Lindley Murray Moore
Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

 

     

 

AMERICA THE GREAT MELTING POT

Contact information on HOME page

Direct descendant is highlighted in red

 

Lindley Murray Moore










Born: 31 May 1788 Annapolis, Nova Scotia, Canada


Oil Painting of Lindley Murray Moore
On display at Livingston Backus House
Genesee Country Village & Museum
Courtesy of Peter A. Wisbey, Currator of Collections
  see FAMILY TREE





Picture of Lindley Murray Moore found in book, "Adam and Anne Mott, their ancestors and their descendants" by Thomas C Cornell
Married: 19 Aug 1813 Mamaroneck, Westchester Co., NY at Premium Point (original home of James Mott)BB

Built home in Rochester, Monroe, NY abt 1835

 

   
22 Lake View Park, Rochester, Monroe, NY
home built by Lindley Murray Moore about 1831
Died: 14 Aug 1871 Rochester, Monroe Co., NY
Died of Heart Disease
     
Buried: 17 Aug 1871 Mt Hope Cemetery, Rochester, NY
Mary H, Moore, Lindley M Moore Jr., Abigail L Mott Moore, Lindley Murray Moore, Edward Mott Moore (left to right)

Buried Mt Hope Cemetery
Section G  Lot 40

FATHER

Samuel Moore

MOTHER

Rachel Stone

WIFE

Abigail Lydia Mott

CHILDREN

1. Edward Mott Moore  
Edward Mott Moore
2. Gilbert Hicks Moore  
Gilbert Hicks Moore
3. Anne Mott Moore  
Ann Mott Moore Haines
4. Mary H. Moore     
 
5. Lindley Murray Moore  
Lindley Murray Moore, Jr
6. Mary Hicks Moore           

Mary H Moore
7. Richard Mott Moore

 

   
8.Alice Marie Moore
b. Jun 1839
d. Bef 17 Aug 1839
   

Notes
by Chase Brooke
Dec 2012

Lindley's father, a Quaker, had fled the United States during the Revolution so Lindley was born in Nova Scotia.  Apparently it was a fairly rugged life.  He was named for Lindley Murray, a celebrated grammarian and wealthy merchant of New York who "befriended Samuel Moore in the difficulties growing out of the war."  (1)   The family returned to New Jersey in 1810. (2) Lindley was already a teacher at Nine Partners when Adam and Anne Mott moved there in 1811. He and Abigail became engaged when she was 17 and he an assistant teacher at the school.  His letter to Abby in 1812 shows that he was very much in love and the match was not arranged. (3)   The pay was not good so they moved to Rahway, NJ  where they opened a Quaker School.  Their son Edward Mott Moore was born there in 1814. In 1815 they moved to New York City to take charge of the Monthly Meeting School of Friends on Pearl Street.  Lindley and Abigail made their home with her parents, Adam and Anne Mott, on Lombardy Street.  However in 1817 they rented a house on Chrystie Street.  He had been earning $1,200 a year but in 1820 times were tough and his salary was reduced.  Lindley decided to give up the school and move to Flushing and opened a boarding school for boys in 1820.  "Seven years later he bought five acres of land in Westchester Village, on the road to New York, about opposite the Friends Meeting house, and removed his school to this place in the Spring of 1828.  Here also he prospered, and his residence here is several times referred to in family letters.  But he had laid up money and was beginning to think of retiring from the arduous labors of a school to the tranquility of a farm.  A visit that he and his wife made at Rochester confirmed him in this desire, and after considerable inquiry and negotiation he purchased, in 1829, the farm of 170 acres then occupied by Erastus Spalding for $5,200.  The farm was beautifully situated, on high ground, on what was alter know as Lake Avenue in the City of Rochester, being the direct road from the City to lake Ontario, at the mouth of the Genesee River." (1) In 1831 he built a "two story house in the Greek revival style." (Later the house became a convent for the Sisters of Nazareth Academy.)  For more information about their early married life and photos of their home, see page for Abigail Mott Moore

Not a lot is known about his relationship with his parents and siblings but there are definite indications that he cared about them.  For starters, Lindley's oldest son Edward, was named after his brother.  He also visited Canada to visit his family several times. In 1819 James Mott Sr, Abigail's grandfather, mentions that Lindley is going to Canada and hopes that he will visit him on his way back.  (4)  Lindley's father Samuel died in September 1822 and left him 200 acres in Norwich, Ontario which shows that the affection went two ways.  By 1834 we know that Lindley was a naturalized US citizen. (5)  In 1838 he traveled to Canada to intercede with the authorities on behalf of his brothers, Enoch and John, who were being tried for treason.  After being held for sometime both were pardoned. Both John and another brother, Samuel, visited Lindley in the United States.  Samuel as early as 1812.  Later on Samuel moved from Canada to the United States permanently.  When John was released from prison in 1838 he spent a couple of months in the United States with his brothers, Lindley in New York, and Joseph in Ohio.  John returned to Canada and died there in 1850 (for more  information - see pages for John Moore and Samuel Moore, Lindley's brothers.)

