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CHAPTER XXVI.

Lynn Township.

 

By Samuel J. Kistler, Esq.

 

Pages 297 to 314

Including sections on:

                   Land Warrants, Tax Lists & Early Settlement

                   Justices of the Peace

                   Schools

                   Villages & Churches

                   Cemeteries



a REGION of country lying in this township and in the township of Albany in Berks County, adjoining, was from the earliest settlement designated as “Allemangel,” and further for judicial purposes called “adjacents,” or “back parts of Macungie,” and “The Heidelberg District.” In March, 1752, Northampton County was erected; in June following Heidelberg township was organized, and at the October term of court, in the same year, a petition was presented asking for a new township to be taken from the west part of Heidelberg. An order was granted by the court, and viewers were appointed, who laid out the territory and reported their action at the June term of court, 1753, when it was confirmed. In this connection we quote the following, which appears on the records under date of June 9, 1753:


“The Petition of Sundry inhabitants lying under the blue mountains, between Heidelberg and the County line, to be laid out into a Township was allowed, and Edward or Nicholas Scull are appointed Surveyor to be Employed to Survey and make return of the same.”


The report stated that there “was laid out a Certain tract of Land. Beginning at a post at a Corner of Heidelberg township and from thence Extending by the same north twenty (20) degrees west, 1280 perches and by vacant land 290 perches to Ye blue mountains thence along the mountains south sixty-five (65) degrees west 518 perches, south thirty (30) degrees west 60 perches, South fifty (50) degrees west 302 perches and south sixty-seven (67) degrees west 1578 perches to the County line. Thence by the same line South East (S 45 E) 2200 perches to a stone in said line thence by Weissenberg township north East (N 45 E) 1640 perches to Ye place of beginning. Containing about 20,000 acres which said described Tract of land is laid out and included for a township Called Linn Township.”


At the September court following the confirmation of the township Charles Folk was appointed constable, and on the 16th of September, 1755, George Briner was appointed to the same office.

 

Many people settled in the limits of Lynn township several years before warrants were taken out for the land, and the dates given below are not reliable data as to the time of settlement, as in many other parts of the country.


The names as found are here given, with the dates and number of acres:

Acres.
Valentine Barontheisel, March 6, 1741.......................................... 156
Michael John Bomgarder, Feb. 15, 1743........................................ 109
Valentine Barontheisel, Oct. 16, 1750............................................. 54
Henry Brenigh, Jan. 10, 1753........................................................... 64
Peter Beisel, Sept. 3, 1754................................................................. 25
Jacob Billman, Sept 4, 1772.............................................................. 40
Martin Brobat, Jan. 7, 1790.............................................................. 84
Michael Buck, Nov. 14, 1765........................................................... 64
Peter Bulldoff (Baldaüf), Sept. 24, 1768......................................... 43
Jacob Billman, Dec. 27, 1766............................................................ 50
Jacob Barr, Nov. 4, 1767................................................................... 121
Peter Beisel, Aug. 24, 1768............................................................... 36
Henry Bredich, April 6, 1769........................................................... 97
Adam Clause, April 3, 1767............................................................. 136
Adam Creities (Adam Creitz), Dec. 19, 1768................................ 154
Gottlieb Demut (Gottleb Donat), Aug 24. 1753............................ 95
John Everitt, May 4, 1759.................................................................. 56
George Enos, May 30, 1785............................................................... 42
Philip Enos, April 12, 1768................................................................ 25
Philip Eberth, May 4, 1768................................................................ 44
Thomas Everitt, March 18, 1769....................................................... 36
Gabriel Foagher, Oct. 25, 1748.......................................................... 63
John Flugh, Dec. 12, 1749................................................................... 53
Samuel Frees, Oct. 22, 1752................................................................ 60
Daniel Hiester, April 25, 1744........................................................... 112
George Harmony, March 6, 1749...................................................... 50
Zachariah Heller, May 11, 1769......................................................... 223
Christian Henry, June 22, 1769.......................................................... 78
Abraham Kerper, Jan. 24, 1743.......................................................... 200
                            , Oct. 30, 1744.......................................................... 21
Henry Kuntzman, Sept 2, 1749.......................................................... 160
                             , July 19, 1754......................................................... 79
Jacob Kistler, April 30, 1866................................................................ 126
John Kistler, May 21, 1766................................................................... 42
Henry King, June 14, 1769................................................................... 146
Evan Long, Feb. 8, 1744....................................................................... 348
Jacob Lesser, Oct. 14, 1749................................................................... 115
Peter Lutz, Sept. 13, 1765..................................................................... 59
Michael Miller, Aug. 11, 1747.............................................................. 63
Simon Moser, Dec. 22, 1748................................................................. 203
Christian Miller, April 20, 1749........................................................... 31
                          , March 23, 1750......................................................... 72
Frederick Michael, Aug. 4, 1750.......................................................... 70
Adam Miller, Aug. 5, 1752................................................................... 149
Michael Moser, June 8, 1754................................................................. 54
Simon Moser, Nov. 19, 1766................................................................. 33
Jacob Muntz (Moutz), Dec. 10, 1766.................................................... 48
                                   , Dec. 10, 1766..................................................... 39
Conrad Muntz (Moutz), Dec. 10, 1766................................................. 49
Christian Miller, April 7, 1767............................................................... 105
Larance Miller, Oct. 19, 1767................................................................. 44
George Nongener, April 1, 1747........................................................... 53
George Neiss (or Neirs), Dec. 19, 1751................................................. 75
John Neart, Feb. 8, 1769.......................................................................... 56
George Oswald, June 9, 1752................................................................. 199
Daniel Oswald, April 27, 1768............................................................... 75
                        , May 11, 1769................................................................. 142
David Pillman, Oct. 4, 1738.................................................................... 200
Adam Potts, March 13, 1745................................................................... 79
Michael Poke, May 11, 1748.................................................................... 124
Henry Pedneek, May 3, 1749................................................................... 115
Godfried Peatzle, April 30, 1767............................................................. 131
Mathias Rhoods, April 15, 1740.............................................................. 204
Baltzer Redenhower, Nov. 29, 1748........................................................ 124
Henry Rubrecht, Nov. 12, 1768............................................................... 70
Job Sickfried (Earlist), Feb. 24, 1737........................................................ 300
Charles Stroub, Sept 5. 1748.................................................................... 293
Henry Sunday, March 6, 1750................................................................. 130


 

 

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Andrew Seachler (Sechler), May 30, 1785.............................................. 40
Nicholas Smith, Sept. 30, 1765.................................................................. 107
Jacob Snyder, Oct. 11, 1765....................................................................... 112
Melchoir Geer, Nov. 12, 1766................................................................... 109
Gabriel Vogel, June 8, 1754...................................................................... 37
Sebastian Verner, Sept. 8, 1754................................................................ 125
Martin Wydsell, Sept. 29, 1741................................................................ 168
Philip Wertman, Dec. 15, 1749................................................................. 197
                           , Aug. 8, 1750.................................................................. 123
Henry Wetherstine (called Winderstein), May 12, 1773..................... 10
George Witzell, Dec. 28, 1767.................................................................. 17
Henry Weiderstine (called Wintherstein), Feb. 1, 1768....................... 86
Michael Wertman, April 27, 1768............................................................ 42
Baltzer Yeager, Nov. 4, 1752..................................................................... 65
George Huns Zimmerman, Aug. 2, 1751................................................ 22


The names given below are taken from the assessment-roll made by the commissioners of Northampton County, Dec. 27, 1781:


Philip Anthony                               Christian Haas
Adam Arend                                   Leonard Haas
John Anthony                                  Henry Kram
Philip Breiner                                  Andrew Kunkle
Philip Bower                                    Adam Krok
John Breiner                                     Christian Kock
Michael Beck                                   Jacob Kuntz
John Bear                                          John Kuntz
Martin Baily                                    Michael Kuntz
Abraham Baily                                John Kistler
Lorance Bachman                          Michael Kistler
Paul Bachman                                 Jacob Kistler
Frederick Breyner                           Samuel Kistler
Conrad Bylman                              Philip Kistler
George Breish                                  George Kistler (Dietrich Mill, over two Henry Bautz                                                                 miles from Kutztown)

Martin Bear                                     Henry King
Widow Bear                                     Frederick Lyser
Conrad Baldauf                              John Lyser
Adam Clause                                   Peter Leitz
Adam Critis                                     John Lyby
Wilhelm J. Carl                               John Lorah
Melchoir Derr                                 Christian Luff
Mathias DeLong                             Jacob Manes
John Dietrich                                   Christian Miller
John DeLong                                    Simon Mosser
Thomas Everett                              Philip Mosser
Philip Ebert                                      Berghard Mosser
Bastian Edel                                     Andrew Meyer
George Eckroth                               Eagle Meyer
Stofle Eckroth                                  William Meyer
George Ehris                                    Carl Meyer
Michael Fenstermaechr                Andrew Miller
Bernard Fallweiler                         Jacob Miller
Philip Fusselman                            Martin Metzger
George Folck                                    Conrad Nun
Joseph Gorber                                 John Moyer
Peter Gift John                                Moyer, Jr.
Henry Gissler                                  Daniel Moyer
Conrad Hollebach                          Peter Notstein
Christian Henry                             Daniel Oswald
George Hauselman                        Jacob Oswald
Zachariah Haller                            Anthony Opp
Zachariah Haller, Jr.                     Philip Puhl
Henry Haller                                   Margaret Pugh
Christian Haller                             Matthias Probst (Matthias)
Dewalt Houck, Jr.                           George Probst
George Hermany                            Martin Probst
John Heil                                          Philip Probst
Jacob Hans                                       Peter Rerdenower
William Holby                                Jacob Rex
Paul Hertzog                                   Jacob Reegle
Daniel Ham                                     Henry Ruprecht
George Hollenbach                        Henry Riehes
John Herman                                   Daniel Reiss
Jacob Heinbach                               Henry Steigerwalt
Dewalt Hanck                                 George Sausley
George Heilman                             John Swatz
George Heilman, Jr.                       Abraham Shellhamer
Peter Sheefly                                    Philip Shellhamer
Michael Stein                                  Bernard Snyder
Stoffle Sunday                                 Henry Snyder
Charles Shuck                                 Daniel Snyder
Widow of John Stein                     Samuel Everett
Frederick Sechler                            Daniel Stambach
George Shuck                                  Christian Shuman
Martin Shuck                                  Philip Shock
George Snyder                                Jacob Steitly
Michael Shickly                              Jacob Wertman
Andrew Sechler                              Martin Wertman
John Smith                                       Michael Wertman
Mathias Schitz                                Widow Weitzel
Daniel Straub                                  John Weiss
Charles Straub                                Jacob Wannamacher
Andrew Straub                               Jacob Wannamacher, Jr.
Philip Sittler                                    Philip Wannamacher
Ehrhard Seisloff                              Caspar Wannamacher
Henry Snyder                                  John Weisser
Widow Stambach                           William Yett
Frederick Sauder
Adam Stahler

                                     Single Freemen


John Hermany                                Paul Anthony
Daniel Shuman                               Henry Fink
Leonard Bock                                  Philip Opt
Charles Bock                                    George Ruprecht
John Baldauff                                  Deater Hanselman
Philip Baldauff                                Andrew Hanselman


Of these, the largest tax-payers were Philip Mosser, who was assessed for ten pounds; Thomas Everitt for eight pounds; George Hermany, Jacob Manss, Martin Probst, John Swatz, Bernard Snyder, each seven pounds; John Breiner, Conrad Bylman, Geo. Breish, Paul Hertzog, Frederick Lyserbad, Michael Stein, each for six pounds; all others for lesser amounts.

