I used as the basis for what was said 1st Samuel 16:7(RSV) ".. the Lord sees not as man sees; a man looks on the outwardappearance, but the Lord looks on the heart." I quoted Paul Sheppy whocommented on this passage "When God measures a man or woman he puts thetape round the heart instead of the head!" Then I commented on thecouples big hearts and generosity over the years to all near and dear tothem and said that it would be difficult to find a tape long enough tomeasure their hearts. I commented that marriages, like theirs, may bemade in heaven but the maintenance had to be done on earth and Gladys hadto be complimented on always being a support to Cyril in his career andfor producing such a lovely family. We toasted the couple and thoseabsent, especially Mum, Charlie and Grant and recalled all loved ones bythen passed to Glory who had been at the wedding 40 years ago.

On Monday, 23/03/1998, when I was with Gladys and Sandy at Cyril's housein preparation for my overnight sleeper train journey south from Aberdeenthat night, Gladys said how pleased Cyril was with his Macfarlane tie.She also said he had no momentoes of John Caseby, our other Grandfather,or of Alexander Caseby, our father. On returning home I packed up andsent Cyril my copy of "Dewar's Divinity," published in 1841 by Fullertonand Co, Edinburgh and Glasgow and sold by Robert Mather's Bookshop ofChapelshade, Dundee, in 1848. This book was gifted by Grandfather JohnCaseby to his son Alexander Caseby on the occasion of his wedding toWilliamina Macfarlane and was taken by her to Africa with her luggage.The book was probably bought by John Caseby's father, also named John,around 1850 and bequeathed by him to his son. The book was used by allthree men for their Biblical studies, Grandfather John whilst at StAndrew's University and at the Free Church Biblical College in Edinburgh,and by Alexander Caseby for his Theological studies leading to hisOrdination as a Minister of the Church of Scotland in 1946, by specialorder of the Church of Scotland Assembly in Edinburgh. Alexander Casebygifted the book to me in 1978 and I used it to prepare many sermons andto help me understand the beliefs and theology my parents andGrandparents were brought up to respect. It was the most precious book inmy collection because of its genealogical connections with the Casebyancestors. Cyril was delighted with the gift and said it would be wellpreserved and bequeathed to Derek in his will.
When Cyril knew that I was spending another 200 on research into CASEBYdocuments at The Guildhall, London, at the beginning of August 1998 hesent me a cheque for 25 to help with the costs.

Alison, Gordon, Aaron and Hayley went to Oman for two years from March1998 and Cyril and Gladys went there for a holiday from 03/11 to20/11/1998 and Cyril sent me a postcard which is included with thephotographs.


Gladys Mary Rose MAKIN

BIO:NAME: GLADYS MARY ROSE MAKIN MARRIED BY REV A. CASEBY, BRIDEGROOMSFATHER AND R
BIO:NAME: GLADYS MARY ROSE MAKIN MARRIED BY REV A. CASEBY, BRIDEGROOMS
FATHER AND REV. GEORGE H. MAKIN, MINISTER OF THE PARISH OF SAUGHTREE,
NEAR NEWCASTLETON, ROXBURGHSHIRE, FATHER OF THE BRIDE. BEST MAN WAS
RONALD RODGER CASEBY AND THE BRIDESMAID WAS ISLA SCOTT OF HAWICK.
GLADYS MET ISLA AT THE ASTLEY AINSLIE HOSPITAL, EDINBURGH WHEN THEY
BOTH DID SOME NURSING TRAINING THERE.
[Testing98.ftw]

BIO:NAME: GLADYS MARY ROSE MAKIN MARRIED BY REV A. CASEBY, BRIDEGROOMSFATHER AND R
BIO:NAME: GLADYS MARY ROSE MAKIN MARRIED BY REV A. CASEBY, BRIDEGROOMS
FATHER AND REV. GEORGE H. MAKIN, MINISTER OF THE PARISH OF SAUGHTREE,
NEAR NEWCASTLETON, ROXBURGHSHIRE, FATHER OF THE BRIDE. BEST MAN WAS
RONALD RODGER CASEBY AND THE BRIDESMAID WAS ISLA SCOTT OF HAWICK.
GLADYS MET ISLA AT THE ASTLEY AINSLIE HOSPITAL, EDINBURGH WHEN THEY
BOTH DID SOME NURSING TRAINING THERE.
[Caseby01.ged]

BIO:NAME: GLADYS MARY ROSE MAKIN MARRIED BY REV A. CASEBY, BRIDEGROOMSFATHER AND R


John CASEBY

John CASSMAY - International Genealogical Index, LDS #8226, BritishIsles, Gender: M Birth: 16 Nov 1860, Orwell, Kinross, Scotland. Found onthe LDS Internet site by Ron Caseby on 13/06/1999.

D. Shippey report 09/12/95, 1891 Census, Edinburgh, 658/108/13, for
109, Gorgie Road, Edinburgh (3 rooms); John Caseby, head, married, 30,
Bootmaker, born Kinrossshire, Orwell, Margaret Caseby, wife, married,
28, born Fife, Largo, John Caseby, son, 4, born Fife, Largo, James R.
Caseby, son, 1, born Fife, Largo. The same report gives the date of
marriage as 03/09/1886 and the place as Largo, at Largo 443/11, where
the birth of their first child John Caseby is given as 09/02/1887.

D.Shippey report 24/01/96, Marriages, Largo 443/4, on 03/09/1886, at
Lundin Mill, Largo, according to the forms of the United Presbyterian
Church, John Caseby, 25, Bootmaker, batchelor, of 12, Leith Street,
Edinburgh. Son of John Caseby, Farmer, deceased, and Janet Caseby,
m.s. Robin; Maggie Rodger, 23, Domestic servant, spinster, of Lundin
Mill, Largo. Daughter of James Rodger, Salmon Fisher and Margaret
Rodger, m.s. Angus. Witnesses: David Caseby and Bella Rodger. Also
under Births for Orwell, Kinross, 463/55, on 16/07/1862, John CASSMAY,
Farmer and Janet CASSMAY m.s. Robin. Informant, father, his mark (So
John must have been illiterate if he had to make his mark rather than
sign the Birth Certificate and could not tell that the surname had beenmispelt.)


