Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   
 
6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company
&
2nd Battalion Canadian Machine Gun Corps
Personnel Database - W
Please contact Brett Payne if you have further details relating to any soldier mentioned on this page.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

Waddington, John, (Orig. #76002), Lieutenant
Walker, -, Lieutenant-Colonel, D.S.O.
Walker, Albert Edward, 1000438, Private
Walker, Harry, 415703, Private
Walker, William George, 71535, Private (d. 1917)
Wallace, John Gordon, 180687, Sergeant, M.M.
Wallbridge, Joseph Dudley, Lieutenant
Walsh, Osborne Stanley, 526645, Private
Wamboldt, Henry Havelock, 488757, Private
Wansborough, Elgin McKinnon, 663682, Sergeant, M.M. (1898-)
Ward, George (alias George Wilton), 429620, Private
Ward, Henry Thomas, 817193, Corporal
Ward, Herman Henry, 709512, Private
Warner, Charles Oscar, 733734, Private
Watson, J., Lieutenant
Watson, Stancliffe Wallace, Lieutenant-Colonel
Watson, Stewart, 425466, Private
Watson, William Neil, 799896, Sergeant (c1889-1918)
Watts, George, 757654, Private
Webb, Frederick, 835918, Private (c1892-1918)
Webster, James Russell, 928252, Private (c1898-1918)
Webster, John (alias John William Baird), 406878, Sergeant (1893-)
Weir, James Gordon, Lieutenant-Colonel, M.C., D.S.O.
Wells, Charles Augustus, 805332, Private
Wells, Clarence Edgar, 3105206, Private
Welsford, Walter Giles, Lieutenant (Orig. #24)
Wert, Roy Osgoode, 2408336, Private
Westbrook, Vincent William, 681636, Private
Whalen, James, 160930, Corporal
Whatcott, Alfred, 75445, Private
Wheeler, Robert Bruce, 805380, Private
White, Arthur Bransby, (Orig. #21443), Lieutenant
White, Charles, 715321, Private
White, Edward Sanderson, 2408346, Private (c1892-1918)
White, Ernest James, 57318, Brigade Sergeant-Major, M.M.
White, George Gordon, Major
White, Harry Edgar, 907718, Private
White, Leonard Frederick, Captain, M.C.
White, William Joseph, 716085, Private
Whitecross, George, 57968, Corporal
Whitehouse, Samuel, 817891, Private
Whitelam, George Thomas, 288626, Private
Whittaker, Chester Garfield, 817380, Private
Wilcox, Arthur Wellesley, Lieutenant
Wilkinson, Alfred, 57532, Private
Wilkinson, Jack, 742643, Private
Wilkinson, Larry, 757780, Private
Willard, Isaac, 227741, Private
Willgoose, Harold, 257929, Private
William, William Henry, 195808, Private
Williams, Alfred Percy, (Orig. #60066), Lieutenant
Williams, Claude Vivian, Lieutenant
Williams, Edward S., 166927, Sergeant
Williams, John Lewis, 415636, Private (c1895-1917)
Williams, Merrill Robert, 734242, Private
Williams, Victor Lawrence, 542139, Private
Williams, William John, 466945, Private
Williamson, Harry W., 437140, Private
Willox, George Henderson (Bud), 2009, Lieutenant (1886-)
Wilson, Alexander Mitchell, 775428, Private
Wilson, Clarence Harrison, 911787, Private
Wilson, Jackson Somerville, 727150, Private
Wilson, Joseph, 120236, Private
Wilson, Percy Stanley, (Orig. #2574), Lieutenant
Wilson, Samuel, 4099039, Private
Wilson, Thomas, 71968, Corporal (c1892-1918)
Wilton, George (alias George Ward), 429620, Private
Wilton, Herbert James, 175336, Sergeant, C. de G.
Wintle, Albert, 452535, Private
Wisner, Alexander, 405139, Private
Withrow, Leslie, Lieutenant
Wolfenden, Thomas, 412861, Private, M.M.
Wonnacott, Frank Albert, 883071, Private
Woodean, William John, 424277, Private
Woods, Clark, 409366, Corporal
Woods, George, 513958, Private (d. 1918)
Wright, Robert Stanley, 228401, Private
Wright, William Harold, 1263641, Private
Wylde, Henry, 124317, Private
Wythe, Garnett Nathan, 3131751, Private

Waddington, John, (Orig. #76002), Lieutenant

On 3 November 1916, Lt. James Waddington and Lt. J. Stonehewer reported for duty with the 6th Bde CMG Company Headquarters at Aix Noulette, as reinforcements.  On 20 Mar 1917 he returned from a map reading course at Pernes.