There is not much doubt that Lindley was a devout Quaker.  In a letter to his son Edward written in June 1834 he wrote, ". But I hope thou wilt not let a few scientific pursuits prevent the acquisition of general information. But there is another reason to rend thy residence at Troy for so long a time, particularly unpleasant; I mean the seclusion from Society of Friends. I hope my dear son, whether thy stay is long or short thou wilt be particular in thy observance of the peculiarities of our Society. A consistent Quaker is always respected. I have no objection to thy going the round of the different meetings at Troy, but as they are all so different in their code of Worship from Friends & generally so outward in their ideas of thought, I should be glad of those converts have the privilege of remaining in they chambers on the 1st day of the week & devote they attention to the readings & study of the bible. An intelligent Quaker stands deservedly high in the estimation of sensible & well bred people, but an ignorant one very low." (6)  In another letter to his son Edward after Edward had married in 1847, he says, "I want to hear from my new daughter as well as thyself. As little as I saw of her, I can truly say that I love her as a daughter."  (7) This is striking because Lucy Prescott was an Episcopalian and remained so for the rest of her life.  Normally marrying outside of their faith was frowned upon by Quakers and called for dismissal from the church.  Lindley was also referred to in a history of the University of Rochester as being pretty tolerant of secular education. The Rochester site says, "In much the same vein, the Quaker Lindley M. Moore, apparently an early advocate of the idea of higher education in Rochester, dismissed as groundless the alarm of Church over the sectarian serpent. Besides the collegiate department, the university, he pointed out, would furnish training in medicine, law, and area theology, and only in the last area could sectarianism manifest itself. Even that danger would be nullified, Moore reasoned, if each Protestant denomination endowed a theological professorship to furnish instruction in keeping with its own convictions. 'It is greatly to be desired that no unnecessary fears, or illiberal views frustrate or jeopardize the success of the great and noble enterprise,' he concluded. " (8)  Also, most Quakers were strongly against slavery, and Lindley was no exception.  In 1838 he helped form the Rochester Anti-Slavery Society and became its first president. (9)

It isn't often that you get an insight into an ancestor's character, but in Lindley's case, we have a few clues.  In the following letter he teases his wife Abby who loves to get letters from their son, Edward.  Abby was writing to Edward.  "Thy father went to Rochester this afternoon, and when he returned, he asked me who I would rather have a letter of all my friends I immediately replied “Edward” and he handed me them." (10)  In another letter from Abby to Edward in 1834 she refers to suit brought against Lindley.  He was being sued for not paying a tax on a cow that he owned.  He refused to pay the tax because it was being levied against the inhabitants of the ward to built a school which originally was not supposed to cost a penny!  He was having none of that! In fact he was "willing to take the lead & settle the principle, for there are a number of poor people who are unable to sustain the expense of a suit." (11) 

In a history of Haverford College of which he had been principal from 1848-1850, he is remembered as genial and fine old man.  There is a humorous account of his disciplinary methods as seen below.  (12)

His strong character served him well.  He had an eventful but difficult life.  Although he was a teacher for most of his life, he seemed to want more.  As a young man he devoted all of his time to teaching.  First at Nine Partners where he met Abby, then at Rahway, and after that at New York City.  He always taught at Quaker schools.  In 1830 he became a farmer in Rochester.  At first he did well, but by 1836 when President Jackson abolished the Second National Bank and caused the recession, times became difficult.  In her letters to Edward, Abby often refers to their financial difficulties. When he really needed money he would teach at a school in Rochester where his children and Lindley also taught but it did not pay very much.  (13)  He also had the misfortune of cosigning a note for his son, Gilbert, in a business venture, and when that went sour, his financial difficulties only got worse. (See page for Gilbert Moore.)