John Caseby, father of John, James, David, Margaret, Robert,
Alexander, William, Janet (Netta) and Angus.
John (Snr.) died aged 80 and left a widow (Janet Robin), John age
11, David age 10, and Alex 9 1/2. The widow carried on the Farm,
(Tannerhall), Kinrossshire, with the aid of a brother, Alex Robin
(who had a coal merchant business in Leith), a cousin called John Tod,
and a family called Lumsden. This arrangement lasted only one
year. The farm let was cancelled. The widow worked for 2 years
housekeeping. John, now aged 12, walked 5 miles, morning and night to
work in a weaving factory for 6 shillings (30p) per week of 60 hours.
In bad weather young John stayed overnight in the home of Lumsdens
(Grocers); or Tod (Joiners). Each Sunday mother and 3 boys walked to
Orwell Parish Church.
When John was 14 he had an accident which cracked one of his
ankles. The firm allowed him 2/6 per week to get better. The time
was not wasted, for the local school master brought books for John
- books on History, Geography, English and Bible Stories.
John's progress was rapid. The teacher was amazed at the speed John
read, wrote and spoke.
When 14 1/2 years old the family moved to St Andrews. They were
settled in when Uncle Alex Robin (Coal Merchant Leith), called and
told young John: "Allan of Edinburgh needs an apprentice boot maker".
John secured the job - 5 years apprenticeship - board and 2/6
each week. The boy proved a first class worker and 5 nights each
week, 7 to 9 pm, he attended school.
He was so popular at work, in school and in church. He was made a
First Hand Bootmaker and at the end of 4 years gained a pupil teacher
bursary and made a Church Deacon. He was graded a First Class Boot
Craftsman at the age of 19 years. A high honour indeed.
He was transferred to Burntisland in Fife as Senior Boot
Craftsman at the age of 20, with a wage of 1 per week. School and
Church were not neglected. Each Saturday evening he took the Ferry
Boat from Burntisland to Leith and stayed with his Uncle Alex Robin
and Aunt Eva. On his 20th birthday John gained a
"Certificate of Entrance" to Edinburgh University, but he could not
accept as his home was in St Andrews and his work in
Burntisland. John became a tutor (4 subjects) in a working Lad's Club
which brought in 5/- each week, and this he sent on to his widow
mother who kept a few student boarders. John made sure his younger
brothers got good education - David entered St Andrews Savings
Bank and Alex the Post Office as a Sorter. John had an ambition to
own his own Bootshop. At this time he met a young lady who later
became his wife - Margaret Rodger.
One of the Directors of Allan's Bootshops secured premises in
Dalry Road, Edinburgh, and appointed John its Manager. It was a
pleasant occasion - a double event, Marriage and Manager of a
shop. Later a second shop was opened in Newington Road,
Edinburgh, Margaret Caseby's brother was working in South
Africa. Robert (Uncle Bob) sent 80 to John to enter Edinburgh
University. John was happy, a son was born (in Lundin Mill), he was
called John; also Managers were appointed to each shop. Events
proved 2 shops and a university career was too much for one man.
At the end of 3 years John obtained enough passes to enter the
United Presbyterian College of Theology. He had high marks in
Greek, Latin and Maths.
The generous Uncle Bob was murdered at the Limpopo River, Gold
area of South Africa; John's brother David took money from his
bank (John stood security for him, signing a "Trust Deed").
Managers in both shops proved to be unfaithful, the high
adventure in shops and university, and brother David's high debts
proved too much for John, he was bankrupt - without shops,
closure of University fees, household goods sold and no work.
John's father in-law (James Rodger) secured a shop for John in
Lundin Links (with a house above the shop), so a new adventure
started well, but within a short time Sheriff Officers appeared
demanding more money to pay off Brother David's debts. Brother
David still kept up his fine house, high living and drinking
habits all at Johns's expense, for John had signed a "Trust Deed"
twice to save his brother from ruin. The shop in Lundin Links was
closed.
John and family moved to a shop in St Andrews (leant by Forrester
Bootmakers) but this did not last long - within 6 months Sheriff
Officers were demanding more money to pay off the remaining debts of
Brother David. Failure again - a move was made to Leuchars for a
short period, then to Balmullo where hand-made boots were in demand
by the "Gentry" and cobbling repairs in boots and shoes. John's
family numbered 9 (one died infancy and another 2
1/2 died eating wild gooseberries). John was an embittered man,
only the calm sweet nature of his wife Margaret kept the home
together. The local School Board offered John a teaching post -
this he declined, he felt his boot craftsmanship came first.
Things improved little by little, Margaret kept the family
together and then another child was born - a daughter, she was
given names from both sides of the family after a lot of
disputing - she was called Janet (Netta) Isabella Robin Rodger
Caseby, a unique combination embracing to historic families. One
promise was made if the child born the name of "Janet Robin" she
will inherit the lovely Grandfather's Clock and so preserve an
unbroken line covering a 100 years (up to 1903).
John's hand-made boots ended with the influx of machine made
footwear. So a new avenue opened, John became Postman with a 12
mile walk each day and mending boots part-time. This arrangement
worked for nearly 30 years. John helped 100's of pupils,
students professors and lecturers who came to him to solve Greek,
Latin and Maths problems; he wrote many Liberal (Political)
addresses, was on many committees, School Boards, Council and
Welfare; he was a Kirk Elder and he said he was a glutton for
Books, an intense reader. He was a very intelligent man (Mum
said that these moods were very neurotic and defensive amounting to
near mental illness - thrawn and stubborn at times to
exasperation point - rather like Dad was prone to).
John had moods of silence, he saw his family progress in learning and
trades for sons serving in World War I and most reaching high places
in their professions, sober and pleasant in nature. Secretly,
he was highly delighted with nearly all of his children.
bioc092/07/04/1992.


Margaret RODGER

BIO:D. Shippey report, 24/01/96, Births, Largo 443/19, on 13/02/1863,
Margaret Rodger at Lundinmill, Largo. Daughter of James Rodger, Linen
weaver, and Margaret Rodger, m.s. Angus (married 26/03/1852, Largo,
Fife). Informant: father.
BIO:~bD. Shippey report, 24/01/96, Births, Largo 443/19, on 13/02/1863,
Margaret Rodger at Lundinmill, Largo. Daughter of James Rodger, Linen
weaver, and Margaret Rodger, m.s. Angus (married 26/03/1852, Largo,
Fife). Informant: father.
[Testing98.ftw]

BIO:D. Shippey report, 24/01/96, Births, Largo 443/19, on 13/02/1863,
Margaret Rodger at Lundinmill, Largo. Daughter of James Rodger, Linen
weaver, and Margaret Rodger, m.s. Angus (married 26/03/1852, Largo,
Fife). Informant: father.
BIO:~bD. Shippey report, 24/01/96, Births, Largo 443/19, on 13/02/1863,
Margaret Rodger at Lundinmill, Largo. Daughter of James Rodger, Linen
weaver, and Margaret Rodger, m.s. Angus (married 26/03/1852, Largo,
Fife). Informant: father.
[Caseby01.ged]

BIO:D. Shippey report, 24/01/96, Births, Largo 443/19, on 13/02/1863,
Margaret Rodger at Lundinmill, Largo. Daughter of James Rodger, Linen
weaver, and Margaret Rodger, m.s. Angus (married 26/03/1852, Largo,
Fife). Informant: father.