 

The following names are copied from the assessment-roll made by the commissioner of Northampton county for the year A.D. 1812:

Paul Anthony                                  Henry Creitz
Daniel Arndt                                   Henry Carl (estate)
John Arndt                                       Adam Clause
Valentine Brobst                             Samuel Billman
Jacob Bachman                               George Castord
Sebastian Benninghoff                  John Crash
John Benninghoff                           Martin Crone
Mathias Brobst                                George Crone
John Brobst                                      Martin Donot
Michael Brobst, Sr.                         John Fogel, Esq.
George Breinere                              Job Delong
Jacob Baush                                     George Dreine (Treiner)
Daniel Bachman                             Henry Drumbower
Frederick Frey                                 John Everitt (estate)
William Kistler                               John Everitt
Martin Bear                                     Peter Everitt (weaver)
Philip Baldauf                                 Tobias Ebert
George Bihl                                      Philip Ebert
Catharine Baldauf                         Peter Ebert
Godfrey Brobst                                Peter Eberoth
John Baush                                       John Eberoth
Jacob Bear                                        Ferdinand Fullweiler
George Breisch (estate)                 Daniel Fullweiler
Abraham Belchley                         Henry Fusselman
Michael Brobst                                Ebrhard Fusselman
James Brier                                       Michael Fenstermacher
Christian Beary                               Jacob Fenstermacher
Jacob Benfield                                 Frederick Fry
John Bear                                          Philip Fenstermacher
Michael Croll                                  Jacob Frederolf (Fetherolf)
John Carl                                          Jacob Frey
Widow Carl                                     Christian Fink
Jacob Behley                                    Widow Frey

 

 

 

 

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Andrew Graver                              Henry Moyer
John Seiberling                                Philip Mosser
Daniel Greenwald                          George Mosser
Philip Harman                                John Neif (Neff)
Nicholas Hartman                         John Meyer
Conrad Hartman                           Peter Neif (Neff)
Adam Harry                                    John Notestein
Jesse Hermany                                Daniel Oswald
Peter Hunsicker                              Jacob Oswald
Jacob Holben                                   Jacob Oswald, Jr.
Desterich Hunsicker                      John Oswald
Widow Hausman                           John Oswald, Jr.
Jacob Haas                                       Anthony Opp
George Harman                              Conrad Opp
Jacob Haas, Jr.                                 William Peter
John Heil                                          John Rubrecht
Lewis Herring                                 Laurence Reitz
Nicholas Hollenbach                     John Reitz
Christian Holben                            George Raush (supposed Baush)
Samuel Ely                                       George Rubrecht
Daniel Hollenbach                         Henry Rubrochl
Samuel Jenser                                  Isaac Romick
George Jenser                                  John Sensinger
Philip Jaxheimere                           Andrew Straub
Jacob Klingsman                            George Sherry
Jacob King (Koenig)                       John Sittler
Henry Krum                                    Jacob Shneider
John Kistler                                      Henry Shneider
Samuel Kistler                                 John Stein
Jacob Kuntz John                           Snyder (Shneider)
Philip Kistler                                   Peter Shneider
Jacob Kistler                                    John Steirwold (Steigerwalt)
John Kistler, Jr.                                Jacob Smith
Ferdinand Kistler                           Henry Steirwold (Steigerwalt)
Jacob Kashner (Kerschner)          Nicholas Schleicher
George Krumm                               Jacob Sechler
Michael Kistler                               Jacob Schneider
Jacob Kistler                                    Conrad Stump
Samuel Kistler                                 Valentine Sell
Peter Kunkle                                    Andrew Sechler
Philip Kerschner                             John Sechler
Conrad Kerschner                          Jacob Schallhard (Schellhart)
Jacob Kerschner                              Henry Schackler
Conrad Kerschner                          Frederick Sechler
Christian Klingeman                     George Sittler
Michael Klingsmen                        Daniel Saeger (late Crawford Co.)
Michael Kistler                               Andrew Straub
Frederick Andrew Leiby               Andrew Sechler, Jr.
Jacob Lutz                                        John Stroub
Daniel Lesser                                   Henry Stroub
Frederick Lutz                                 Jacob Schalhard (Schellhart)
Jacob Leiber                                     George Shnyder
Christian Lutz                                 William Shnyeder (Snyder)
Henry Lutz                                      Henry Smith
John Lutz                                          Melchior Schwab
Peter Lutz                                         Conrad Hartman
John Liebic, Jr.                                 Henry Schitz
George Lock (Loch)                       John Schaller
Zachariah Long                              Henry Soudal
Abraham Long                                Andrew Steirwold
Conrad Lutz                                    John Shnyder
Andrew Miller                                Samuel Shneider
Peter Miller                                      John Seiberling
Jacob Mauce (Mautz)                    George Sentee, Jr.
Henry Mauce (Mautz)                  Peter Shnyder
Philip Mauce (Mautz)                   Frederick Sheoffer
David Mosser                                  Joseph Sechler
Borgart Mosser                               Christian Shnyder
Abraham Merkch (Merkel)         Jacob Straub
Peter Myer                                       George Schallhamer
Michael Mosser                              George Wonnemacher
Jacob Mosser                                   Jacob Wartman
Peter Miller                                      Philip Wartman
Andrew Miller, Jr.                          Philip Wannemacher
John Miller                                       Daniel Wannemacher
Peter Miller                                      Jacob Wannemacher, Jr.
Abraham Miller                              Jacob Wannemacher, Sr.
John Weiss                                       Henry Weaver
John Weiss, Jr.                                 Henry Weaver, Jr.
Christian Wert                                Andrew Wertman
Casper Wannemacher                  John Ritter (estate)
                              Christian Wannemacher


                                     Single Freemen
Christian Kuntz                              George Benighoff
Thomas Everitt                               Jacob Bachman
Henry Weaver                                Henry Beitz (supposed Reitz)
Abraham Fenstermacher             Henry Long
John Miller                                       Charles Long
John Fenstermacher                      Henry Koenig
John Shnyder                                   Philip Brobst
John Miller                                       Michael Kistler
Jacob Weaver                                  John Kistler
Andrew Hartzell                            Jacob Rubrecht
Peter Shnyder                                  Henry Fullweiler
Jacob Meyer                                     John Hoffman
                                     Jacob Mosser

 

It is very difficult to gather reliable data concerning the early families who settled in the township, as their descendants in many cases know but little of them, except that the land they inherited came from some remote ancestor. Effort has been made to secure records of a few of the first settlers, with the result here given.

 

George Hermany emigrated from Europe in the year 1736, when but seventeen years of age, with his uncle, who settled in Kutztown, where George remained until 1749. On the 6th of March in that year, he took out a warrant for fifty acres of land, a part of the tract now owned by his grandsons, - George and Philip. George emigrated to Ohio, and died there: Philip settled on the homestead, married Catherine Stiegerwalt, lived to an advanced age, and died about 1837, leaving a family of five sons, - John, Samuel, Daniel, George, and Isaac. John settled in Jacksonville, kept the hotel, store, and post-office, and died in 1863. Samuel married Salome, the daughter of Christian Wannemacher, and settled on the homestead, where he lived all his days, and died in 1868, aged sixty-three years, leaving four sons, of whom Charles became a civil engineer, and resides in St. Louis. Edwin, Lewis, Samuel, and Amanda reside on the homestead, which is one of the finest in the county. Edwin is actively engaged in the interest of the schools in the township. Lewis was captain in the Carbon County regiment in the last war. Daniel, son of Philip, settled at Lockport, N. Y. George emigrated to Ohio. Isaac located in Hamberg, Berks County. Of the daughters of Philip, Rebecca married the Rev. John Zulich; Magdalena became Mrs. Jacob Lieby; Catharine married Jonathan Smith, of Albany, Berks Co.; and Molly, Mrs. Henry Long.


Peter Hunsicker came to the township from Heidelberg after 1781, and located on land adjoining Philip Mosser. He was a farmer, and had one son, Peter, who died in 1883, aged ninety years. He left several children, of whom Reuben and Paul reside in Heidelberg, and Joseph resides in the township. John D. Kistler resides on the old Hunsicker farm.

 

 

 

 

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Of the Fetterolf family were four brothers, - Jacob, Peter, Philip, and John. Jacob lived below Jacksonville, where his family still reside. Peter resided in the Kistler Valley near the Berks County line. Philip lived on the arm now owned by Daniel K. Fetterolf, of Allentown. John was a miller, and settled in Kistler’s Valley, at Fettrolfsville, in Berks County.


Among the very first settlers of Lynn township was John Heil, Sr., who was the owner of a tract of land on the south side of Kistler’s Valley. The tract is now owned by the heirs of David J. Kistler, deceased. John Heil, Sr., sold his land to his son, John Heil, Jr., and John Heil, Jr., had two sons, - David and John. John remained unmarried, and David, who was married, finally became the owner of the whole tract, and in his lifetime sold the same to the above named present owners. David had sons and daughters, who are all scattered in different directions except his son, John Heil, who is residing with his family in Germansville, Heidelberg township. The family all the way down was a religious family, and the first John Heil belonged to the Moravian denomination, who had
first settled here and who had a church here before any other denomination had succeeded that far, and is buried in the Moravian graveyard, on land of Jonas J. Kistler, in Kistler’s Valley.


On the 24th of September, 1766, Peter Baldauff took out a warrant for forty-three acres of land. One Caspar Baldauff is assessed in 1781, and in 1798 Philip Baldauff lived adjoining land of Philip Mosser, and in 1812 Philip and Catharine Baldauff were assessed. The family died out without leaving heirs, and by authority of law Governor Shunk conveyed the property by deed to Michael Lauchnor on the 29th day of July, 1846. It now belongs to his sons, James and William F. Lauchnor. On the place is a station of the Schuylkill and Lehigh Railroad. A store was kept there by Peter Miller from 1851 to 1855.


In the assessment-roll of 1781 occur the names of Martin, Matthias, George and Philip Probst. The name later was changed to Brobst. In 1786 Martin Brobst was licensed by the court of Northampton County to keep a tavern. It appears that four years later, Jan. 7, 1790, he took out a warrant for eighty-four acres of land. His name does not appear in the assessment-roll of 1812, when the following members of the family were assessed, - Michael Brobst, Sr., Michael Brobst, Jr., Valentine Matthias, John F., and Godfrey. In 1815 John F. Brobst was licensed to keep a tavern and lived near Steinsville. Jacob F. Brobst was a son of John F., and in 1822 married Lydia, a daughter of Philip Kistler; they had three sons, of whom Samuel K. Brobst was the eldest. He was born Nov. 16, 1822, attended the Washington college, Kutztown Academy, Marshall College, and later Washington College, where he gave instructions in German. In 1845 he was appointed agent of the Sunday-school Union and to establish German Sunday-schools. In May, 1847, he was licensed as a Lutheran minister in the Zion’s Lutheran Church in Philadelphia, and in 1850 was ordained in Pottsville. For a number of years he acted as missionary and supply for different congregations.  From 1843 to his death, Dec. 23, 1876, he was connected with the publishing house at Allentown, and had charge of the St. Peter’s Church in that city for several years.


Marcus, Jacob, Sr., and Philip Wannemacher were cousins who settled in Lynn township at an early day. Marcus located on land around and including Lynnport. He lived in a house that stood by the spring near where the depot at Lynnport stands. His name does not occur in the assessment of 1781. The names of Jacob, Sr., Jacob, Jr., Philip and Caspar appear. Jacob Wannemacher, Sr., lived near Lynnport. He built the grist-mill now owned by Joel Snyder. He died about 1829 and left Jacob,
Daniel and Christian, and a daughter who married Jacob Wetherold. Jacob settled on part of the tract of his father. He was at one time commissioner of the county. His family are scattered.


Christian settled at Steinville. His son, Charles, was for several years a merchant in Philadelphia, and now resides in Boston.


Philip Wannemacher resided on part of the tract, and where Edwin Hermany now resides. He died about 1829, and at the time of his death was the wealthiest man in the township. Catharine, his only child, married Joseph Sechler, and settled on the homestead.


Caspar settled on part of the original tract, now owned by Daniel Wannemacher, his son. He died about 1845, and left three sons and five daughters, - Joseph, Daniel, and Jesse.


Of the daughters, Catharine married David Folweiler, and settled in Lynnport. Maria married Abraham Leidy, who also settled at Lynnport. Susan became the wife of Reuben Fetherolf, and she now lives at the old Jacob Fetherolf place.


