Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   
 
6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company
&
2nd Battalion Canadian Machine Gun Corps
Personnel Database - S
Please contact Brett Payne if you have further details relating to any soldier mentioned on this page.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

Sacks, Sidney Edward, (Orig. #259), Lieutenant, M.C. (1884-)
Saint, Russell, 135305, Corporal, M.M. (1897-)
St. Amand, Wilfred, 1042056, Private (1896-)
St. Pierre, Lucien, 61993, Private (1893-)
Salisbury, Hudson Stewart, (Orig. #446839), Lieutenant, M.C. (1893-)
Sampson, A.J., Lieutenant
Sampson, Patrick, 1018405, Private
Sanders, George Percy, 1051417, Private
Sanders, Omer, 1063034, Private (1898-)
Sansom, Ernest William, Lieutenant-Colonel, D.S.O. (1891-)
Sansom, Joseph, 922348, Private (1885-)
Saunders, A., 1063043, Private
Savoie, Henry, 817158, Private, M.M. (1890-)
Scarlett, Earle Parkhill, 910038, Private (1896-)
Schill, Clayton Jack, 602342, Private (1893-)
Scott, Fred Lyonel, 696307, Private (1894-)
Scott, Harold Anderson, Lieutenant (1897-1918)
Scott, Robert James, 3030047, Private (1894-)
Scott, William, 225341, Private (1899-1918)
Seed, Richard, 787952, Private (1879-)
Senior, -, Quartermaster Sergeant
Seward, Gail Llewyllyn, 625063, Private (1888-)
Shankland, Cochrane Hillhouse, 116213, Sergeant (1890-)
Shaw, Hiram, 195735, Private (1898-)
Shean, Walter Arthur, 423111, Sergeant (1886-)
Shearer, Thomas, 922714, Private (1888-)
Sheldrake, Frederick, 514166, Private, M.M. (1884-)
Shepherd, Alexander, 424360, Private (1886-1916)
Sheppard, Edward, 1015623, Private (1878-)
Sheridan, John Lawrence, 455516, Private (1888-)
Sherk, Gordon Elmo, 228353 (also #769129), Private (1898-)
Short, Aubrey Allison, 69949, Private (1894-)
Short, William John, 817424, Private (1889-)
Sibbald, Hugh Martyn, Captain (1886-)
Sibbitt, Rex 59886, Private (1896-)
Sillers, Wilfred, 721950, Sergeant, D.C.M.
Simmons, Archibald Gilbert, 733402, Private (1895-)
Simmons, Charles William, 542160, Private (1888-)
Simpson, Frederick Ernest, 3314092, Private (1897-)
Simpson, Joseph, 672930, Private (1895-)
Singleton, Frank, 66155, Private (1894-1918)
Sivyer, Chester Linton, 773047, Private (1897-)
Skeoch, James Ernest, 928843, Private (1897-1918)
Skinner, John Raymond, 406448, Sergeant (1892-)
Slater, Herbert, 65895, Corporal (1892-1916)
Slight, Frederick John, 436584, Sergeant (1888-)
Sly, Levi, 256316, Private (1894-)
Small, Robert Wilson, 210016, Private (1894-)
Smart, Wallace Victor, Lieutenant (1887-)
Smith, A.C., Lieutenant
Smith, Arthur Thomas, 56031, Sergeant (1896-)
Smith, Edwin Charles, 880860, Private (1893-1918)
Smith, Eugene, 469077, Private
Smith, F., 817116, Private
Smith, Frank (alias Frank Harrison), 690755, Private, M.M. (1892-1918)
Smith, Frank Havergal, 875391, Private (1896-)
Smith, George, 117536 (Orig. #470), Private (1879-1916)
Smith, James Joseph, 198161, Private (1881-)
Smith, John, 782280, Private (1896-)
Smith, S., 2073325, Private
Smith, Sidney John, 101082, Sergeant (1890-)
Smith, W., 174391, Private
Smith, William John, 441434, Private (1894-)
Smith, William Pennington, 446474, Corporal
Snook, Robert, 424492, Private (1894-)
Somerville, Hugh Robert, 237669, Private (1889-)
Speller, Frank Charles, 174936, Private (1892-1918)
Spence, Alfred, 135397, Sergeant (1889-)
Spence, Harry, 135398, Sergeant (d. 1918)
Spencer, George, 1045150, Private (1886-)
Spendlove, Richard Charles, 100360, Private (1892-)
Spratt, Richard Edward, 113566, Sergeant, M.M. (1896-)
Stafford, Arthur Thomas, 788519, Sergeant (1892-)
Starratt, Mack Albion, 415617, Private (1896-)
Steel, William, 454710, Private (1884-)
Steele, Ernest, 213996, Private (1887-)
Steeves, -, Private
Steeves, Harold Walter, 709875, Private (1897-)
Stephen, Ian, 757199, Private, M.M. (1894-)
Stephen, William Donaldson, 141291, Private (1895-)
Stephenson, Harry, 442487, Private (1882-1917)
Stevens, Cecil Arthur, 2223374, Private (1888-)
Stewart, Alexander, 2004617, Private (1877-)
Stewart, George Hardy, 928332, Private (1891-)
Stewart, J.A., Captain
Stewart, Kenneth Edward, 113577, Private, M.M.
Stewart, Richard Alexander, 435712, Sergeant
Stonehewer, James, (Orig. #8398), Lieutenant (1890-)
Stover, Kenneth Spencer, Lieutenant (1891-)
Stowell, Frank, 3105204, Private (1897-)
Stradling, Harry, 56078, Private (1883-1918)
Stuart, John Hector, 712220, Private (1894-)
Styles, Albert Edward, 622052, Private, M.S.M. (1886-)
Sullivan, John D., 400788, Private (1889-)
Surette, Anselm Eli, 3180332, Private
Surtees, Andrew, 435662, Sergeant (1890-1917)
Sutherland, Colin George, Captain (1892-)
Sutherland, John, 71316, Private (1890-)
Sutherland, Robert Douglas, 727771, Private
Sutton, George, 716107, Private (1890-)
Switzer, Albert Robert, Lieutenant
Switzer, Ambrose, 835533, Corporal

Sacks, Sidney Edward, (Orig. #259), Lieutenant, M.C. (1884-)

Sidney Edward Sacks was born on 16 May 1884 at Croydon, England, son of Louis Hugh Sacks.  When he enlisted in the 2nd Signal Company at Ottawa, Ontario on 21 January 1915, he was working as a gas engineer, and belonged to the 2nd Field Troop of Canadian Engineers at Winnipeg.  He had also served as a Corporal with the City of London Yeomanry, and as a Color Sergeant with the 1st Volunteer Battalion, West Surreys.  He stated his next-of-kin to be his father, then living at 107 Bishopsgate (later changed to 36 Camomile Street), London.

Lieut. S.E. Sacks reported for duty with the 6th Brigade CMG Company on 13 November 1917, while they were resting in billets at St. Floris.  From 30 December 1917 until 3 February 1918, he proceeded to the First Army School of Instruction at Hardelot.  After his return, he was placed in command of No. 3 Section.  With Capt. Millican and Lt. Tucker, he attended a lecture on 26 February at Camblain l'Abbe by General Byng on the Cambrai Offensive.

The March 1918 Nominal Roll for the 2nd Bn. CMG Corps shows Lt. Sacks as Signalling Officer, a position he remained in for the rest of his time at the front, until March 1919.  He was awarded the Military Cross on 3 October 1918, a month later, the Nominal Roll shows him on leave.


Saint, Russell, 135305, Corporal, M.M. (1897-)

Russell Saint was born on 29 November 1897 at Bradford, Ontario.  He was a student when he enlisted at 1452 Dundas Street, Toronto, Ontario on 21 July 1915, naming his next-of-kin as his mother Mary Russell, of Bradford, Ontario.

The War Diary shows that he was awarded a Military Medal on 12 March 1918, although incorrectly showing his initial as "J".  This was corrected in a later listing of these awards, dated January 1919.


St. Amand, Wilfred, 1042056, Private (1896-)

Wilfred St. Amand was born on 1 January 1896 at Pembroke, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 240th Overseas Battalion (via the 42nd Regiment) at Renfrew, Ontario on 29 July 1916, having served in the Home Guard for 17 months.  At the ti9me, he was single, working as labourer in Pembroke, Ontario, and listed his mother, Armeline St. Amand, also of Pembroke, as next-of-kin.

