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6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company
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2nd Battalion Canadian Machine Gun Corps
Personnel Database - R
Please contact Brett Payne if you have further details relating to any soldier mentioned on this page.
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Raines, Augustus George, 745166, Private
Ramsay, John Albert, Captain
Ravenhill, Arthur, 799889, Sergeant (d. 1918)
Ray, Richard Ross, 430734, Private
Reakes, Henry John, 1048192, Private
Ream, Walter Aaron, 1051549, Private
Reddy, William Manus, 710163, Private/Driver
Reece, Elmer, 734013, Corporal
Reid, William Irwin, 730408, Private
Reilly, John D'Arcy, 455134, Sergeant
Relph, -, Private
Rennie, Frank Blair, 488715, Sergeant
Reynolds, Gordon, 742526, Private
Reynolds, Howard Robert, 853324, Private
Reynolds, John Russell, 805273, Private
Rhodes, Alfred Cecil, 817328, Private
Rhodes, Harold, 898358, Private
Rich, John Edward, 412518, Private
Richards, John William, 712845, Private
Richards, Leonard, (Orig. #10210 & #71093), Lieutenant
Richards, Robert Edmond, 74207, Sergeant
Richardson, Norman Gladish, Lieutenant
Riddell, William George, 2000002, Private
Rigby, Richard, 237738, Private
Riggs, William Henry, 1030572, Private
Ritchie, John Ernest, (Orig. #838174), Captain
Rivard, Paul Elmer, 475188, Private
Roach, Frederick, 709688, Corporal
Robertshaw, Earl Frederick, 171999, Private (d. 1918)
Robertson, James Wilby, 228295, Private
Robertson, Leonard, 445629, Lance-Corporal
Robinson, Albert, 3317437, Private
Robinson, Alfred Peter, 877794, Private
Robinson, Ben, Private
Robinson, Samuel, 288934, Private
Robison, Earl Raymond, Lieutenant
Robson, Lyle, 3204114, Private
Rodgers, Benjamin Arthur, 772965, Private
Rodgers, Claude, 186226, Private
Rogers, John Albert, 226701, Private
Rogers, Luke, 488244, Private (1879-1918)
Rommel, John Roy, 832815, Private
Ronayne, Charles (Charlie) Burchell, 67174, Sergeant (c1894-1918)
Roseburgh, Harold, 772792, Private
Rosengrein, -, Rank unknown
Ross, D.A., Lieutenant
Ross, Frederick James, 817530, Corporal (c1891-1918)
Rothwell, Guy Sutton, Lieutenant
Roughton, Allan Dacre, (Orig. #79659), Lieutenant
Roy, Alfred, 61954, Private (d. 1918)
Rozon, William, 417335, Private
Rubenstein, Rowland H., 922594, Private
Rundle, William James, 3314620, Private
Rupert, David Albert, 214162, Private
Rust, John Basset, 76903, Sergeant, C.de G., M.M., D.C.M.
Rutt, James, 186234, Private

Raines, Augustus George, 745166, Private

Private A.G. Raines was gassed on 23 September 1918.  He was wounded again on 11 October 1918.


Ramsay, John Albert, Captain
 
On 3 April 1918, Lieut. J.A. Ramsay is mentioned in the War Diary as being in the 4th CMG Company: "A Patrol of the 19th Battalion reported presence of a working party in 'No Mans Land' to Lieut J.A. Ramsay 4th Company. This officer at once switched two guns on to the target and fired 2,300 rounds into them."  Capt. J.A. Ramsay - he had obviously been promoted at around this time - is shown as being in "F" Battery of No. 2 Company in the first Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps compiled in April 1918.  Capt. Ramsay saw some action during the Battle of Amiens on 9 and 10 August, and was mentioned in a report which accompanies the War Diary:
"The first objective was very quickly taken in spite of a very stubborn resistance and heavy M.G. fire from the enemy and the Brigade continued to push on to it's final objective, but it's advance had to be temporarily suspended as the 5th C.I.B., had been very late in starting and it left our right flank in the air, and the Australians on the left met with a check and left our left flank in the air, but these were very quickly protected by Capt. RAMSAY, O.C. 'F' Battery on the left, assisted by 4 Guns from 'H' Battery, Capt. TUCKER under Lieut. BLAIR, who had some wonderful live targets."