Michael Fenstermacher resided near Lynnville. He was a resident there many years previous to 1781, and built an oil-mill on the creek, which was later changed to a grist-mill. He also started a store in his dwelling-house. It is related of him that for many years his doors were without locks, bolts, or bars. He was urged to fasten his doors, and finally consented. The next week after he had bolted and barred his store it was broken into and some of his goods taken. He was living in 1812, and his sons, Jacob and Philip, were also owners of land at that time. His other sons were Abraham, Daniel, and Peter. Daniel, a grandson of Michael, now resides on the old homestead.


The land known as the Holben farm and mill property, on Switzer Creek, was originally warranted by Caspar Wieser, and by him sold to ____ Kuntz, and in 1750 came into possession of Sylvester Holben. He left Germany with his brother, John, and his wife. On the voyage John was taken sick, made his will in…



 

 

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             …favor of his brother, with the provision that Solomon should marry his wife. John died, and was buried in the sea. Solomon carried out the provisions of the will, married the widow, and settled on the Switzer Creek. He had two sons, Gideon and Jacob. The former moved to Lowhill, where his descendants now live. Jacob settled on the old tract, built a grist-mill about half a mile up from the present one, and in 1813 erected the present stone mill. He had three sons, - Jacob, Andrew, and
David. The latter settled on the homestead, and died in 1882, leaving the property to a son, Dr. M. J. Holen, of Slatington, and a daughter. Jacob settled at Pleasant Corner, and died there. Hon. Evan Holben, of Allentown, and Professor Oliver Holben, of New York, are sons of Jacob. Andrew settled at Weissenberg, and died in 1883, aged eighty-two years.

 

Among the early land warrants appear the names of John Everett, with the date of May 4, 1759, and Thomas Everett, in April, 1769. It is not known whether these men settled in the township or not. There are families of the name residing in the township. Samuel Everett, whose name has not been associated with the others above mentioned, married a daughter of Philip Mosser. Although his name is not found at Easton in the list of justices of the peace of this district, it appears attached to many of
the deeds as the justice taking the acknowledgments. He resided on a farm near the Jacksonville church, and where for many years Jacob Oswald, son of John, resided. Michael Everett, a son of Samuel, settled at Lynnport, and kept the hotel and a store several years, and moved to Philadelphia, where he was a merchant. Other sons of Samuel removed to Ohio.


Jacob, Samuel, and John Everett, not of the line of Samuel Everett, Esq., were living in the township fifty years ago, and their descendants now reside here.


Andrew Miller was born near Lynnville, some time between 1730 and 1740; he married Magdalena Sieberling, and settled on the farm now owned by Nathan Bachman. He had three children, - John, Maria and Catharine. Maria was the wife of John D. Heintzelman, and Catharine became the wife
of Samuel Kistler. John was born in 1790; served in the war of 1812; married Maria Rex, and settled on the homestead. He died in 1835, and left six children, - Reuben, John, Stephen, Catharine, Mary, and Sarah. Reuben, John, and Catharine are residents in the township.


George Kistler was among a number of Palatinates, or Swiss, who, it appears, moved, between 1735 and 1745, from Falkner Swamp and Goshenhoppen (present Montgomery County) up to Lynn township, and settled down in the vicinity of what is now called the Jerusalem Church, formerly called Allemangel Church, which section of the country was then called “Allemangel.” He was elder of the Allemangel Church about 1755 to 1768. The names of his children were George Kistler, Jr., who afterwards lived near Kutztown; Jacob Kistler, John Kistler, Samuel Kistler, Philip Kistler, and Michael Kistler. Barbara was married, first to a Brobst, and afterwards to Michael Mosser, of Lowhill. Dorotea was married to Michael Reinhart, and Elizabeth to a Keller, near Hamburg, Pa.


Samuel Kistler was born Sept. 20, 1754, and died April 24, 1822, at the old homestead, where Daniel b. Kistler now lives, and is buried at the said Jerusalem Church, who, with his first wife, Mary Elizabeth Ladich, daughter of Jacob Ladich, who was born Nov. 22, 1761, in Greenwich township, Berks Co., had three children, - Barbara, who was married to Henry Sunday, who died, and is buried at the Dunkels Church, near Klinesville; Jacob S. Kistler, who was born Oct. 5, 1781, and died Oct. 7, 1849, and is buried at the Jerusalem Church; and Samuel Kistler, who was born Aug. 12, 1785 and died Sept. 18, 1862, and is buried at the Ebenezer Church at New Tripoli. And with his second wife, Catharine Brobst, he had the following named children, to wit: John S. Kistler, who died, and is buried at the Jerusalem Church; Michael Kistler, who moved to Ohio, where he died; Christian Kistler, who died, and is buried at the Ebenezer Church at New Tripoli; Daniel S. Kistler, who died in
West Penn, Schuylkill Co., and is buried there; David Kistler, who is still alive, and is residing in West Penn township, Schuylkill Co.; Jesse Kistler had moved to Ohio and died there; Charles Kistler had also moved to the State of Ohio, in the neighborhood of Warren, and is still living; Levi Kistler, who was the youngest son and child, was born July 8, 1811, and died Feb. 9, 1884, and is buried at the Jacob’s Church at Jacksonville, in Lynn township. Maria Elizabeth Kistler was married to Jacob Snyder, who moved to Ohio and died there; Catherine was married to George Weida, and died at an early age in Lowhill township; Salome was married to Jacob Mosser (the tanner), and died at Allentown; and Magdalena was married to Solomon Mosser, who died, and was buried at the
Jerusalem or Lynnville Church. The above-named Samuel Kistler was the owner of large tracts of lands. He had at the time of his death, in 1822, a tract of five hundred and ninety-six acres one hundred and ten perches of land, all adjoining, in Kistler’s Valley. Besides that he owned a tract of land near New Tripoli, on which he had built an expensive stone grist-mill, saw-mill, etc., and had also owned the tract on which now Parry Kistler resides, where he first started out. He was favorably known as a leading man in the upper part of the county.


Jacob S. Kistler was born in Lynn township, at the place where now Parry Kistler resides; was a farmer by occupation, and had two farms in Kistler’s Valley, which together contained nearly four hundred acres of land. He held the office of justice of the peace, and served otherwise
in the affairs of the township. He was first married to a daughter of Wilhelm J. Carl, with whom he had two sons, - John, who was born…



 

 

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                                                                     …Aug. 21, 1802, and who died Jan. 27, 1862; and Jacob, who died in or about the year 1836. Both are buried at the Jerusalem Church. His second wife was Catharine, and his third wife Anna Barbara, daughters of Henry Bausch. Jacob S. Kistler had no children by the second wife, and the following are of the third wife. She was born June 25, 1790, and died Nov. 19, 1867. Nathan Kistler was born April 6, 1811, and died Sept. 11, 1878; Stephen Kistler, born Dec. 26, 1817, died March 13, 1874; David J. Kistler, born Jan. 1,1826, died Oct. 15, 1880 (all buried at the Jerusalem Church); Reuben Kistler, born March 8, 1816, is still alive, and is residing at Louisville, Ky.; Jonas J. Kistler and Charles Kistler are both living, and reside in Kistler’s Valley, Lynn township; Salome, who was born Feb. 17, 1810, and married to John Hermany, died Jan. 27, 1851, and is buried at Jacob’s Church at Jacksonville; Mary, who was born Oct. 4, 1812, and who was married to Elias Wertman, died Sept. 21, 1875, near Yates City, Ill., is buried at French Grove, Peoria Co., Ill.; Lydia , who was married to Daniel Long, died Aug. 9, 1854, aged thirty-four years, at Ringgold, Schuylkill Co., and is buried there; Catharine, who is living yet, and who is now the widow of Reuben Buck, resides near Jacksonville, Pa., and Elizabeth at Saegersville, Pa.,; Anna Fenah is married to Charles Lenhart, and resides near the Corner Church, in Albany township, Berks Co.,; and Helenah, who was the second wife of Daniel Long (deceased), is now a widow, and resides near Atchison, Kan., and Samuel J. Kistler at Saegersville, Pa.

 

Philip, son of George, settled on the Billman land, in Kistler Valley, and died there. He left nine children, - Jacob, John, Ferdinand, Philip, Jonathan, Barbara, Maria, Catharine, and Elizabeth. Jacob located where the Kistler tannery now is, and died there, leaving a large family. He married Marie Bear. Mrs. Philip Fetherolf is a daughter.


John, known as the hatter, married Sally Markle, settled on the Billman place, where his father had lived. He learned the trade of a hatter, and carried on the business. He left two sons - Benjamin, of Allentown, and David, of Iowa - and three daughters. Judith became the wife of Jacob Kistler. Ferdinand moved beyond the mountains, and had two sons, - Adam and Isaac. Philip settled near Orangeville, Columbia Co.; Jonathan in Schuylkill County. Barbara married Jacob Wannemacher, and settled near Lynnport, in Lynn township. Maria married Tobias Wehr; settled beyond the Blue Mountains; later married Jacob Fetterolf. Catharine became the wife of Daniel Wannemacher; settled near Lynnport. Elizabeth married Peter Greenwalt, and lived in Lynn township.


Michael Kistler, son of George, removed to Ohio from Lynn township. He had seven children, - John, Michael, Joseph, Nathan, Monroe, Salome, and Judith. There all remained in Ohio.


Jacob, son of George, settled at the old homestead. He had eight children, - Philip, Jacob, Daniel, Michael, Solomon, Catharine, Magdalena.

 

Philip settled in Kistler Valley. He married Maria Freece. Rev. Samuel K. Brobst is a grandson.

 

Jacob lived at Levan’s Tannery. He left Louisa (Mrs. Elias Hartman), Polly (Mrs. Joseph Sechler), of Indiana.


Daniel settled near Catawissa.


Michael was the tanner in Kistler valley, and lived there many years, carrying on the business. His son Stephen was born here, and learned the trade with his father, and later went to Catawissa seven years; returned home, worked the tannery with his father, and after a few years he went to Lehighton, where he was in 1841. There ten years, and moved to Tannersville, Monroe Co., and purchased a tannery property. From this time he enlarged his business, building and buying tanneries at Stroudsburg, Great Bend, Bartonsville, Fennersville, etc., and established a headquarters in New York. His sons later became interested with him. He died in 1880, at Stroudsburg. The business is conducted under the same name.


Other sons were Parry, Jacob, Joel.


Dr. Willoughby K. Kistler, of Germansville, is a son of Jacob.

 

Solomon Kistler, son of Jacob, moved to Ohio.


Catharine married Jacob Baily, and also emigrated to Ohio.


Magdalena married Jacob Bear, and lived at Jeremiah Fusselman’s, in Lynn township.


Henry Baush, who came at the age of eighteen years from Germany, by the way of Amsterdam, to this country, and who was married to Anna Margaret Greenwalt, a daughter of Jacob Greenwalt, Sr., settled east of Peter Miller, on Switzer Creek, and had the following-named children: Jacob Baush, Henry Baush, John Baush (Henry and John had moved to Columbia County, and died there), George Baush, Maria Baush, who was married to Peter Snyder, and settled near Bath; Anna Elizabeth married Henry Snyder, and afterwards to a Mr. Gray, and both died near Bath, Pa.; Dora was married to Nicholas Bachman, Catharine and Anna Barbara to said Jacob S. Kistler.


Jacob Baush settled on the homestead; had one daughter, who married, remained at home, and died there. Henry and John moved to Columbia County, Pa. George married Peter Miller’s sister, and settled on the homestead. His sons, Joseph and Stephen, live on the place, and David, another son, lives near.


In 1781, Laurence and Paul Bachman were assessed on property in the township. Nicholas also was of the family. The tract on which they settled is partly owned by Owen Elwyn, near Switzer Creek.


Paul’s sons were David, Daniel, and Nicholas. They mostly emigrated to Ohio.