Private W. St. Amand was wounded on 7 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includses the following: "Enemy shelled area around BUISSY very heavily and all forward Batteries."  He must have recovered sufficiently to return to duty, as he was detached to 21st Canadian Battalion Unit Group 12, "H" Kingston, Ontario on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


St. Pierre, Lucien, 61993, Private (1893-)

Lucien St. Pierre was born on 4 August 1893 at Montreal, Canada.  He enlisted in the 22nd (F.C.) Battalion at St. Johns (St. Jean), Quebec on 4 January 1915, having previously served for three years with the 54th Regiment at Sherbrooke.  He was unmarried, working as an electrician, and listed his mother Mrs. M.L. St. Pierre, of 177 Berrie, Montreal, as next-of-kin.

Private L. St. Pierre was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Salisbury, Hudson Stewart, (Orig. #446839), Lieutenant, M.C. (1893-)
 
Hudson Stewart Salisbury was born on 18 July 1893 at Belleville, Ontario.  He enlisted at Calgary, Alberta on 12 May 1915, at which time he was working as a plumber, and listed his next-of-kin as his father [sic - presumably this should read mother], Elsi Ivy Salisbury of 1811, 16.a Street West, Calgary.
Lt. H.S. Salisbury appears in a 2nd Dvision D.M.G.C. Operation Order dated 9 November 1917.  His role at that time is not clear, although he appears to have been in the 14th Bde. CMG Coy.  The War Diary for the 2nd Bn. CMG Corps states that he and Lt. C.V. Williams reported on 19 March 1918, and were posted to the 14th and 6th Companies respectively.  The Nominal Roll for March 1918 shows Lt. Salisbury in "J" Battery No. 3 Company, where he seems to have remained until late 1918.

The War Diary describes his actions on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens, thus: "The advance of 'J' Battery was ... spectacular.  During the early stages of the attack they suffered heavy casualties, but pressing forward attacked the defending strongpoints with great vigour.  Captain J.A. SALISBURY, in charge, aided only by his Headquarters captured two German Machine Guns, with one Officer and ten men, two of his Signallers being wounded in closing in.  They manned these guns and turned them on another strongpoint situate to a flank which was a thorn in the side of the Infantry attack in that region, putting it out of action ... Lieut. BUSH sprained his ankle during the advance, but continued to the objective and remained with his crews until evening, when he had to be evacuated ... Three Guns of this Battery were destroyed during the advance."  He and his battery were also involved in the Battle of Arras, between 26 and 28 August.

The September 1918 Nominal Roll shows Lt. Salisbury on leave, and on 24 of that month he was awarded the Military Cross.  By October, he appears to have been promoted to Captain.  By mid-January 1919, he had transferred to being O.C. of "K" Battery, where he remained until the end of March.


Sampson, A.J., Lieutenant

Lieut. A.J. Sampson is shown as being in "D" Battery of No. 1 Company in the Nominal Rolls for May and June 1918.  In a report of the actions of No.1 Company during the Battle of Amiens on 8 August 1918, the following extract refers: "At 9.00 p.m. 7/8th August under Orders of the G.O.C., 5th Canadian Infantry Brigade they moved forward to Assembly Positions in Front of BOIS L'ABBE.  The Batteries advanced as follows :- ... "D" Battery Centre Support ... Lieut SAMPSON and 3 Other Ranks of "D" Battery were wounded by Machine Gun fire during the advance from WIENCOURT forward."


Sampson, Patrick, 1018405, Private

Private P. Sampson was detached to 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Sanders, George Percy, 1051417, Private

Private G.P. Sanders was accidentally wounded on 25 May 1918.  The War Diary entry for this day does not give any clues as to the cause of this accident.


Sanders, Omer, 1063034, Private (1898-)

Omer Sanders was born on 21 October 1898 at Belmont Township, Ontario, son of William & Mary Sanders.  He enlisted in the 57th Regiment at Peterboro, Ontario on 8 February 1916, declaring that he was a farmer, living at Havelock, Ontario.  He listed his mother, also of Havelock, as next-of-kin.  He enlisted He filled another attestation paper for the 247th Battalion at Peterboro, Ontario on 11 November 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at Havelock, Ontario.  He listed his father, also of Havelock, as next-of-kin.  He was transferred from the 247th to the 235th Battalion on 16 May 1917.

Private O. Sanders was wounded on 27 September 1918.


Sansom, Ernest William, Lieutenant-Colonel (subsequently Major General), D.S.O. (1891-)
 
Ernest William Sansom was born on 18 December 1891 at Stanley, New Brunswick.  His family couldn't afford to send him to the Royal Military College, so he worked on farms and surveyed land in Western Canada.  After his return to New Brunswick, he served for five years with the 71st Militia Regiment and worked as a clerk.  He enlisted in the 30th Battalion at Valcartier, Quebec on 25 September 1914, being assigned the rank of Lieutenant, at which time he was unmarried.  He listed his mother Mrs. J.E. Sansom, of Stanley, New Brunswick, as next-of-kin.  He went overseas as a machine-gun instructor, but did not get to France until August 1916.

The first mention of Major E.W. Sansom in the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary is arrival on 4 October 1918: "18.00 Major E.W. SANSOM arrived from 4th Battalion, C.M.G.C. and assumed command of Battalion."

Left: Lieut.-Col. EW Sanson reviewing troops with H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, Emerchicourt, 25 Oct 1918

His signature was on the Casualty List compiled for the month of September 1918.  In the Nominal Roll for October 1918, he is shown as Lieut.-Col. E.W. Sansom, Officer Commanding the 2nd Bn. CMGC.  On 25 November, he was admitted to hospital, but returned to command of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps on 7 December 1918.  By 15 January 1919, he was Second-in-Command, Lieut.-Col. J.G. Weir having returned from England.  He does not appear in later Nominal Rolls.  However, by the end of the war, he was a recipient of the D.S.O. (Distinguished Service Order).

E.W. Sansom remained in the army, and was a Colonel when the Second World War broke out.  He went overseas in December 1939 as the Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster General (AA&QMG) of the First Division, serving under General McNaugton.  Four months later, he became a brigade commander, after Brigadier Pearkes went down with meningitis, and subsequently commanded two battalions in an aborted attack on Trondheim in Norway.  In May 1940, after the Brigadier Pearkes had recovered and taken back his command, Sansom resumed staff duties at divisional headquarters.  He moved to Canadian Military Headquarters in London as a Brigadier in July 1940.  Three months later, he was promoted to Major General and given command of the Third Division, which he held from 26 October 1940 until 13 March 1941.  After this, he was transferred to cammand of the Fifth Canadian Armoured Division.  [Source: CANUCK Website - Third Canadian Division, General Officers Commanding]


Sansom, Joseph, 922348, Private (1885-)

Joseph Sansom was born on 30 June 1885 at Dorsetshire, England.  He enlisted in the 200th Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 26 April 1916, at which time he was an active member of the Home Defence Militia.  He was unmarried, working as a blacksmith, and living at 1563 Alexander Avenue, Winnipeg.  He listed his mother, Mrs. C. Sansom of 9 St George's Road, Portland, England, as next-of-kin.

Private J. Sansom was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Saunders, A., 1063043, Private

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary shows that Private A. Saunders (1063043) was one of several soldiers wounded during a retaliatory enemy artillery barrage on 27 September 1918.  However, the National Archives of Canada on-line CEF database shows no such soldier with this name and number.


Savoie, Henry, 817158, Private, M.M. (1890-)

Henry Savoie was born on 16 January 1890 at St, Mary's, New Brunswick.  He enlisted in the 140th Overseas Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 15 November 1915, at which time he was unmarried, working as a carpenter, and living at John Street, Moncton, New Brunswick.  He listed his mother, Mrs. Delina Savoie of 233 John Street, Moncton, New Brunswick, as next-of-kin.

