Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

Benjamin Evans

DateEventSource
12 Oct 1760 Born in Limerick Community, near Philadelphia PA to Thomas Evans and Hannah Rees Evans.Dupuy Family History
18 July 1777Enlisted for Revolutionary Service. Several stints with 3rd SC Regiment under Capt Oliver Towles. Militia under Col Marion in 1782.SC Accounts Audited 2249; Revolutionary Records of 3rd South Carolina (Capt Towles) online at footnote.com Note: Bobby Gilmer Moss has Benjamin Evans, wife Hannah, with 3 references for SC Revolutionary Service. DAR records online have David Smith, wife Hannah, but state that DAR membership was erroneously granted based upon PA service. DAR says need correct service record.
1785Gave surety for sisterís marriage in PAFrom Mark Dixon, a quote from 1981 privately published genealogy of the family by Frank Brooke Evans, III. Need SOURCE of the document.
23 10th 1790Hannah (Evens) (Formerly Smith) dis mou.[dismissed for marrying out of unity] She was the daughter of David Smith. She was born July 3, 1767.Hinshaw Vol I, Cane Creek MM, p 1061. Hannahís birth, Dupuy Family History.
abt 1790In screw auger business with John Edmundson and Joseph SmithQuakers in the South Carolina Backcountry Wateree and Bush River Compiled by William Heiss Indiana Quaker Records 4020 East 34th Street Indianapolis, Indiana 46218
1799,11,30Benjamin Evans recrq [received by request].
1800, 5,21Hannah Evans recf Cane Creek MM [received certificate from?]Hinshaw, Vol I, Bush River, p 1029
1800 censusProbably the Benjamin in Newberry SC.
1804, 1, 28Benjamin [Evans] and w and ch gct Miamin MM, Ohio [granted certificate to]Hinshaw, Vol I, Bush River, p 1029
1810 censusPossibly the Benjamin in Union SC.
1812-1814Moved west and eventually settled in Waynesville with other Quakers.
1820 census Benjamin Evans household with 3 people Waynesville, warren, OH.
1830 Census Canít identify family. There is no Benjamin or Hannah in Warren Co OH, but there is a David. Also there is a Hannah Evans in Limerick, PA..
10 July 1830Died Waynesville and buried in Friends Ground, Waynesville, OHBurial Hinshaw, vol 5, p 52
1840 censusWidow hannah. Ohio > Warren > Wayne > 18.
1850 censusHannah Smith Evans, aged 82, Waynesville, OH. Also Sarah Evans 46..
19 Sept 1853Hannah Smith Evans died Wayneville and is buried in Friends Burial GroundDupuy Family History.

************************************************************************

Benjamin Evans Info
http://qugenswohio.blogspot.com/2005/10/jason-evans-businessman-and.html
Jason Evans ~ Businessman and Philanthropist 1807~1876

Jason Evans was a wealthy Cincinnati pork packer and banker who had been born in Waynesville into the influential Evans family. Jason was one of the sons of Benjamin and Hannah Smith Evans, who had immigrated from Bush River Meeting in South Carolina to Waynesville with their five children. He was the youngest brother of David Evans and the uncle of John Evans who was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln to be the territorial governor of Colorado on March 26, 1862

(see, http://www.colorado.gov/dpa/doit/archives/govs/evans.html for more information about John Evans).

The following memorial of Jason Evans is taken from Cincinnati, Past and Present or Its Industrial History as Exhibited in the Life and Labors of its Leading Men by J. Lundy (M. Joblin & Co., Cincinnati, 1872), pp. 114-16. The following memorial was also printed in "Memorial of Cincinnati Monthly Meeting of Friends Concerning our Deceased Friend, Jason Evans (Cincinnati, 1877):

The subject of this memoir was born November 25, 1807, in Warren County, Ohio. His family on the paternal side is of Welsh descent, his ancestors having emigrated to this country near the close of the seventeenth century, and settled in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.

His father, Benjamin Evans, at the age of twenty-five, and just after the close of the Revolutionary War, actuated by a spirit of adventure and a laudable ambition to be self-supporting, left the scenes of his youth, and with knapsack on back, traveled on foot to Chraleston, South Carolina. While there, in search of employment, he was induced by some country people to accompany them home to the district of Newberry, where he finally established himself and carried on his trade of auger- making. It was his custom annually to make a journey to Charleston, to dispose of his manufactures and lay in a stock of raw material. These trips were made by wagon, and for a distance of one hundred and fifty miles through a sparsely settled country, and over very indifferent roads.

Having acquired what was thought in those days to be a comfortable living, he married Hannah Smith, the daughter of a Carolina farmer and a members of the Society of Friends. He too espoused that faith, and with others of that persuasion, were induced to seek new homes by reason of the "testimony they bore" against the institution of Slavery. In the year 1803 an exodus took place, and he, with many of that particular belief, emigrated to the distant Valley of the Miamis, in the then wilderness of the Far West. Their route was through a dreary and almost trackless forest. Their women and children, with a few household effects and a limited supply of provisions, were transported in covered wagons. Their route was through Cumberland Gap, thence through Kentucky~then known as the bloody ground~and they finally after weeks of toil and privation, reached the Ohio River and crossed over into the "promised land", at the village of Cincinnati, then containing less than a thousand inhabitants; pushing on they at length settled in Warren County, not far distant from the present site of Wayensville. Then commenced the struggle to subdue nature and to pluck subsistence from her virgin soil. Soon the log cabin was erected to shelter the wife and wee ones; by day was heard the ringing sound of the axe and the crash of falling timber, and the gloom of night in a primitive forest was dissipated by the brush-fired of the pioneer.

Quakers in the South Carolina Backcountry Wateree and Bush River Compiled by William Heiss Indiana Quaker Records 4020 East 34th Street Indianapolis, Indiana 46218

The screw auger was invented in Newberry by a Quaker, Benjamin Evans, who lived on a place now owned by Gillam Davenport, and who removed with other Friends to Ohio. Joseph Smith and John Edmondson learned the trade with him, and followed it; the first until he was unable to follow it longer; the latter until he secured an independence. Many a box of screw augers have I seen sent by wagons to Charleston, between 1800 and 1807. I think Samuel Maverick, who now resides near Pendleton, then in Charleston, shipped some to England. Some one will ask, what sort of auger was previously used? The barrel, auger, with a mere bit to enter the wood.

Bibliography

Dupuy, Charles Meredith (1910) A Genealogical History of the Dupuy Family. Philadelphia, PA: J. B. Lippencott. Available online at google books

Evans, Frank Brook, III. (1981) Evans Family, immigrant ancestor William Evans (1675 - 1717). Williamsburg, VA: np

Heiss, William. Quakers in the South Carolina Backcountry Wateree and Bush River Compiled by William Heiss Indiana Quaker Records 4020 East 34th Street Indianapolis, Indiana 46218

Lundy, J. Cincinnati, Past and Present or Its Industrial History as Exhibited in the Life and Labors of its Leading Men. (M. Joblin & Co., Cincinnati, 1872), pp. 114-16. Also printed in "Memorial of Cincinnati Monthly Meeting of Friends Concerning our Deceased Friend, Jason Evans (Cincinnati, 1877):

Contents