The sons of Nicholas were Paul, Peter, Nicholas, Daniel, Jacob, and Jonathan. They settled for a…



 

 

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… time on the land of their father, and later Paul and Peter emigrated to Ohio. Nicholas lived and died on the homestead, as did also his son John, whose sons, Levi and Jonas, now reside on the farm.

 

Daniel, son of Nicholas, settled near Lynnville, where he died. His sons, Jonas, Peter, and Nathan, reside in the township. Jacob and Jonathan, sons of Nicholas, after a few years of mature life on the home farm, settled in Mahoning township, Carbon Co., Pa.


Bernardt Folweiler emigrated to this county from Switzerland, as one of the early settlers, and before 1781 purchased about one hundred acres of land, now owned by Edwin Schitz. He left two sons, Ferdinand and Daniel, and Susan (Mrs. John Brobst). She became a widow, married a man by the
name of Taylor, moved to Ohio, and died there.

 

Ferdinand settled on the farm of his father. He was born Feb. 17, 1765, and died April 1, 1844, aged seventy-nine years. He was a captain in the State militia, and at the time of the Whisky Insurrection he called his men together and urged them to go with him; they refused, and he went to Lancaster, and went on without them. The agitation at the time was intense, and public opinion was quite equally divided. Upon the return, Ferdinand and his brothers were antagonistic in politics, Federalist and Democrat, and always remained so.


He had a large family of children, - Daniel, Henry, Ferdinand, Jonas, Israel, Anna, Maria (Mrs. ------- Grover), Catharine (Mrs. Eckerode), Magdalena (Mrs. Daniel Brobst), Susanna (Mrs. Henry Brobst), Leah (Mrs. Eckerode), Rachel (Mrs. Adam Lynn). The daughters all emigrated to Ohio.


Daniel moved to Schuylkill County, and Henry, Ferdinand, Jonas, and Israel settled in this township and died here.

 

Daniel, son of Bernardt Folweiler, was bon Oct. 2, 1769, died Feb. 14, 1847, aged seventy-seven years. He married Marie Dorothea Leazer, daughter of Frederick Leazer, and settled on the land of his
father-in-law below Jacksonville. He died there and left children, - Daniel, born 1793, died Dec. 23, 1878, aged eighty-three; John, now living at eighty-five years on the old Leazer farm; David, born 1807, now living at Lynnport, aged seventy-seven years; Jesse, living in the township at seventy-two years of age; Magdalena, born Jan. 26, 1792, married Henry Lutz, and is still living in the township with her daughter, Mrs. Jeremiah Fusselman; Elizabeth, born 1802, married Henry Creitz, and now lives at Jacksonville; Maria, born 1789, died July 20, 1865 (she married John folk; they moved to Ohio, where he is living at the age of ninety years); Esther, born 1809, married Adam Kressley, lived in the township, she died about twenty-five years ago.

 

Daniel, the eldest, lived on the old Leazer farm and died there. His family are scattered. Two of his sons, Charles and Levi, live in Tamaqua; Jesse, eldest, lives in Lynn township, at Steinville.


David Folweiler, Esq, of Lynnport, has in his possession a deed for land that was located on the Allemangel Creek, a branch of the Schuylkill, and sold to Joseph Gibson in 1750. The acknowledgment was made before Benjamin Franklin, one of the justice of the peace of the city of
Philadelphia.


On the 14th of October, 1749, Jacob Leazer took out a warrant for one hundred and fifteen acres of land. In 1781, Frederick Leazer owned a tract of land now owned by his descendants. He was in the Revolution, and was engaged as a teamster, having his own team. He hauled the bell from Independence Hall, in Philadelphia, to Lancaster, when the British were threatening the city. The hubs of two of the wheels are in possession of Jesse Folweiler, a descendant, who resides near
Jacksonville. Frederick Leazer had three children, - Daniel, who served in the war of 1812, and resided on the homestead; Ana Maria, who married the Reb. Miller; and Maria Dorothea, who became the wife of Daniel Folweiler. Mrs. Folweiler used to relate that she could remember when
the Indians had their tents near her father’s house, where she used to play with the Indian children.


The families of Daniel Leazer and Daniel Folweiler were numerous, and the Leazer tract is still in their possession.

 

In the Kistler Valley, Jacob Billman took up a warrant for land in 1766 and 1772, having lived there several years earlier. The story is current in the township that in the early times the Indians were in the habit of coming over the Blue Mountains and selling their baskets from house to house. The Billmans at one time set the dogs upon them. Some time after that the Billman family were aroused in the night by the Indians, and the whole family, with the exception of Mr. Billman, were murdered. No
one else in the neighborhood was molested. They then crossed the mountains. John Kistler, the hatter, settled upon the tract which came to him from his father, Philip. The farm is now owned by Deitrich.

The land at the mill and tannery of Mosserville was first warranted by John Much, Aug. 13, 1746, and was in two tracts, - one of forty-three acres, the other of thirty-nine. On the 2d of May, 1763, one of these tracts was sold to Philip Mosser, who also bought the other tract six years later, April 27, 1769. Philip Mosser came from Goshenhoppen when a young man, and settled at this place, and from time to time added to his lands.


A Sebastian Mosser took out a warrant for land in 1750. Whether this was a brother of Philip is not known. It was surveyed to Philip in 1810.

 

The sons of Philip Mosser were John, Philip, Jacob, and David. With the exception of David, the sons all removed to Centre County, in this State, where they now pass by the name of Musser.


A daughter of Philip Mosser married Michael Ohl, Jr., of Heidelberg, and settled in Schuylkill…



 

 

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… County, where he owned a large tract of land, and was extensively engaged in milling.

 

David Mosser married Catharine Oswald, of the township. They settled here permanently; on the 25th of April, 1798, David buying the farm of his father, who lived with them till his death, in 1817. Philip Mosser had built a log grist-mill on the Attellana (or Maiden) Creek, which in 1817 was rebuilt by David. This mill, with additions and repairs, is still in use. David Mosser died in 1832, aged sixty-five years. In February, 1839, the property was divided, John taking the tannery and Joseph the grist- and saw-mill.


Mrs. Mosser used to relate to her children that she remembered when (in 1794) two companies of New Jersey soldiers, on their return from the western part of the State, where they had been to assist in putting down the Whiskey Insurrection, tired and hungry, encamped on the farms of Philip Mosser, Jacob Oswald and Peter Hunsicker. The ovens at these farm-houses were brought into requisition, and Mrs. Mosser was actively engaged in baking for the soldiers, who stood around anxiously waiting or the bread to bake. After their hunger was appeased and they were rested, they went on their way.


David and Catharine Mosser had eleven children, of whom were John, Jacob, Elizabeth (Mrs. Christian Kistler), William, Magdalena (Mrs. Daniel Kistler), Lydia (Mrs. William Kaul), Joseph, Catharine (Mrs. Joshua Sieberling), and David O. Mosser.

 

John was a farmer, and carried on a tannery that had been established in a small way previously. He conducted for this region an extensive business. David J. and John, his sons, continued the tannery. They also have a store at the tannery. John, the father, died in 1857. A post-office was established at the place in 1865.

 

Jacob was a tanner, worked here a few years, married Salome Kistler, moved to Trexlertown, and established a tannery at that place. Later he moved to Allentown and purchased a tannery on the Little Lehigh, which is now conducted by his grandson, William Mosser. James K. Mosser, a son
of Jacob, established with others the tannery at East Allentown, and also one at Williamsport. Charles, another son of Jacob, came into possession of a tannery in Trexlertown, which he still owns.
William was a miller, and moved to near Steinsville in Berks County.


Joseph settled on the home-place, and still resides upon it. His sons are William F. Mosser, of Allentown, and Lewis F., who conducts the farm and mill.


David O. was ten years of age when his father died. He studied medicine in New York, and after graduation settled in Breinigsville, where he died in 1861, aged thirty-nine years.


Berkhardt Mosser, a cousin of Philip Mosser, who came to the township in 1769, settled about the same time on the farm now owned by Jacob Mosser, Jr., his great-grandson. He started a store at the place in 1784, which was continued by his son, Jacob.


George Philip Wertman came from Berks County to this township, and on the 15th of December,1749, took out on a warrant one hundred and ninety-seven acres of land, and on the 8th of August, 1750, took up one hundred and twenty-three acres. These tracts were where Daniel Wertman, his great-grandson, now lives, near the foot of the Blue Mountains. He had sons, of whom Michael took up forth-two acres, April 27, 1768. Other sons were George Philip, John Martin, Jacob, and Simon. George Philip went to Nova Scotia in 1799. John Martin and Simon moved to Schuylkill
County. Jacob married and settled on the homestead farm. He died in 1819 and left four sons, - Andrew, Philip, Jacob, and Daniel, - and five daughters. Jacob and Daniel moved to Northumberland County. Andrew and Philip kept the homestead. Daniel, the son of Andrew, occupies a part. The family of Philip are scattered from the homestead. The farm is now owned by Joseph and Henry Weber, sons of Jonathan.


The Kreutz (or Creitz) family emigrated from Nassua to Switzerland about 1680, and, in 1735, John Adam Creitz emigrated to this country with his family, and settled in that part of Allemangel that lies in Albany, Berks co., where now Jeremiah Behly resides. He died there, and left children, of whom were John Adam, Christian, Samuel, and Daniel. The sons, with the exception of John Adam, emigrated to the West. John Adam Creitz, Sr., took up a tract of land of one hundred and fifty-four
acres, near Lynnport, now owned by John Braucher, on the 19th day of December, 1768. On this tract John Adam Creitz, Jr., settled. He married a daughter of Ritter, an early settler. He died in 1812, and left six children, of whom Henry, Isaac, and Samuel settled in this township. Henry married Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel Folweiler, and located on the farm where William Lory resides, near Jacksonville. Daniel H. Creitz, living in Shochora valley, is a son. He was justice of the peace
from 1860-68, a member of the Legislature in the term of 1868-69-70. He was actively interested in the introduction of the railroad through the township. He resides on the old Baer farm, which is now well stocked with choice fruit. Henry F., a son of Henry, is in the regular army, stationed at Fort Clark, Texas. William F., another son, is in Portland, Oregon. Lewis F. and Samuel F. are in Iowa. Isaac, a son of John Adam, and brother of Henry, settled in Jacksonville, and died in Tamaqua.
Samuel, also a son of John Adam, settled at Wannemacher, and died in 1833.

 

George Custard, a German, came to the township after 1781, and purchased land now owned by Peter Bachman. He was born April 25, 1750, and died May 11, 1813. His wife, Anna Maria, died in 1841,…



 

 

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aged eighty-one years. They had no children, and half of their property was left to the Evangelical Association, of which they were members. Services were held at their house.

 

On the 19th of June, 1752, George Oswald took out a warrant for one hundred and ninety-nine acres of land in the territory that soon after became Lynn township. One Daniel Oswald, on the 27th of April, 1768, took up seventy-five acres, and on May 11, 1769, one hundred and forty-two acres, in the township.

 

In 1781 the names of Daniel and Jacob Oswald appear in the assessment-roll. In 1812, Daniel Jacob, Sr., Daniel, Jr., John, Sr., and John, Jr., appear. Jacob Oswald, Sr., lived on the farm now owned by
Lewis F. Wertman. He was an assessor in 1798, when the Fries rebellion was at its height, and in the trial was called as a witness. He had two sons, Daniel and Jacob; both settled in the township. The family is still represented.


Of the daughters Anna Maria married ------- Frederici. The settled in Columbia County, and raised a family of children, who, after their parents’ death, returned to this county.


The other daughter became the wife of John Neff.


John Weiss, who was a prominent man in the township and a member of the Legislature from Northampton County before Lehigh was erected, is said to have been brought to the township by some unknown family, and left here to the care of the people. The date is not known. He came into
possession of land before 1781, and lived on the farm now owned by Owen Weida. He left three sons, Henry, John, and Daniel, and two daughters, who became Mrs. Conrad Opp and Mrs. Jacob Holben.