Robert Angus CASEBY

BIO:D. Shippey report 09/12/95, for St George, Edinburgh, 685/79, born
Robert Angus Caseby at 256 Dalry Road, Edinburgh, son of John Caseby,
Bootmaker. Informant father. Under deaths for St George, Edinburgh,
685/79, from Meningitis on 20/10/1894, Robert Angus Caseby.
[Testing98.ftw]

BIO:D. Shippey report 09/12/95, for St George, Edinburgh, 685/79, born
Robert Angus Caseby at 256 Dalry Road, Edinburgh, son of John Caseby,
Bootmaker. Informant father. Under deaths for St George, Edinburgh,
685/79, from Meningitis on 20/10/1894, Robert Angus Caseby.
[Caseby01.ged]

BIO:D. Shippey report 09/12/95, for St George, Edinburgh, 685/79, born
Robert Angus Caseby at 256 Dalry Road, Edinburgh, son of John Caseby,
Bootmaker. Informant father. Under deaths for St George, Edinburgh,
685/79, from Meningitis on 20/10/1894, Robert Angus Caseby.


Margaret Angus CASEBY

BIO:D. Shippey report 09/12/95, St George, Edinburgh, born Margaret Angus
Caseby at 256 Dalry Road, Edinburgh, daughter of John Caseby, Master
Bootmaker. Informant: father.
Deaths, Largo, Fife, 143/24, 17/06/1898, at Bridge House, Lundin Mill,
Largo, of acute bronchitis, duration 3 days. This is in contradiction
to the previously idea that she had died of eating unripe hedgerow
berries which my father had believed.
[Testing98.ftw]

BIO:D. Shippey report 09/12/95, St George, Edinburgh, born Margaret Angus
Caseby at 256 Dalry Road, Edinburgh, daughter of John Caseby, Master
Bootmaker. Informant: father.
Deaths, Largo, Fife, 143/24, 17/06/1898, at Bridge House, Lundin Mill,
Largo, of acute bronchitis, duration 3 days. This is in contradiction
to the previously idea that she had died of eating unripe hedgerow
berries which my father had believed.
[Caseby01.ged]

BIO:D. Shippey report 09/12/95, St George, Edinburgh, born Margaret Angus
Caseby at 256 Dalry Road, Edinburgh, daughter of John Caseby, Master
Bootmaker. Informant: father.
Deaths, Largo, Fife, 143/24, 17/06/1898, at Bridge House, Lundin Mill,
Largo, of acute bronchitis, duration 3 days. This is in contradiction
to the previously idea that she had died of eating unripe hedgerow
berries which my father had believed.


James RODGER

BIO:D. Shippey report, 24/01/96,on the Birth of Margaret Rodger on
13/02/1863, Largo 443/19, where it gives the date of the parents
marriage as 26/03/1852, at Largo, Fife. D. Shippey report, 24/01/96,
1861 Census for Largo, Fife, at Lundin Mill, 443/1/6; James Rodger,
head, married, 30, Linen weaver, born Largo, Fife, Margaret Rodger,
wife, married, 30, born Kirkland, Fife, James Rodger, son, 4, born
Largo, Fife.
D. Shippey report, 24/01/96, notes the BAPTISM of James Rodger under
Largo 443/5, 07/03/1830, was born James to William Rodger, weaver,
Lundin Mill and Isabella Dall his spouse etc. (frame 1347)
D. Shippey report 26/07/96, 1841 Census for Largo, 443/1/6,
Lundiemill,
William Rodger, 40, Linen Handloom Weaver, born Fife.
Isibella(?) Rodger, 40, born in Fife.
Janet Rodger, 20, Linen Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
Andrew Rodger, 15, Linen Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
William Rodger, 15, Linen Handloon Weaver, born in Fife.
Cirston (Christian?) Rodger, 14, Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
James Rodger, 11, Linen Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
Isabella Rodger, 7, born in Fife.
Ann Rodger, 5, born in Fife.
David Rodger, 1, born in Fife.
[Testing98.ftw]

BIO:D. Shippey report, 24/01/96,on the Birth of Margaret Rodger on
13/02/1863, Largo 443/19, where it gives the date of the parents
marriage as 26/03/1852, at Largo, Fife. D. Shippey report, 24/01/96,
1861 Census for Largo, Fife, at Lundin Mill, 443/1/6; James Rodger,
head, married, 30, Linen weaver, born Largo, Fife, Margaret Rodger,
wife, married, 30, born Kirkland, Fife, James Rodger, son, 4, born
Largo, Fife.
D. Shippey report, 24/01/96, notes the BAPTISM of James Rodger under
Largo 443/5, 07/03/1830, was born James to William Rodger, weaver,
Lundin Mill and Isabella Dall his spouse etc. (frame 1347)
D. Shippey report 26/07/96, 1841 Census for Largo, 443/1/6,
Lundiemill,
William Rodger, 40, Linen Handloom Weaver, born Fife.
Isibella(?) Rodger, 40, born in Fife.
Janet Rodger, 20, Linen Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
Andrew Rodger, 15, Linen Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
William Rodger, 15, Linen Handloon Weaver, born in Fife.
Cirston (Christian?) Rodger, 14, Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
James Rodger, 11, Linen Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
Isabella Rodger, 7, born in Fife.
Ann Rodger, 5, born in Fife.
David Rodger, 1, born in Fife.
[Caseby01.ged]

BIO:D. Shippey report, 24/01/96,on the Birth of Margaret Rodger on
13/02/1863, Largo 443/19, where it gives the date of the parents
marriage as 26/03/1852, at Largo, Fife. D. Shippey report, 24/01/96,
1861 Census for Largo, Fife, at Lundin Mill, 443/1/6; James Rodger,
head, married, 30, Linen weaver, born Largo, Fife, Margaret Rodger,
wife, married, 30, born Kirkland, Fife, James Rodger, son, 4, born
Largo, Fife.
D. Shippey report, 24/01/96, notes the BAPTISM of James Rodger under
Largo 443/5, 07/03/1830, was born James to William Rodger, weaver,
Lundin Mill and Isabella Dall his spouse etc. (frame 1347)
D. Shippey report 26/07/96, 1841 Census for Largo, 443/1/6,
Lundiemill,
William Rodger, 40, Linen Handloom Weaver, born Fife.
Isibella(?) Rodger, 40, born in Fife.
Janet Rodger, 20, Linen Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
Andrew Rodger, 15, Linen Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
William Rodger, 15, Linen Handloon Weaver, born in Fife.
Cirston (Christian?) Rodger, 14, Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
James Rodger, 11, Linen Handloom Weaver, born in Fife.
Isabella Rodger, 7, born in Fife.
Ann Rodger, 5, born in Fife.
David Rodger, 1, born in Fife.


