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According to my copy of "The Pennsylvania Line", there is a Warrington Township in York County. The township was formed in 1744 while part of Lancaster County. There is indeed another Warrington Township in Bucks County, which was formed in 1734 from Warminster Township. Although I cannot find Warrington Township in York County in my atlas, there are plenty of references to it in Prowell's "History of York County". The town was settled by English Quakers. A rough map in "York County, Pennsylvania Church Records of the 18th Century", volume 3, shows Warrington as being northwest of Dover Township, northeast of Washington Township and slightly southeast of Dillsburg.
Kindly submitted by Vanessa.

Warrington was organized in 1734. Warrington is the upper of the three rectangular townships that border the Montgomery county line. When Holme's map was published, there were but four land-owners in the township, none of which lived there, Richard Ingolo, R. Sneed, Charles Jones, jr., and R. Vickers. In the will of William Penn, ten thousand acres in the county were devised to his grandson, William Penn, jr., of which one thousand four hundred and seventeen acres lay in Warrington.

Landowners on an old Southampton, Warminster and Warrington map were: Andrew Long, J. Paul, Lukens, Jones, R. Miller, T. Pritchard, the London company, the Proprietaries, Charles Tenant, Nailor, and William Allen.There are no villages but several hamlets of about half a dozen houses, each, namely: Warrington, Neshaminy, Tradesville and Pleasantville.

John Barclay House 1799

Warrington is taking the first step by identifying 80 buildings for historic recognition.

  • The building that now houses the law firm of Randolph Scott Associates dates back to 1808.
  • The Hatboro Federal Savings Bank building was once home to leading township citizen John Barclay in 1799.
  • And the history of the McNaney farmhouse on Folly Road can be traced back to 1810.

The supervisors and the Warrington Township Historic Commission and commission chairman Thomas Mackin, would like to make sure that does not happen. The commission, created less than two years ago, is in the process of identifying 80 buildings for historic recognition.3

  • FROG HOLLOW
    Name given to a portionof Little Neshaminy valley in southwestern Warrington Twp, in which there ware several houses and a hotel. The power house of the former willow Grove and Doylestown trolley line of the Philadelphia Rapid transit Company was located there near the stone arch bridge on Doylestown and willow Grove Turnpike Road (Route 611). This bridge was built in 1821 and replaced another bridge erected before 1795. The Frog Hollow Hotel is one of the old inns of the county. For many years its landlord was Mahlon Keller, a brother of County Commissioner Samuel Keller. The valley at this point is sometimes known as Paul Valley, from a family who owned much property there, but the popular name of Frog Hollow still clings to the place. A colored resident, asked how the place came by its name, replied: "Dunno huccom, but , Man Alive, dem frawgs, dey sho' do hollah nites."3 Reminiscences of Frog Hollow
  • TRADESVILLE
    Since 1854 at the intersection of Bristol and Lower State Roads. Partly in Warrington and Doylestown. Once known as Stuckerts Corner. 4
  • EUREKA
    Once known as Pleasantville, where Lower State Road meets Limekiln Pike. The village store, post office and hotel closed long ago (the buildings are still there). The church, organized in 1840 still thrives.3
  • NESHAMINY
    Where Easton Road (611) and Street Road (132) meet, originally known as Warrington Square. The name was changed to Neshaminy at the coming of the post office in 1864. 3
1. Davis History of Bucks County. . . 1876
2. An Illustrated History of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Wm H. Egle, M.D. (1876)
3. Place Names of Bucks County . . . compiled by George Mac Reynolds (Doylestown, PA: Bucks Co. Historical Society, 1942)
4. History of Bucks County Pennsylvania Volume I, William W. H. Davis, A.M.
4a. THE JOURNAL, NOVEMBER 1998, PUBLISHED BY THE BUCKS COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
5. History of Bucks County Pennsylvania Volume II, William W. H. Davis, A.M.
6. History of Bucks County Pennsylvania Volume III, William W. H. Davis, A.M.
7. Battle's History of Bucks County. . . 1887

LEVITTOWN'S 50TH ANNIVERSARY
BUCKS COUNTY RESEARCHER
Quakertown Alive Main Street Project
DELHAAS-WILSON CLASS OF 1960
DELHAAS LINKS_BRISTOL/LEVITTOWN
REUNION PICTURES
NON-CUSTODIAL FATHERS


This website was created as a guide to the history and genealogy of Bucks County Pennsylvania . All efforts have been made to be accurate and to document sources. Some of the material has been contributed and published, with permission, in good faith. I am always open to suggestions. Enjoy!
1997-2001 Nancy C. Benner © - P.O. Box 235 - Revere PA 18953 - All rights reserved. Please feel free to link to the pages on this site. I accept no responsibility for the content of other websites or for services or products purchased or used as a result of a link from these pages. This page was last updated Sunday, June 24, 2001
"Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Deed Records, 1684-1763"

"BUCKS COUNTY, Pennsylvania, CHURCH RECORDS OF THE 17th and 18TH Centuries, Volume 3. QUAKER RECORDS "