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History of Lincoln

THOMAS LINCOLN "MILLER"

Thomas Lincoln was born in Swanton Morley Norfolk England on 28 Dec. 1600. Who his 1st wife is unknown but while still in England in the year 1630 he had a son named Thomas, then about 1635 he had another son named John.

The 2nd Colony in America was Massachusetts. The town of Hingham Plymouth Massachusetts had settlers in 1633. In the summer or autumn of 1635 Thomas Lincoln came to the town of Hingham probably with the Rev. Peter Hobart, the towns first minister. Hingham was incorporated on 2 Sept. 1635, only 11 town in America had earlier incorporation date. At time of towns incorporation there were only 42 residents. Of these 42 residents there were (3) Thomas Lincoln's they are distinguished on town records by there trade hence the notation "Miller" behind the name of Thomas Lincoln.

On 3 July 1636 Thomas Lincoln, Jr. Miller drew a house lot of five acres at Hingham on what is now South street, near Main, and later drew lots for planting purposes.

These early settlers of America were mainly Puritans (dissenters who officially remained within the Church of England, but often acted independently on religious matters). Thomas was probably a Puritan because his children were all baptized by the Puritan leader in the town Rev. Peter Hobart. These Puritans were usually fairly well-to-do members of the English middle class.

Some time in Feb. of 1637/38 Thomas had (3) sons chr. By Rev. Peter Hobart Thomas and John who were mentioned earlier as being born in England and another son Samuel. On the 6th of Oct. 1642 he had a daughter chr. Named Mary and in Dec. of 1645 he had another daughter chr. named Sarah.

In 1644 all inhabitants in Hingham were compelled to keep arms ready for service in their houses against the Indians.

In 1644 a controversy over the commander of the Army divided the town and many settlers lift, this controversy lasted until 1648. This could be the reason that Thomas and his family left the town of Hingham because before 1650 he removed to Taunton, Mass. where, Dec. 10, 1665 he married for his 2nd wife Ellizabeth Street, prob. the wid. of Francis Street. Tradition says that he erected at Taunton the old grist-mill, where, in 1675, King Philip and his chiefs met the pioneers of the place for a peaceful interview; and that at a later period his sons John and Samuel conveyed the old mill property to Robert Crosman. (The mill was located on mill river at a point in the very heart of the present city, near the street leading from the railroad station to City Square.)

He served in Taunton on the jury in 1650; was highway surveyor there in 1650 and the largest land owner. He became one of the stockholders in the famous Tauton iron works, established October, 1652, as a stock company.

Thomas Lincoln's will was dated August 23, 1683, when he stated his age as about eighty years. The will was proved March 5, 1684.

Lineage

It is probable that the LINCOLN family is of Norman stock, as one Alfred DE LINCOLN held large landed possessions in the year following the Norman Conquest. In 1086 we find that Alfred DE LINCOLN'S son, Alan DE LINCOLN, succeeded to his father's great barony in Lincolnshire. The ancestor of the American LINCOLN'S settled in the County of Norfolk, but at what date is not known. In King John's reign, 1202-3, we find there one Ivo DE LINCOLN. The LINCOLN'S were located in many parts of the country, but the ancestor of Samuel LINCOLN, of Hingham, Mass., came from Hingham, Norwich, Swanton and Carbrooke, and his descendants seem to have had strong pioneer instincts, as may became first settlers in the expanding territory of the United States.

ROBERT LINCOLN, of Hingham, County Norfolk, England, was b. probably in the fifteenth century. His will is dated 18th April. 1540. m. Johan (surname unknown). His son,

ROBERT LINCOLN, of County Norfolk, d. Jan. 1555-56, the year his will was made and probated; m. Margaret (surname unknown). His son,

RICHARD LINCOLN, of County Norfolk, was buried 23rd Dec. 1620, at Hingham. In his will, made 3rd Jan. 1615-16, he calls himself "Swanton Morlie." He seems to have left a good estate and provided for the liberal education of his youngest son, Henry, who in later documents is styled "Gentleman," showing the family to have been of the gentry and entitled to coat armour. Richard LINCOLN, m. (firstly) Elizabeth REMCHING, of Carbrooke, dau. of Richard REMCHING, Lord of Carbrooke Manor, whose will is dated 12th Mar. 1566-67, in which is mentioned his dau. Elizabeth, who later m. this Richard LINCOLN; m. (secondly) _______ HOBBS, widow; m. (thirdly) Margery DUNHAM, widow; m. (fourthly) Anne (BIRD) SMALL, widow, of the BIRD family of Great Witchingham.

