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6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company
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2nd Battalion Canadian Machine Gun Corps
Personnel Database - M
Please contact Brett Payne if you have further details relating to any soldier mentioned on this page.
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McAdam, Frank, 79749, Private (1888-)
McAllister, Charles, 67235, Corporal, D.C.M. (1893-)
McArthur, John Arthur, 526926, Private (1894-)
MacArthur, John William, 877952, Private (1898-)
McBeth, James, 1000075, Private (1892-)
McBurney, Hugh Allan, Captain, M.C. (1886-)
McCabe, Leonard Ray, 663334, Private (1897-)
McCamus, John Arthur, Lieutenant
McCarron, Harold Devere James, 82, Private (1893-)
McClare, Ernest Ethelbert, 3030171, Private (1899-1918)
McClellan, Charles Warren, 3031600, Private (1896-)
McCoombs, Lester Lionel, 2005063, Private (1893-1918)
McCorkell, Joseph Edward, Major (1891-)
McCormick, -, Private
McCorrall, -, 65236(?), Private
McCoss, Frederick Sleigh Roberts, 237666, Private (1893-1918)
McCracken, Lyle Gardner, 654186, Private (1897-1918)
McCubbin, William Earl, 542154, Corporal, M.M. (1895-)
McCullough, John Alexander, 301367, Captain, M.C. (1885-)
McDiarmid, Harold William, 414605, Pte. (1895-1917)
MacDonald, Harold Thomas, 642721, Sergeant (1894-)
MacDonald, John Emerson, 256203, Private (1890-)
McDonald, John Hugh, 3034548, Private (1893-)
MacDonald, William, 2600832, Private (1891-)
MacDonald, William Duncan, 1090093, Private (1898-)
MacDonnell, Gladwyn, 733858, Corporal, M.M. (1899-1918)
MacDonnell, John Harold, 733863, Private (1895-)
McDowell, William, 288976, Private (1890-)
McFarlane, Ernest George, 455646, Private (1897-)
McGillivray, Murdie, 1090059, Private
McGirr, Ernest Alyn, 75018, Sergeant (1895-1917)
McGowan, John McGregor, 164513, Corporal
McGregor, Gregor, 799339, Corporal (c1891-1918)
McInnis, Guy, 712764, Private
McIntosh, George Cunningham, 542269, Private
McJunkin, John Edward, 183562, Private
McKay, David Ross, 2413301, Private
McKay, Hugh Samuel, 712291, Private
McKenzie, J., Lieutenant
MacKenzie, Neil Roy, 877579, Private
McKenzie, Robert Malcolm, Lieutenant
McKie, William H., 285529, Private
McKinnon, Arnold Laughlin, 832303, Private
McKinnon, John, 651586, Private
McKinnon, Murdoch Joseph, 878417, Private
McKinnon, Ross, 684682, Private
MacLaggan, Peter Young, 445256, Corporal (1885-1966)
MacLaren, Irvine Grey, Lieutenant, M.C.
MacLaren, J.J., Lieutenant
McLaren, John David, 901395, Private (c1895-1918)
McLaughlin, Nelson, 712635, Private
MacLean, George, 904458, Private
McLean, Hubert James, 175332, Lance Corporal
MacLean, Hugh, 2600821, Private
McLean, James Albert, 3180345, Private
McLean, John, 171175, Sergeant
McLean, Roddie, 877871, Private
McLelan, A.G., Lieutenant
McLennan, William Edgar, 712294, Lance Corporal
McLeod, John Milton, 712928, Private
MacLorg, F.C., Lieutenant
McMasters, Seldon Cummings, 414611, Private
McMillan, Thomas, 423086, Private
McMillan, William Hunter, 174892, Private
McNairney, Charles Frampson, 73651, Private, M.M.
McNamara, William Stafford, 240325, Private
McNeil, Roderick, 878316, Private
MacNeil, Stephen Joseph, 1015593, Private (c.1870-1918)
McNeill, Stephen Roderick, 2060319, Private
McNeilly, William, 2355324, Private
McPherson, John Angus, 536520, Private
McQueen, Arthur, 2418348, Private
McRae, Duncan, 1000731, Private (d. 1918)
McWhirter, David Lean, 832576, Private
Mader, Morris William, 733758, Private (1897-)
Madore, William, 417623, Private (1892-)