Christian Miller emigrated to this country from Switzerland, and came to this township partly by the Warrior’s Path, which crossed the Lehigh River at Slatington. On the 20th of April, 1749, he took up a tract of land of thirty-one acres; March 23, 1750, seventy-two acres; and April 7, 1767, one hundred and five acres; and, later, other tracts. He was born June 25, 1706, and died July 14, 1785, aged seventy-nine years. He had two sons, - Andrew, who died in 1817, aged seventy-three years, and
Christian; the latter was born in 1741, married Maria Butz. He died in 1778, aged thirty-seven years, and left John, Christian, Daniel, and Peter. John first settled at the old place and later moved over the Blue Mountains. Christian settled at Schwartz Dam on the Lehigh River. Daniel emigrated to the West. Peter was born Jan. 19, 1772, married Maria Magdalena Bachman in March, 1793, and settled on the homestead farm, where he conducted and commenced the manufacture of the tall clocks that
are so well and widely known throughout this county. He died Aug. 22, 1855, aged eighty-three years, and left three sons, - Jonas, George, and Peter. Jonas married Salome, daughter of Jacob Baush, and settled on part of the old tract and died there. His descendants are in the county. George also settled on part of the tract and left descendants. Peter also settled on part of the tract. His daughter became the wife of Samuel J. Kistler, Esq., of Heidelberg, with whom he now resides.


On the 11th of October, 1765, Jacob Snyder took up a tract of one hundred and twelve acres of land, and in 1781 Henry and Daniel Snyder were assessed on real estate. In 1812, the names of Peter, Henry, Jacob, John, George, William, and Samuel Snyder were on the assessment roll. The family are still in the township.


Rex’s Mill. – This was probably the earliest mill in Lehigh County, north and west of the Lehigh Mountains. It was situated on Switzer Creek, in Lynn township, near the boundary line of Weissenberg, the dam being in Weissenberg. It was about a quarter of a mile below where
Greenwald’s mill now is. Rex’s Mill was built of lags, and was already an old mill that had probably stood for half a century in 1790 when Greenwald’s mill was built. In 1790 and thereabout, Rex’s mill was doing a large business, and Mr. Greenwald asked Mr. Rex to sell it to him, but the latter refused, and then Mr. Greenwald built a mill just above it. Rex’s mill was used to make flour and chaff; also for hulling millet, which was at that time much used for pap, being considered an extra dish; and for breaking and cleaning hemp, and for bruising hemp-seed. The place where the mill was is still visible, although it has been torn down for many years. Such a place has its history, but who can trace it.
When the sturdy farmers came from five, ten, to fifteen miles to mill, having a bag of grain on a horse, and sitting on top of it, often passing through woods for miles, without roads, but only paths, with Indians and wild beasts lurking about on each side.


JUSTICES OF THE PEACE

(Prior to 1840 the justices having jurisdiction over this territory were elected in district,

and their names will be found in the civil list of the general history)


Commenced                                                            Commenced.

Peter Snyder....................April 14, 1840              David Follweiler......... .April 11, 1865
Jacob S. Kistler.................        14, 1840             Daniel H. Creitz...........         11, 1865
Jonas Haas.......................         15, 1845             Alvin F. Creitz..............         14, 1868
Peter Snyder.....................        15, 1845             David Follweiler...........          8, 1870
Jonas Haas........................         9, 1850               Alvin F. Creitz...............         15, 1873
David Follweiler..............        9, 1850               William F. Krause.......   March 13, 1875
Peter Snyder.....................        10, 1855             Alvin F. Creitz..............            25, 1878
William M. Kistler...........        10, 1855             William F. Krause.......             30, 1880
William M. Kistler..........        10, 1860              Alvin F. Creitz............. April 6, 1883
Daniel H. Creitz..............        10, 1860

 

Schools. - The history of the Lutheran and German Reformed Churches of the township includes the account of the early educational institutions. The first action of the people of the township, except in connection with the churches, was at what in 1812 was called Saegersville, later New Tripoli. A society was formed in that year for the erection of an English school-house, in which all instruction was to be in English. Daniel Saeger was the most influential in the movement. The school-house
was built on…



 

 

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                       … what later in the town plot were lots 70-71, each sixty-six feet wide on Decatur Street, and one hundred and seventy-seven and a half feet deep. It was called the Saegersville English school-house, and school was regularly kept there from that time till the township accepted the school law. A copy of the rules and regulations is here given:

 

“RULES AND REGULATIONS OF SAEGERSVILLE ENGLISH SCHOOL SOCIETY.
“At an Election held at the House of George Tryne, Innkeeper, on the twenty-seventh Day of March. A.D. 1812, Jacob Mosser & Daniel Saeger, Esq., were Duly Elected a committee to establish Rules and Regulations, as follows, to wit:


“1st. That there shall be five Trustees and One Treasurer Chosen annually by ballot, and the Elections to be held on the second Saturday of April at the School-Room, and the sail Trustees and the successors shall be elected in manner and form as is hereinafter Described, to have the name & title ‘Saegersville English School Society.’

 

“2d. That the said Trustees, after each annual election, shall elect from among their own members a President and Secretary, and in all cases Two-Thirds of the Trustees shall constitute a quorum to transact any business.


“3d. That all elections to be held in Pursuance of this Rule Shall be conducted by two members of the society, who shall be appointed
inspectors at the same time & Place where the Trustees are to be elected
as af’ordered by the Electors then assembled, and the inspectors so
chosen shall appoint one suitable person as a clerk.


“4th. That the Secretary of the Society shall make out and furnish the
Inspectors of every election with a fair, true, and correct list of all
members of the said Society & the number of shares set opposite their
Respective names.


“5th. That in all elections to be held in pursuance of these Rules, every person of the age of twenty-one years who has subscribed for any number of shares in Said Stock of Said society, shall be entitled to a vote for each and every Respective Share.


“6th. That in case any vacancy happens by Death, resignation, removal, or otherwise, a majority of the Trustees assembled shall appoint special
election for supplying such vacancies, and ever special election shall be held and Conducted as is directed for the annual Election, and the Persons so legally chosen shall hold said office for the remainder of the time in whose place he was elected.


“7th. That it shall be the Duty of the Trustees yearly and every year to get a School-Master who is by them judged competent for Business, and agree with him for his salary for Three months, to commence from the first day of December, or near that time as conveniently may be, and defray the said salary. Each subscriber of the said English School Society shall pay quarterly the sum of two Dollars, and every month if not amounts to a quarter the sum of eighty cents, and every non-subscriber shall pay quarterly the sum of three Dollars, & every month if not amounts to a quarter the sum of one Dollar & twenty cents; and if it should happen that it would not be money enough to pay said salary, and no money in the Treasury, then every Subscriber Shall pay his proportionable part according to the number of shares subscribed, & if money left, then to remain in the Treasury for any use the said Trustees shall direct.


“8th. This after the said quarterly school is expired, and any number of said subscribers is Desirous of having School for any time before the then next quarterly school, they shall apply to the Trustees, who shall grant them Leave for any time for getting a School-Master competent for Business to have a school at said school-house at the expense of the Company supplying for said school.


“9th. That in case the Teacher or employees should think themselves
aggrieved, they are to make known their complaint to any one of the
Trustees, who can at any time call a meeting of the Board of Directors in all cases.


“10. That the Trustees take particular Notice that Sufficiency of wood be provided for the stove during the quarterly school mentioned in the 7th article, for the comfort of the Teacher and Scholars.


“11th. That the said Trustees & their successors shall be impowered to keep the school-house & appurtenances whatsoever thereunto belonging, all in good order and Repair, and to draw the Money from the Treasury of said society found to defray the expenses of all warrants or orders on the Treasury which shall be signed by the President of the Society.


“12th. That the present Trustees and their Successors shall permit and suffer all Persons of Lawful age who shall offer to subscribe in their own name or the name of any other person who shall Duly authorize the same for any number of Shares in the Stock of said Society, and the Shares in said stock shall be Ten Dollars each, and that each and every subscriber shall have and to hold the several and respective shares for which subscribed for themselves, their Heirs, or Assigns, & the warrants or titles for said shares or Share shall be signed by the President of Said Society.


“13th. That a book to be kept by the Trustees and their proceedings recorded therein.

 

“In witness whereof we, the said Committee, have hereunto set our hands the twentyeth Day of August, in the Year of our Lord one Thousand Eight
Hundred and Twelve.


“JACOB MOSER.
“DAN. SAEGER”

A paper was circulated, a copy of which is here given:



“We, whose names are hereunto subscribed, do promise to pay to the managers or trustees of the Saegersville English School Society the sum of Ten Dollars for every share of stock in said society or company set opposite to our respective names, in such manner and proportion, and at such time as shall be determined by the Trustees of the said society, and the said sums of money to be applied for the use of the aforesaid
English school, as witness our hand the 20th day of August, A.D. 1812.


Names of                                                                              Number
Subscribers.                                                                          Of Shares
Jacob Moser............................................................................ 2                              $20
Daniel Saeger......................................................................... 2                                20
Henry Mantz..........................................................................2                                20
George Tryne......................................................................... 2                                20
Burckhardt Moser................................................................. 2                                20
Christian Holben................................................................... 2                               20
John Kishler............................................................................ 2                                20
John Sittler............................................................................... 2                               20
George Sittler.......................................................................... 2                               20
David Moser........................................................................... 2                               20
Samuel Ely, Jr......................................................................... 2                                20"

On the 2d of April, 1813, an election was held at the school-house, and the following persons were elected trustees: David Mosser, George Sittler, John Sittler, George Tryne, and Henry Mantz. These trustees chose George Tryne president, and Henry Mantz secretary.

 

From the old minutes from which the above facts are derived it is learned that the school-house cost L85, 3s. 5-1/2d.


Teachers were employed, and the school was well conducted until 1838. Robert M. Blair was the last of the teachers under the old system.

 

This school-house at New Tripoli (Saegersville English school-house) was occupied until the township accepted the school law in 1838. At that time there were in the township three hundred and seventy-five persons liable to taxation for school purposes; $242.78 was received from the
State for schools. Jesse Hermany was chosen president of the board of school directors, J. S. Kistler secretary, and Daniel Brobst treasurer. Slowly under the new law schools began to be kept, log and frame houses were erected. In 1855 there were thirteen in the township, and there were six hundred and four pupils.

 

There are at present (1884) fifteen schools in the township, as follows:


Jacksonville. – At this place was erected about 1839-40 a log house, which was used until the present brick house was erected about 1856.


Federal. – The present house, the first at the place, was built of brick in 1860.



 

 

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Donnot. – The present house, built of stone, was erected about 1845.


Steinville. –About 1862 a school was started in a room rented in Odd-Fellows’ Hall, which is still used.


New Tripoli. – The old Saegersville school-house was in use by the board of directors from 1838 till 1857, when the present two-story brick edifice was erected.


Other houses are at Lieby’s, Fenstermacher’s, Snyder’s, Baush’s, Lynnville, Weaver’s, two at Lynnport, Camp’s, Kistler’s, and Jacob Kistler’s.


New Tripoli. – The land on which this village is located was prior to 1811 part of the farm of Henry Mantz, who, on the 19th of July, in that year, sold the water-privilege of the Antalaunee creek to Daniel Saeger. He built the stone grist-mill soon after, and a stone house in which he kept a store. In 1812 a few people had gathered near there, and the place took the name of Saegersville, and in 1812 a society was formed to erect a school-house in which the English language and English studies should be taught. A full account of the school will be found in the history of the schools of the township.

Soon after the establishment of the school, Daniel Saeger, who was a brother of Nicholas and Jacob Saeger, late of Allentown (deceased), moved to Allentown, and he and Jacob then built the flour-mill, now of Pretz, Weinsheimer & Co. He soon afterward sold the same to Dr. John Romig’s father. After that Daniel Saeger lived on the farm where the Allentown Furnace is situated, and afterward bought a farm on Cedar Creek, near the Lehigh Poor-House. After he had resided there several years, he then (abut 1822) moved to Crawford County, Pa., to the place now called Saegerstown, which town he laid out and named. In 1836 he was a member of the Constitutional Convention, and soon after he had returned from said convention he died.