He was again involved in the Battle of Arras on 26 August, but this time commanding "G" and "H" Batteries: "'G' & 'H' Batteries passed to the command of Captain RAMSAY, Acting O.C., No. 2 Company and from their positions ... fired upon selected targets ... and assisted the 6th Canadian Infantry Brigade in their attack. Owing to the smoke they could not see to fire direct, so fired by map for 15 minutes and ceased fire as there were no definite orders out as to the action of the 6th C.I.B., in mopping up. These Batteries then re-filled belts and during the night of 26/27th moved forward to support positions ..." 

The September and October Nominal Rolls show him commanding "F" Battery once again, but on leave.  On 8 October, the War Diary indicates that Capt. Ramsay temporarily assumed command of No. 2 Company, presumably while Major McCorkell was on leave.  On 21 December 1918 he was once more Acting Commander while the O.C. was on leave in England.  He remained in "F" Battery until the end of March 1919.


Ravenhill, Arthur, 799889, Sergeant (d. 1918)

Sergeant Arthur Ravenhill died on 28 August 1918, after having been wounded during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Sun Quarry Cemetery, Cherisy, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. B.22).


Ray, Richard Ross, 430734, Private

Private R.R. Ray was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Reakes, Henry John, 1048192, Private

Private H.J. Reakes was wounded on 11 October 1918.


Ream, Walter Aaron, 1051549, Private

Private W.A. Ream was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Reddy, William Manus, 710163, Private/Driver

Private W.M. Reddy was wounded on 12 October 1918.  The National Archives of Canada CEF database shows his final rank as Driver.


Reece, Elmer, 734013, Corporal

Corporal E. Reece was wounded on 25 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Reid, William Irwin, 730408, Private

William Irwin Reid was born c. 1883, son of Alexander and Margaret Reid of Ayr, Ontario.

The first mention of Private Reid is in Donald Fraser's Diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books).  The company was based in the suburbs of Lens at the time: "Monday, 16 July 1917 - When dusk set in, myself and Reid, who was No. 4 on the gun, were detailed to take over another twenty-four hour position on Hill 65 which lies above the Green Crassier and overlooks a stagnat, slimy pond.  We went up on the night before with the previous relief and an officer and guide in order that we might know our way in.  I told Reid to pay special attention as there would be no one with us tonight, but when we got back he said he had no idea where the dickens we went to.  I had only a hazy idea myself.  The position was in shell hole in a sea of shell holes in the open.  In the darkness we started out carrying tripod and gun, crossed the derailed railway truck and ascended the face of the ridge ... We wandered around and around but yet we could not see the couple we had to relieve and they, of course, were naturally on the lookout for us ... After much wandering we at last struck the place ... They were packed up and ready to go since a couple of hours.  In a moment they were out of sight in the darkness and we took over.  Reid was a new man and had only recently arrived.  He was red-haired and came from Ayr, Ontario.  The position was a middle-sized shell hole ... There was no shelter whatsoever and we would be here, wet or dry, for twenty-four hours without means of getting away in the day time without being seen.  We set up the gun and lay back for eventualities ... Towards dusk, however, the enemy became active and sent several shells into our vicinity and lobbed over small sausages, but none found their mark."
They were relieved the following night, after some intense artillery activity: "Tuseday, 17 July - When daylight broke we had to watch for planes and cover up when they were around.  Expecting to be relieved about midnight, I had the gun packed up and in readiness to be taken out.  When the graveyard hour was reached Heinie all of a sudden launched a bombardment on our front line barraging towards us.  In a few moments our distress signals went up.  Unwrapping the gun we got busy trying to set it up for action and at the same time keeping low for the air was alive with whiz-bangs which screeched past us as fast as lightning.  This was Reid's first experience of fire and I had a job keeping him quiet in the shell hole.  He wanted to get up and see what was taking place and would not keep still.  As the noise of rifle fire and bombing did not follow and the bombardment slackened, I concluded Heiny was only after casualties and a little nerve shaking, so I took down the gun and once more recovered it to take it away.  We were relieved about 3.00 a.m. and as it was showing signs of brightness we hurried out."

A month later, Fraser recounts another experience in the suburbs of Lens: "Tuesday, 21 August 1917 - ... an officer appeared in our cellar and said he required a couple of men to replace casualties, one of which was Elmer Bishop.  He looked around and spoke to Ladd and Reid telling them to get their equipment on and be ready to go up to the front in a few minutes.  Ladd took the matter philosophically, but not so Reid.  The order stunned him.  He looked at me and in a quivering voice said he did not see why he should have to go because he was a new man and did not have any war experience.  McCormick piped in, 'Now is your opportunity to get the experience."  Reid's gloom only deepened.  He looked dispairingly at me and said, "Besides, I am not feeling very well."  At this moment the officer breezed into the cellar and called out.  "Are those two fellows not ready yet?"  Reid had to jump to in a hurry.  He reached into his pocket and pulled out fifteen francs and in a shaky, whimpering voice full of pathos and dejection, said, "Here, Fraser, take this and if i don't come back keep it."  Seeing the condition he was in I told him to buck up and not take it that way, that it would not be as bad as that.  In a moment they were off with a guide to the fray ... all our fellows were packed and very anxious looking.  They were fidgetting to get away ... Some of the late arrivals were lying on the floor exhausted.  I spotted Reid and asked him if he wanted his fifteen francs, but he was too far gone to even answer or smile."