ISSUE BY 1st m.
I. EDWARD

(Of the issue by other marriages there were daughters, and a son, Henry.) EDWARD LINCOLN was buried in Hingham churchyard, as recorded 11th Feb. 1639-40. His wife's name is unknown. Of eight children, three came to America:

ISSUE
		I. Thomas, eldest son, who came in 1633 and settled in Hingham, Mass., 
                   1635.      Left no issue.
  		II. Daniel, also settled in Hingham. Left no issue.
		III. SAMUEL, bap. In England, 24th Aug. 1622.

SAMUEL LINCOLN, bap. In England, 24th Aug. 1622; d. 10th Apr. 1693. Was apprenticed as a weaver to Francis LAWER, of Norwich, England, and sailed with him form England, 8th Apr. 1637. Settled in Hingham, Mass., and followed his trade there. M. Martha (surname unknown).

Hingham, Massachusetts, is distinguished as the home of all the first settlers of the LINCOLN surname Lincoln. From these pioneers are descended all the colonial families of the name, including President Lincoln and more than one governor and man of note in all walks of life. The surname was variously spelled Linkhorn, Linkoln, Lincon, and was common in old Hingham, in England, for more than a century before immigrant ancestors made their home in Massachusetts. The origin or meaning of the name has been a theme of discussion. Some have maintained that it is a relic of the Angol-Saxon-Norman-Conquest period, when, near some waterfall (Anglo-Saxon "lin") a colony (Roman "colonia") was founded, thus giving Lincolonia a finally Lincolnshire. Eight of the name were among the first settlers of Hingham, coming thither from Wymondham, county Norfolk, England. Three brothers, Daniel, Samuel and Thomas, came with their mother Joan. There were no less than four named Thomas Lincoln, ____ and heads of families, all doubtless re-_______They were distinguished on the records and in local speech by their trades. They were known at Thomas, the miller; Thomas, the cooper; Thomas, the husbandman and Thomas the weaver. There was also Stephen Lincoln who came with his wife and son Stephen, from Wymond, England, in 1638. This name is spelled also Windham and Wymondham.

(I) Thomas Lincoln, the miller, was born in Norfolk county, England, in 1603. He came to Hingham, Massachusetts, in 1635, and was one of the proprietors the same year. He drew a house-lot of five acres at Hingham, July 3, 1636, on what is now South street, near Main, and later drew lots for planting. Before 1650, he had removed to Taunton, Massachusetts, and had built a grist mill there on Mill river at a point in the very heart of the present city, near the street leading from the railroad station to City Square. It is said that King Philip and his chiefs once met the colonists in conference in this mill. He served in Taunton on the jury in 1650; was highway surveyor there in 1650 and the largest land owner. He became one of the stockholders in the famous Taunton iron works, established October, 1652, as a stock company. Among other stockholders were Richard Williams, Richard Stacy and George Watson. These works were operated until 1883, and the dam and foundation still mark one of the most interesting sites in the history of American industry. He married (first) in England, and (second) December 10, 1665, Elizabeth (Harvey) Street, widow of Francis Street. Lincoln gave land in Hingham to his son Thomas, who sold it October 11, 1662, specifying the history of the transactions. Lincoln's will was dated August 23, 1683, when he stated his age as about eighty years. The will was proved March 5, 1684. Children: John, baptized February, 1639, married Edith Macomber; Samuel, mentioned below; Thomas Jr., February, 1637-38, at Hingham; Mary at Hingham, October 6, 1642, married William Hack and Richard Stevens; Sarah, December, 1645, married Joseph Wills, of Taunton, and settled in Scituate.

(II) Samuel, son of Thomas Lincoln, the miller, was born at Hingham, England, or vicinity and baptized in Hingham, Massachusetts, in 1637. He married Jane _______, and settled in Taunton, Massachusetts. Children: Samuel (q. v.) Born June 1, 1664; Hannah, married ______Owen: Tamsen, married Jonah Austin Jr.; Elizabeth, married William Briggs.

Ref.
History of town of Higham Mass. Vol 3 P 20
US Mass., Plym., Hingham
H2
1
LINCOLN.

This surname, variously written Linkhorn, Linklon, Lincon, etc., upon early documents, was a common one in Hingham, Norfolk County, England, for more than a century before our ancestors first came to New England; and the same names which occur here appear quite frequently among the baptisms registered upon the records of St. Andrew's Church in old Hingham. There can scarcely be a doubt, therefore, but that the surname Lincoln originated in Norfolk County, England; while it is more than probable, judging from a recent examination of the St. Andrew's church records, that the place of their abode prior to the seventeenth century, with perhaps one exception, was at old Hingham. Among the earlier settlers of our Hing. were eight person (males) of mature age bearing his surname, of whom mention is made upon the records of the town. These were, Daniel, Lincoln the husbandman, who died unm. 3 Apr. 1644, and his brother Samuel Lincoln, and Thomas Lincoln the weaver; Daniel Lincoln kn. as "the young man." and as "Sergeant" and "boatman," Stephen Lincoln, and his bro. Thomas Lincoln the husbandman; Thomas Lincoln the cooper; and Thomas Lincoln the miller.