Daniel Saeger sold the mill property and store to Samuel Ely, Jr., on the 11th of March, 1813. He was a miller, and kept the mill, store, and tavern. The tavern has a stone in its wall with “1771" engraved upon it. In 1816, Samuel Ely, Jr., proprietor of the place, engaged James Price, surveyor, to lay out lots, streets, and alleys, which was done in July, 1816, and named “New Tripoli,” in honor of the success of the United States navy at Tripoli, and on the 28th of July the lots were offered for public sale at the house of Samuel Ely, Jr. The first one was bought by Peter Haas, No. 31, for twenty-one dollars, fronting on Wayne Street.

 

The streets and alleys running north and south were named Washington Street, Apple Alley, Franklin Street, Mantz Street, Butchers’ Alley, Madison Street, Market Alley, and Water Street. The streets and alleys running east and west were called Pumpkin Street, Egg Alley, Bridge Street, Farmers’ Alley, Jefferson Street, Brewers’ Alley, Perry Street, Jackson Alley, Wayne Street, Cheery Alley, Market Street, Hucksters’ Alley, Decatur Street, Merchant Street, and Drovers’ Alley. From No. 1 to 284 regularly-numbered lots are laid out.


The following is a list of names of men who bought lots at New Tripoli in 1816-17:
Peter Haas, Nos. 31, 42, 13, 64, 65, 81, 82.
Christian Kuntz, No. 115.
Jacob Fenstermacher, Nos. 10, 14, 61, 62, 72-77.
Abraham Smith, Nos. 39, 40, 80, 87.
John Straub, Jr., Nos. 31, 67, 68.
John Schoenberger, No. 88.
Henry Weaver, Nos. 89, 90, 91.
Jacob Schmeck, Nos. 10, 13.
Philip Everett, No. 86.
Isaac Miller, No. 85.
Henry Rubrecht, Nos. 83, 129, 130.
John Schmeck, Nos. 11, 12.
Andrew Kunkel, No. 20.
Andrew Straub, Nos. 66, 125, 126.
George Lock, Nos. 29, 30.
Henry Meyer, No. 103.
John Settler, No. 102.
Michael Krum, No. 116.
John Kresley, No. 131.
Solomon Kistler, Nos. 118, 119.
Abraham Miller, No. 63.
Jacob Linn, Nos. 133, 134.
John Reitz, Nos. 127, 128.
Daniel Marburger, No. 115.
George Tryne, No. 48.
Daniel Shaeffer, No. 16.
Christian Biery, Nos. 7, 8, 15-18.
William Wuchter, No. 132.
John Bier, No. 9.
John Mantz, No. 69.
Henry Falmer, of Bucks County, Nos. 32-38.
Adam Heckman, No. 43.
Diedrich Hiesler, Nos. 44-47.
Daniel O’Daniel, Nos. 17, 122.
Andrew Krause, No. 49.
Andrew Shifferstine, No. 50.
Samuel Marx, No. 21.
Daniel Koch, Nos. 18, 109.
Isaac Frober, No. 37.
Henry Rossman, of Berks County, Nos. 19, 36, 39-42, 61, 62, 63, 67, 68, 73, 74, 79, 80.
Solomon Hartman, Nos. 14, 123, 124.
Samuel Ely, Nos. 4-6, 64.
Conrad Hartman, No. 78.
Jacob Moyer, Nos. 11, 12.
John Kistler, No. 54.
Daniel Kern, Nos/ 100, 101.
Morris Ancona, No. 66.
Jacob Hillegas, No. 157.
Maria Hiller, Nos. 120, 121.
Jacob Grim, No. 22.
John Derr, No. 79.
Conrad German, Nos. 52, 105.



 

 

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Daniel Dorward, Nos. 104, 167.
John Mohr, Nos. 58, 59, 99.


At the time of this sale Samuel Ely, Jr., kept the hotel, and Daniel Saeger the store. He (Saeger) soon after moved to Allentown, and Peter Haas moved from Lynnville to New Tripoli, and purchased the store. In the year 1819, Samuel Camp, who had married Esther Tryne, daughter of George Tryne, came to town and entered the store of Peter Haas, and in a few years became a partner. Later, the interest of Mr. Haas was purchased by Mr. Camp, who carried on a prosperous business many years,
and sold the store to his son Edwin, who continued the business till 1866, when he sold to James & W. P. Krum, who carried on the business for a year, when W. P. Krum sold to James Krum, who continued till April, 1868, when he sold to Jonas German, in whose possession the store and hotel now are, he having built a new store and hotel building at the corner of Madison and Decatur Streets.

The post-office was established at New Tripoli in 1823, and Samuel Camp was the postmaster, and remained many years. He was succeeded by Silas Camp and Edwin camp, and in 1866, James Krum was appointed, and served till 1869, when Jonas German became postmaster, and served till 1872. W.
F. Krause succeeded to the position, and served ten years, and in 1882, Elias K. Giltner, the present incumbent, was appointed.


Samuel Camp, who came to the place in 1819, married Esther, the daughter of George Tryne, who lived near here. Mr. Camp was a member of Legislature in 1862. His son, Silas, was recorder of Lehigh County from 1868 to 1874, and now resides in Allentown. Edwin, who was in business in New Tripoli for several years, resides in Tannersville. Franklin, another son, resides in New Tripoli.


The mill property was owned by Mr. Ely from 1813 to Dec. 12, 1820, when it was conveyed to Henry Weber, who, in September of the next year, sold it to Jacob Grim. He continued the business till his death, in 1833, when it was sold by his executor to Jonathan Shoemaker, Feb. 26, 1834. It passed, in 1838, to George Blank, in 1839 to George Blook, in 1843 to Thomas Tryne. The property is now owned by Reuben Sherman, having been purchased of Joseph Ricker in 1867.


W. H. Krause, in 1858, came to New Tripoli, and entered the store of Samuel Camp, and later became landlord, merchant, postmaster, and justice of the peace. He is now engaged in grain, coal, and lumber, and also interested in slate-quarries near the village.


The Ebenezer Church. (By Rev. W. A. Helffrich) - This church is also known by the name of the Lynn Township Church, and in earlier times was called the “Orgel Kirche,” or “Organ Church,” being the only church in that region which had an organ. The church stands at New Tripoli, in Lynn township. The limits of the congregation extended to the Blue Mountains on the north, to the limits of the Heidelberg congregation on the east, to those of the Jacksonville on the west, and to those of the Weissenberg on the south. The jurisdiction of the church comprises a territory lying between the Blue
Mountains and the Schochary Mountain, three or four miles in width, with low hills and short valleys, from which the Antalaunee, and, more toward the east, the west branch of the Jordan arise. The church has always been a “union” church, although it takes its origin properly from the Reformed.


The settlement was made by a portion of the Allemãngel colony; it was the northern, as the Weissenberg settlement was the eastern, limit of that colony. While Kistler’s Valley was settled properly by Allemãngel immigrants, principally of the Lutheran faith, those of the Reformed
Church settled here more particularly. The slopes of the Schochary were occupied before Kistler’s Valley was settled. The earliest pioneers were Christian Weber, Georg Ludwig Schüt, Heinrich Oswald, Philipp Gabriel Fogel (Vogel) with his two sons, Conrath and Johannes, the latter of whom moved back with the remainder of the family and founded Fogelsville; Valentine Schnider, Jacob Lynn, and others, all of whom came here about 1735. They were all Palatines, Swiss, and Huguenots.
Soon others followed, and moved farther into the valley, and quickly took possession of the good tracts, especially those along the sides of the Antalaunee, where there were excellent woods and fine meadows inviting the settlers. The following heads of families generally pass for the first settlers, but of these many came later, and some may even belong to the succeeding generation:

 

Peter Scholl                                      Philipp Mosser
Peter Beisel                                       Philipp Wertmann
Mathias Schütz                               Philipp Antoni
Wilhelm Meyer                               Martin Schuck
Heinrich Widerstein                      Dietrich Sittler
Bernhard Schneider                       Melchior Düer
Aaron Hartell                                  Jacob Mauz
Jacob Hoffman                                Joseph Holder
Jacob Lynn                                       Erhard Zeisloff
Christian Müller                             Jacob Grünewald
Joseph Gerber                                  Michael Fenstermacher
Johannes Schmidt                          Jacob Oswald
Burkhard Mosser                            Heinrich Hauss
Michael Bock                                   Conrath Billmann
Michael Hãttinger                         Johann Adam Kressly
Peter Kirschner                               Andreas Straub
Stephen Gross                                 Thomas Everitt
Abraham Schellhammer              Heinrich Kðnig
Philipp Schumann                         Georg Kistler
Martin Grentler                              Abraham Offenbach
Sylvester Holben                            Adam Arndt
Michael Habbes                              Jacob Donatt
Adam Brentz                                   Friederich Hess
Georg Brenner

 

The foundation of the congregation dates from about the year 1740. Where the road from Lynnville to the Blue Mountain crosses the Antalaunee there stands,…



 

 

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                                                                                                             … a couple of hundred paces on the other side of the creek and on this side of Kistler’s mill, an old wealtherboarded log house, in which for
many years Peter Snyder, Esq., of Lynn, resided. This old house witnessed the origin and beginning of the Ebenezer Church. About the beginning of the decade between 1740 and 1750 it was the residence of Peter Scholl, one of the prominent and most active of the founders of the church. The settlement contained at that time a very talented teacher by the name of Andrew Steiger, who kept the winter school. In response to the solicitations of his neighbors he held the first divine service, with reading of sermons, prayer, and praise. The house in which Peter Scholl lived being the most appropriate for the purpose in the vicinity, these services were held in it until after the church building was erected. It was also the place of refuge in the time of the Indian troubles for the neighbors when threatened with danger. The walls under the weatherboarding, as we were informed by Squire Snyder, are pierced
with loopholes for protection of those within. It was at the same time a store, which was kept by Scholl, who transported the necessaries of life from Philadelphia and sold them to his neighbors.


About the year 1745 the neighborhood agreed to build a church. The construction languished, however, for fifteen years. All that was done was the extending of invitations to Revs. Philipp J. Michael and Melchior Muhlenberg to preach and to found the church. Both of these pastors preached here once, and then apparently delivered the further charge of the congregation to the schoolmaster.

In 1760 the congregation purchased from Jacob Hoffman the piece of ground which still forms its church and school lands. It lies near Scholl’s house, above referred to. The brethren who accomplished the purchase were: Peter Scholl, Bernhard Schneider, Aaron Hartel, Jacob Hoffmann, Peter Beisel, Heinrich Widerstein, Philipp Wertmann, Philipp Mosser, Dietrich Sittler, Martin Schuck, Jacob Lynn, and Jacob Oswald.

 

In the year 1761 the building was erected. The building had been planned as early as 1750, but the Indians, who had a village in the vicinity, becoming troublesome and burning down more than one-half of the dwellings of the settlers, the construction was postponed from year to year until they believed themselves safe from further attacks of the savages. The building here, as everywhere else, was of logs; there was neither flooring nor any side-boarding. An ordinary table served for the
altar, the pulpit was constructed of rough boards, and a small organ (from which the church became known as the Orgel Kirche, or Organ Church) stood on one side. Where this came from or who brought it there no one can tell. Rev. Michael, and one of Rev. Muhlenberg’s assistants - undoubtedly Rev. Schellhardt - dedicated the church.


No community suffered more during the Indian wars than this one. They occupied the extreme bounds of the settlements of the whites, and before the Indians could attack those farther in they must first overcome these. Here, therefore, the massacres and the burnings began. Right through the middle of the settlements ran one of the principal Indian paths, leading to the southern regions. Conflagrations were a common occurrence in Lynn, and frequently the entire population fled to the
settlement lying farther south. Upon the southern slope of the Schochary Mountain, above Lynnville, in a small hollow on the left hand side of the present road, dwelt the Zeisloff family, who were overtaken in their flight by the Indians, and butchered without mercy. And yet nearly all the settlers returned and erected their log houses again, and strove anew to maintain possession of the ground. The old fathers used to relate that every night they would place the loaded guns and their
well-sharpened axes within easy reach from their bed, not knowing when they might be attacked by the savages.


