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Oakland Plantation

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Oakland Plantation was built in 1781 with the finest bricks from England carried abroad the Atlantic Ocean to Carver's Creek, North Carolina via the Cape Fear River.  It was first owned by General Thomas Brown, son of George and Lucy Bright Brown.  General Brown owned several plantations with Oakland being the most grand.   He also owned: Sedgefield on the Sound, Drunken Run, and Walker's Bluff Plantations. The land was purchased from Colonel Samuel Ashe. 

Front View (Facing River): This view is a front shot of the plantation house; the side facing the river front. It is architecturally structured with bricks made in England and was designed so that both the front and back of the house are alike.

Smokehouse: According to Mrs. Lena Neill, Oakland plantation cook, this smokehouse was transported to the property and used as a storage facility in the latter 20th century by present landowner, Mr. Neisler.

Several disputes arose over ownership of this land which at that time involved Brighton Plantation.  A deed was drawn up to "quiet the lands".  General Thomas Brown became owner of the lands and erected Ashwood which is now Oakland in 1781. It's noted by  historians that Lord Cornwallis used Oakland as a refuge while hiding from the British.  

 

Top Picture: Rear View  

 

Bottom Picture: Front View (Facing River)

 

Picture submitted by: Mark Zadra of Florida, great-great-great-grandson of General Thomas Brown.

 

 

Entrance to Oakland:This view is a scenic view taken from the highway. It leads directly to the rear of the plantation house which is easily mistaken for the front of the house because of the similarity of both sides. The path is lined with trees that were planted in the 20th century. Before the birth of these 20th century trees, the path to the house and the highway were nonexistent and consisted of a dense forest with numerous historic trees.  Through time and weatherization, most of the historic trees no longer exist.  This dirt path was created in order to keep up with modernization of time.

Under construction!!!

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If you would like to submit pictures of Oakland plantation, please email Sonya Brown at starkist77@yahoo.com. All pictures will be returned to rightful owner.

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Brown and Mear(e)s of Bladen and Columbus County