The years 1844 to 1846 were terrible. Mary, his nineteen year old daughter, died in December, 1844; Abby his wife died in April 1846 and Murray his twenty-five year old son died in December 1846.  All died of consumption (tuberculosis).  Lindley then became a full time teacher at a Quaker school in Providence Rhode Island and then became the principal of Haverford College from 1848-1850.  While at Haverford, Lindley wrote to his son Edward on June 30, 1850, "Do write to Ann.  It does her good to have a letter from thee.  You two are the only ones of 9 children that are left, on what affection I rely. We must keep up that affectionate intercourse which is the sweetener of human life." (14)

Lindley retired from Haverford in 1850 and then went to live with his son Edward until Lindley died in 1871.  Judging from the few letters from that period, Lindley must have led a contented life with his son and his grandchildren.  He also must have continued dabbling with his farm at Sandy Creek in Rochester since in his will he leaves an interest in the Sandy Creek farm to his son Edward.

Sources:

(1)  Adam and Anne Mott by Thomas C. Cornell, 1890.
  "The only traditions that have reached me of the farm life in Nova Scotia are that it was a rugged one. In illustration, it was said to be the custom, when the women as well as the men worked in the summer hay fields, to take the children into the fields with them; and the baby was provided with a piece of pork, tied by a strong cord to its own foot, in order that if the child, when left alone should choke itself with the port, its snuggles would remove the difficulty."   pg 82 and 83
 

(2) "Loyalist Settlements 1783-1789 - New Evidence of Canadian Loyalist Claims" by W. Bruce Antliff, 1985.  Mississauga Library Call #971.042 ANT pg 5-6.  Also New Jersey Tax Lists, Aug 1810, Nov 1810, Woodbridge Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey

 (3)  Letter from Lindley Murray Moore to Abigail Mott,  7th Mo. 31, 1812.  Letter on file with Moore-Haines Papers at Swarthmore College

  Rahway 7th mo 31, 1812

Shortly after thee receipt of thine, I replied to it, my letter was directed immediately to thee, but whether it ever reached thee or not, I am not able to say, not having heard from Nine Partners since. The distance of this place from your school is so considerable that it is almost impossible to hear a whisper from you except by letter, and this mode of conveyance has not always proved certain, which possibly has been the case with the note which I last addressed to thee. Whether so or not thou wilst please excuse this early inquiry being it well timed, anxious to hear from thee, the object of my dearest regards - thou wilt therefore much oblige me by giving a line soon after this reaches thee.
I impatiently wait for the time to come when it will be convenient for me to leave my school long enough to make a visit to Nine Partners. If consonant to the visit of my employment, I intend to have a few days vacation at the end of my present quarter for that purpose & tho they are anxious for the improvement of their children, they will not, I presume object to a request so reasonable as this. If they only knew how worthy a female it is my intention of visiting in the interim, certainly they would not. But this I must leave to their own conjecture, to gather from the reports which are current even here. I frequently hear that I am to be married, but more of them undertake to tell me to whom. All that they tell me is that I must certainly bring her to Bridge Town to live. How will that do?
My employment is such as necessarily subject me to a good deal of dependence and consequently confinement. We indeed can find but few useful occupations that are in some degree in this description. But according to the present gloomy appearance of the world mine is as good an employment as most at least. I intend to content myself for the time being.
I hope thou find this that the fatigue of thy business as a teacher is not too much for thee and that it is on all accounts a pleasant one. My school continues as usual quite agreeable. I have not I think been at any place where the task of a teacher is more pleasant than where I now am.
I expect to go to New York tomorrow with my brother Samuel who is now at this place and intends returning immediately to Nova Scotia to make but a temporary stay to transact some unsettled business in that country. I have not been to N York since I last saw thee.
With wishes for all the happiness of your family generally in their arduous employment and of thine in particular, I am thy friend affectionately. Lindley M Moore
 


(4)  Adam and Anne Mott, by Thomas C. Cornell, pg 112 
Letter from James Mott, Senior to Adam and Anne Mott 8 mo 13, 1819
“We, a few weeks ago, had a visit from J. Everingham and A. U. Mott. They informed us that Lindley M Moore called on them a few days before, on his way to Canada. I hope he will want to see us enough to take Skaneateles on his way home, and see whether he will not like the lake, and the good land around it, as well as Canada.

(5) Letter from Abigail Mott Moore to Edward Mott Moore, 5th mo 1st 1834.  Letter on file at the University of Rochester with the Edward Mott Moore Papers.
"Well, Rochester is a city and its respective officers are appointed - the Jacksons 'carried the day in every word,' the total majority 24%, old Lunt challenged thy father's vote, and he was obliged to affirm that he had become naturalized."