There are few communities which have remained so entirely secluded from public intercourse during the whole of the last century down to the middle of the present as this one of Lynn. This accounts also for the preservation of the ancient customs and ways in their primitive simplicity. It accounts, likewise, for their want of advance or development. This is the case in worldly as well as churchly affairs. Even now along the sides of the Blue Mountains can be found dwellings whose construction dates back to the earliest times. The ground naturally is more suited to agriculture than farther south, and that upon the Weissenberg and Lowhill hills; but the conveyance of lime to Lynn used to be a difficult matter, and so frequently remained undone, and the crops, consequently, became poorer than in the country farther south. But since the construction of the Berks county Railroad an unusually rapid advance has been made; the harvests testify to the use of lime, and new residences and immense Swiss barns have everywhere been erected; and the people enjoy prosperity and wealth. Especially is this the case since the slate quarries of Lynn have been bringing their excellent products to the notice of the public markets.


The church records begin with the year 1764. The old writings concerning the first church are entirely wanting; and many family histories, containing accounts of the first settlements and their early
circumstances, were destroyed by fire during the Indian wars.

 

Between 1790 and 1800 the congregation owned a parsonage in common with the Jacobs’ and the bethel congregations.


The community early erected a school-house, and for the most part had able preachers.


The Second Church was built in the year 1798. A storm had almost entirely destroyed the old building. The organ, too, lay in ruins (and, by the way, did not



 

 

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appear in the following building). A new building was a necessity, and the work of construction was willingly undertaken. The consistory resolved to erect a two-story church upon the site of the old. In the course of the year it was constructed. This church was also built of logs, but had galleries and all the conveniences of those times. The dedicatory services were held by Rev. Johannes Roth, the Reformed minister, and DAniel Lehmann, the Lutheran.


Concerning the construction of the Third Church, there are complete records at hand. The congregation adopted a new constitution, founded upon the former contracts made between the reformed and Lutheran members, under which constitution they resolved to maintain the church -
a union one - as it had been originated by their fathers. This constitution answers its purposes better than that of any of the neighboring churches. The corner stone was laid on the 16th of May, 1824, and the service of the day were conducted by the pastors of the church, Revs. Johannes Helffrich and Däring and Wartman, assisted by Rev. Johann Gobrecht, of Whitehall, and Conrath Yaeger, of Hanover, who were present by invitation. The teacher of the school at this time was
Jacob Salem.


The members subscribed towards the building the sum of $2433.53; the cost of erecting the church was $2425.04. The church was dedicated in the fall of the same year. The building still stands, firm and sound. It is of stone, and is more beautifully finished, and provided with more conveniences than any other in the neighborhood.

 

The consistory at the time of building the Third Church were as follows: On the Reformed side, Philipp Ebert, elder; Jacob Oswald, trustee; Daniel Oswald, Abraham Fenstermacher, Peter Mayer, Johann Miller, deacons; Philipp Ebert, and Jacob Fenstermacher, building committee. The work of George Fusselman, the carpenter, and of Peter Neff, the mason, puts to shame that of many of the artisans of the present day.


A new organ was built under contract by Charles Heinzelman during the summer of 1850. It was dedicated on Saturday and Sunday, the 19th and 20th days of October, with services conducted by Revs. Johannes Helffrich, William A. Helffrich, J. S. Dubs, and Jeremiah Schindel. The Lutheran pastor, Rev. Zacharias Peter Oberfeld, was drowned on the 2d of September preceding in the great flood at Tamaqua, where he lived. The teacher at the time was Frederick Schmidt.


Some years after the building of the organ, in 1853, a new Swiss barn was erected upon the church lands.


Frederick Schmidt, who had served the congregation well and faithfully as a schoolmaster and organist for many years, had also brought the church lands - which had always lain neglected - by his industry to a fine state of cultivation. The old barn being about to fall into ruin, and there being no room for storing the products of the soil, the new barn was put up. Schmidt was a man in every sense of the word; he was not only a well-educated school-teacher from Germany, devoting himself with his whole heart to his calling, but was also faithful and honest without wavering.


The old school-house which was first occupied by Jacob Salem, another capable teacher, was of stone, and stood several feet farther within the meadow than the present one. It had one story, with a hall running through the middle. On the left was the school-room, on the right a room used as a living and sleeping-room, and another small room used as a kitchen. The children slept in the loft where the snow was often blown in, and lay in heaps upon their beds in the morning. But the old ways have disappeared even here. The congregation built a new dwelling-house recently appropriate to the times. Here the old teacher, worn out by his manifold labors, spent with his spouse, a worthy German matron, and surrounded by their children, the declining years of his life in peace. Friederich Schmidt died in April, 1876, and was interred on the 27th of the month, with services held by Revs. William A. Helffrich and H. S. Fegeley, the pastors of the church, in the cemetery of the congregation, whither his wife had already a short time before preceded him. His son, Theodore, became his successor.


At the same time with this house a two-story brick school-house, with two rooms - one for the school, the other for the congregation - was also erected.


The old God’s-acre had been filled and enlarged and filled again, and a cemetery was therefore laid out upon a regular plan and interments began.


The Reformed preachers of the church were:


1. Philipp Jacob Michael. He was elected in 1760, and preached till 1770. Before his time there was a reader here by the name of Andreas Steiger, who also remained for some time after Rev. Michael came, but must soon afterwards have died or moved away. There is also mention made of a certain Peter Miller, likewise a reader, who came about this time to Heidelberg and the surrounding country, and is yet spoken of in Lynn. Rev. Michael is the same minister who preached in the Ziegel Church.


2. Peter Miller, formerly a reader, was afterwards accepted as pastor. He did not serve for a long time. He died here, and his remains rest in the old cemetery.


3. Heinrich Hentzel, commonly called Herzel, who was also only a reader, but preached in several of the churches of this neighborhood. How long he labored here cannot now be told.


4. Johannes Roth, also a man who, without being…



 

 

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                                                                                             … educated, elevated himself to the ministry, and was accepted as minister by the congregation, because no other was to be had. Both Hentzel and Roth had made application to the Snyod for ordination, but were both rejected on account of their unfitness. None of these four were ordained, nor did they acknowledge any higher churchly authority. They undertook the office like a trade. The worthiest of the four was Michael; but he was not fully qualified for the ministry. Roth lies buried at Jacob’s Church. He was buried beneath the alter, but it is said the new church does not occupy the same location as the old.


5. J. Friederich van der Slat, a minister belonging to the old Synod, was called by the congregation, but he preached only occasionally. Yet with this the congregation were well satisfied; they would sooner have none than incompetent preachers.


6. Johann Heinrich Helffrich, who served from 1804 to 1810, when he died. He brought the congregation into subjection to the Synod.


7. Heinrich Diefenbach, from 1810 to 1816.

 

8. Johannes Helffrich, from 1845 to 1852. He had his son, William A. Helffrich, as assistant.


9. William A. Helffrich, from 1845 to 1867.


10. E. J. Fogel in the last-named year was appointed his assistant, who, however, served the congregation alone till 1874, from which year till 1879, Rev. William A. Helffrich again served as the pastor.


11. Nevin A. Helffrich was in the latter year appointed his assistant.

 

The Lutheran ministers were (1) Melchior Muhlenberg, and his assistants preached occasionally; (2) Hermann Jacob Schellhardt; (3) Daniel Lehman; (4) Friederich Gaisenheimer; (5) Johannes Knoske; (6) G. F. J. Yeager; (7) Däring and Wartmann; (8) Jeremias Schindel; (9) Peter Z. Oberfeld; (10) August Bauer; (11) W. Siegelin; (12) Owen Leopold; (13) S. S. Klein; (14) ________ Zuber; (15) H. S. Fegeley.


Steinsville. – The land on which Steinsville was originally located was granted to Michael Stein by Warrant about the year 1756. After the Steins, J. L. Brobst possessed the hotel and store until the year 1878, when it was conveyed to dr. J. D. Graver. It is occupied by Joseph Rose.


Steinsville at present includes the property of Jacob Miller, which was by warrant granted to him about the year 1760, conveyed to Philip Wannemacher in 1791, and in 1812 to Christian Wannemacher, who began to improve the same in 1825. He built a grist-mill at the Antalaunee
stream, which with the farm was conveyed to his son, Daniel Wannemacher, in 1840, who rebuilt the mill in 1866. In 1874 the Schuylkill and Lehigh Railroad was cut through the property, and the Steinsville depot was located upon it. Soon after that year a hotel was built near the depot by Benjamin Swan, a stone building erected by William Fusselman, stream saw-mill by Jerry Klingman, and a foundry by Klotz & Billig, and a marble-yard by Milton Kergner. In 1878 the Wannemacher farm was conveyed to Dr. D. S. Shade, and the mill property to Willington B. Griessamer, and in 1881 Benneville Lutz became the owner of the mill and occupies it at present.


The village of Steinsville is situated in the north-western part of the county, one mile south from the foot of the Blue Mountains, and one-fourth of a mile north of the Antalaunee Creek, on the Schuylkill
and Lehigh Railroad. It was founded by John Stein in 1810, a son of Michael Stein, who emigrated to this country from Germany. The Stein family consisted of eight sons and one daughter. The father being a man of industry, decided to provide homes for his children in the West, and traveled as early as 1825 to the Scioto, at Circleville, Pickaway Co., Ohio, and secured land for all his children, and afterwards one by one, from the oldest to the youngest, all moved to their Western homes, and
finally the father, after the decease of his wife, followed his children as late as 1847. Dr. Joseph Soliday came to Steinsville, footing his way from Sumneytown, Pa., in 1826, and settled down to practice medicine. After being in practice several years, he became wedded to the daughter of John Stein. He was engaged in continuous practice until 1856, when he removed to Circleville, Ohio, with his family, consisting of four sons and one daughter. Two of his sons are physicians, and two practice
dentistry. In the year 1818 a young German Reformed minister, Rev. John Zulick, came on foot from Philadelphia, and began to preach not only at Steinsville but also to congregations across the Blue Mountains, in Albany, Berks Co., and Jacksonville. He was fond of travel on horseback, and followed his calling in that style until he died in 1874. He was married to Rebecca Hermany, a daughter of Philip Hermany, of Jacksonville, and was blessed with seven daughters and one son, John, who was prepared in 1855 to take upon himself his father’s labors, when he was taken with consumption and died. The homes of both the clergyman and doctor are at present in the same state as they left them, the former being occupied at present by two of his daughters. The hotel and store building built by John Stein in 1832, is a spacious brick structure. The carriage-factory is operated by its founders, Ely & Waidelich. It was established in 1852. Dr. D. S. Shade was the successor to Dr. Soliday in 1856, and is at present following his practice, in connection with his partner, whom he took in with himself in 1870, viz., Dr. J. D. Graver. In 1860 several people of Steinsville and vicinity obtained a charter and organized The Steinsville Hall Association for religious, society, and educational purposes, and in 1861 erected a fine brick building, where from that time to the present the Independent Order of Odd-Fellows have held their lodge meetings. Religious services…



 

 

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                                                                                                                          … are held, and a good school is open for children and the more advanced scholars. In the fall of 1881 a few men in the village and surrounding country started a creamery to manufacture butter and cheese, which has proved a success and is highly appreciated. The country immediately surrounding Steinsville is productive and healthy. Slate was first discovered here by three brothers, - John, Michael, and Samuel K. Lutz,
- sons of Samuel J. Lutz, in 1851, and quarries were opened and first operated by Foulk, Daniel, and William Roberts. No especial interest was manifested in the slate industry until in the year 1869 a storm uprooted a will-tree on lands of Samuel F. Lutz, which unearthed a slate-bed that was afterwards quarried and is now owned and operated extensively by George W. Griessamer. In 1874 the Berks and Lehigh Quarry was opened by Mosser, Krumm & Roberts, and is at present operated by Lutz & Keever. In 1876 the Centennial was opened on lands of Charles Foust. In 1880 the Standard was opened by a foreign party on the same tract, and in 1882 the Quaker City Quarries on lands of Willoughby and Charles Lutz.