Isabella Dall RODGER

BIO:At 10 Lincoln Green, Chichester we have a lovely Firescreen which Mum
and dad gifted to us when they left Balhouffie. During a holiday with
Mum, on 16/04/1992, Mum said that when Bella Rodger died at Newmills
Manse she left everything to Mum and Dad in her will. She said she had
money but none was ever found. Her solicitor was a relation who left
for South America when she died. Bella inherited her parent's home,
Burnside House, Lundin Links, Fife. Bella was of course sister to
Margaret Rodger wife of John Caseby, Dad's parents. Dad was told that
the property was only fit to be demolished as it was in such a state
and so he, believing the informant, sold it to him for 30. (It was
almost immediately let out in 1937 with little done to it and was
still in use at Easter 1992. There were some belongings in the house
and these included the firescreen which was a wall hanging picture in
1936. About 1943 Dad had Willie Hunter the Newmills Joiner change it
into a Firescreen. Mum said that it had been sown by a May West who
was a cousin of either Bellas or of Bellas mother, Margaret Barnet
Angus (which would make her Bella's second cousin. The screen depicts
Joseph being sold into slavery by his brothers. My recollection is
the Carpenter at Drumoak, Aberdeenshire, made some repairs and that
there may be newspapers in the back to prove this.
Mum also said that Bella burned a lot of papers some of which might
have been share certificates a few days before she died and that this
might explain the missing money. There was also a story that she might
have had an illigitimate child and sent the money to him or her.
BIO:At 10 Lincoln Green, Chichester we have a lovely Firescreen which Mum
and dad gifted to us when they left Balhouffie. During a holiday with
Mum, on 16/04/1992, Mum said that when Bella Rodger died at Newmills
Manse she left everything to Mum and Dad in her will. She said she had
money but none was ever found. Her solicitor was a relation who left
for South America when she died. Bella inherited her parent's home,
Burnside House, Lundin Links, Fife. Bella was of course sister to
Margaret Rodger wife of John Caseby, Dad's parents. Dad was told that
the property was only fit to be demolished as it was in such a state
and so he, believing the informant, sold it to him for 30. (It was
almost immediately let out in 1937 with little done to it and was
still in use at Easter 1992. There were some belongings in the house
and these included the firescreen which was a wall hanging picture in
1936. About 1943 Dad had Willie Hunter the Newmills Joiner change it
into a Firescreen. Mum said that it had been sown by a May West who
was a cousin of either Bellas or of Bellas mother, Margaret Barnet
Angus (which would make her Bella's second cousin. The screen depicts
Joseph being sold into slavery by his brothers. My recollection is
the Carpenter at Drumoak, Aberdeenshire, made some repairs and that
there may be newspapers in the back to prove this.
Mum also said that Bella burned a lot of papers some of which might
have been share certificates a few days before she died and that this
might explain the missing money. There was also a story that she might
have had an illigitimate child and sent the money to him or her.
[Testing98.ftw]

BIO:At 10 Lincoln Green, Chichester we have a lovely Firescreen which Mum
and dad gifted to us when they left Balhouffie. During a holiday with
Mum, on 16/04/1992, Mum said that when Bella Rodger died at Newmills
Manse she left everything to Mum and Dad in her will. She said she had
money but none was ever found. Her solicitor was a relation who left
for South America when she died. Bella inherited her parent's home,
Burnside House, Lundin Links, Fife. Bella was of course sister to
Margaret Rodger wife of John Caseby, Dad's parents. Dad was told that
the property was only fit to be demolished as it was in such a state
and so he, believing the informant, sold it to him for 30. (It was
almost immediately let out in 1937 with little done to it and was
still in use at Easter 1992. There were some belongings in the house
and these included the firescreen which was a wall hanging picture in
1936. About 1943 Dad had Willie Hunter the Newmills Joiner change it
into a Firescreen. Mum said that it had been sown by a May West who
was a cousin of either Bellas or of Bellas mother, Margaret Barnet
Angus (which would make her Bella's second cousin. The screen depicts
Joseph being sold into slavery by his brothers. My recollection is
the Carpenter at Drumoak, Aberdeenshire, made some repairs and that
there may be newspapers in the back to prove this.
Mum also said that Bella burned a lot of papers some of which might
have been share certificates a few days before she died and that this
might explain the missing money. There was also a story that she might
have had an illigitimate child and sent the money to him or her.
BIO:At 10 Lincoln Green, Chichester we have a lovely Firescreen which Mum
and dad gifted to us when they left Balhouffie. During a holiday with
Mum, on 16/04/1992, Mum said that when Bella Rodger died at Newmills
Manse she left everything to Mum and Dad in her will. She said she had
money but none was ever found. Her solicitor was a relation who left
for South America when she died. Bella inherited her parent's home,
Burnside House, Lundin Links, Fife. Bella was of course sister to
Margaret Rodger wife of John Caseby, Dad's parents. Dad was told that
the property was only fit to be demolished as it was in such a state
and so he, believing the informant, sold it to him for 30. (It was
almost immediately let out in 1937 with little done to it and was
still in use at Easter 1992. There were some belongings in the house
and these included the firescreen which was a wall hanging picture in
1936. About 1943 Dad had Willie Hunter the Newmills Joiner change it
into a Firescreen. Mum said that it had been sown by a May West who
was a cousin of either Bellas or of Bellas mother, Margaret Barnet
Angus (which would make her Bella's second cousin. The screen depicts
Joseph being sold into slavery by his brothers. My recollection is
the Carpenter at Drumoak, Aberdeenshire, made some repairs and that
there may be newspapers in the back to prove this.
Mum also said that Bella burned a lot of papers some of which might
have been share certificates a few days before she died and that this
might explain the missing money. There was also a story that she might
have had an illigitimate child and sent the money to him or her.
[Caseby01.ged]

BIO:At 10 Lincoln Green, Chichester we have a lovely Firescreen which Mum
and dad gifted to us when they left Balhouffie. During a holiday with
Mum, on 16/04/1992, Mum said that when Bella Rodger died at Newmills
Manse she left everything to Mum and Dad in her will. She said she had
money but none was ever found. Her solicitor was a relation who left
for South America when she died. Bella inherited her parent's home,
Burnside House, Lundin Links, Fife. Bella was of course sister to
Margaret Rodger wife of John Caseby, Dad's parents. Dad was told that
the property was only fit to be demolished as it was in such a state
and so he, believing the informant, sold it to him for 30. (It was
almost immediately let out in 1937 with little done to it and was
still in use at Easter 1992. There were some belongings in the house
and these included the firescreen which was a wall hanging picture in
1936. About 1943 Dad had Willie Hunter the Newmills Joiner change it
into a Firescreen. Mum said that it had been sown by a May West who
was a cousin of either Bellas or of Bellas mother, Margaret Barnet
Angus (which would make her Bella's second cousin. The screen depicts
Joseph being sold into slavery by his brothers. My recollection is
the Carpenter at Drumoak, Aberdeenshire, made some repairs and that
there may be newspapers in the back to prove this.
Mum also said that Bella burned a lot of papers some of which might
have been share certificates a few days before she died and that this
might explain the missing money. There was also a story that she might
have had an illigitimate child and sent the money to him or her.


Charles John CASEBY

I visited Charlie, my brother, at the Roxburghe House, Hospice Suite inTor na Dee Hospital, Miltimber, near Aberdeen, Scotland on 20, 22 and23rd March, 1998. Charlie was well aware that he was dying and was atpeace with the world. He was not eating and did not feel as if he neededfood.

On 20/03/1998 Charlie asked me to read some New Testament words ofcomfort with him and say a prayer before wishing me a last and fondfarewell with several loving hugs and pats on the back to console metogether with the oft repeated words, "I hive always loved yea, my dearwee brither." In our discussions it became clear that Charlie wasrepentant for all he had done wrong in his life, including smokinghimself to death? He said that he had again given his life to Jesus andbelieved that he would soon be in heaven.