(6) Letter from Lindley and Abigail Moore to Edward Mott Moore, 6th mo 22nd, 1834.  Letter on file at the University of Rochester with the Edward Mott Moore Papers.

(7) Letter from Lindley Murray Moore to Edward Mott Moore, 11th mo 21st, 1847.  Letter on file at the University of Rochester with the Edward Mott Moore Papers.

(8) University of Rochester  http://www.lib.rochester.edu/index.cfm?PAGE=2307

(9) Notable Men of Rochester and Vicinity, 1902

(10) Letter from Lindley and Abigail Moore to Edward Mott Moore, 5th mo, 5th, 1834.   Letter on file at the University of Rochester with the Edward Mott Moore Papers.

(11) Letter from Abigail and Lindley Moore to Edward Mott Moore, 5th mo 5th, 1834.  Letter on file at the University of Rochester with the Edward Mott Moore Papers.

"Thou probably recollects that it was promised and advertised last fall that the school at the corners should be a free school - thou also remembers Met - the new trustee appointed Dr Hall as collector for the old school - bill, well, they also authorized him to collect the bills for the present winter and made our a bill of 70$ - rather a singular free school. - Dixon’s children went a part of the time - Thomas 8 weeks and Ann 5 weeks and now Dixons bill is $2.75 there are many others quite as much out of the way as that, some and indeed most of them say they will not pay it. (Handwriting changes to Lindley’s) Mother has not told thee how I am circumstanced in this whole business at the Landing. It seems they have made out a tax of eight dollars for wood, which thou mayst recollect was not voted by the district, but 3 dollars for repairs were voted. They added the 3 dolls voted by the district to the 8 dolls laid by themselves contrary to law, making 11 dolls and of this 11 dolls they taxed me $2.40 - this, I suppose, was to revenge me for telling Avery & his crew so many plain & home things on Sabbath schools, etc. Dr Hall called on me to know what I would do as he was under the necessity of making returns within 30 days. I told him I should not submit to injustice & therefore would not pay it until I was obliged to do so. He accordingly levied on a two year old heifer yesterday, and I went to Rochester in the afternoon and got out a summons for Avery, Gidding & Peter. I am to have a hearing before Justice Alexander the 16th inst. I understand the whole district nearly refuse to pay their school bills. I thought I was willing to take the lead & settle the principle, for there are a number of poor people who are unable to sustain the expense of a suit. We will inform thee of the result when it is decided."

Letter from Abigail Mott Moore to Edward Mott Moore, 5th mo , 1st, 1834.  Letter on file at the University of Rochester with the Edward Mott Moore Papers.
"In my last I told thee something respecting a law suit which was then pending between thy father and our trustees, and believe they had got as far as to meet and adjourn to the next week. Well accordingly they met on the following 7th day -  the trustees with a new lawyer, they demanded a jury trial, which the Justice was obliged to grant - and accordingly sent out a young constable to summon 6 men to act on the occasion, which was soon accomplished, Lunt and 3 more of the same stamp, and fortunately for thy father the other 2 were honest men - they received their discharge from the Justice, and retired to the room allotted for them, the respective parties remained in and about the office to hear the discussion until 9 oclock, when thy father came home quite disheartened, knowing that the majority was against him, and fearing that the others two would hardly be willing to sit there until 12 oclock at night (as the next day was first day) but contrary to his expectations, they were honest enough to stick to them until 12 oclock and then they reported that they could not agree, of course a new trial must take place - the 3rd day following they came together again - the trustees with the third Lawyer, who took up most of the afternoon in attempting to ridicule the motive which actuated thy father in entering this suit, as a specimen of his eloquence & argumentative powers, mark the following sentences - “If I was as rich as Mr Moore I would not be seen engaged in such a petty suit as this, just because he had a cow levied upon - because Dr Hall happened to go in his field and scare one of his cows” And then by way of excuse for him, for giving them (the lawyers) so much trouble he said “ I always admired the character of the Friends they are so pacific in their turn - seldom going to law with their neighbors and never seeking occasion for strife - but Mr Moore appears to be so ignorant of the rules and regulations of the Society that I suppose he was brought up, and has lived most of his life away one side, and has not associated but little with the society” - This is sufficient to show thee the character Bishop’s (father’s lawyer) antagonist. His manner fully corresponded with his ideas - he stood with one foot, a part of the time, on the stove without a coat, - and his pantaloons needed a few stitches to make them decent - After he had got through - Bishop arose and made some suitable remarks on the occasion, and the jury returned - but soon returned with judgment against the trustees. Those of our neighbors who are favorable to good order rejoice greatly that Avery has for once been made to bow, there is another suit coming on in a few days."