Private H. Savoie was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.  He was detached to No. 3 Section, D.A.C. Unit Group 5, "D" Moncton, New Brunswick on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Scarlett, Earle Parkhill, 910038, Private (1896-)

Earle Parkhill Scarlett was born on 27 June 1896 at High Bluff, Manitoba, son of Robert A. Scarlett.  He enlisted Winnipeg, Manitoba on 26 February 1916, at which time he was an unmarried student living at Wesley College, Winnipeg.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, then of 309 Church Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Private E.P. Scarlett was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Schill, Clayton Jack, 602342, Private (1893-)

Private Clayton Jack Schill was born on 31 December 1893 at Carrick Township, Bruce County, Ontario.  He enlisted at Walkerton, Ontario on 23 January 1915, having served for a year in the 31st Regiment, at which time he was a farmer, and stated his next-of-kin to be Henry Schill of Wildway, Ontario.

Private C.J. Schill was wounded on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Scott, Fred Lyonel, 696307, Private (1894-)

Fred Lyonel Scott was born on 18 January 1894 at Flathead County, Montana, U.S.A., son of Milo Scott.  He enlisted in the 175th Overseas Battalion at Winnifred, Saskatchewan on 16 February 1916, at which time he was single and working as a mechanic at Winnifred.  He listed his father, also of Winnifred, as next-of-kin.  He received a medical examination at Medicine Hat, Saskatchewan on 21 February 1916.

Private F.L. Scott was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Scott, Harold Anderson, Lieutenant (1897-1918)

Harold Anderson Scott was born on 9 December 1898 at Quebec, son of Colonel James Archibald and Mrs. Scott.  He enlisted in the Forestry Battalion at Levis? on 2 November 1917, having previously served for three years with the 10th Q.O.C.H. (Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders) and a further 14 months with the 8th Regiment R.R.  He stated that was still an active member of the 8th Regiment R.R. (a militia), and that he was a student living at Breakeyville, Quebec.  He listed his father, also of Breakeyville, as next-of-kin.

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Lieut. H.A. Scott in "M" Battery No. 3 Company, where he remained for the next two months.  On 9 or 10 November 1918 (War Diary and CWGC show different dates) Lieut. H.A. Scott died of wounds received, probably during the Battle of Cambrai, and was buried at Denain Communal Cemetery (Grave Ref. B.24).


Scott, Robert James, 3030047, Private (1894-)

Robert James Scott was born on 3 June 1894 at Melbourne, Australia, son of Robert Scott.  He enlisted in the 1st Reserve/Depot Battalion, 1st C.O. Regiment at Toronto, Ontario on 16 August 1917, having served for two years as a gunner with the 18th Battery A.F.A.  He was single, working as a bookkeeper, and living at 2126? Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.  He lised his father, of General Delivery, Sydney, Australia, as next-of-kin.  He was later transferred to the Machine Gun Corps.

Private R.J. Scott was wounded in October 1918.


Scott, William, 225341, Private (1899-1918)

William Scott was born on 10 January 1899 at Glasgow, Scotland, son of Thomas & Jennie Scott.  He enlisted in the Reinforcing Draft of the 156th Battalion at Brickville, Ontario on 14 March 1917, at which time he described himself as a farmer, of Prescott, Ontario.  He listed his next-of-kin as his mother, then of 39 New Street, Beith, Ayrshire, Scotland.

Private W. Scott died on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras - the Battalion War Diary states 28 August - and was buried at Tigris Lane Cemetery, Wancourt, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. II.A.15).  His next-of-kin is shown in the CWGC on-line database as having been his father, then of Glasgow, Scotland.


Scott, William Harmon, 240185, Private (1895-)

William Harmon Scott was born on 20 February 1895 at North Grimsby, Lincoln, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 205th Battalion at Hamilton, Wentworth County, Ontario on 3 March 1916, at which time he was single, working as a carpenter, and living at 43 Melrose Avenue, Hamilton, Ontario.  He listed his mother Ida Scott, at the same address (although this was later changed to 101 Walnut Street South, Hamilton, Ontario), as next-of-kin.

Private W.H. Scott was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Seed, Richard, 787952, Private (1879-)

Richard Seed was born on 9 February 1879 at Lancashire, England.  He enlisted in the 130th (?) Overseas Battalion at Perth, Ontario on 7 August 1916, having previously served for six years with the 6th Regiment (Lancashire Fusiliers).  He was married, and working as a teamster at Prestonvale, R.R. No. 1, Lanark County, Ontario.  He listed his wife Hazel Seed, of the same address, as next-of-kin.

Private R. Seed was detached to the 6th Battalion, C.E. Unit Group No. 10 "G" Ottawa on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Senior, -, Quartermaster Sergeant

An operation order dated 12 April 1918 stated that, "Q.M.S. Senior will act as Company Q.M.S."


Seward, Gail Llewyllyn, 625063, Private (1888-)

Gail Llewyllyn Seward was born on 20 February 1888 at Bolliver, Missouri, U.S.A.  He enlisted in the 151st Overseas battalion at Hastings Coulee on 28 February 1916, having received his medical examination at Strome, Alberta on 26 February, at which time he was single and working as an engineer at Strome, Alberta.  He listed his mother, Francis Seward of Strome, Alberta, as next-of-kin.

Private G.L. Seward was wounded in October 1918.


Shankland, Cochrane Hillhouse, 116213, Sergeant (1890-)

Cochrane Hillhouse Shankland was born on 12 July 1890 at Old Cummock, Ayrshire, Scotland, son of Mr. J. Shankland.  He enlisted in the 11th Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles (C.M.R.) at Vancouver, British Columbia on 22 March 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a carpenter.  He listed his father, still of Old Cummock, Ayrshire, Scotland, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant C.H. Shankland was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Shaw, Hiram, 195735, Private (1898-)

Hiram Shaw was born on 30 August 1898 at Leeds, Yorkshire, England.  He enlisted at Peterborough, Ontario on 17 February 1916, having served in the 57th Regiment for three years.  He was married, living at 516 Romaine Street, Peterborough, Ontario, and working as a labourer.

Privates H.V. Cox and H. Shaw were wounded on 15 May 1918, perhaps as a result of the following activity reported in the War Diary fvor that day: "1.45 am Enemy plane dropped five bombs in vicinity of ADAM Gun."  A later list of casualties compiled at the end of that month gave his initial as "W" and a date of 16 May, but the former date is more likely to be correct.


Shean, Walter Arthur, 423111, Sergeant (1886-)

Walter Arthur Shean was born on 3 August 1886 at Somerset, England.  He enlisted in the 30th Battalion at Portage La Prairie, Manitoba on 22 April 1916, at which time he was single and working as a farmer.  He stated his next-of-kin as Ellen Shean, of Charlton Horethorn, Dorset, England.

Sergeant W.A. Shean was wounded on 8 August 1918, at the Battle of Amiens.


Shearer, Thomas, 922714, Private (1888-)

Thomas Shearer was born on 11 March 1888 at Turriff, Scotland, son of George Shearer.  He enlisted in the 200th Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 7 November 1916, at which time he was working as a teamster and living at the Cri Hotel in Winnipeg.  He gave his next-of-kin as his father, of Auchderless, Scotland.

On 19 May 1918, "8.00 p.m. ... 922714 Pte SPEARE, T. [sic] was wounded while carrying rations.  He did not report this until he had delivered his rations over ½ an hour after.  During this time he must have suffered considerable pain."  The War Diary then states, in an entry three days later, that Private T. Speare [sic] (922714) was wounded during the battalion's support of raids carried out by 5th and 6th Canadian Infantry Brigades on 22 May 1918.  A later list of casualties for the month of Mary, suggests that he and several other soldiers were actually wounded on 20 May, and gives his details, correctly, as Pte Shearer, T. (922714).  The only suggestion of casualties in the War Diary entry for 20 May was as follows: "3.00-4.00 pm Sunken Road at 'A' Battery Headquarters heavily shelled."


Sheldrake, Frederick, 514166, Private, M.M. (1884-)

Frederick Sheldrake was born on 19 January 1884 at Hampshire, England, son of Samuel Sheldrake.  He enlisted in the No. 2 Overseas Aarmy Service Corps (A.S.C.) Training Depot at Montreal, Quebec on 13 March 1917, at which time he was unmarried and working as a chauffeur.  He was living at 1192, 1st Avenue, New York, New York, U.S.A., and listed his father, then of Greenwood Cottage, Durley, Hampshire, England, as next-of-kin.

Private F. Sheldrake was awarded the Military Medal on 28 October 1918.