The following extracts relating to the Battle of Vimy Ridge and subsequent events are taken from the War Diaries:
8 April 1917 - "Nos. 1 and 2 Sections under Lts Waddington and Stonehewer moved independently across country and took up Barrage Positions along Rhine Trench. These guns formed complete Battery with Lt Waddington as Battery Commander. They were in position with guns laid at 12 midnight night 8/9th."
9 April - "Lt Waddington's guns passed safely through the barrage and were dug in with guns laid by 9 a.m. No casualties occurred while moving but shortly afterward No 2 Section had Ptes French and Defayette killed and 4 men wounded by shell fire while later in the day Ptes Lee and Relph were caught in fumes from gas shells and were slightly gassed. Upon the 6th Cdn Inf Bde obtaining their objective these batteries ceased fire and laid their guns on S.O.S. line in accordance with Corps Instructions."
10 April - "The barrage guns under Lt Waddington were informed that hostile troops were massing North of Willerval attached and were ordered further forward so as to sweep area in question. Shortly after battery opened fire the enemy retired."
"Lts Waddington, Williams, Tucker and Hardiman rendered exceptionally good Brigade services throughout whole of the operations."
15 April - O.C. No. 1 Section located at The Quarries.
3 May - "Company took part in attack ... 2 guns under Lt Waddington moved forward with the 31st Bn."
4 May - "Lt Waddington was severely wounded."
Donald Fraser in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books) has the following:
"Sunday, May 6, 1917: Lt. Waddington of No. 1 Section passed out wounded today, pretty badly I understand."
There is no further mention of Lt. Waddington in the War Diaries, so presumably he saw no further active service.


Walker, -, Lieutenant-Colonel, D.S.O.

A War Diary entry dated 7 October 1918, and various operation orders, indicate that Lieut.-Col. Walker, D.S.O., was Commanding the 1st Canadian Motorized Machine-Gun Brigade at this time.


Walker, Albert Edward, 1000438, Private

Private A.E. Walker was wounded and gassed on 17 August 1918.


Walker, Harry, 415703, Private

Private Harry Walker was wounded on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Walker, William George, 71535, Private (d. 1917)

Private W.G. Walker died on 7 November 1917, the day following the company's support of the successful infantry attack on the village of Passchendaele.  The following extract is from the 6th Brigade CMG Company's War Diary for that day: "Weather unfavorable.  Barrage guns fired during night.  6000 rounds on S.O.S. line.  Mobile guns spent a comparatively quiet day.  Ration parties made successful trips without casualties.  Guns of No. 1 Section suffered heavily during the day ... Total Casualties for the day were 6 O.R's killed 7 O.R's wounded and 3 O.R's missing.  10 O.R's reinforcements were received."  His name is commemmorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial (Panel 32).  The CWGC on-line database shows his next-of-kin as his sister, Mrs Louise Musty of Exchange Buildings, Union Stock Yards, St Boniface, Manitoba.


Wallace, John Gordon, 180687, Sergeant, M.M.

Sergeant J.G. Wallace was recommended for the Military Medal for his efforts during the Battle of Cambrai, between 9 and 15 October 1918, and was indeed awarded the M.M. on 19 November 1918.


Wallbridge, Joseph Dudley, Lieutenant

Lt. J.D. Wallbridge reported for duty with the 6th Brigade CMG Company at Mont-St. Eloi on 13 April 1917.  On 3 May he was with Lt. Carter and four guns in reserve at Vancouver Road, east of Vimy Ridge.  On 3 July 1917, an Operation Order notes that he would "remain at transport lines for the night 3/4th."  Then from 23 to 26 September he proceeded on a machine-gun demonstration at Camiers.  He went on leave to England from 17 until 30 October 1917.  On 5 November 1917, during the company's attack on the village of Passchendaele, Lt. Wallbridge temporarily took over command of the company.

On 25 January 1918, he was admitted sick to a Field Ambulance, and does not appear further in the War Diaries.


Walsh, Osborne Stanley, 526645, Private

Private O.S. Walsh was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.  The War Diary shows him as attached from the C.A.M.C. (Canadian Army Medical Corps).


Wamboldt, Henry Havelock, 488757, Private

Private H.H. Wamboldt was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Wansborough, Elgin McKinnon, 663682, Sergeant, M.M. (1898-)

Sergeant E.M. Wansborough was awarded the Military Medal on 24 May 1918.


Ward, George (alias George Wilton), 429620, Private

Private G. Ward was wounded on 1 October 1918.


Ward, Henry Thomas, 817193, Corporal

Corporal H.T. Ward was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Ward, Herman Henry, 709512, Private

Private H.H. Ward was detached to No. 3 Section, D.A.C. Unit Group 5, "D" Moncton, New Brunswick on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Warner, Charles Oscar, 733734, Private

Private Charles Oscar Warner was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Watson, J., Lieutenant

"20 August 1916 - Lt. J. Watson met with accident en route [on march from Reningelst to Steenvoorde] and was admitted to F.A."


Watson, Stancliffe Wallace, Lieutenant-Colonel

Various operation orders dated September and October 1918, accompanying the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary, show Lieut.-Col. Watson as Commanding the 1st Battalion Canadian Machine-Gun Corps at this time.


Watson, Stewart, 425466, Private

Private Stewart Watson was gassed on 12 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy were very active with Artillery and Machine Gun fire, using also a quantity of gas shells.  Heavy barrage put down in forward area by Germans.  One casualty caused."


Watson, William Neil, 799896, Sergeant (c1889-1918)

Sergeant W.N. Watson died on 15 October 1918, aged 29, of wounds received, and was buried at Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Ficheux, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. IV.H.2).  The CWGC database shows his next-of-kin as his parents, William Gardner and Sarah C. Watson, and Jennie Margaret Vansickle (formerly Watson) - presumably his widow - of 16 Duke Street, St. Catherine's, Ontario.