Later that day when trying to persuade and tempt Charlie into eatingsomething Jane and I discussed favourite foods and Charlie reacted withgreat lip smacking to talk of "Cullen Skink" which I had never heard of -a baked dish normally made with smoked haddock, sliced potatoes, creamand herbs.

I looked for convenience "Cullen Skink" in the shops when I returned toStonehaven and found that Baxter's made a "Cullen Skink" Soup at 1.89 acan. I bought one and took it to Charlie in a surprise visit on theafternoon of 23/03/1998 when Alison and Gordon Muirhead detoured theirjourney in taking me to Aberdeen, with Aaron and Hayley, their children,to have an evening meal with Cyril, Gladys, Sandy and Jane, beforecatching the overnight sleeper train home. Charlie was delighted with his"Cullen Skink" and said he would eat it like a last meal!

He then told us that in the morning a lady pain specialist said that thelast thing she could do to relieve the pain of his extensive lower organcancers was to fit an epidural needle into his spine and attach this to apump device to allow him to apply more medication at will. This heunderstood would virtually paralyse his body from the midriff downwardsthus preventing walking. He took all of this news and his continual painand discomfort with good heart and grace and was obviously fighting hardto stay alive, but without a fear of dying.

Alison had also brought Charlie a piece of Gladys and Cyril's 40thWedding Anniversary Party cake from our festivities in the Athol Hotel,Aberdeen, on 21/03/1998. Because Mum was ill and could not visit him heagreed to Mum's suggested plan that they both eat a little bit of thatcake each day at 4-00pm and think and pray for each other. When I leftCharlie at 2-40 pm he again said a loving goodbye, told me not to beunhappy when we died, nor to waste money on travelling to his funeral oron flowers, cuddled me in his strong arms and shook my hands in a firmgrasp and with a big happy smile repeated again in his Aberdonianacquired accent, "I hive always loved yea, my dear wee brither." Then headded, "And I always will." It was all I could do to leave him withouttotally breaking down in tears at his bravery. I hope my often professedfaith lives up to the tests Charlie has had to endure and yet hold fastto his renewed trust in Christ Jesus as his Saviour, Redeemer and Friend.Amen

June 17/98 E-Mail from Vancouver, Canada, relayed by Fax to Jane atGladys and Cyril's Home on the morning of 18/06/98.
Dear Ronnie & Eveline:
Thankyou for your letters. We just now receievedyour
letter telling us that Charlie has passed away peacefuly. Grant had a good
cry but is happy that Charlie is now with Jesus and reunited with Dad so
that should be a comfort to Mum. We are thankful that Mum was able to see
Charlie before he passed away. We thankyou so much Ronnie for keeping us
informed as how conditions have been. We thank all the family for standing
by Charlie in all his illness and especially thank Jane for all the loveand
care she has given Charlie.We feel so far away from you all now but our
hearts and prayers are with you all. We shall all meet again one day in
heaven where ther is no more pain or sorrow. Just now we are at a loss to
know what to say but we grieve with all of you at the loss of ourbrother.

Love, Grant & Ann. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
I put this message on the World Connect Internet pages on 19/06/98.

I told you in October 1997 that Charlie (Charles John CASEBY), one of mybrother's,
was terminally ill with lung cancer. Charlie died peacefully on 17/06/98,after having
a visit from our 97 year old mother which he acknowledged with looks andsmiles, a
service in his room with the lady Chaplain, Jane his wife, Cyril andMargaret who are
a brother and sister and their spouses, Gladys and Lionel Hansford, inAnchor Ward
of Aberdeen Royal Infirmary at 7-45 pm (GMT), Death Certificate reads08-20 pm
(GMT).

Charlie loved the countryside scenery, bird watching and, when he wasyoung, The
Boys Brigade which has an anchor for its badge and the motto, "Sure andSteadfast"
which summed his attitude to life very well. When he needed his finalhospitalisation
there was not a bed available for him in the Tornadee, Roxburghe House,he had been
regularly in and visiting for 8 months and so a bed was found for him inAberdeen
Royal Infirmary's Anchor ward, what a coincidence. Cyril tells me thatthe hospitalis
on a hill overlooking Aberdeen, Anchor Ward is on the top floor, andCharlies large
and beautiful room had an amazing panoramic view of the City with alllits flowery
colours and tree and shrub greenery, the Harbour and sands, and Charliesfavourite
countryside stretching to right and left, all as far as the eye couldsee, first in the
bright sunlight of the day, then in the graciousness added by astartling sunset and
finally in the intriguing mystery of the velvet dark creeping night withthe twinkling
lights of the living mirroring the stars in the heavens as they all leftthe hospital after a
final service by the padre. Cyril told me that Charlie was so calm andpeaceful, as if
he were asleep like a baby, gently resting his cheek on the pillow, andwith smooth
soft unblemished skin free from pain wrinkles and disease blemishes, likethe perfect
new child he had once been when he drew his first breath 64 years ago.Jane told her
husband in this service how much she loved him and what a good husband hehad
been. At this point an Oyster Catcher landed on the window sill and madeseveral
shrill calls before flying off to meet with some Pigeons which werefluttering about
nearbye, and then they all flew into the gathering darkness to find theirresting palces.
Cyril was surethat this was Charlie's spirit soaring to heaven with thebirds he so
loved in life. The funeral will be on 23/06/98 at 11-05 am (GMT), pleasepray for
Jane, my mother and all who loved Charlie that we will learn from hisChristian
example of dying in the arms of Jesus Christ hid Saviour. Amen.

I repeat a poem I wrote for Charlie and which he personally told me heappreciated
for he never thought anyone would write one for him.

"Good News."

We pray to God whom we adore,
Through Jesus, our faith's great Commodore,
Lighten our passage home, Dear Lord,
With beacon flashes from your Word.

Sure Holy Helmsman we thank you
That transfixed on our topmost spar,
As stand-in for earth's sinful crew,
You rose as our night's guiding star.

Your Sacrifice at Calvary
Cast rudderless remorseful soul's free
From fear of death for evermore,
High and dry on Heaven's safe shore.

Christians need not fear hell's blast
With Christ's colours nailed to their mast
For angry tempests from afar
Assuage by his Communion bar.

Thus no wicked worldly furore,
Can dim the "Good News" of God's Glory
Where surrendered spirits swim
Content, complete, at one with Him.

Amen. All pray so let it be.

Copyright Ronald Rodger Caseby, Chichester, 29/11/1997.
First published on 31/03/1998 in "Joyful Meditations," a Christian Poetryanthology,
Editor Chris Walton, Triumph House Press, 1 Wainman Road, Peterborough,PE2
7BU, ISBN (Hardback) 1861613296.[Testing98.ftw]

I visited Charlie, my brother, at the Roxburghe House, Hospice Suite inTor na Dee Hospital, Miltimber, near Aberdeen, Scotland on 20, 22 and23rd March, 1998. Charlie was well aware that he was dying and was atpeace with the world. He was not eating and did not feel as if he neededfood.