Shepherd, Alexander, 424360, Private (1886-1916)

Alexander Shepherd was born on 28 May 1886 at Aberdeen, Scotland.  He served in the Gordon Highlanders for three years before going to Canada, where he was working as a labourer at the time of his enlistment in the 45th Battalion at Dauphin on 24 February 1915.  He stated his next-of-kin as Mrs. Jane Shepherd, of Aberdeen, presumably his mother, since he was unmarried.

He was one of two 6th Bde. CMG Coy. soldiers - the other was AS Durant - killed on 5 June 1916 during a major German attack and bombardment on the front lines near Ypres, part of the Battle of Mount Sorrel.  His name is commemmorated on Panel 32 of the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.


Sheppard, Edward, 1015623, Private (1878-)

Edward Sheppard was born on 2 August 1878 at Harbor Grace, Newfoundland.  He enlisted in the 231st Overseas Battalion at Sidney on 1 July 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a fireman at Dawson, Yukon Territory.  He listed his brother William Sheppard of Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, as next-of-kin.

Private E. Sheppard was detached to 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Sheridan, John Lawrence, 455516, Private (1888-)

John Lawrence Sheridan was born on 3 April 1888 at York County, Toronto, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 59th Battalion at Barrie Field, Ontario on 20 August 1915, having served previously in the 34th Regiment.  He was married and working as a clerk, and listed his next-of-kin as his wife, Mrs. Bessie Sheridan, of P.O. Whitby, Ontario.

Private J.L. Sheridan was wounded on 17 July 1918.  The War Diary for this day states: "Hostile artillery very quiet around gun positions. One plane crossed line and was driven back by A.A. and M.G. fire. Arrangements were made for infantry escort at No's. 33 and 34 Positions."  It is not clear how this casualty occurred.  He was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Sherk, Gordon Elmo, 228353 (also #769129), Private (1898-)

Gordon Elmo Sherk was born on 4 April 1898 (or 1897, according to one version of his attestation paper) at Toronto, Ontario.  He enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 26 April 1916, having served for two weeks as a Private in the 124th Battalion.  He stated that he was an ammunition worker, and was living with his mother, Elizabeth Sherk, at 164 Fern Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.  Another version of his attestation paper states that he enlisted in the 124th Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 27 December 1915.

Private G.E. Sherk was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Short, Aubrey Allison, 69949, Private (1894-)

Aubrey Allison Short was born on 22 September 1894 at Jerusalem, New Brunswick, son of George Short.  He enlisted in the 26th Battalion at St. John, New Brunswick on 23 November 1914, having previously served for a year in the 62nd Regiment.  He was unmarried, working as a salesman, and listed his father, then of Central Greenwick, Kings County, New Brunswick, as next-of-kin.

Private A.A. Short was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Short, William John, 817424, Private (1889-)

William John Short was born on 2 July 1889 at St. John, New Brunswick, son of R.J. Short.  He enlisted in the 140th (later amended to 104th) Overseas Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 9 September 1915, at which time he was unmarried, working as a barber, and living at 127 Erin Street, St. John, New Brunswick.  At the time of his enlistment, he listed his father, still of St. John, as next-of-kin, although this was later amended to show his wife, Elvina Short of 27½ Erin Street.

Private W.J. Short was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Sibbald, Hugh Martyn, Captain (1886-)
 
Hugh Martyn Sibbald was born on 8 December 1886 at Sutton West, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 188th Overseas Battalion at Camp Hughes, Manitoba on 4 October 1916, when he was working as a lumber merchant, and living at 1829, 2nd Avenue West, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.  He listed his next-of-kin as his wife, Florence L. Sibbald.

Lieutenant H.M. Sibbald is shown as being in "M" Battery of No. 3 Company in the April 1918 Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, and continued in this unit for the remainder of the year.  He was on leave in October 1918, and at the end of December was shown as being attached to the Battalion Headquarters as Assistant Adjutant.  By mid-March 1919, he had been appointed as Adjutant.


Sibbitt, Rex, 59886, Private (1896-)

Rex Sibbitt was born on 10 February 1896 at Carleton Place, Ontario, and enlisted at Kingston, Ontario on 6 November 1914.  He was unmarried and working as a labourer, and listed Mrs. F.J. Sibbitt, of 209 Aldon Block, Regina, Saskatchewan, as his next-of-kin.

Private R. Sibbitt was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Sillers, Wilfred, 721950, Sergeant, D.C.M.

Lance Corporal Wilfred Sillers was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal on 26 March 1918.  A later listing of this, and other, awards dated January 1919, shows that he had been promoted to the rank of Sergeant by that time.


Simmons, Archibald Gilbert, 733402, Private (1895-)

Archibald Gilbert Simmons was born on 11 May 1895 at Round Hill, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, son of Alexander Simmons.  He enlisted in the 112th Overseas Battalion at Middleton on 15 December 1915, at which time he was unmarried, living at Round Hill, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, and working as a labourer, and he listed his father, also of Round Hill, as next-of-kin.

Private A.G. Simmons was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Simmons, Charles William, 542160, Private (1888-)

Charles William Simmons was born on 19 August 1999 at Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England.  He enlisted in the 11th Regiment (The Irish Fusiliers of Canada) at Vancouver, British Columbia on 7 June 1916, at which time he was unmarried, living at 341 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, British Columbia, and working as an engineer.  He listed his mother, Mrs Sarah A. Simmons of 6 Melbourne Road, West Bridgeford, England, as next-of-kin.

Private C.W. Simmons was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Simpson, Frederick Ernest, 3314092, Private (1897-)

Frederick Ernest Simpson was born on 5 April 1897.

Private F.E. Simpson was wounded on 9 October 1918.


Simpson, Joseph, 672930, Private (1895-)

Joseph Simpson was born on 25 November 1895 at Yorkshire, England, son of John Simpson.  He enlisted in the 167th Battalion at Quebec City, Quebec on 25 November 1916, having served for six months in the 8 R.R. in Quebec.  At that time, he was working as a printer, and living with his father at 427 Windermeer Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.

Private J. Simpson was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Singleton, Frank, 66155, Private (1894-1918)

Frank Singleton was born on 5 November 1894 at Montreal, Quebec, son of William J. Singleton.  He enlisted in the 24th Battalion at Montreal, Quebec on 16 March 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a boilermaker's assistant.  He listed his father, of 51 Congregation Street, Montreal, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private F. Singleton died on 10 October 1918, and was buried at Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Ficheux, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. III.E.16).


Sivyer, Chester Linton, 773047, Private (1897-)

Chester Linton Sivyer was born on 4 August 1897 at South Dumfries, Brant County, Ontario, son of Henry Sivyer.  He enlisted in the 125th Overseas Battalion at Brantford, Ontario on 21 March 1916, when he was unmarried and working as a banker in St George, Ontario.  He listed his father, also of St George, as next-of-kin.

Private C.L. Sivyer was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Skeoch, James Ernest, 928843, Private (1897-1918)

James Ernest Skeoch was born on 31 December 1897 at Nichol Township, Ontario, son of James & Margaret Skeoch.  He enlisted at Fergus, Ontario on 3 January 1916, having previously served for a year in the 30th Wellington Rifles.  He was single and working as a farmer at Fergus, Ontario, and listed his father, also of Fergus, as next-of-kin.

Private J.E. Skeoch was killed in action on 10 September 1918, and buried at Sun Quarry Cemetery, Cherisy, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. F.22).  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "'E' Battery relieved 'F' Battery and 'H' Battery relieved 'G' Battery.  Great deal of difficulty was experienced in making relief owing to guns being changed in their positions.  Six casualties were caused by enemy shelling during relief and two tripods hit."


Skinner, John Raymond, 406448, Sergeant (1892-)

John Raymond Skinner was born on 8 April 1892 at Niagara Falls, Ontario, son of J.A. Skinner.  He enlisted at Hamilton, Ontario on 16 April 1915, having served with the 44th Regiment at Welland, Ontario.  He was a carpenter, and listed his next-of-kin as his father, then of 14 Barker Street, Niagara Falls, South Ontario.

Corporal J.R. Skinner was wounded on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens, although he remained at duty, and must have received a promotion shortly after, as his final rank is shown in the National Archives of Canada on-line CEF database as Sergeant.