Watts, George, 757654, Private

Private George Watts was wounded on 29 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Webb, Frederick, 835918, Private (c1892-1918)

The War Diary for 3 April 1918 includes the following entry: "Pte. WEBB Killed in Action 2nd inst. was buried in BELLACOURT Cemetry (Map Ref. R.25.c.3.2)."  This was Frederick Webb, shown on the CWGC on-line database as being a member of the 20th Canadian Infantry Battalion (Central Ontario Regiment), who died on Tuesday 2 April 1918, aged 25.  He was a son of Frederick and Louisa Webb of Sharp Corners, Ontario, but a native of Brockley, London, England.  The CWGC confirms that he was buried at Bellacourt Military Cemetery (Grave Ref. II.A.7).  Presumably he was attached to the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps at this time, and was killed during an enemy artillery bombardment.  The War Diary merely states: "Casualties 1 Killed 3 Wounded and 1 Wounded accidentally."


Webster, James Russell, 928252, Private (c1898-1918)

Private J.R. Webster was killed in action on 9 October 1918, aged 20, and was buried at Canada Cemetery, Tilloy-les-Cambrai, Nord (Grave Ref. II.E.10).  The CWGC database shows his next-of-kin as his parents, James & Edith E. Webster of Mount Forest, Ontario.


Weir, James Gordon, Lieutenant-Colonel, M.C., D.S.O.
 
Major Weir was commander of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps from the time it was reorganized from the various machine-gun companies of the Second Canadian Division in March 1918.  At this time, he was already a recipient of the Military Cross.  On 18 March 1918, "Authority was received for Major J.G. Weir to wear the badges of Lieut-Colonel pending approval and publication of promotion to that rank." [War Diary]  Lt.-Col. Weir proceeded on leave to England from 6 until 25 July.  On 3 October, he left to join a Senior Officers' Course at Aldershot in England, command of the battalion being assumed the following day by Major E.W. Sansom, who had been transferred from the 4th Battalion CMGC.  He was mentioned in dispatches on 1 January 1919.  He returned to the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps by 15 January 1919, and took over command once again.  He remained as O.C. until the end of March 1919.  He was awarded the D.S.O. on 1 January 1919, having already been a recipient of the Military Cross.

Wells, Charles Augustus, 805332, Private

Private C.A. Wells was gassed on 11 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy gas and H.E., gave Gunners a great deal of trouble and caused 2 (slight) casualties ... 6.15 pm ... Heavy gas shelling by enemy all night."


Wells, Clarence Edgar, 3105206, Private

Private C.E. Wells was gassed on 24 September 1918.


Welsford, Walter Giles, Lieutenant (Orig. #24)

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Liuet. W.G. Welsford as being in "D" Battery No. 1 Company, where he remained until November 1918, when he went to hospital.  He does not appear to have returned to duty prior to March 1919.


Wert, Roy Osgoode, 2408336, Private

Private R.O. Wert was wounded on 11 October 1918.


Westbrook, Vincent William, 681636, Private

Private V.W. Westbrook was wounded on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Whalen, James, 160930, Corporal

Corporal J. Whalen was mentioned in dispatches on 1 January 1919.


Whatcott, Alfred, 75445, Private

Private Alfred Whatcott was gassed on 14 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled with gas shells in forward area and caused strong concentration.  13 O.R's gassed. Shells used by enemy were all H.E. containing small portion of gas."


Wheeler, Robert Bruce, 805380, Private

The Battalion War Diary entry for 8 June 1918 states: "9.50 pm Hostile Barrage lifted from front line to supports at same time three parties of enemy attempted to enter our lines at three different points ... Casualties:- 817213 Pte Dargavel, W.W., 805300 Pte Wheeler, S.B. [sic], 887816 Pte Hammond, G. - Shrapnel wounds."


White, Arthur Bransby, (Orig. #21443), Lieutenant
 
Lieut. A.B. White arrived for duty with the 6th Brigade CMG Comapny on 21 February 1918, having been posted there three days earlier.  After the re-organization of the machine-gun companies into the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps in late March, he was in "L" Battery.  He went on leave during July 1918, and again in October 1918, but remained in that unit until the end of March 1919.

White, Charles, 715321, Private

Private C. White was wounded on 1 October 1918.


White, Edward Sanderson, 2408346, Private (c1892-1918)

Private E.S. White was killed in action on 2 October 1918, aged 26, and was buried at Sains-les-Marquion British Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. II.B.3).  The CWGC database lists his next-of-kin as his parents, Robert & Elizabeth White of Whitewood, Saskatchewan.


White, Ernest James, 57318, Brigade Sergeant-Major, M.M.

The War Diary entry for 21 April 1918 shows that Sgt. E.J. White was awarded the Military Medal on 12 March 1918.  A later list of awards dated c. January 1919 indicates that by that time he had been promoted to the rank of Acting Brigade Sergeant-Major.  The National Archives of Canada CEF Database confirms his final rank as B.S.M.