On 20/03/1998 Charlie asked me to read some New Testament words ofcomfort with him and say a prayer before wishing me a last and fondfarewell with several loving hugs and pats on the back to console metogether with the oft repeated words, "I hive always loved yea, my dearwee brither." In our discussions it became clear that Charlie wasrepentant for all he had done wrong in his life, including smokinghimself to death? He said that he had again given his life to Jesus andbelieved that he would soon be in heaven.

Later that day when trying to persuade and tempt Charlie into eatingsomething Jane and I discussed favourite foods and Charlie reacted withgreat lip smacking to talk of "Cullen Skink" which I had never heard of -a baked dish normally made with smoked haddock, sliced potatoes, creamand herbs.

I looked for convenience "Cullen Skink" in the shops when I returned toStonehaven and found that Baxter's made a "Cullen Skink" Soup at 1.89 acan. I bought one and took it to Charlie in a surprise visit on theafternoon of 23/03/1998 when Alison and Gordon Muirhead detoured theirjourney in taking me to Aberdeen, with Aaron and Hayley, their children,to have an evening meal with Cyril, Gladys, Sandy and Jane, beforecatching the overnight sleeper train home. Charlie was delighted with his"Cullen Skink" and said he would eat it like a last meal!

He then told us that in the morning a lady pain specialist said that thelast thing she could do to relieve the pain of his extensive lower organcancers was to fit an epidural needle into his spine and attach this to apump device to allow him to apply more medication at will. This heunderstood would virtually paralyse his body from the midriff downwardsthus preventing walking. He took all of this news and his continual painand discomfort with good heart and grace and was obviously fighting hardto stay alive, but without a fear of dying.

Alison had also brought Charlie a piece of Gladys and Cyril's 40thWedding Anniversary Party cake from our festivities in the Athol Hotel,Aberdeen, on 21/03/1998. Because Mum was ill and could not visit him heagreed to Mum's suggested plan that they both eat a little bit of thatcake each day at 4-00pm and think and pray for each other. When I leftCharlie at 2-40 pm he again said a loving goodbye, told me not to beunhappy when we died, nor to waste money on travelling to his funeral oron flowers, cuddled me in his strong arms and shook my hands in a firmgrasp and with a big happy smile repeated again in his Aberdonianacquired accent, "I hive always loved yea, my dear wee brither." Then headded, "And I always will." It was all I could do to leave him withouttotally breaking down in tears at his bravery. I hope my often professedfaith lives up to the tests Charlie has had to endure and yet hold fastto his renewed trust in Christ Jesus as his Saviour, Redeemer and Friend.Amen

June 17/98 E-Mail from Vancouver, Canada, relayed by Fax to Jane atGladys and Cyril's Home on the morning of 18/06/98.
Dear Ronnie & Eveline:
Thankyou for your letters. We just now receievedyour
letter telling us that Charlie has passed away peacefuly. Grant had a good
cry but is happy that Charlie is now with Jesus and reunited with Dad so
that should be a comfort to Mum. We are thankful that Mum was able to see
Charlie before he passed away. We thankyou so much Ronnie for keeping us
informed as how conditions have been. We thank all the family for standing
by Charlie in all his illness and especially thank Jane for all the loveand
care she has given Charlie.We feel so far away from you all now but our
hearts and prayers are with you all. We shall all meet again one day in
heaven where ther is no more pain or sorrow. Just now we are at a loss to
know what to say but we grieve with all of you at the loss of ourbrother.

Love, Grant & Ann. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
I put this message on the World Connect Internet pages on 19/06/98.

I told you in October 1997 that Charlie (Charles John CASEBY), one of mybrother's,
was terminally ill with lung cancer. Charlie died peacefully on 17/06/98,after having
a visit from our 97 year old mother which he acknowledged with looks andsmiles, a
service in his room with the lady Chaplain, Jane his wife, Cyril andMargaret who are
a brother and sister and their spouses, Gladys and Lionel Hansford, inAnchor Ward
of Aberdeen Royal Infirmary at 7-45 pm (GMT), Death Certificate reads08-20 pm
(GMT).

Charlie loved the countryside scenery, bird watching and, when he wasyoung, The
Boys Brigade which has an anchor for its badge and the motto, "Sure andSteadfast"
which summed his attitude to life very well. When he needed his finalhospitalisation
there was not a bed available for him in the Tornadee, Roxburghe House,he had been
regularly in and visiting for 8 months and so a bed was found for him inAberdeen
Royal Infirmary's Anchor ward, what a coincidence. Cyril tells me thatthe hospitalis
on a hill overlooking Aberdeen, Anchor Ward is on the top floor, andCharlies large
and beautiful room had an amazing panoramic view of the City with alllits flowery
colours and tree and shrub greenery, the Harbour and sands, and Charliesfavourite
countryside stretching to right and left, all as far as the eye couldsee, first in the
bright sunlight of the day, then in the graciousness added by astartling sunset and
finally in the intriguing mystery of the velvet dark creeping night withthe twinkling
lights of the living mirroring the stars in the heavens as they all leftthe hospital after a
final service by the padre. Cyril told me that Charlie was so calm andpeaceful, as if
he were asleep like a baby, gently resting his cheek on the pillow, andwith smooth
soft unblemished skin free from pain wrinkles and disease blemishes, likethe perfect
new child he had once been when he drew his first breath 64 years ago.Jane told her
husband in this service how much she loved him and what a good husband hehad
been. At this point an Oyster Catcher landed on the window sill and madeseveral
shrill calls before flying off to meet with some Pigeons which werefluttering about
nearbye, and then they all flew into the gathering darkness to find theirresting palces.
Cyril was surethat this was Charlie's spirit soaring to heaven with thebirds he so
loved in life. The funeral will be on 23/06/98 at 11-05 am (GMT), pleasepray for
Jane, my mother and all who loved Charlie that we will learn from hisChristian
example of dying in the arms of Jesus Christ hid Saviour. Amen.

I repeat a poem I wrote for Charlie and which he personally told me heappreciated
for he never thought anyone would write one for him.

"Good News."

We pray to God whom we adore,
Through Jesus, our faith's great Commodore,
Lighten our passage home, Dear Lord,
With beacon flashes from your Word.

Sure Holy Helmsman we thank you
That transfixed on our topmost spar,
As stand-in for earth's sinful crew,
You rose as our night's guiding star.

Your Sacrifice at Calvary
Cast rudderless remorseful soul's free
From fear of death for evermore,
High and dry on Heaven's safe shore.

Christians need not fear hell's blast
With Christ's colours nailed to their mast
For angry tempests from afar
Assuage by his Communion bar.

Thus no wicked worldly furore,
Can dim the "Good News" of God's Glory
Where surrendered spirits swim
Content, complete, at one with Him.

Amen. All pray so let it be.

Copyright Ronald Rodger Caseby, Chichester, 29/11/1997.
First published on 31/03/1998 in "Joyful Meditations," a Christian Poetryanthology,
Editor Chris Walton, Triumph House Press, 1 Wainman Road, Peterborough,PE2
7BU, ISBN (Hardback) 1861613296.