On 4 November 1917, as they were preparing for the attack on Passchendaele village, Fraser found some time to contemplate the make-up of his crew: "Expecting to remain here until the end of the Passchendaele action, I found time to check up on the crew and the gun and noted the following:

No. 14 Gun Crew Gun Particulars
1. Fraser, D. 1. Tripod and Crosshead C48348
2. Ladd, Wm. 2. Gun L862
3. Reid 3. Field Mount C79931
4. Linden 4. Lock A313
5. Orme 5. Lock (Spare) 47734
6. Goodman, C.W. 6. Feed Block 41788
7. Bartley 7. Feed Block (Spare) A45
8. Fage
Crew members 4, 5, 6 and 7 were new men and at the present date I have no recollection of them.  Although I was the longest in France and Belgium Fage was longer with the Machine-Gun Company and was latterly transferred to my crew from No. 15."

On 11 November 1917, Pte. W.I. Reid was killed.  His name is listed on Panel 32 of the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, at Ypres.  The War Diary shows that the company was relieved on Sunday 11 November, but makes no mention of casualties.  However, there were three O.R.s killed on the previous day by heavy shelling during a Second Division attack on the enemy lines which the company supported with a machine-gun barrage. The following is an extract from the War Diary for 10 November: "Weather stormy with heavy rain. The 2nd Cdn Div again attacked on the left sector. Barrage guns in positions taken up on the 9th opened fire in accordance with Fire Organization Table attached. Zero hour was 6.05 a.m. Attack was successful but units were subjected to one of the heaviest barrages they have yet endured. On account of the heavy rain which set in during the early morning and converted the countryside into a quagmire the men suffered severely from exposure, the heavy shelling causing trenches and shelters to cave in and burying men, guns, and ammunition. It was impossible to keep guns clean. Casualties for the day were 3 O.R's killed."


Reilly, John D'Arcy, 455134, Sergeant

Sergeant J.D. Reilly was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Relph, -, Private

The War Diary of the 6th Brigade CMG Company includes the following in its description of the events of 9 April 1917, during the attack on Vimy Ridge: "... later in the day Ptes Lee and Relph were caught in fumes from gas shells and were slightly gassed."


Rennie, Frank Blair, 488713, Sergeant

Sergeant Frank Blair Rennie was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Reynolds, Gordon, 742526, Private

Private G. Reynolds was wounded on 7 October 1918.


Reynolds, Howard Robert, 853324, Private

Private H.R. Reynolds was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Reynolds, John Russell, 805273, Private

Private J.R. Reynolds was wounded on 15 October 1918.


Rhodes, Alfred Cecil, 817328, Private

Private A.C. Rhodes was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Rhodes, Harold, 898358, Private

Private H. Rhodes was wounded on 5 September 1918, but remained at duty.


Rich, John Edward, 412518, Private

Private J.E. Rich was detached to the 21st Canadian Battalion Unit Group 12, "H" Kingston on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Richards, John William, 712845, Private

Private J.W. Williams was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Richards, Leonard, (Orig. #10210 & #71093), Lieutenant
 
The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Lieut. L. Richards in "G" Battery No. 2 Company, where he remained until the end of March 1919, although he is shown as being on leave at the end of October 1918, and again at the end of March 1919.

Richards, Robert Edmond, 74207, Sergeant

Sergeant R.E. Richards was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Richardson, Norman Gladish, Lieutenant

Lieut. N.G. Richardson is shown as being in "E" Battery of No. 2 Company in the first Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps compiled in April 1918.  By the end of December 1918, he had transferred to "F" Battery, where he remained until the end of March 1919.


Riddell, William George, 2000002, Private

Private W.G. Riddell was wounded on 2 October 1918.


Rigby, Richard, 237738, Private

Private R. Rigby was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Riggs, William Henry, 1030572, Private

Private W.H. Riggs was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Ritchie, John Ernest, (Orig. #838174), Captain

6th Brigade CMG Company War Diary shows that Lieutenant J.E. Ritchie reported for duty with this unit on 5 November 1917.  On 19 November, he proceeded to join the Corps M.G. Reinforcement Camp.