Slater, Herbert, 65895, Corporal (1892-1916)

Herbert Slater was born on 20 April 1892 at Montreal, Quebec, son of Samuel and Emily Slater.  He enlisted at Montreal on 28 October 1914, when he described himself as a pen maker, and his next-of-kin as his mother, then living in Montreal, South Quebec.

The CWGC web site shows him to have been killed on 10 June 1916, and buried at the Brandhoek Military Cemetery, Ypres (Ref. II.F.2), and this probably equates to the War Diary entry for 9th June: "Considerable artillery activity. We had following casualties: 1 O.R. killed ..."  Nothing further is known of the circumstances surrounding his death.


Slight, Frederick John, 436584, Sergeant (1888-)

Frederick John Slight was born on 31 October 1888 at Brighton, Sussex, England.  He enlisted at Camrose, Alberta on 22 January 1915, having served for three years in the R.A.M.C.  He was a printer, and listed A.J. Slight of Lifeboat Arch, Kings Road, Brighton as next-of-kin.

Sergeant S.J. Slight was awarded the Military Medal on 24 May 1918.


Sly, Levi, 256316, Private (1894-)

Levi Sly was born on 15 May 1894 at Sharbott Lake, Ontario, son of David Sly.  He enlisted in the First Saskatchewan Depot Battalion at Regina, Saskatchewan on 15 December 1917, having passed his medical examination with an "A" Category at North Battleford, Saskatchewan.  He was working as a farmer, giving his address as the Metropole Hotel, North Battleford, Saskatchewan, and listed his next-of-kin as his father, still of Sharbott Lake, Ontario.

Private L. Sly was wounded on 15 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Hostile gas shelling very heavy during day, and aerial activity very marked  7 am ... 1 O.R. Killed. And 2 O.R. wounded."  The wounds could not have been too serious, because he recovered sufficiently to return to duty prior to his detachment to the 21st Canadian Battalion Unit Group 12, "H" Kingston, Ontario on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Small, Robert Wilson, 210016, Private (1894-)

Robert Wilson Small was born on 28 July 1894 at Beamsville, Ontario, son of Alex T. Small.  He enlisted in the 98th Overseas Battalion at Grimsby, Ontario on 1 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a labourer in Beamsville.  He listed his father, also of Beamsville, as next-of-kin, and stated that he had previously served with the 44th Regiment.

Private R.W. Small was gassed on 8 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Considerable shelling reported in forward area causing a few casualties."


Smart, Wallace Victor, Lieutenant (1887-)

Wallace Victor Smart was born on 24 May 1887 at Montreal, Quebec, son of Albert Smart.  He enlisted at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 3 April 1916, when he was working as a Bag Manufacturer, and living at 470 River Road, Winnipeg.  He showed his next-of-kin to be his father, then resident at 1 Seymour Avenue, Montreal, and stated that he was serving with the 100th (Winnipeg) Grenadiers (Militia), in which he was a Lieutenant.  On 25 May 1916, also at Winnipeg, he was transferred as a Lieutenant into the 183rd Battalion.  At this stime, he stated his next-of-kin to be his brother, Campbell L. Smart, of 1 Seymour Avenue, Montreal.

Lieut. W.V. Smart is shown as Assistant Quartermaster (attached from the 27th Battalion) with the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps in April 1918.  The following appears in the War Diary entry for 14 April: "Lieut. SMART was loaned by the [27th] Battalion to act as Assistant Quartermaster as owing to the great increase in personnel, this step was found necessary."  He does not appear in subsequent Nominal Rolls, and presumably went back to his own unit shortly thereafter.


Smith, A.C. (or C.A.), Lieutenant

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Lieut. A.C. Smith in "C" Battery No. 1 Company.  He was on leave in October, but returned to duty in that unit in November 1918, where he remained until the end of March 1919.


Smith, Arthur Thomas, 56031, Sergeant (1896-)

Arthur Thomas Smith was born on 25 November 1896 at Lachine, Quebec.  He enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 12 November 1914, having served for a year with the 19th Lincoln Regiment.  He was working as a clerk and stated his next-of-kin to be his sister, Mrs. A. Budd, of 65 Albert Street, St. Catharine's, Ontario.

Sergeant A.T. Smith was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.  Annotations on his attestation paper suggest that Sgt. Smith was at Buxton (Derbyshire?) on 28 December 1918, and left for Canada on 2 Jan 1919.


Smith, Edwin Charles, 880860, Private (1893-1918)

Edwin Charles Smith was born on 1 April 1893 at Merlin (or Ilbury East), Ontario.  He enlisted in the 33rd Overseas Battalion at Chatham, Ontario on 22 February 1915, at which time he was working as a farm labourer, and listed his next-of-kin as Mrs. W.H. (Elizabeth) Embrey (or Embury), of R.R. No. 2, Blenheim, Ontario.  On 12 February 1917, he re-enlisted in the 186th Overseas Battalion at Chatham, this time stating that he had served with the 33rd Battalion for 6 months, was working in the engineering trade.

Private E.C. Smith died of wounds on 8 August 1918, and was buried at Longueau British Cemetery, Somme (Grave Ref. III.A.4).  His next-of-kin were listed as W.H. & Elizabeth Emling of Blenheim, Kent County, Ontario.  This cemtery was used by fighting units and Field Ambulances from April until August 1918.


Smith, Eugene, 469077, Private

Private Eugene Smith was wounded on 29 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Smith, F., 817116, Private

According to the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary, Private F. Smith (#817116) was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras. The regimental number #817116, does not correspond to a Frank Smith in the National Archives of Canada CEF database, so presumably the number is incorrect.


Smith, Frank (alias Frank Harrison), 690755, Private, M.M. (1892-1918)

Frank Smith was born on 21 March 1892 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England.  He enlisted in the 173rd Battalion (Highlanders) at Hamilton, Ontario on 8 April 1916, at which time he was working as a labourer and living at 211 Mary Street, Hamilton, Ontario.  He listed his next-of-kin as his sister, Ethel Beaver, of 74 Cromwell Street, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England.  According to a typed note on his attestation paper, he was assigned to "D" Company.

Private Frank Smith was awarded the Military Medal on 24 May 1918.  He died on 27 August 1918, aged 28, from wounds received during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Ligny-St. Canche British Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. A.20).  His next-of-kin is stated by the CWGC on-line database to have been his sister, Ethel Beever [sic], of 96 Ellerton Rd., Firth Park, Sheffield, England.


Smith, Frank Havergal, 875391, Private (1896-)

Frank Havergal Smith was born on 9 April 1896 at Winnipeg, Manitoba.  He enlisted in the 184th Overseas Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 7 April 1916, at which time he was living at 214 Winchester Avenue, St James, and working as a cashier.  He was unmarried and listed his mother Mrs. G.E. Smith, also of 214 Winchester Avenue, as next-of-kin.

Private F.H. Smith was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Smith, George, 117536 (Orig. #470), Private (1879-1916)

George Smith was born on 22 August 1879 at High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England, one of several children of John and Emma Smith of Flackwell Heath, Wycombe.  Although he was not in an Active Militia at the time of his enlistment in the 12th Canadian Mounted Rifles (C.M.R.) at Calgary, Alberta on 9 February 1915, he had served for twelve years in the Royal Navy.  He showed his profession as a blacksmith, and stated his next-of-kin as his wife Maud Mary Smith of 2521, 16A St, Hill Division, Calgary.

He was one of four soldiers in the company - the others were Privates Batts, Caddell and Jensen - killed on 10 June 1916, during what was referred to in the War Diary as "considerable artillery activity."  Nothing further is known regarding the circumstances of his death, but he was buried at Reninghelst New Military Cemetery, near Poperinge.


Smith, James Joseph, 198161, Private (1881-)

James Joseph Smith was born on 2 February 1881 at London, Ontario, and enlisted in the 94th Overseas Battalion at Fort William, Ontario on 6 November 1915.  At this time, he was working as a machinist, having served in the 96th Regiment for a month.  He listed Alex McColl of Sturgeon Falls, Kent County, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private J.J. Smith was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Smith, John, 782280, Private (1896-)

John Smith was born on 28 October 1896 at Kingston, Ontario, son of Thomas Smith.  He enlisted in the 128th Overseas Battalion at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan on 28 March 1916, at which time he was living at Keeler, Saskatchewan and working as a farmer.  He listed his father, then of Amherst Island, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private J. Smith was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Smith, S., 2073325, Private

The War Diary shows Private S. Smith as having been gassed on 19 September 1918, the entry for that day including the following: "6.00 pm  Enemy shelling above normal.  100 Gas shells in V.24.a. & c.  TRIGGER COPSE was spasmodically shelled by enemy with H.V. Guns."