White, George Gordon, Major

The 6th Bde. Canadian Machine Gun Coy. War Diary shows Lieutenant GG White to have arrived with the company, along with four other junior officers - Lieuts. Basevi, Beck, Eastham and McLelan - and presumably for the first time, at 7.30 p.m. on 1 February 1916.  There is no further mention of Lt. (Major in the CEF Database) White in the War Diaries of the 6th Bde. CMG Coy. and the 2nd Bn. CMG Corps, and presumably he was transferred to another unit shortly after this date.


White, Harry Edgar, 907718, Private

Private H.E. White was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


White, Leonard Frederick, Captain, M.C.

On 1 March 1918, Lieut. L.F. White was commanding the 14th CMG Company in the Lens Section Front Line System.  By the end of March, once the machine-gun companies had been re-organized into the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, the Nominal Roll shows Acting Captain L.F. White as O.C. "A" Battery, No. 1 Company.  By the end of May, his rank of Captain appears to have been confirmed.  He remained in this position durung the unit's operations in the Battle of Amiens, on 8 and 9 August 1918, as described in the War Diary: "Meanwhile Capt. L.F. White Officer Commanding 'A' Battery noticed that the right flank of the 5th. Brigade was out of touch with the Battalion on its right ... Immediately he pushed up four of his guns ... and covered this gap and the right flank of the 25th Battalion.  Other Batteries came up and rendered support this obviating a dangerous situation.  With night fall, consolidation was the order and soon the ground won was put in good condition for holding.  The night passed very quietly and next morning the 4th Canadian Division came through and attacked enemy keeping up the battle."

On 26 August, they were in action again: "Captain L.F. WHITE, O.C., 'A' Battery who was following in support saw this withdrawal, moved forward his battery to the high ground ... and got into action to neutralise the enemy fire. Afterwards reporting his disposition to the O.C. 26th Cdn. Inf. Battalion."

On 28 August he was wounded, but probably not seriously, as he is shown back on duty, and O.C. of "A" Battery, in the Nominal Roll for September.  He was awarded the Military Cross on 24 September 1918.  On 21 December 1918, he temporarily assumed command of No. 1 Company while Major Basevi was on leave, and became permanent O.C. in February 1919.


White, William Joseph, 716085, Private

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary notes that Private W.J. White went missing on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.  Presumably he was wounded or made his way back to duty in due course, because he does not appear on the CWGC on-line database as having died, and is not mentioned again in the War Diary.  Analysis of the reports submitted on operations between 8 and 10 August by the O.C.s of the Machine-gun Companies suggests that Pte. White was one of nine soldiers who went missing, probably due to the thick mist, and may well have been wounded, during the advance of No. 3 Company on 9 August.


Whitecross, George, 57968, Corporal

Corporal G. Whitecross was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Whitehouse, Samuel, 817891, Private

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary notes that Private S. Whitehouse went missing on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.  Presumably he was wounded or made his way back to duty in due course, because he does not appear on the CWGC on-line database as having died, and is not mentioned again in the War Diary.  Analysis of the reports submitted on operations between 8 and 10 August by the O.C.s of the Machine-gun Companies suggests that Pte. Whitehouse was one of nine soldiers who went missing, probably due to the thick mist, and may well have been wounded, during the advance of No. 3 Company on 9 August.


Whitelam, George Thomas, 288626, Private

Private G.T. Whitelam was wounded on 10 October 1918.


Whittaker, Chester Garfield, 817380, Private

Private C.G. Whittaker was gassed on 14 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled with gas shells in forward area and caused strong concentration.  13 O.R's gassed. Shells used by enemy were all H.E. containing small portion of gas."


Wilcox, Arthur Wellesley, Lieutenant

The November 1918 Nominal Roll of officers for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps shows Lieut. A.W. Wilcox attached to No. 1 Company.  At the end of December and in mid-January, he was listed in "D" Battery of No. 1 Company, attached from the CMGCRD.


Wilkinson, Alfred, 57532, Private

Private Alfred Wilkinson was wounded on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens, but remained on duty.


Wilkinson, Jack, 742643, Private

Private J. Wilkinson was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Wilkinson, Larry, 757780, Private

Private L. Wilkinson was wounded on 29 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Willard, Isaac, 227741, Private

Private Isaac Willard was wounded on 17 May 1918, as the following excerpt from the War Diary details: "12.45 [a.m.] Relief of No. 2 Company by No. 3 Company completed without hitch excepting for three other ranks 'M' Battery wounded by shrapnel. Namely:- 240147 Pte Murden. 734290 Pte Eisnor, S. 227741 Pte Willard, J."


Willgoose, Harold, 257929, Private

Private H. Willgoose was wounded on 9 October 1918.


William, William Henry, 195808, Private

Private W.H. William was wounded in October 1918.


Williams, Alfred Percy, (Orig. #60066), Lieutenant

The Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps dated March 1918 shows Lt. A.P. Williams as being in "A" Battery No. 1 Company.  This is probably the same as the Lt. Williams of the 14th CMG Company mentioned in an operation order dated c. 1 November 1917, discussing preparations for the attack on Passchendaele village.  From June 1918 until March 1919, he was the Assistant Quartermaster for the Battalion.