Ronald Rodger CASEBY

RONALD RODGER CASEBY - NOVEMBER 7th 1936
In response to my request in late 1988 my father, Rev. Alexander
Caseby, in the FTREE system wrote the following notes about my birth
and young years.
When Ronnie was born, on November 7th, 1936 there was excitement,
for he would be our sixth child. He weighed 8.5 lbs. Mother long
before his birth had a qualified nurse - Miss White - standing
by for baby to arrive. A number of girl teenagers, 17 to 19,
volunteered to take baby out in the pram, or take over watching when
Nurse was off duty. The first problem was a name. When our baby
arrived, Mother was sure that she would have a boy. I fancied Rodger,
an old, old name, in the Rodger line. Mother suggested Ronald. At
last the day dawned - a beautiful boy, a lovely son, came to light,
aided by Dr Donald McDugal and Nurse White. A charming child indeed,
and as suggested, his name was Ronald Rodger Caseby. A few minutes
later, with baby in his Mum's arms, the Doctor and Nurse at the
bedside, I offered up the child, by prayer, as a faithful servant, to
God, to us and in his childhood, youth and life.
Congratulations came from many quarters. We were so joyful. Few
babies had so many helpers. All were so kind. With one
daughter, four boys, Ronald, the sixth child, our family was
complete. A missionary colleague from Edinburgh came through to my
Newmills Church, and baptised Ronald before a large
congregation.
One amusing incident happened when I registered Ronald's birth.
The Registrar was an elderly spinster called Miss Simpson. She
wrote out the Certificate. I signed the book. She stared at me, then
she said sharply, "Stop it!" I looked at her, "I beg your pardon,
Miss Simpson?" "Stop it! Stop it!" "I beg your pardon, what do you
mean?" "I don't know anything about it - just stop it! Your family
is big enough!" "Thank you, Miss Simpson." She handed me the baby's
Certificate - "No fee - your wife's a lovely lady."
In the last months of 1936, the whole of Europe was in turmoil
over the rise of Germany's Adolph Hitler. He gathered around him a
band of wicked men whose aim was to sever the European states by
means of War unless his demands were met. He conscripted many
hundreds of peaceful factories and turned them into arsenals for
bombs, shells, guns, building of guns, planes and devilish
devices. Threats poured from radios; millions of German men and
women were conscripted to toil in mines, harbours to build battle
ships, submarines, planes, poison gas, also to enlist children to
carry war banners; shout slogans, and dig for victory. Never in the
long life of nations did one man, Hitler, spread such terror
- all his Jack-booted followers caused fear. The United Kingdom
(hesitant at first) stood firm. We were at war. Our coastal
areas were shelled. Bombs were crashing down on our cities. How
foolish of Hitler - he did not realise the British zeal.
When Ronnie was four months old (say, March 1937), in bouts of
sunshine and warmer days, Jean, or Betty Park, May Terris, Kate or
Bella Young, among others, took our little boy out in his pram.
Margaret and her friend Jenny took him out most Saturdays and on
clear, bright Sundays, between church services, we were all out
walking, up by Torrie House, away from the busy streets and lanes.
We were all so cheerful and happy. There were many stops by local
people, chatting to our well dressed family - Margaret's pretty
dresses were the "hand-work" of my wife. The boys: Sandy, Grant,
Cyril and Charlie were all pictures of our joy. My health was not
too good at times; severe headaches, result of World War I wounds
and gas, plus tormenting African fevers. Fortunately, we had a
host of very good friends - ministers, lay preachers, business
people, were only too keen to come to my help. They took over
services in Church, Sunday Schools, Bible class, Band of Hope
etc.,, while fellow ministers generously visited the sick in
hospitals and homes. I was rushed to the Deaconess Hospital and
received first class attention from professors (Medical),
specialists, doctors and tropical specialists and friends who
looked after our family while my wife visited me in Edinburgh. My
heart went out to her in truest love for her faithfulness. People
rallied around her. All their services were FREE. One afternoon,
after visitors had gone, a nurse said, "Mr Caseby, there is 15 in
notes in your locker drawer" - silent gifts.
After all, my salary was only 100 per year (paid quarterly),
plus 50 invalid pension. I gave lectures on my former work in
Central Africa, also wrote news items for newspapers. So all in all,
our income was in the region of 10 weekly. Having a well stocked
garden, with all kinds of vegetables and fruit, my wife had well
stocked cupboards and shelves of fruits, jams etc. Everyone who
entered our room Manse admired its order, beauty and its cleanliness.
There was no maid; it was all "Mother's design", and
everything in its place. Margaret had her room; our twins had their
room; Cyril and Charles had joint room; baby Ronald was in his cot
in our room. Two rooms were reserved for visitors; one large drawing
room, one dining room, small sitting room - in the attic, a double
playroom - large kitchen, outside well appointed wash house; not far
away, a coal and timber area.
This was the well appointed world Ronnie was brought into. He
was a contented, happy, joyful child, always smiling. When
Hitler's Ambassador (Ribbentrop) was appointed to London, he did not
salute King George V in the usual way - he raised his right hand
high, clicked his heels and roared, "Heil Hitler". Boys in our
village took up the joke, but they said "Hell Hitler". Our twins
did not use the word "Hell" (in our hearing) but up went the arm;
Cyril was too shy to do such a thing. Charles raised his right arm,
said, "Well"; baby Ronnie, in his pram, copied the arm stunt, but did
not repeat any word. By November 1937, local wardens were appointed.
Newspapers talked, or rather speculated about rationiong, shelters,
depots for munitions, "no go" areas,
"refugees" from danger areas, blackouts in homes, holes to be dug for
poles to destroy "hover planes" and trenches to be dug in vital
areas. By the beginning of 1938, a new word was circulated like wild
fire, "Gas Masks". Naturally, I had long experiences of "Gas Masks"
from World War I (1914-1918). I had my share of gas (of many
kinds), so I loathed the idea. All school children were excited.
To them, it would be great. Ronnie, who talked,
(aged one) - "Daddy, me big one."
One teenage girl, Peggy Hunter, adored Ronnie. She was often at the
door, "Mrs Caseby, can I take Ronnie out for a walk around the
football field?" She would hurry home from school. She had
"heels" and crusts of bread all broken up. Ronnie threw bits
down - seagulls, blackbirds, crows fought for pieces, but Ronnie
kept special bits for sparrows and smaller birds. He had a great
love for nature. He loved Cyril's rabbits and our cat. Nearby was
the River Forth. He delighted to watch all the plumaged birds
frolicking in the water.
In the autumn of 1938, Ronnie was nearing two years old. Dr
Lundie, Chief Medical Officer for Fife, called at the Manse.
(Many years earlier his Father was the Minister of my Church and he
was reared in our Manse). He loved seeing through our lovely home.
However, his visit was something special. Torryburn, Newmills,
High and Low Valleyfield - parents would not take their children to
Torryburn Hall for immunisation against certain diseases. I
said, "Leave it to me - On Sunday, I will intimate, we will take
our six children to Torryburn Hall at 11 am on the following
Saturday to be immunised and request that all other parents do
the same." Dr Lundie said that he would have a full staff ready.
As promised we took our our six children. Many parents also
arrived. Our children came out of the Hall; not in tears, but
smiling. For six and a half hours the medical team toiled and at
the end of the appointed session, I was told that
95% of the children in the area were immunised. "A record
indeed," said Dr Lundie, "and I am most grateful". No child out of
the 95% immunised suffered any great discomfort and hundreds of Mums
and Dads thanked me for my example in sending, or rather taking, our
children first to the Torryburn Hall. Ronnie, to his credit, did not
murmur nor whimper.
Swiftly events took place. Hundreds of Anderson steel shelters
were left in as many places. Engineers fixed them up in
prepared, hidden places. Floors were concreted. Householders
covered them with carpets; camp beds, brought in; areas heated by
thick candles, shrouded by large flower pots, collapsible tables at
hand, small cupboard with food stuffs, games (ludo, draughts, etc.,
etc.,) also large bottles of water, juices, jar of sweets, books and
a Bible.
The children were keen to sleep in the Iron Tent, but they were
firmly told, "NO". The shelter had to be kept clean, tidy and
ready in the moment of emergency. Why? Why? Why? was the
request from many, many children. Some parents gave in and
regretted saying yes.
Margaret had her choice girl friends and we were happy. The
twins were noisy, often naughty in many ways. Cyril was always
quiet, frank and open, intelligent, on the point of becoming a
loner, kindly in nature. Charles was a combination of wit and
wisdom, had an enquiring mind. Ronnie, from his earliest days was
very affectionate, bright eyed and good. We were proud of our
family, every one, from an early age. They had a high mark of
obedience, which was a mark of pride to Mother and me. Like most
parents with families, we did not have a favourite child in a sense
of petting, but Ronnie, the youngest, born in the age of national
peril, required more attention, and he responded to us and the
others in the family with sound joy and appreciation. All in all
we were happy. Many newspapers were reduced in size, certain news
items were brief, pages given over to "In cases of emergency, phone
-----?" Some part columns, news from "France Papers or "Austrian
Papers" or "Belgian" or "Swiss" or "Spanish" or "Russian" Papers
etc., etc., etc.
One thing annoyed our children and others. "Comic Papers" and
"Comic Sheets" were cut out. Everything pointed to "War was
drawing nearer" - what happened before World War I in 1914 -
with "Hitler Hate" increasing day by day, pointed to War. Night
after night, saying Evening Prayers with our children, it was
difficult to ask God to preserve and reform all who wish to
destroy our country and people. We never neglected to pray.
One night, after singing "Jesus Loves Me" after bed time kisses,
chubby-faced Ronnie looked into my face, "Daddy 'Heel Hitler'
needs Jesus." No one laughed.
The early morning radio news said,
"The era of peace and quiet is over - Hitler's millions of fully
armed men, tanks panzer cars, war ships, aeroplanes, battleships,
submarines, munitions, double all the Combined Forces, armaments put
together. In addition, spies in every neutral country in Europe.
Like former dictators, Herr Hitler was badly informed about the
strength of the British Commonwealth.
My congregation in Newmills Parish Church were assembled for
worship at 11 am. In the vestry, I had brought in a small radio.
Ronnie was asleep in his pram. At exactly 11 am, the then Prime
Minister said at this hour - 11 o'clock am,
"We are at WAR with Germany."
Quietly, I walked into my pulpit. First I said, "Do not be
alarmed at my words. One minute ago I heard the voice of the
Prime Minister say over the radio at 11 o'clock am, "We are at War
with Germany." I was amazed at the stunned silence. A prayer,
a few words - there will be no Sunday Schools, Evening Services,
Bible Classes until further notice. The very word
'War' made me shudder. Every window had to be blacked out;
identity cards used; ration coupons for most goods. Above all, a
time of gloom for everyone who experienced World War I.
Information came over the radio at regular periods. "One of the
first said if air raids took place after 10 p.m., schools would be
closed all next day." Children hoped for raids after 10 each night!
It happened many times. Not long after my pulpit intimation,
I found Charlie on top of the air raid shelter, looking over
the Manse wall. "Dad", he cried, "People are carrying stuff
into their shelters. Can we do it too?" Ronnie was at my side,
"Daddy, lift me up to see too." I lifted him up. He was not
impressed. "Take me in our one, I'll come too," said Charlie. So,
I let Ronnie in first; Charlie next, then Cyril appeared and
jumped in; I followed. Mother came to see where we were - she
looked anxious. "The twins are scouring the football field for
fragments of anti-aircraft shells." I was after them like a shot.
Many boys had pieces, very sharp ragged pieces. I collected quite a
lot - sent for the Chief Warden. He was young, never thought of such
dangerous fragments. He was true to his word. German planes
passed over our area to bomb Rosyth Dockyard, so many
anti-aircraft sites were around our area. The Warden had leaflets
sent around homes to warn of the danger.
The initial period of the War was a busy and anxious time for me
- young lads called up; Army units around to be visited; many
invalids to be visited in hospitals and homes. Fortunately,
after screening at Rosyth Headquarters, I had a special pass with my
photo that eased my travel.
Entered/rrc/07/01/92.
Ends.