Rivard, Paul Elmer, 475188, Private

Private Paul Elmer Rivard was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Roach, Frederick, 709688, Corporal

Corporal F. Roach was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Robertshaw, Earl Frederick, 171999, Private (d. 1918)

Private E.F. Robertshaw died on 19 April 1918, and is buried at Brookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey, England (Grave Ref. IX.A.12).  Presumably he died of wounds received earlier, but I have no further details regarding the time or nature of the action in which he was wounded.


Robertson, James Wilby, 228295, Private

Private J.W. Robertson was gassed on 8 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Considerable shelling reported in forward area causing a few casualties."


Robertson, Leonard, 445629, Lance-Corporal

Lance-Corporal Leonard Robertson was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Robinson, Albert, 3317437, Private

Private A. Robinson was gassed on 14 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled with gas shells in forward area and caused strong concentration.  13 O.R's gassed.  Shells used by enemy were all H.E. containing small portion of gas."


Robinson, Alfred Peter, 877794, Private

Private A.P. Robinson was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Robinson, Ben, Private

Donald Fraser (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books) describes the members of his gun crew shortly after joining the 6th Brigade CMG Company in October 1916: "Monday, 16 October 1916 - ... a crowded dug-out is a great medium for an introduction to one's comrades ... Ben Robinson, who was fairly old and had a quiet, pawky style, was the perfect peacetime soldier.  He took great care of himself and his belongings, kept everything in ship-shape and was always ready and on time.  He never seemed to have occasion to hurry and was always ahead of the next move ..."

Private Robinson was wounded during the Battle of Lens, as recounted once again by Fraser: "Friday, 21 August 1917 - Our section was unlucky; a shell exploded and mortally wounded Sgt. McGirr, badly wounding Harry Stevenson, slightly injuring Ben Robinson, and shook up Lt. Wallbridge."


Robinson, Samuel, 288934, Private

Private S. Robinson was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Robison, Earl Raymond, Lieutenant

Lt. E.R. Robison was first mentioned in the 6th Brigade CMG Company War Diary on 3 September 1916.  On 14 September 1916, two guns from No 2 Section under Lt. Robison were attached to the 28th Infantry Battalion for the Battle of Flers-Courcelette on the following day.

On 26 October 1916, while the company was based in the trenches in the Bajolle-Souchez Sector, at the northern end of Vimy Ridge, Lt. Robison O.C. No 4 Section, caught a German Carrier Pigeon with a message attached.  On 10 January 1917 Lt. Robison assumed temporary command of company.  He went on leave from 11 January until 23 January 1917.  He assumed temporary command of the company on several occasions over the next few months when the O.C. was on leave, on a course, and sick.  Then, on 12 August he himself proceeded on leave to England again.  On 15 October 1917 Lt Robison was admitted to hospital, and three days later he was invalided to England. There is no further mention of him in the War Diaries.


Robson, Lyle, 3204114, Private

Private Lyle Robson was wounded on 27 September 1918, during a retaliatory enemy artillery bombardment.


Rodgers, Benjamin Arthur, 772965, Private

Private B.A. Rodgers was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Rodgers, Claude, 186226, Private

Private C. Rodgers was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Rogers, John Albert, 226701, Private

Private J.A. Rogers was wounded on 7 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled area around BUISSY very heavily and all forward Batteries."


Rogers, Luke, 488244, Private (1879-1918)

Pte. L. Rogers died on 8 August 1918, aged 39.  His name is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial.  The CWGC on-line database shows his parents as William and Mary Rodgers [sic], of New Haven, Victoria County, Nova Scotia.


Rommel, John Roy, 832815, Private

Private J.R. Rommel was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Ronayne, Charles (Charlie) Burchell, 67174, Sergeant (c1894-1918)

Sergeant Charlie Ronayne was killed in action on 1 October 1918, aged 24, and was buried at Canada Cemetery, Tilloy-les-Cambrai, Nord (Grave Ref. I.A.22).  The CWGC database shows hies next-of-kin to have been his parents, William J. & Josephine Ronayne of Sydney Mines, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.  It also indicates that he had been a recipient of the Military Medal.


Roseburgh, Harold, 772792, Private

Private Harold Roseburgh was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Rosengrein, -, Rank unknown

Donald Fraser includes the following entry in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Monday, 11 June 1917 - Word has reached us that Rosengrein, who waxs wounded in the Vimy advance, died of his wounds."  I can find no suitable entry in either the CWGC or VACC databases for a soldiers that died with the surname Rosengrein or similar.  There are, however, several Rosengren entries in the National Archives of Canada CEF database.