The National Archives of Canada CEF database shows no soldier with this surname and number.


Smith, Sidney John, 101082, Sergeant (1890-)

Sidney John Smith was born on 16 May 1890 at Greenwich, Kent, England.  He enlisted in the 66th Overseas Battalion at Edmonton, Alberta on 21 July 1915, at which time he was single and working as a farmer.  He listed Thomas Gable Smith of Hadleigh-on-Sea, Essex, England as next-of-kin.

Sergeant S.J. Smith was awarded the Military Medal on 24 May 1918.


Smith, W., 174391, Private

The 2nd Battalion War Diary shows a Private W. Smith (174391) wounded on 6 October 1918.

The National Archives of Canada CEF database shows no soldier with this surname and number.


Smith, William John, 441434, Private (1894-)

William John Smith was born on 13 August 1918 at Dunseth, North Dakota, USA.  He enlisted in the 108th Battalion at Camp Hughes on 14 September 1915, at which time he was living at Wingard, Saskatchewan, unmarried, and working as a labourer.  He stated that he had served for a year in the 29th Light Horse at Leask, and listed his mother, Sarah Smith of Wingard, Saskatchewan, as next-of-kin.

Private W.J. Smith was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Smith, William Pennington, 446474, Corporal

Corporal W.P. Smith was gassed on 9 September 1918.


Snook, Robert, 424492, Private (1894-)

Robert Snook was born on 24 September 1894 at Southampton, England.  He enlisted at Minnedosa on 29 September 1914, at which time he was single and working as a farmer.  He listed his next-of-kin as Henry V. Snook of Beavers Hill, Cottage, Avenue Road, Southampton, England.

Private R. Snook was wounded on 14 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled with gas shells in forward area and caused strong concentration.  13 O.R's gassed.  Shells used by enemy were all H.E. containing small portion of gas."


Somerville, Hugh Robert, 237669, Private (1889-)

Hugh Robert Somerville was born on 7 April 1889 at Glasgow, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 204th Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 28 April 1916, at which time he was working as a farmer.  He listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Christina Rogers, of Box 208. Almont, Michigan, USA.

Private H.R. Somerville was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Speller, Frank Charles, 174936, Private (1892-1918)

Frank Charles Speller was born on 25 March 1892 at London, England.  He enlisted in the 86th Machine Gun Battalion at Dundas, Ontario on 14 September 1915, at which time he was farming, and lived at 1031 Logan Avenue, Toronto, Ontario. He listed his next-of-kin as his uncle, Ira Griffin, of 134 Birch Avenue East, Hamilton, Ontario.

On 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens, Private F.C. Speller was killed in action, and was buried at Adelaide Cemetery, Villers-Bretonneux, Somme (Grave Ref. II.F.9).  After the Armistice a large number of graves were brought into the cemetery from small graveyards and isolated positions on the north, west and south of Villers-Bretonneux.


Spence, Alfred, 135397, Sergeant (1889-)

Alfred Spence was born on 7 March 1889 at Aberdeen, Scotland, and enlisted in the 74th Battalion at the Armouries, Toronto, Ontario on 26 July 1915.  At the time, he was unmarried and working as a teamster.  He listed his mother, Isabella Spence of Garmond Village, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant A. Spence was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras. 


Spence, Harry, 135398, Sergeant (d. 1918)

Sergeant Harry Spence died on 1 October 1918, and was later buried at Canada Cemetery, Tilloy-les-Cambrai, Nord (Grave Ref. I.B.20).  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled heavily and many casualties resulted.  Sgt SPENCE was killed to the great regret of his comrades, amongst whom he was very popular.  Sgt SPENCE was an outstanding N.C.O. in this Battalion."


Spencer, George, 1045150, Private (1886-)

George Spencer was born on 22 September 1886 at Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 241st Overseas Battalion at Windsor, Ontario on 15 August 1916, having served for 1½ years in the 21st Essex Fusiliers and 2½ years in the R.A.M.C. Transports, in Glasgow, Scotland.  At the time of his enlistment, he was married, living at 321 Argyle Road, Walkerville, Ontario, and working as a carpenter.  He listed his wife, Elizabeth Smith Spencer, as next-of-kin.

Private G. Spencer was reported missing on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.  Presumably he was subsequently found, since he does not appear in the CWGC on-line database of soldiers killed in WW1.


Spendlove, Richard Charles, 100360, Private (1892-)

Richard Charles Spendlove was born on 6 July 1892 at Reading, Berkshire, England, son of John Spendlove.  He enlisted in the 68th Overseas Battalion at Edmonton, Alberta on 3 July 1915.  He was unmarried and stated his occupation as "Oilwell".  He listed his father, then of Vanscoy, Saskatchewan, as next-of-kin.

Private R.C. Spendlove was gassed on 9 September 1918.


Spratt, Richard Edward, 113566, Sergeant, M.M. (1896-)

Richard Edward Spratt was born on 5 May 1896 at Johnston's Corner, Gloucester, Ontario, son of Richard Spratt.  He enlisted in the 8th C.M.R. at Barriefield, Ontario on 11 August 1915.  He was unmarried, and listed his trade/calling as "schooling" and his next-of-kin as his father, then of 4 Thornton Avenue, Otttawa, Ontario.

Sergeant R.E. Spratt was wounded on 1 October 1918, having been awarded the Military Medal a few days earlier on 19 September 1918.


Stafford, Arthur Thomas, 788519, Sergeant (1892-)

Arthur Thomas Stafford was born on 30 July 1892 at Renfrew, Ontario, son of Thomas Stafford.  He enlisted in the 130th Battalion (via the 42nd Regiment) at Renfrew, Ontario on 24 November 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a clerk.  He listed his mother, also of Renfrew, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant A.T. Stafford was detached to the 6th Battalion, C.E. Unit Group No. 10 "G" Ottawa on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Starratt, Mack Albion, 415617, Private (1896-)

Mack Albion Starratt was born in 1896 at Port Lorne, Anna County, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted in the 40th Battalion at Middleton on 14 April 1915, at which time he was unmarried, an active militia member, and working as a bank clerk.  He listed Charles A. Starratt, also of Port Lorne, as his next-of-kin.

Private M.A. Starratt was detached to 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.

The following extract is from Donald Fraser's diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books) "... a crowded dug-out is a great medium for an introduction to one's comrades ... Then there was Starratt, a young fellow, not much more than a boy, from, I think, Stellarton, Nova Scotia ..."  It is possible this is the same soldier as the one described above.


Steel, William, 454710, Private (1884-)

William Steel was born on 26 June 1884 at Kirklinton, Cumberland, England, son of George Steel.  He enlisted in the 59th Battalion (via the 42nd Regiment) at Smiths Falls, Ontario on 2 July 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a labourer.  He listed his father, then of Cargo, Carlisle, Cumberland, England, as next-of-kin.

Private W. Steel was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Steele, Ernest, 213996, Private (1887-)

Ernest Steele was born on 22 June 1887 at St. Thomas, Ontario, son of Mr. Granville Steele.  He enlisted in the 99th Battalion at Windsor, Ontario on 25 February 1915, at which time he was working as an elevator constructor, and living at 51 Abbott Street, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A.  He stated his next-of-kin to be his father, thenm of Union, Ontario.

Private E. Steele was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Steeves, -, Private

Donald Fraser (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books) describes the members of his gun crew shortly after joining the 6th Brigade CMG Company in October 1916: "Monday, 16 October 1916 - ... a crowded dug-out is a great medium for an introduction to one's comrades ... Steeves, a big, red-faced, healthy-looking fellow from Moncton, New Brunswick, later on tired of the crew and joined the transport ..."  This was possibly the same soldier as the Private H.W. Steeves detailed below.


Steeves, Harold Walter, 709875, Private (1897-)

Harold Walter Steeves was born on 1 May 1897 at Hillsboro, New Brunswick.  He enlisted in the 104th (or 64th?) Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 30 November 1915, at which time he was single and working as a quarryman at Hillsboro.  He listed his grandmother, Mrs. Thomas Taylor, also of Hillsboro, as next-of-kin.