Williams, Claude Vivian, Lieutenant

Lieutenant Claude Vivian Williams was a medical student when he enlisted.  His father, being an army padre in Hamilton, Ontario, and friend of Sam Hughes, got him a place on an officer's training course at Niagara Camp, Ontario in May 1915, where he trained to be a machine-gunner.  Once in England, in 1916, he trained further at Shorncliffe, in Kent.

Williams arrived with the 6th Brigade CMG Company in "late fall", when they were based in trenches in the Bajolle-Souchez Sector, at the northern end of Vimy Ridge.  He quickly learnt that life in the trenches was very different to what he had experienced in training.  On 3 January he got caught in the shelling while visiting gun positions, and experienced several very close calls, which shook him severely.  Donald Fraser in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books) and Pierre Berton (in Vimy, publ. 1987, Penguin Books) both mention this incident.

On 10 February 1917, the War Diary refers to him as an Orderly officer.  Almost two weeks later, on 22 February he proceeded on a map reading course at Pernes.  He had returned by 22 March, when he examined positions in the line near Neuville St Vaast.  On 8 April, he and his section were attached to 29th Bn and moved into assembly positions with them at 8.30 pm, in readiness for early morning attack on Vimy Ridge.  The following extracts from the War Diaries relate to the Battle of Vimy Ridge:
9 April: "No 4 Section advanced under Lt Williams in rear of D Coy 27th Bn. The final objective was reached without casualties. Two guns being placed in unfinished German Trench in front of 2nd line of wire on crest of slope and one gun on each flank of 27th Bn."
10 April: "On the afternoon No. 4 Section under Lt Williams pushed forward a party with 1 gun in front of Farbus in order to protect the flank of the 27th Bn Station Wood ... Lts ... Williams ... rendered exceptionally good services throughout whole of the operations."

On 27 April he was still O.C. of No. 4 Section, and on 3 May is shown as being in charge of barrage guns.  On 27 July he was granted 10 days leave in England, and returned on 7 August, at which time he is shown as being a recipient of the Military Cross.  In fact this award had taken place in May.  Private Fraser noted in his diary the award on 30 May 1917 of medals for the Vimy offensive: "... today we are notified of the Vimy honours for the company.  Decorations are fast falling into disrepute as most of them by far are given for no outstanding service, and as a certain number of awards are allotted to each unit, they have to be distributed.  At Vimy there was absolutely nothing out of the ordinary done by our fellows.  The artillery took such good care od the enemy that there was nothing much for us to do but to move to our objective with little opposition.  In spite of this Lt. Williams was given the Military Cross ... It is too bad that the decorations are not granted for bravery exclusively."

Between 12 and 25 August, Lt. Williams assumed temporary command of company in the absence of the O.C. Major Eastham.  Some time during September Lieut. C.V. Williams [was] invalided to England.

It appears that Claude Williams returned to the unit after his recovery.  On 19 March 1918, he reported to the 2nd Battalion, and was posted to the 6th Bde CMG Company, where he arrived on 21 March.  He promoted to Acting Captain and appointed O.C. of "B" Battery No. 1 Companyand remained there until July 1918, after which he is not mentioned in the Nominal Rolls.

Berton (ibid, 1987) states that C.V. Williams went back to medical school after demobilization, and became a successful doctor.


Williams, Edward S., 166927, Sergeant

Sergeant E.S. Williams was wounded on 20 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "6.00 pm Enemy shelling above normal. 100 Gas shells in V.24.a. & c.  TRIGGER COPSE was spasmodically shelled by enemy with H.V. Guns."


Williams, John Lewis, 415636, Private (c1895-1917)

John Lewis Williams was born c. 1895, the son of Elkanah and Annie Williams of Horton Street, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.

18 April 1917 - "Ptes Eckford and Williams were killed by shell in gun position." [War Diary].  This event was recounted by Donald Fraser in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books), as follows: "Thursday, April 19, 1917: The enemy is still shelling the road in front of our positions and killed one man and three horses this morning.  Eckford and Williams of our No. 2 Section, when changing relief, were killed during the morning by a shell bursting beside them."  Pte. Williams' name is commemmorated on the Vimy Memorial.


Williams, Merrill Robert, 734242, Private

Private M.R. Williams was wounded on 3 October 1918.


Williams, Victor Lawrence, 542139, Private

Private V.L. Williams was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Williams, William John, 466945, Private

Private W.J. Williams was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Williamson, Harry W., 437140, Private

The Battalion War Diary entry for 13 June 1918 states: "Casualties:- 12.30 a.m. 437140 Pte Williamson, A. [sic], 53446 Pte Coleby, H. - Slightly wounded.  An artillery Battery H.Q. behind D Battery H Q was shelled with 150 8" shells."


Willox, George Henderson (Bud), 2009, Lieutenant (1886-)

George Henderson Willox was born on 24 January 1886 at Lonmay (Fraserburgh), Aberdeenshire, Scotland, son of James Willox.  He emigrated to the United States, arriving at Ellis Island on 5 April 1906 on the ship S.S. Baltic from Liverpool, England, and worked for some time in Duluth, Minnesota.  On 11 November 1914, together with friends Leslie Payne and Bob Moodie, he enlisted in the Canadian Army Service Corps (C.A.S.C.) at Winnipeg, Manitoba.  At the time, he was employed as a grain merchant.  After a period of training at McFadden Barracks in Winnipeg, he entrained for St. John, Nova Scotia, where the training continued and he was transferred to No. 7 Company of the 2nd Divisional Train, C.A.S.C.  The unit sailed for England on board the R.M.T.S.S. Grampian on 16 April 1915, arriving at Liverpool two weeks later on 29 April.