The following additional childhood recollection came to me on the morning of 01/01/20000.


Addresses I have lived or lodged at over the years;
The Manse, Newmills, Fife, Scotland,
The Manse, Main Street, Blackridge, West Lothian, Scotland,
Bangour Hospital, Whitburn, West Lothian, Scotland,
Stracathro Hospital, Brecin, Angus, Scotland,
The Manse, Drumoak, Park, Aberdeenshire, Scotland,
Stoneywood House (Trainee Hostel), Bucksburn, Aberdeenshire, Scotland,
c/o Mrs Shepherd (address in Dartford, Kent, forgotten),
c/o Mrs Probert, 107, North Road, Dartford, Kent, England,
c/o The Old Bell Inn, Cookham, Bucks, England,
c/o Mrs Pender, 53 Chesser Crescent, Edinburgh, Scotland,
The Manse, Carlops, Penicuik, Mid Lothian, Scotland,
c/o Mrs Barnes, 23, Albany Road, West Ealing, London W13, England.
c/o Miss Wake, 21, Drayton Avenue, West Ealing, London W13, England.
c/o Mrs Patten, 31, Edgerton Gardens, West Ealing, London W13, England.
c/o The Castle Hotel, Tredegar, Monmouthshire, Wales,
c/o Mrs Furness, 25, Edgerton Gardens, West Ealing, London W13, England.
4, Sherbourne Gardens, West Ealing, London W13, England.
A flat at Lewin Road, Streatham, London, England.
33, Sandy Lane South, Wallington, Surrey, England.
4, Sherbourne Gardens, West Ealing, London W13, England.
"Nyasa," 10, Lincoln Green, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 4DN England.