Private H.W. Steeves was wounded on 19 September 1918.


Stephen, Ian, 757199, Private, M.M. (1894-)

Ian Stephen was born on 27 March 1894 at Aberdeenshire, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 120th (City of Hamilton) Battalion at Hamilton, Ontario on 30 November 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer.  He was living with his mother, Jean MacNeill, at 112 Strachan Street, Hamilton, Ontario, whom he listed as next-of-kin.

Private I. Stephen was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.


Stephen, William Donaldson, 141291, Private (1895-)

William Donaldson Stephen was born on 9 November 1895 at Glasgow, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 76th Overseas Battalion at Hamilton, Ontario on 28 July 1915, having served for a year with the XIII Royal Regiment.  He was unmarried and employed as a template maker, and listed his mother, Mrs. O. Stephen of 112 Strachan Street, Hamilton, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private W.D. Stephen was wounded in October 1918.


Stephenson, Harry, 442487, Private (1882-1917)

Harry Stephenson was born on 5 September 1882 at Stockton-on-Tees, Yorkshire, England.  When he enlisted in the 54th (Kootenay) Battalion at Vernon Camp, British Columbia on 6 May 1915, he was working as a mill foreman, and listed his next-of-kin as Mrs. Mary A. Stephenson of 2 Regent Street, Stockton-on-Tees.  He also stated that he had served in the South African Constabulary.

When Donald Fraser joined the 6th Bde CMG Coy. in late 1916, he made the following notes concerning his crew-mates in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "... a crowded dug-out is a great medium for an introduction to one's comrades ... Harry Stevenson [sic], another B.C. man, a transfer from, I think, the 54th Battalion.  Had seen service in South Africa in the Boer War, but was not destined to see the end of this one."

Private Harry Stephenson died on 23 August 1917 of wounds received a couple of days earlier during the Battle of Lens.  He was buried at the Etaples Military Cemetery (Grave Ref. XXII.Q.11).  Donald Fraser recounts the events of 21 August: "Our section was unlucky; a shell exploded and mortally wounded Sgt. McGirr, badly wounding Harry Stevenson ... Word was sent down to our position, which adjoined the communication trench, for four stretcher bearers to carry Harry Stevenson out.  This was the second call on our gun crew for assistance ... McCormick, Jackson, Nick and I responded to the call ... The whole idea was that as soon as Harry Stevenson was picked up and taken away, the gun crews would retire as we were surrounded ... A council of action was held and in a few minutes it was decided that, as soon as possible, two with a stretcher would run to an old German dug-out about fifty yards away where Harry Stevenson lay grievously wounded and pick him up and bring him in.  Bud Willox and Elwood volunteered for the job.  Both were husky, resolute fellows.  In a moment or two the place became enveloped in a fog of smoke and brick dust caused by exploding shells and the two dashed out with the stretcher and in a few minutes reappeared with Harry who was absolutely all in.  After that it was decided that McCormick and Jackson would lead off with the stretcher and fifty yards would be followed by Nick and myself as relief stretcher bearers and later on one by one of the crews would beat it out.  Jackson and McCormick grabbed the strecher and away they went, then Nick.  When I reached the entrance to the trench, I turned round, waved to those behind and was gone.  After a long, arduous spell with many squeaks and narrow shaves and the lives almost scared out of us, we reached the dressing station.  One has to go through such an experience to really understand what it is to carry a wounded man through a double bombardment and without any supporting straps ... Before long Nick and I had to relieve the other two.  After several exchanges Nick's fingers lost their grip entirely and he dropped his end of the stretcher shaking up Harry badly.  The three of us handled the situation for the rest of the way ... If we had delayed our departure from the outpost a few minutes longer, I am afraid Stevenson's fate would have been sealed as he would have been abandoned.  A few days later information reached us that Harry died at Etaples ... After turning Harry over to the Red Cross, we retired to our cellar and were given a tot of rum.  Never did rum taste so good."

The War Diary for this day, merely states: "During the attack, mobile guns in forward positions moved forward & took up new positions and prepared for any counter-attack ..."


Stevens, Cecil Arthur, 2223374, Private (1888-)

Cecil Arthur Stevens was born on 29 January 1888 at London, England.  He enlisted in the Cyclist Platton attached to the 72nd Regiment at the Central Recruitment Depot in Vancouver, British Columbia on 4 September 1917.  He was then living at 1234 Ardmore, Los Angeles, California, USA, and working as a gardener and florist.  He listed his mother Maria Stevns, then of 23 Vincent Terrace, London N., England, as next-of-kin.

Private C.A. Stevens was wounded on 29 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Stewart, Alexander, 2004617, Private (1877-)

Alexander Stewart was born on 7 June 1877 at Dunvagen, Ontario.  He enlisted in the Yukon Infantry Company at Dawson, Yukon Territory on 4 October 1916, at which time he was single and working as a teamster at Dawson, Yukon Territory.  He listed his brother Neil Stewart, also of Dawson, as next-of-kin.

Private A. Stewart was wounded on 16 October 1918.


Stewart, George Hardy, 928332, Private (1891-)

George Hardy Stewart was born on 28 April 1891 at West Garafraxa Township, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 153rd Battalion at Fergus, Ontario on 27 December 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at R.R. No. 4, Fergus, Ontario.  He listed his mother Mrs. Janet Stewart, also of R.R. No. 4, Fergus, as next-of-kin.

Private G.H. Stewart was gassed on 9 September 1918.


Stewart, J.A., Captain

Capt. J.A. Stewart is shown as Medical Officer (attached from the C.A.M.C.) with the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps from March until at least September 1918.


Stewart, Kenneth Edward, 113577, Private, M.M.

Private K.E. Stewart was awarded the Military medal on 28 October 1918.


Stewart, Richard Alexander, 435712, Sergeant

Sergeant R.A. Stewart was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.



Stonehewer, James, (Form. #8398 & 113580), Lieutenant
 
James Stonehewer was born on 26 December 1890 at Macclesfield, Cheshire, England.  He was working as a Lodger Keeper when he enlisted in at Hamilton, Ontario on 25 January 1915, having served for four months in the Corps of G...?  He listed his next-of-kin as George Stonehewer, of 10 Kerton Road, Pelsmore, Sheffield, England.

On 3 November 1916, Lt. J. Stonehewer and Lt. J. Waddington reported for duty with the 6th Bde CMG Company Headquarters at Aix Noulette, as reinforcements.  On 11 February 1917 he proceeded to Pernes on a map reading course.  The following extracts relating to the Battle of Vimy Ridge and subsequent events are taken from the War Diaries:
8 April 1917 - "Nos. 1 and 2 Sections under Lts Waddington and Stonehewer moved independently across country and took up Barrage Positions along Rhine Trench. These guns formed complete Battery with Lt Waddington as Battery Commander. They were in position with guns laid at 12 midnight night 8/9th."

On 12 July 1917 Lt. Stonehewer returned from leave.  On 2 November he took over temporary command of the company, and three days later he was appointed liaison officer with the G.O.C. 6th Canadian Infantry Brigade.  On 16 November, Lt. Stonehewer went to England on leave for 14 days, from which he returned on 4 December.  Two days later, he assumed command of the company until 23 December, while the O.C. Capt. Grantham was on leave.  The Nominal Rolls show that when the 2nd Bn CMG Corps was formed in February 1918, James Stonehewer (by March he had been promoted to the rank of Captain) was made the Quartermaster of the Battalion.  From May to August, however, he was O.C. of "E" Battery No. 2 Company.  On 19 September, he temporarily took on the additional job of Acting O.C. of No. 1 Company, Major Basevi having taken over the duties of 2nd-in-command of the Battalion while Major Graham was on leave.  From 3 November, he was put in charge of the Transport Group.
Stover, Kenneth Spencer, Lieutenant (1891-)

Kenneth Spencer Stover was born on 20 September 1891 at Standish, Michigan, U.S.A., son of John Russell Stover.  He enlisted at Blind River, Ontario on 12 January 1916, having served for a year with the Queen's Own Regiment at Toronto, Ontario.  He was working as a book keeper in Blind River, and stated his next-of-kin to be his father, also of Blind River, Ontario.