Mahaffy, Alexander Francis, Lieutenant (1891-)
Mahoney, Edward Levette, Lieutenant
Manson, William George, Lieutenant (1894-)
Manville, -, Private?
Manzer, Turney Clarence, 817925, Private (1895-)
Markle, Laverne Austin, 240153, Private (1895-)
Marks, Frank W., 3317086, Private (1896-)
Marotta, Arthur, 660542, Private
Marrenger, Alfred, 856752, Private (1897-)
Marsh, William Heywood, 2486318, Private (1894-)
Marshall, Charles Pooley, 488718, Sergeant (1894-)
Marshall, George Leslie, (Orig. #19611), Lieutenant (1893-)
Martin, Edward Austin Hamilton, Lieutenant (1892-)
Martin, Frank, 414167, Sergeant (1892-)
Martyn, Ross Howard, 524324, Private (1898-)
Mash, Alfred, 113389, Private (1896-)
Matheson, Alexander, (Orig. #522803), Lieutenant (d. 1918)
Matthews, James Emmett Thomas, 1015577, Private (1900-)
Matthews, Raymond, 434898, Private (1895-1916)
Mawer, Victor, 623097, Private (1897-)
Meeks, Jack (John) Quinn, 59649, Brigade Sergeant-Major, D.C.M. (1894-)
Meil, Balfour Logey, 1045319, Private (1894-)
Mellish, -, Sergeant
Mellish, Sherman Lee, 216161, Private (1890-)
Mercer, Angus G., Lieutenant
Mercer, Thomas, 716243, Private
Metcalfe, Charles Norman, 724183, Private (1886-1918)
Methot, Alexander, 69556, Private, M.M. (1894-)
Midgley, Emmanuel, 405084, Corporal, M.S.M. (1886-)
Millard, Henry James, 75385, Sergeant (1892-)
Miller, Edward Perrin, 528995, Private (1895-)
Miller, Ray C., 634005, Private (1895-)
Miller, William Dowell, 409642, Corporal, M.M. (1886-)
Millican, George William Harold, (Orig. #406862), Captain (1887-)
Mills, Joseph Thomas, 838958, Private (1896-)
Mills, William, 874333, Private (1898-)
Millsap, William Elvin, (Orig. #404896), Lieutenant (1895-)
Mitchell, George Edward, 100052, Private (1897-)
Mitchell, Henry, 835293, Private (1893-)
Mitchell, Herbert, 113399, Private (1888-)
Mitchell, Roy Elgin, 237069, Private (1894-)
Mitchinson, Henry, 467079, Corporal (1882-)
Moffat, James Wallace, 886560, Private (1888-)
Monk, Edward, 174088, Private (1882-1917)
Montle, Guy Harold, 748342, Corporal (1886-1918)
Moodie, Robert Valentine (Bob), 1976, Cpl. (1886-1956)
Moore, Edwin Archibald, 709978, Private (1896-)
Moore, Frederick Julian, 1003679, Private (1894-)
Moore, W.M., Lieutenant
Moores, James, 141505, Private
Morden, Reuben, 240147, Private (1898-)
Morell, Armand, 660636, Private (1898-)
Morgan, Arthur, 175231, Private (1892-)
Morgan, Marcel Turner, Captain (1885-)
Morrice, Robert, 424343, Sergeant
Morris, James Louis, 912029, Sergeant, M.M. (1883-)
Morris, Urbin, 210594, Private (1893-)
Morris, William, 772187, Lance Corporal, M.M. (1897-)
Morrison, -, Corporal/Sergeant
Morrison, Daniel Angus, 905101, Corporal (1879-)
Morrison, William Gemmell, 117430, Sergeant, C.de G. (1883-)
Moss, Alexander Henry, 406873, Sergeant, M.M. (1891-)
Moulton, Frank, 415377, Private (1897-)
Mouser, William Lewis, 2356231, Private (1897-)
Mowll, George Herbert, 71623, Private (1891-)
Much, Frank Llewellyn, Lieutenant, M.C. (1881-1918)
Muirhead, -, Private
Mulligan, Albert Edward, 1010247, Private (1886-)
Munro, -, Sergeant-Major
Murphy, -, Private
Murphy, George William, 817673, Private (1897-)
Murphy, James Hay, 113418, Private (1887-)
Murphy, John Frederick Faber, 862242, Private (c1884-1918)
Murphy, Norman V., 226626, Private (1892-)
Murray, Ian McDonald, 634099, Private (1897-)
Murray, James Rossland, 629039, Private (1896-)
Murray, Peter Alphonsus, 652016, Private (1897-)
Murray, William, 71196, Sergeant, D.C.M. (1892-1918)
Myers, Emile, 712891, Private (1897-)
Myers, Joseph, 120644, Private (1897-)
Myers, Napoleon, 415055, Private (1892-)