They spent the summer of 1915 training at Dibgate and other camps around Shorncliffe Barracks, near Folkestone in Kent.  After almost six months, and an inspection by the King and Lord Kitchener at Beechborough Park, they were off to France, arriving at Le Havre on the morning of 15th September.  Nothing is known of Bud Willox's first few months in France, although he appears to have been transferred to the 6th Brigade CMG Company in late March 1916.  Shortly afterwards, he went on leave from 23 May to 2 June.

Donald Fraser encountered Bud Willox within days of arriving in the Machine Gun Coy in September 1916 (in The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Sunday, 24 September 1916 - At 9.00 a.m. our trek begins ... The day is very hot, my pack heavy, and as I developed a strained ankle, between pain and heat, perspiration poured out of me.  For years afterwards, Willox, who was marching behind me, reminded me of that sweltering day, saying that each individual hair of my head stood straight out with a blob of sweat at the end, dropping down in tiny cascades."

Then, in March 1917, when the company was preparing for the attack on Vimy Ridge, Fraser recounts another incident: "Tuesday, 27 March 1917 - Tonight a number of us were detailed to carry ammunition (rifle shells) from a dump beside a road leading out from the north side of Neuville St. Vaast to a point several hundred yards further up Vimy Ridge.  As the roads and terrain were in a sodden, muddy condition, we were directed to a spot in a trench where several pairs of long rubber boots lay and were told that we better make use of them when packing up the boxes of shells.  We looked them over carefully and found that they were dor most, partially filled with mud and water and decided against their use.  However, a few hardy souls struggled into them.  We started together on the job, but it was not very long before we separated and got strung out.  Up and down the trail we went, sliding and slipping and emitting curses in the darkness until we found that Moodie, one of the rubber boot fanatics, was in dire distress.  Then our misery turned to levity.  We razzed him every time we passed.  He was all in due to trying to keep upright on his slippery rubber boots, but he was determined that he would not discard them.  Wearily he struggled on.  Bud Willox particularly took great pleasure in taunting him.  Of course it was pitch black and the area was not very healthy; bullets were hissing and pinging around every few moments and we were glad when we saw the last of the boxes.  We had carried 144,000 rounds.  It was fatigue that we will not readily forget."  The War Diary merely states: "Crews engaged in ... carrying up ammunition both for use and to fill Reserve dump." 

Bud Willox was promoted to Lance Corporal in 1 April 1917, just prior to the Battle of Vimy Ridge.  On Thursday, 10 May: "A shell burst yesterday, partially buried Willox and Moodie, but they were freed without difficulty." [The Journal of Private Fraser]

On 21 August 1917, Fraser recounts an incident in the suburbs of Lens, where they were sent to evacuate a wounded man: "The whole idea was that as soon as Harry Stevenson was picked up and taken away, the gun crews would retire as we were surrounded ... A council of action was held and in a few minutes it was decided that, as soon as possible, two with a stretcher would run to an old German dug-out about fifty yards away where Harry Stevenson lay grievously wounded and pick him up and bring him in.  Bud Willox and Elwood volunteered for the job.  Both were husky, resolute fellows.  In a moment or two the place became enveloped in a fog of smoke and brick dust caused by exploding shells and the two dashed out with the stretcher and in a few minutes reappeared with Harry who was absolutely all in.  After that it was decided that McCormick and Jackson would lead off with the stretcher and fifty yards would be followed by Nick and myself as relief stretcher bearers and later on one by one of the crews would beat it out.  Jackson and McCormick grabbed the strecher and away they went, then Nick.  When I reached the entrance to the trench, I turned round, waved to those behind and was gone.  After a long, arduous spell with many squeaks and narrow shaves and the lives almost scared out of us, we reached the dressing station.  One has to go through such an experience to really understand what it is to carry a wounded man through a double bombardment and without any supporting straps ... Before long Nick and I had to relieve the other two.  After several exchanges Nick's fingers lost their grip entirely and he dropped his end of the stretcher shaking up Harry badly.  The three of us handled the situation for the rest of the way ... If we had delayed our departure from the outpost a few minutes longer, I am afraid Stevenson's fate would have been sealed as he would have been abandoned.  A few days later information reached us that Harry died at Etaples ... After turning Harry over to the Red Cross, we retired to our cellar and were given a tot of rum.  Never did rum taste so good."

On 9 October 1917, Bud Willox was granted permission to marry.  Three days later he was granted ten days' leave; presumably he left for England shortly thereafter, and was probably married to Jean Margaret (surname unknown) on 17 October 1917.  He rejoined his unit on 25 October, by which time the company was at rest in billets at Hondeghem Nord.  From 28 October until 24 November he attended a Machine-Gun Course, thus missing the Battle of Passchendaele.  During this period was promoted to Acting Corporal when Cpl. Cailly was wounded.  Then on 20 December, he relinquished his rank of Corporal, and proceeded to England for a commission.