(12)   A history of Haverford College for the first sixty years of its existence.  Porter & Coates, 1892   pg 187-8

"Those who have known will lovingly remember this genial gentleman. (Lindley M Moore) His scholars will not soon forget his kindly ways, nor his friendship for Horace Greeley and the principles of the Free Soil Party, nor the sonorous tones with which he repeated the verses of Milton and other English poets, although an amused smile may suffuse their faces when they recollect how he discouraged their efforts at smoking tobacco, while hiding his own, or when they revert to some of his eccentric methods, more appropriate to the boarding-school than to the college. He had a way of affixing to each offence a letter which designated it, as " n," for "negligent," etc., and at the morning collection would read out the names of offenders, each with his appropriate letter. One morning he determined to make an impression on a boy notorious for his laziness, and called out "John  t,"  which was an unfamiliar letter in this vocabulary. All eyes were, of course, turned upon John, wondering what heinous crime he had been guilty of, when Friend Moore announced in stentorian tones that " t" stood for " tardy," making it the text for a lecture to the offender which he did not soon forget. The fact that it was the custom of "Super," as the boys irreverently called him, to wander about the corridors of Founders' Hall after bedtime, in slippered feet, did not deter the students from many a roguish escapade, visiting each other's rooms, tying toes to bedposts, and flitting like sheeted ghosts from place to place between his rounds. On one occasion, he had sentenced a boy to incarceration, during study hours, in one of the class-rooms on the first floor, from which there was a descent of, perhaps, ten feet to the area below. During the morning Friend Moore was walking around the house, and caught his prisoner in the act of climbing down and attempting to escape. Confronting the delinquent, he repeated the lines from Virgil—

"Facilis descensus Averno,
Sed revocare gradum, superasque evadere ad auras,
Hoc opus, hie labor est"—

and required him to perform the more difficult feat of climbing back into the window. But these incidents only gave spice to Haverford life. And it perhaps was well that Haverford reopened under the attractive influence of this fine old man."

(13) Abigail Mott Moore to Edward Mott Moore, Rochester 2 mo 18, 1839.  Letter on file with the Edward Mott Moore Papers at the University of Rochester.

 "How dost thou feel about father’s engaging another year in the High School, devoting his whole time and talents for a salary of $600 or at most $700 a year, and what is most trying to me is his being prevented from attending meetings of any description except on first days, of course, he of no use in society matters, and where that is the case we soon loose our interest in these things. This view of the subject is a source of no small anxiety to me; I had much rather see him a plain simple farmer than a gentleman teaching under such circumstances. He has two months more to keep before his year is up, and what he is to do for an assistant during that time he knows not."  Later in the letter she is writing about the legal battles.  " ----  at present it is a heavy draw upon thy father with all this other difficulties and I assume but from that it will prove a heavy loss to us. With regard to ourselves, I think I should prefer going on the little farm to any other movement which we can make at present, but this does not suit thy father "

(14) Letter from Lindley Murray Moore to Edward Mott Moore, June 30, 1850.  Letter on file at the University of Rochester with the Edward Mott Moore Papers.

 

Will  page 1
Will page 2
Will  page 3

Will of Lindley M Moore

"I Lindley M Moor of the City of Rochester, Do make, publish & declare this, my last will & testament, in manner following, that is to say

First, I give & devise & bequeath to my son Edward M. Moore a note for five hundred dollars given by him to me, being the only note given by him to me.

Second.  I give & devise & bequeath to my daughter Ann M Haines a note for sixteen hundred & fifty dollars, being the only note given by Emmor Haines to me.

Third.  I give & devise & bequeath to my daughter Ann M. Haines, my library.

Fourth.  I give, devise & bequeath to my son Edward M Moor my interest in the Sandy Creek Farm in the town of Hamlin, Monroe Co. State of New York.

Fifth.  I give and divisive & bequeath to my grandson Walter C. Moore the sum of one hundred dollars.  Also to my grandson Edward D. Moore the like sum of one hundred dollars.  Also to my grandson Crowell Murray Moore the sum of one hundred dollars.

Sixth.  I give and devise and bequeath the remainder of my personal property to be equally divided between my son Edward M Moore & my daughter Ann M. Haines.