Lieut. K.S. Stover was listed as being with "H" Battery, No. 2 Company in the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps July 1918 Nominal Roll, and he remained in that unit until March 1919.  He was shown as being on leave in the Nominal Roll for October 1918, but the War Diary entry for 18 October includes a report from O.C. "H" Battery, as follows: "Left EPINOY 1330 and moved to Chalkpit at M.18.d. Reported O.C. 29th Battalion and moved to bridge head where limbers were unloaded. M.18.b.) Battery crossed bridge and moved to WASNES AU BAC. 29th Battalion were endeavouring to get in touch with their Companies forward. Information very meagre. Lieut. STOVER and two runners went up light railroad to H.26.c.90.00, thence North West through H.36.d. to MARQUETTE, returning to WASNES AU BAC with only one rifle shot being fired at party. Positions were located, but guns were not mounted until dark."


Stowell, Frank, 3105204, Private (1897-)

Frank Stowell was born on 2 March 1897 at Bradford, Yorkshire, England.  He enlisted in the 1st Depot Battalion, 2nd C.O. Regiment at Toronto, Ontario on 8 Ocotber 1917, at which time he was single, working as a labourer, and living at 4225 Orchard Street, Frankford, Pennsylvannia, U.S.A.  He listed his mother Mary Stowell, also of 4225 Orchard Street, Frankford, as next-of-kin.

Private F. Stowell was wounded in October 1918.


Stradling, Harry, 56078, Private (1883-1918)

Harry Stradling was born on 6 August 1883 at Dewsbury, Yorkshire, England.  He enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 2 March 1915, at which time he was working as a shipper.  He was an active member of a militia, and had served with the Devonshire Regiment in England for three years.  He listed his next-of-kin as his wife, Mrs. Alice Stradling, of 10 Richard Avenue (later of 44 Seymour Avenue), Toronto, Ontario.

Private H. Stradling died on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens, and was buried at Mezieres Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme (Grave Ref. C.5).


Stuart, John Hector, 712220, Private (1894-)

John Hector Stuart was born on 9 December 1894 at Belle River, Prince Edward Island, son of Alexander M. Stewart.  He enlisted in the 105th Battalion at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island on 14 October 1915, at which time he was unmarried, working as a farmer, and an active militia member of the 82nd Regiment.  He listed his father, also of Belle River, P.E.I., as next-of-kin.

Private J.H. Stuart was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Styles, Albert Edward, 622052, Private, M.S.M. (1886-)

Albert Edward Styles was born on 6 April 1886 at East Grimstead, England.  He enlisted in the 44th Overseas Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 22 December 1914, at which time he was unmarried and working as a stone-cutter.  He listed his next-of-kin as Mrs. Parsons of 17 Dumford Road, Holloway, England.

Private A.E. Styles was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal on 1 January 1919.


Sullivan, John D., 400788, Private (1889-)

John Sullivan was born on 22 February 1889 at Coventry, Warwickshire, England.  He enlisted in the 33rd Overseas Battalion at London, Ontario on 30 March 1915, at which time he was married and working as a plater.  He listed his wife, Florence Sullivan of 19 Little Drummer? Street, London N.E., England, as next-of-kin.

Private J.D. Sullivan was wounded on 11 October 1918.


Surette, Anselm Eli, 3180332, Private

Private A.E. Surette was detached to 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Surtees, Andrew, 435662, Sergeant (1890-1917)

Andrew Surtees was born on 4 March 1890 at Chollerton, Northumberland, England, son of Thomas and Isabella Surtees.  He enlisted in the 50th Battalion at Calgary, Alberta on 30 August 1918.  He was working as a mason and stated that he had served in the territorial force of the 4th Northumberland Fusiliers from 1909 to 1912.  He showed his next-of-kin as his father, then living at Wheat Hill, Colwell, Barrasford, Northumberland.

An Operation Order dated 8 April 1917 and attached to the 6th Bde. CMG Coy. War Diary contains the following: "Sixteen men already detailed under Sgt Surtees will form first reinforcements. Sixteen men under Corporal Bierd will form Divisional Reserve. Separate instructions will be issued as to time and place where above parties will report."  These were part of the preparations for the attack on Vimy Ridge, which was due to take place on the following day.

Sergeant Surtees was killed on 3 May 1917, a day during which the company supported an infantry attack, part of the Battle of Fresnoy.  The following is an extract from the War Diary for that day: "Weather fine. Company took part in attack as follows. 2 Mobile guns under Lt. Dickie moved forward with the 27th Bn. 2 guns under Lt Waddington moved forward with the 31st Bn. 4 Guns under Lts Carter and Wallbridge were in Reserve at Vancouver Road T28. 8 Barrage guns under Lts Hardiman and Williams kept up indirect fire in accordance with Corps Scheme. Lts Carter and Wallbridge took up two fresh gun crews owing to Casualties and damages and rearranged section. Lt Carter did exceptionally fine work. Sgt A. Surtees was killed."  He was initially buried in one of two cemeteries used by the Second Canadian Division in May 1917; the first (2nd Cdn Div Cemetery, Willerval) was midway between Vimy and Acheville, the second (Willerval Canadian Cemetery/Vancouver Road Cemetery) midway between Vimy and Fresnoy.  The graves from these two cemeteries were later transferred after the Armistice to the Orchard Dump Cemetery, at Arleux-en-Gohelle.  Andrew Surtees' grave is therefore now at the Orchard Dump Cemetery (Ref. III.A.22).


Sutherland, Colin George, Captain (1892-)

Colin George Sutherland was born on 22 January 1892 at New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, son of Hector T. Sutherland.  He originally enlisted in the Army Medical Corps (A.M.C.) at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 9 November 1915.  At the time of his enlistment he had been a medical student for four years, served in the C.O.S.C. at McGill University, and was a Lieutenant in the 78th Pictou (Militia) Regiment.  At this time his rank was shown as Sergeant.  He listed his father, of New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.  He was later attested as a Lieutenant into the Canadian Army Medical Corps on 1 August 1917 at Halifax, Nova Scotia, having previously served with the Army Medical Corps at #7 Stationary Hospital.  He was a physician and living at New Glasgow at the time of his attestation.  He again listed his father, also of New Glasgow, as next-of-kin.

Captain C.G. Sutherland first appears in the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary as Medical Officer in November 1918, and he remained in this position until the end of January 1919.


Sutherland, John, 71316, Private (1890-)

John Sutherland was born on 25 October 1890 at Brora, Sutherlandshire, Scotland, son of Robert Sutherland.  When he enlisted in the 27th Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 5 November 1914, he was an active member of the 79th Cameron Highlanders of Canada, a militia regiment, and was working as a lineman.  He gave his next-of-kin as his father, then of 665 Langside Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Private J. Sutherland was "severely" wounded on 25 May 1918, although a later list of casualties compiled for the month of May gives the date of the event as 27 May.  Given the numerous other errors in the list, the former date seems more likely.


Sutherland, Robert Douglas, 727771, Private

Private R.D. Sutherland was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Sutton, George, 716107, Private (1890-)

George Sutton was born on 28 May 1890 at Fredericton, New Brunswick, son of Charles Sutton.  He enlisted in the 166th Battallion (Nova Scotia Rifles) at Truro, Nova Scotia on 22 April 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a machinist at Fredericton.  He listed his father, also of Fredericton, as next-of-kin.  Included in the list of identifying marks on his attestation paper was a tattoo on his right arm, described thus: "Cross. Kneeling female figure. Scroll, 'In memory of mother' above cross. Clasped hands & two hearts."  Presumably his mother was deceased by this time.

Private G. Sutton was wounded on 6 September 1918.  He was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Switzer, Albert Robert, Lieutenant

Lieut. A.R. Switzer is shown as being in "J" Battery of No. 3 Company in the April 1918 Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, attached from the 19th (Canadian Infantry) Battalion.  He does not reappear in the War Diaries, and probably returned to his original battalion shortly after.


Switzer, Ambrose, 835533, Corporal

Corporal A. Switzer was detached to 21st Canadian Battalion Unit Group 12, "H" Kingston, Ontario on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


This page last updated 21 April 2003
Return to the CMGC Personnel Database Contents Page
Return to the 6th Brigade CMGC Contents Page
Copyright © 2002, 2003 Brett Payne All Rights Reserved