The next four months were spent at the Canadian Machine Gun Depot at Seaford, apart from a period in hospital from 4 February until 11 March 1918 with neuralgia affecting his right hand.  On 25 April, he was granted a commission in the Corps, and promoted to Lieutenant two days later.  However, at the beginning of May, according to his Service Medical Records, his "Varicose [vein] condition began to cause some discomfort - [with a] dull pain around [his] left knee."  By the middle of the month he was feeling ill, and reported sick on 27 May.  Three days later, he was admitted to the XIII Canadian General Hospital at Hastings, and an "operation for [the] removal of [the] varicose veins" was carried out on 3 June.  Four days later, his "wounds [were] healing very satisfactorily", and on 12 June, the stitches were removed.  On 16 June, he was examined again, and reported to be "walking about slowly. Some stiffness in limb."  After another five days, the report was, "Much improved. Stiffness much less."  A few days more, and his transfer was approved to the Canadian Convalescent Officers' Hospital at Matlock Bath for a course of treatment including P.T. and Hydrotherapy Baths.  On 6 July he was discharged from hospital, and returned to Bexhill at Seaford, although he was given "Category D" for one month. 

From 11 July, Bud Willox was attached to the G.T.S. (Transport?).  On 14 August, an examination by the Medical Board finally found him fit for General service, and then on 24 August he returned to the Canadian Machine Gun Depot.  No sooner had he arrived there, however, than he was posted to the C.M.G. School, also at Seaford.  Then from 14 October until 20 November, he proceeded "On Command" to the School of Musketry at Mitchett.  Two weeks later he was struck off strength (S.O.S.) to C.E.A. Canada, and he embarked for Canada on board the S.S. Olympic on 14 December 1918.  Lieutenant Bud Willox was demobilized on 3 January 1919, at which time he gave his address as "2748 - 14th St. W-Calgary, Alberta".


Wilson, Alexander Mitchell, 775428, Private

Private A.M. Wilson was wounded in October 1918.


Wilson, Clarence Harrison, 911787, Private

Private C.H. Wilson was wounded on 9 October 1918.


Wilson, Jackson Somerville, 727150, Private

Private J.S. Wilson was wounded on 6 November 1918.


Wilson, Joseph, 120236, Private

Private J. Wilson was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Wilson, Percy Stanley (Buck), (Orig. #2574), Lieutenant
 
The July 1918 Nominal Roll for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps shows Lieut. P.S. Wilson as Transport Officer of No. 3 Company ("Attached from C.C.M.G. RD.").  He remained in this position until the end of March 1919, although he was shown as being on leave during October 1918.  A photo taken in about February 1919 suggests that he may have been promoted to Acting Captain, and gives his nickname as "Buck".

Wilson, Samuel, 4099039, Private

Private S. Wilson was detached to the 6th Battalion, C.E. Unit Group No. 10 "G" Ottawa on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Wilson, Thomas, 71968, Corporal (c1892-1918)

Corporal Thomas Wilson died on 28 August 1918, aged 26, during the Battle of Arras, after having been reported missing earlier that day, and was buried at Quebec Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. B.9).  His next-of-kin are listed by the CWGC on-line database as having been Robert & Agnes Wilson, then of Cherry Street, Boissevain, Manitoba.  He was also stated to have been a native of Kilwinning, Ayrshire, Scotland.


Wilton, George (alias George Ward), 429620, Private
Wilton, Herbert James, 175336, Sergeant, C. de G.

Sergeant H.J. Wilton was awarded the Croix de Guerre on 9 July 1918.


Wintle, Albert, 452535, Private

Private Albert Wintle was wounded on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Wisner, Alexander, 405139, Private

Private A. Wisner was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Withrow, Leslie, Lieutenant

Lieutenant Leslie Withrow joined the 6th Brigade CMG Company on 17 May 1917.  A week later, on 24 May he, Lt. Hardiman and four N.C.O.s proceeded on a Revolver Shooting Course at Camblain l'Abbe for five days.  An operation order dated 3 July 1917 contained the following instruction, "Lt. Withrow and Sgt Boddie will act as guides and bring the Company to Coy Hdqrs."  On the night of 2 November 1917, the company was moving into the line at Seine Corner, preparing for the attack on Passchendaele village: "No. 3 Section 6th Cdn M G Coy proceeded to relieve the corresponding section of the 12th Cdn M G Coy in Battery Position ... This section was under command of Lt. Leslie Withrow who was wounded on the way in. Sgt. F Eustace then took command and completed the relief. Relief was complete by 9 p.m."  A later report by Lt. W.G. Broadbridge, who took over command of No. 3 Company on the morning of 3 November, stated that Lt. Withrow was wounded on the night of 2/3 November.

The May/June Nominal Roll for the 2nd Bnm CMG Corps shows Lieut. L. Withrow back in "F" Battery of No. 2 Company, so he had obviously recovered by then.  He remained in this battery until October - although the Nominal Roll for September shows him in a rest camp - when he moved to "G" Battery.  There he remained until the end of March 1919.  The February Nominal Roll shows him on leave.


Wolfenden, Thomas, 412861, Private, M.M.