Ross, D.A. (or D.H./H.D.) (Dave), Lieutenant
 
Lieutenant Ross is shown in "K" Battery of No. 3 Company in the May Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, and remained in that unit until November 1918; he was shown as being on leave in October 1918.  From December 1918 until February 1919 he was in "L" Battery, and then he moved to "J" Battery, where he remained until the end of March 1919.

Ross, Frederick James, 817530, Corporal (c1891-1918)

Corporal Frederick James Ross died on 27 August 1918 -according to the Battalion Diary, on 28 August - aged 27, during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Wancourt British Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. V.B.3).  The CWGC on-line database shows his next-of-kin to have been his parents Wesley A. & Cathrine E. Ross, of 336 Queen St., Fredericton, New Brunswick.  The obituary also shows him to have been awarded the Military Medal.  Perhaps this was prior to his arrival at the Battalion, because it is not mentioned in the War Diaries.


Rothwell, Guy Sutton, Lieutenant

Lieut. G.S. Rothwell first appears in the November 1918 Nominal Roll for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, attached to No. 2 Company.  The NR for the following month shows him attached to "F" Battery, and on 15 January 1919 he is shown as attached from "CMGCRD".


Roughton, Allan Dacre, (Orig. #79659), Lieutenant
 
Lieutenant A.D. Roughton is shown in "M" Battery of No. 3 Company in the first Nominal Roll compiled for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, dated April 1918, attached from the 31st (Canadian Infantry) Battalion, where he remained until August that year.
On 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens, Lt. Roughton became a casualty, as is demonstrated by the following very descriptive excerpt from the War Diary: "The brunt of the Battalion's fighting on this day was borne by No. 3 Company.  No. 3 Company had been in position in the Line for a couple of days preceeding the attack.  At ZERO Hour it had two Batteries 'J' & 'M' in the Jumping off trench ready to attack with the first wave of Infantry, pursuant to Operation Orders (103) and two Batteries for Barrage Fire 'K' & 'L', somewhat in the rear of the others.  It was an ideal morning for the attack.  The lowering clouds and threatening skies, the intermittent rain which had providently intervened to screen the gigantic preparations for the attack from enemy planes or observation balloon, gave way to fair and clear weather.  The sudden change from damp to dry produced a heavy ground mist which hung upon the fields in the early morning, thus screening the earliest operations.  Owing to thick mist some of the Infantry moved forward of their Assembly Area and had to be recalled.  This movement was little unfortunate, for approaching too close to the enemy, it was seen by the enemy, who laid down a heavy barrage from 3.10 a.m. until the ZERO Hour and many casualties were caused to Infantry Units during the barrage from which they had little or no cover.  Lieut. A. ROUGHTON and nine of our men were wounded by this shell-fire."

Lt. Roughton obviously recovered sufficiently to be listed as "attached" in the Nominal Roll for November 1918.  By the end of December, he was back with "M" Battery, where he remained until the end of March 1919.


Roy, Alfred, 61954, Private (d. 1918)

Private Alfred Roy was killed in action on 2 October 1918, and buried at Sains-les-Marquion British Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. II.B.1).


Rozon, William, 417335, Private

Private W. Rozon was gassed on 14 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled with gas shells in forward area and caused strong concentration.  13 O.R's gassed.  Shells used by enemy were all H.E. containing small portion of gas."


Rubenstein, Rowland H., 922594, Private

Private R.H. Rubenstein was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Rundle, William James, 3314620, Private

Private W.J. Rundle was wounded on 11 October 1918.


Rupert, David Albert, 214162, Private

Private D.A. Rupert was wounded on 26 September 1918, but remained at duty.


Rust, John Basset, 76903 (or 79603), Sergeant, C.de G., M.M., D.C.M.

10 April 1917 - Battle of Vimy Ridge: "Lts Waddington, Williams, Tucker and Hardiman rendered exceptionally good services throughout whole of the operations as did Sgts McGirr and Eustace, L/Cpls Olmsteadand Rust, and Ptes Woodean, Climie and Halstead." [6th Brigade CMG Company War Diary]

On 9 July 1918, Sergeant Rust was awarded the "Croix de Guerre".  In his "Report on Operations October 9/15th 1918", after the Battle of Cambrai, the O.C. Major Sansome recommended him for the Military Medal, which he was, in fact, given on 19 November 1918.  Then on 1 January 1919, he was also awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.


Rutt, James, 186234, Private

Private J. Rutt was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


This page last updated 21 April 2003
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