Eight.  I hereby nominated and appoint my son Edward m Moore and my son in law Emmor Haines the executor this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills made by me.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand & seal this twelfth day of August one thousand eight hundred and seventy one."

He died five days later.

___

A History of Haverford College for the First Sixty Years of its Existence, 1892

"The Committee on the Reorganization of the School --  called a special meeting of the board 2nd month 15th, 1848, and recommended Lindley Murray Moore for Principal and Teacher of English Literature. -- He was then at the close of his sixtieth year.  He was a portly man of commanding height and mien, of benevolent countenance and expressive features.  -- His surviving daughter, Ann M. Haines, says of him: 'He was a Friend by birth and conviction, a great lover of the bible, and very familiar with it.  He rarely failed to give chapter and verse to any one who asked where to find Scripture passages; he was nevertheless, untinged by sectarianism, and always took a strong interest in everything that would advance the cause of Christ in every denomination.'  He had married Abigail L Mott (the niece of Richard Mott, the well-known Friend and minister), 8th month 19th, 1813, and after a married life of thirty-five years had been parted from her by death about eighteen months before taking charge of Haverford.

Lindley Murray Moore's experience as an educator had been wide and varied.  At seventeen an accident confined him for some months to the house.  During this enforced quiet he developed a strong love for study, and was sent to school at Sandwich, Mass.  By teaching he here helped himself to pay for further study for a few years.  He afterward taught at Nine Partners Boarding-School, of New York Yearly Meeting.  He next kept his own private school in Rahway, N.J., for three years.  From thence he went to New York to take charge of the Friends' Monthly Meeting School, on the grounds of the Meeting House, in Pearl Street below Oak from 1815 to 1821.  His salary which at first was $1,200, as time grew harder and harder was made, successively, $1,000 and $800. Induced to quit the city by bad health, and perchance by failing income, he opened, in the spring of 1821, a private boarding-school for boys at Flushing, L. I., which he moved to the village of Westchester, N.Y., in the autumn of 1827, and continued until 1830.  This undertaking having been prosperous, he abandoned teaching, and established himself as a farmer in easy circumstances, on a fine farm of 170 acres, now in the city of Rochester.  In the flush times of 1836 he was induced to sell his farm, and soon after lost all his property.  He then became a teacher in a public school at Rochester.  Death and marriage scattered his family, and the death of his wife in 1846 having broken up his home, he went to Providence to teach in Friends' Boarding-School, and then to Haverford, as we have seen.  He afterward made his home in Rochester with his son, Dr. E. M. Moore, and died 8th month 14th, 1871.

Those who have known will lovingly remember this genial gentleman.  His scholars will not soon forget his kindly ways, nor his friendship for Horace Greeley and the principles of the Free Soil Party, nor the sonorous tones with which he repeated the verses of Milton and other English poets, although an amused smile may suffuse their faces when they recollect how he discouraged their efforts at smoking tobacco, while hiding his own, or when they revert to some of his eccentric methods, more appropriate to the boarding-school than to the college.  He had a way of affixing to each offence a letter which designated it as 'n,' for 'negligent,' etc. and at the morning collection would read out the names of offenders, each with the appropriate letter.  One morning he determined to make an impression on a boy notorious for his laziness, and called out 'John --- t.,' which was an unfamiliar letter in this vocabulary. All eyes were, of course, turned upon John, wondering what heinous crime he had been guilty of, when Friend Moore announced in stentorian tones that 't' stood for 'tardy,' making it the text for a lecture to the offender which he did not soon forget. The fact that it was the custom of 'Super,' as the boys irreverently called him, to wander about the corridors of Founders' Hall after bedtime, in slippered feet, did not deter the students from many a roguish escapade, visiting each other's rooms, tying toes to bedposts, and flitting like sheeted ghosts from place to place between his rounds.  On one occasion, he had sentenced a boy to incarceration, during study hours, in one of the class-rooms on the first floor, from which there was a descent of, perhaps, ten feet to the area below.  During the morning Friend Moore was walking around the house, and caught his prisoner in the act of climbing down and attempting to escape.  Confronting the delinquent, he repeated the lines from Virgil--

  "Facilis descensus Averno,
Sed revocare gradum, superesque evadere ad auras,
Hoc opus, hic labor est'
 

and required him to perform the more difficult feat of climbing back into the window.  But those incidents only gave spice to Haverford life.  And it perhaps was well that Haverford reopened under the attractive influence of this fine old man."

 

.

.