 

The Steinsville post-office was established in 1858.


Jacksonville. – The land on which this hamlet is located was in 1781 owned by Daniel Hamm, who resided where William Long now lives. He gave the land for the church and churchyard. It lies on a ridge of land north from the Antalaunee Creek, in the direction of the Blue Mountains, and on the line of the Berks County Railroad. The first house was built there about 1820 by Martin Baer, and was later purchased by John Hermany, who made additions to the house, and opened a hotel and store.
A post-office was established about 1845, with Zachariah Long as postmaster. His successors have been John Oswald and Jacob Oswald, John Hermany, E. F. Lutz, and the present incumbent, John Folweiler. The hotel and store is now conducted by E. F. Lutz. The store was for a time owned by Uriah Long.


Jacob’s Church. – This church stands in Jacksonville, Lynn township. It is a Union church, held in common by the members of the Reformed and of the Lutheran faith, as is generally the case in churches in Eastern Pennsylvania. The first settlement of this region took place about the same time as that of Allemangel. The same throng of settlers which came from Oley and Goshenhoppen, and originated the Ziegel, Allemangel, Weissenberg, and Ebenzer Churches, also caused the beginning of this congregation. The beautiful tracts of land bordering on the Antalaunee attracted these wanderers, and soon the valleys and hills were dotted with their small log huts. These settlements were made between 1730 and 1740.


Among the first settlers were the following families: Vollweiler, Oswalds, Wannemacher, Corell, Lutz, Tittell, Hamm, Koenig, Probst, Franz, Mosser, Baer, Nungesser, Sechler, Everett, Friess, Stumpf,
Miller, De Long, Krietz, Klingemann, Fussellman, Reitz, Straub, Aenos, Wietzel, Lauenberger, Gerhard, Witterstein, Hess, Billman, and others.

 

About the year 1750 the first church was built, and with it a school-house. The dedication of this little log church, which stood on the spot now occupied by the third church, was held by the Revs. Philip
J. Michael and H. J. Schellhardt, who were also chosen the first pastors.

 

No church records were kept in the early times. It was only about the year 1774 that the first church book was kept, and the first baptismal records were entered by the Rev. Conrad Steiner, Jr., who at that time was the minister here. Probably a church book was kept before that year, but was no doubt destroyed by fire during the Indian troubles. The want of these records leave us very much in doubt as to the early history of this congregation.


The second church building was erected about the year 1808. The corner-stone was laid, and the church dedicated according to the customs of both faiths. At the same time a constitution was adopted, which was changed and extended in the year 1854.


The third building was constructed in the year 1864. It is of brick, surmounted with a tower and bell, and is a beautiful building suitable to these times.


In the course of time the old log school-house was remodeled in the year 1780, and in later years, after the construction of the new church, a new school-house of brick was erected. This was dedicated on the 9th and 10th days of October, 1858.


The members of the Reformed faith of this church owned in earlier times a parsonage in conjunction with three other congregations. About the year 1812 this house with the surrounding land was sold.


The Reformed ministers were Rev. Philip J. Michael, followed by the Rev. Peter Miller, who was the regular preacher of the Ebenezer Church. Heinrich Hertzel (Hentzel) also preached here for a time. Then came _______ Roth. None of these preachers had been admitted to ordination. The congregation could not obtain the services of any minister from the Synod, and the congregation preferred having these rather than none. Johannes Roth was followed by Rev. Conrad Steiner, Jr., who was a preacher from the Synod, and served from 1774 up to the close of 1777. He began the church records, which are still in existence. Rev. C. Steiner was called by several other congregations, and Peter Roth was again elected because the Synod would not send a minister. In the beginning of the present century Henry Dieffenbach came to this church, being sent by the Synod. He was followed, about the year 1816, by the Rev. John Zulich, and served till some time later. Rev. J. M. Bachman became his successor, and he is the present pastor.


The Lutheran ministers were Rev. Herman J. …



 

 

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                                                                              … Schellhardt, Daniel Lehmann, Frederick Geissenhainer, Johannes Knoske, G. F. J. Yeager, Elias B. Kramlich, Owen Leopold, F. Zuber, S. S. Klein, H. S. Fegley.


Lynnville. – The first person to build on the site of Lynnville was Valentine Stull, in the year 1806. He opened a store, which he carried on for many years. He had no children, but adopted a nephew of his wife, named Peter Haas, who carried on the business after his uncles’ decline. He (Haas) was elected to the Legislature several terms, also served as associate judge for some years. John Sieberling built a house in 1807, and opened it to the public. He was the landlord and proprietor of the Lynnville Hotel up to April, 1846, when his son James became possessor by purchase. The post-office at Lynnville was established in July, 1820, and John Sieberling made post-master. He continued as such up to his death in December, 1875. He died at the age of ninety-two years, and served as postmaster fifty-five years. Solomon W. Bachman is the present postmaster.


The hotel is now the property of Dr. F. C. Sieberling. The village at present contains a hotel, school-house, post-office, store, harness and blacksmith-shops, and six dwellings.


The elections of the township were held at this place for many years till 1879. At what is known as Greenwalt’s, on the Schuylkill and Lehigh Railroad, a store was opened about 1850, and kept for a short time by Henry Neff.


St. Peter’s Church. – This church stands upon an elevation along the Sieberlingsville road, south of Lynnville, and is in Lynn township. This is also a Union Church for Lutherans and Reformed. The church was founded in the year 1857, members of the Weissenberg, Lowhill, Lynntown, and Jerusalem communions uniting in forming a new congregation here.


The corner-stone was laid on the 30th of August, 1857, on which occasion appropriate services were held by Rev. W. A. Helffrich, the Reformed minister, and Rev. Siegli, the Lutheran minister.


On Whit-Sunday the 23d and Whit-Monday the 24th days of May, 1858, the building was dedicated to the service of God. Sermons were preached by Revs. J. Derr, Jeremiah Schindel, and William A. Helffrich.


Lynnport. – Marcus Wannemacher was the original owner of the land on which Lynnport is situated. He lived in a house that stood near the railroad depot by the spring. Michael Everett, about the year 1814, erected a part of what is now the hotel, in which he lived, and opened a store for the use of the people roundabout. Levi Kistler, Feb. 8, 1843, opened a tavern in the building. David and William Kistler kept the store at the time. Lewis H. Oswald, the present proprietor, came to the place in April, 1865, and keeps hotel and store and post-office, the latter having been established under Levi Kistler. In addition to the hotel, post-office, and store, there are two school-houses, depot of Schuylkill and Lehigh Railroad, a slate quarry, and about forty dwellings.


Slate quarries were opened near Lynnport first about 1844, by James M. Porter, McDowell, and Daniel Jones, and the same who opened Slatington. David Folweiler was the superintendent. They have been worked more or less from that time.


A mantel factory was started by Anthony Donnon, of Philadelphia, in 1860, and continued by Henry F. Martin. It is carried on by Jesse B. Keim, of Philadelphia.


Laurel Hill Mantel Factory was established in 1880 by Alvin F. Creitz, Moses K. Jacob, and Charles K. Henry, who sold to Potter & McHose, who are now running it.


Stein’s Corner is situated in the southeast corner of the township. The land on which it is located was formerly owned by the Grims. About 1855 Simon Lentz erected a hotel and was the landlord from that time till 1865.

 

About 1875 a post-office was established with Joshua Weida as postmaster, who kept it till his death, when he was succeeded by William Seaman, who retained the position till 1884, when William Stein, the present postmaster, was appointed.


About 1874 William Stein opened a store, and now has charge of the hotel, store, and post-office.

 

Oswaldsville, now called Raber’s Corners, was started about 1860, at which time Jonas Oswald, who owned a farm at the locality, built a hotel and store, which were kept by him for five or six years. A post-office was also established at the place and kept by him till 1866, when it was removed to Mosserville.


New Slatedale contains twelve or fifteen dwellings and a hotel kept by Joseph L. Lutz. The place was started by the opening of slate quarries about 1854 by Daniel Faulk. Quarries are now worked by Lutz & Keever, and Griesemer & Brothers.


Reitz. – At the store of Samuel Reitz, nearly in the center of the township, the elections of the township have been held since 1879. Prior to that time they were held at Lynnville. The old stone house at this place was built by Andrew Straub, Jr., in 1817, his father, Andrew Straub, Sr., having taken up ninety-two acres of land at that place on the 22d of March, 1800, and transferred it to his son, Andrew, on the 23d of May the same year. It later passed to John Ulrich, who in 1849 erected a store and kept it for many years. In 1862 Jonas Reitz purchased the property now owned by his son, Samuel.


An Old Graveyard. – In Kistler’s Valley, in Lynn township, on the farm of Mr. Jonas J. Kistler (being the same farm which was formerly owned by the late Rev. Samuel K. Brobst, deceased, grandfather of Philip Kistler, deceased, and Father Jacob Brobst, deceased), exists a graveyard established by the Moravians over a…



 

 

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                                  …hundred years ago. The sacred spot is well preserved. The first congregation brought into existence in those parts was formed by Moravian missionaries from Bethlehem, and was called the Allemangel Moravian Church. Later, Rev. Muhlenberg established a church in the same vicinity, and called it the Allemangel Lutheran church, now known as Jerusalem. The old Moravian’s burial-ground is numerously dotted with clayed mounds, underneath which repose members of the ancient brotherhood from that section. Among them a preacher by the name of Wirs or Wirz.


In the old burial-ground at Miller’s, near the Baush school-house, many old tablets are standing. Some of the names and dates are here given:


Christian Miller, Sr., born June 25, 1706; died July 14, 1785, age seventy-nine years, nineteen days.


Christian Miller, Jr., born Jan. 6, 1741; died Oct. 9, 1778, age thirty-seven years, nine months, and three days.


Maria Elizabeth Hansin, born April 10, 1809; died Sept. 18, 1820, age eleven years, five months, eight days.


Anna Elizabeth Miller, died Dec. 16, 1830, age seventy-three years, one month, four days.


Andreas Miller, died 1817, age seventy-eight years, three months.


Salome Miller, wife of Jonas Miller, daughter of Jacob Bausch, born May 20, 1802 , age twenty-five years, six months, fourteen days.


William F. Miller, son of Stephen Miller, born June 21, 1854, age eight
months, twelve days.


Mary Kuhns, wife of John Kuhns, died April 2, 1843, age forth-seven
years, nine months, fifteen days.


Mary Cathilla, daughter of John Kuhns, died Sept. 18, 1838, age sixteen
years, eight months, twenty-eight days.


Apolona Ettinger, daughter of Peter Miller, died May 29, 1843, age
thirty-one years, ten months, three days.


Peter Miller, Sr., born Jan. 19, 1772, age eighty-three years, seven
months, three days.


Maria Magdalena Miller, wife of Peter Miller, born Oct. 20, 1770, age
ninety-three years, seven months, six days.


David Miller, born Dec. 30, 1829, age twenty-nine years, four days.


George Miller, born Feb. 10, 1798, age sixty-seven years, three months,
twenty-five days.


Maria M. Miller, wife of George, born Jan. 1, 1805, age sixty-nine
years, eight months, six days.


Anna Maria Custard, wife of George custard, born April 15, 1760, age
eighty-one years, nine months, ten days.


George Custard, born April 25, 1750, age sixty-three years, sixteen days.


John Kuhns, died Sept. 20, 1830, age forty years, nine days.

 

END

 

 

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RETURN TO THE MATHEWS & HUNGERFORD

INDEX PAGE

 

 

 

From

The History of the Counties of Lehigh & Carbon, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania,

By

Alfred Mathews & Austin N. Hungerford

Published in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1884

 

Transcribed from the original in 2005

by

Shirley Kuntz

 

Proofed, arranged &

web page by

Jack Sterling

November 2005