Thus there were four Thomases, distinguished from each other by their occupations, as cooper, husbandman, miller, and weaver; two

THOMAS LINCOLN, "Miller."

1. THOMAS, distinguished from the other three Thomases who early settled in Hing. by his vocation of "miller," came form Old Eng. To New Eng. In 1635, and July 3, 1636, had a house-lot of five acres granted him on what is now South, near Main st. Other lots were also granted him for planting purposes. He prob. brought with him from Eng. two or three ch.; and before 1650 rem. From here with his fam. to Taunton, Mass., where, Dec. 10, 1665, he m. for his sec. w. Elizabeth Street, prob. the wid. of Francis Street. Tradition says that he erected at Taunton the old gris-mill, where, in 1675, King Philip and his chiefs met the pioneers of the place for a peacefull interview; and that at a later period his sons John and Samuel conveyed the old mill property to Robert Crosman. Whether there is any record to verify this statement ab. the old grist-mill or not, it is undoubtedly true that he continued in the same vocation which he had previously followed. In his will of 28, Aug. 1683, he calls himself "eighty years of age or thereabouts." Will proved 5 March foll.

	Ch., all by his first w., were-
	2. 	i. Thomas, bt. In Hing. Feb. 1637-38.
	3.	ii. John,____.
	4.	iii Samuel, bt. In Hing. Feb. 1637-38.
		iv. Mary, bt. In Hing. Oct 6, 1642, m. (1) Wm. Hack, and  
                (2) Richard Stephens.
		v.  Sarah, bt. In Hing. Dec. 1645, m. Joseph Willis.

2. THOMAS (2) (Thomas (1)), prob. b. in Eng., was bt. by Rev. Peter Hobart of Hing. Feb. 1637-38, and became an early resident of Taunton. His w. was Mary, dau. of Jonah Austin. "Oct. 11, 1662. Thomas Linkon of Taunton in New England, husbandman in consideration of 40s sells to Daniel Cushing of Hingham, all my great lot, containing 16 acres, lately given to me by Thomas Linklon, my father, lying in the township of Hingham, on the Great Plaine, and was given by the inhabitants of Higham unto the said Thomas Linklon, my father,'" etc. (S.D., vol. iv. p. 65.)

Ch., prob. b. at Taunton, were-

	i.   MARY, May 12, 1652.
	ii.  SARAH, Sept. 25, 1654.
	iii. THOMAS, Apr. 21, 1656. m. Mary, dau. of Richard and Abigail Stacey.
	iv.  SAMUEL, May 16, 1658.
	v.   SARAH, July 7, 1660.
	vi.  HANNAH, March 15, 1663.
	vii.  CONSTANCE, May 16, 1665. m. July 13, 1687, William Briggs.
	viii. JONAH.
	ix.   MERCY, Apr. 3, 1670. m. William Caswell.
	x.    EXPERIENCE, was unm.

3. JOHN (2) (THOMAS(1)) prob. b. in Eng.; removed form Hing. with his parents and became a resident of Taunton. The chris, name of his w. was Edith. Their ch., b. at Taunton, were -

	i.   JOHN, Oct. 11, 1665, was m.
	ii.  THOMAS, Sept. 15, 1667. m. Ester Smith.
	iii. MARY, 1679. m. Nathaniel Shores.
	iv. DANIEL, ____. m. (1) Abigail Nichols, and (2) Mrs. Hannah Knap.
	v.  JOSIAH, _____. The chris. name of his w. was Jane.

4. SAMUEL (2) (THOMAS (1)). bt. in Hing. Feb. 1637-38, was also a resident of Taunton. The chris. name of his w. was Catherine. Their ch., prob. b. at Taunton, were--

	i.      SAMUEL, June 1, 1664.
	ii.     HANNAH, March 24, 1665-66. m. Daniel Owen of Braintree.
	iii.    TAMSON, Oct. 27, 1667. m. Jonah Austin, Jr.
	iv.    ELIZABETH, Apr.24, 1669. m. Oct. 13, 1693, William Briggs, the s. of 
		William and Sarah (Macomber) of Taunton.
	v.     EBEBEZER, Oct. 15, 1673.
	vi.    RACHEL, Sept. 16, 1677. m. Jan. 20, 1696, Thomas Randall.
	vii.   JOHN, Sept.15, 1679.
	viii.  THOMAS, sept. 1683.
	ix.     DANIEL,_____.

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