Donald Fraser (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books) describes the members of his gun crew shortly after joining the 6th Brigade CMG Company in October 1916: "Monday, 16 October 1916 - ... a crowded dug-out is a great medium for an introduction to one's comrades ... Wolfenden, easy-going, laughing, talkative, and very sloppy, was perfectly at home in any sort of billet and in any kind of weather.  He was always the centre of conversation."

The War Diary contains the following entry for 5 November 1917: "Supplies for Mobile Guns were sent up by a Pack Train of 26 Annimals. This train was heavily shelled near Zonnebeck Station causing several casualties. 1 man missing and 6 men wounded, one of whom afterwards died of wounds. 5 Animals were killed and 5 wounded. Despite the shelling, train reformed and proceeded to destination safely delivering all the guns, tripods and supplies with the exception of 24 hours rations for No. 2 Section. 3 loads of S.A.A. and 2 of water were also lost. No. 2 Section was therefore on short rations during the next 48 hours. During this trip Pte T Wolfenden showed an excellent example. Although severely wounded he stayed at his post and safely delivered his load at the Dump. Afterwards collapsing on the return trip."

Fraser was also involved in this incident, and includes a graphic description of the events in his diary: "On the evening of the 4th, our transport went up the line and met with such opposition that a number were wounded and others so badly shaken and shell-shocked that they were either unfit or unwilling to proceed the following night.  Our crew was, therefore, called upon for assitance.  Leaving Fage in charge of the tent and belongings, the rest of us assumed our new duties and new they certainly were.  For the first time we had each to lead up a horse to a forward dump carrying an assortment of goods.  The transport men left behind soon had the horses loaded up and ready.  Roughly there must have been something like 14 or 15 in our little convoy ... We started out and I found myself second last in the line. My horse was loaded up with cans of water, four on each side ... Up the road we went ... Shell holes were everywhere and most contained slimy, muddy water.  The terrain was a wilderness of mud.  Thank goodness, however, the road was fairly firm.  We were warned to space out which caused quite a distance between the first and the last man ... The artillery was firing as we passed and Fritz was returning the fire.  We soon saw that it would take practically a direct hit to do any damage.  We watched the shells send up fountains of mud and water as they exploded.  For quite a distance you could see eruptions taking place at various points resembling geysers or mud volcanoes ... Near the top, shells were falling beside the road ... According to the map, I would say that we were in the vicinity of Zonnebeke.  Emerging from the hollow, we crept slowly up the ridge ... We were gradually getting through, when I sensed it was about time the next salvo was coming and with it trouble, and sure enough the shells came.  I was thown by the force of the explosion on to my face into the gutter at the side with the rest of me sprawled around the edge ... I was badly dazed and partially choked by mud and water ... my mind quickly cleared and I looked around and saw my horse lying dead half over my right thigh and pinning me down.  We were tossed from one side of the road to the other.  Glancing ahead I observed the horse in front dead and its attendant also.  He was Joe Bishop, a brother of Elmer who was killed several weeks before at Lens.  Joe was taken off the gun crew and given a supposedly safe job with transport.  Ahead of him was Ladd.  His horse was dead also and he, himself, was wounded and trying to rise.  I turned around to see how the fellow behind me fared.  I saw him and his horse motionless in death."

Wolfenden was awarded the Military Medal, presumably as a result of this, in December 1917, later confirmed on 12 March 1918.  On 25 March 1919, Private T. Wolfenden was detached to the 21st Canadian Battalion Unit, Group 12, "H", at Kingston, Ontario, for the purposes of demobilization.


Wonnacott, Frank Albert, 883071, Private

Private F.A. Wonnacott was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Woodean, William John, 424277, Private

10 April 1917 - Battle of Vimy Ridge: "Lts Waddington, Williams, Tucker and Hardiman rendered exceptionally good services throughout whole of the operations as did Sgts McGirr and Eustace, L/Cpls Olmstead and Rust, and Ptes Woodean, Climie and Halstead." [6th Brigade CMG Company War Diary]


Woods, Clark, 409366, Corporal

Corporal C. Woods was detached to the 6th Battalion, C.E. Unit Group No. 10 "G" Ottawa on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Woods, George (alias George Howard), 513958, Private (d. 1918)

According to the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary Private George Woods was killed in action on 10 August (CWGC claims 9 August) 1918, during the Battle of Amiens, and was buried at the Rosieres Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme (Grave Ref. I.D.12).  On the 9th August, after a stubborn defence by the Germans who had occupied Rosieres in March 1918, the village was retaken by the 2nd Canadian Division and Tanks. The Extension was constructed by the units which retook Rosieres.


Wright, Robert Stanley, 228401, Private

Private R.S. Wright was wounded on 3 May 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "One gun was hit by shrapnel during barrage and the No. 1 badly wounded."  However there were two others wounded on this day - Ptes. W.G. Chaif and P. Daigneault - so any of the three could be the soldier mentioned.


Wright, William Harold, 1263641, Private

Private W.H. Wright was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Wylde, Henry, 124317, Private

Private H. Wylde was wounded on 29 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Wythe, Garnett Nathan, 3131751, Private

Private G.N. Wythe was wounded on 11 October 1918.


This page last updated 21 April 2003
Return to the CMGC Personnel Database Contents Page
Return to the 6th Brigade CMGC Contents Page
Copyright © 2002, 2003 Brett Payne All Rights Reserved