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WARWICK

Warwick was organized in 1733.
 
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When Warwick was organized all the townships immediately around it had already been formed except Warrington. the original limits included part of Doylestown, and the line between Warwick and New Britain ran along Court street. When the county was settled, and for many years afterward, this section was known as "The Forks of Neshaminy," because the greater part of its territory lay between the two branches of this stream, which unite in the south-east corner of the township.

Among the original purchasers of land, before 1696, were James Clayton, John Gray, Henry Bailey, Benjamin Twily, Nathaniel Stanbury, John Blayling, Dramell Giles, John Fettiplace, John Cows, Randall Blackshaw, George Willard, Thomas Potter and James Boyden.

The 13th of February, 1733, twenty of the inhabitants of this region, namely: Robert Jamison, Benjamin Walton, William Ramsey, Alexander Breckenridge, Thomas Howell, Hugh Houston, Samuel Martin, William Miller, jr., Valentine Santee, James Polk, Robert Sibbett, John McCollock, Arthur Bleakley, Alexander Jamison, Henry Jamison, Andrew Long, Joseph Walton, and Joseph Roberts, petitioned the court of quarter sessions to organize it into a township to be called Warwick.

The Neshaminy Church of Warwick, Church Building   Chapel   is one of the oldest Presbyterian churches in the county.. A number of distinguished clergymen have been pastors at Neshaminy, the Reverends Messrs. Tennent, Blair, Irwin, Belville, and Wilson.

There are no villages in Warwick. In 1784 Warwick, which then embraced a portion of Doylestown township, contained 609 white inhabitants, 27 blacks, and 105 dwellings.

 

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MOLAND HOUSE

The Intelligencer Record, Monday, January 21, 2001

Washington used Moland House as is headquarters from August 12 through the 23rd, 1777. Moland house is no longer in danger (of being demolished). The exterior renovation is largely finished. Workers replaced several windows, reinforced the original rafter, restored the chimney and installed a new roof of yellow pine shingles.

The Intelligencer Record, Sunday June 8, 2003 - http://www.phillyburbs.com 

Historic Moland House damaged by vandalism.
Vandals wreaked havoc at the historic house where George Washington spent 13 days in 1777.

"where Betsy Ross' first flag is believed to have flown"

Giving the general his due

Polish Count, later Brig. Gen., Casimir Pulaski was overlooked on the original sign marking Washington's encampment at Warwick's Moland House. A new sign corrects the oversight.
During his two-week stay at Warwick's Moland House in August of 1777, Gen. George Washington met Count Casimir Pulaski of Poland, who had crossed the Atlantic to help the Colonies fight the Revolutionary War.


There the two men prepared for Brandywine, the Delaware County battle where Pulaski earned the rank of brigadier general after organizing a rear guard to protect Washington's retreating soldiers.

"Some credit him with saving George
Author: John Anastasi

THE INTELLIGENCER
Date: August 20, 2006
Publication: Intelligencer, The (Doylestown, PA)
Page: B1

Historic house gets facelift

The Moland House, host to George Washington in August 1777, has been brought back from the brink of demolition. It was formally dedicated Saturday. After waiting years, the moment finally arrived. And the rain didn't dampen it.

The historic Moland House, where George Washington set up camp 227 years ago, was dedicated to the public Saturday.

"I'm thrilled," said Warren Williams, president of the Warwick Township Historical Society.

The
Author: Christine Moran
THE INTELLIGENCER
Date: August 22, 2004
Publication: Intelligencer, The (Doylestown, PA)
Page: 2B
 

 

 

 

 

 

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DELHAAS-WILSON CLASS OF 1960

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DELHAAS Class 59

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Sources

This website was created as a guide to the history and genealogy of Bucks County Pennsylvania . All efforts have been made to be accurate and to document sources. Some of the material has been contributed and published, with permission, in good faith. I am always open to suggestions. Enjoy!
 
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