McAdam, Frank, 79749, Private (1888-)

Frank McAdam was born on 7 December 1888 at North River, Prince Edward Island, son of James McAdam.  He enlisted in the 31st Battalion at Calgary, Alberta on 24 November 1914, having previously served for two years in "H" Company of the 103rd Regiment.  He was single and working as a carpenter, and listed his father, still of North River, P.E.I., as next-of-kin.

Private F. McAdam was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McAllister, Charles, 67235, Corporal, D.C.M. (1893-)

Charles McAllister was born on 13 August 1893 at Halifax (presumably in Nova Scotia), son of Charles McAllister.  He enlisted at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 12 December 1914, having served for four years in the 78th Regiment, and at which time he was unmarried and working as a miner.  He listed his father, then of Westville, as next-of-kin.

Corporal McAllister was mentioned in a report accompany the Battalion War Diaries, dated 26 August 1918.  He is probably the same Corporal C. McAllister who was wounded in October 1918, and was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal on the 5th of that month.


McArthur, John Arthur, 526926, Private (1894-)

John Arthur Mcrthur was born on 15 September 1894 at Renfrew, Ontario.  He enlisted in the Army Medical Corps Training Depot No. 4 at Montreal, Quebec on 3 April 1917, having previously been rejected for military service because of "defective eyesight".  He was unmarried, working as a lumber scaler, and living at 529 Sherbrooke East, Montreal, Quebec.  He listed his mother Mrs. H.T. McArthur, then of 622 St. Julien Street, Waukegan, Illinois, U.S.A., as next-of-kin.

Private J.A. McArthur was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


MacArthur, John William, 877952, Private (1898-)

John William MacArthur was born on 1 July 1898 at Cape Mabon, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted in the 185th Overseas Battalion (Cape Breton Highlanders) at Broughton, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia on 5 April 1916, at which time he was unmarried, living at Inverness Town, Cape Breton, and working as a miner.  He listed his mother Flora MacArthur, also of Inverness Town, as next-of-kin.

Private J.W. MacArthur was wounded on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


McBeth, James, 1000075, Private (1892-)

James McBeth was born on 2 August 1918 at Woodworth?, Manitoba, son of Robert S. McBeth.  He enlisted in the 226th Overseas Battalion at Virden, Manitoba on 6 December 1915, at which time he was unmarried, living at Virden, Manitoba and working as a farmer.  He listed his father, also of Virden, as next-of-kin.

Private J. McBeth was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


McBurney, Hugh Allan, Captain, M.C. (1886-)

Hugh Allan McBurney was born on 8 July 1886 at Wingham, Ontario, son of Hugh McBurney.  He enlisted in the 68th Overseas Battalion at Regina, Saskatchewan on 9 December 1915, at which time he was working as a farmer at Forward, Saskatchewan.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, of Wingham, Ontario, and stated that he was currently an active member of the 9th Saskatchewan Rifles.

In November 1917, Lt. McBurney was O.C. of "D" Section in the 5th Brigade CMG Company, and was in command of No. 2 Battery comprising some gun crews from the 6th Bde. CMG Coy., which took part in operations around the village of Passchendaele.  In March 1918, after the re-organization of the companies into the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, Lt. McBurney was promoted to Acting Captain and made O.C. of "D" Battery No. 1 Company.  By May 1918, this promotion seems to have been made permanent.

On 15 August 1918, the War Diary has the following entry: "During the night the enemy put over a number of Gas shells and Capt. H.A. McBURNEY of 'D' Battery No. 1 Company with four other ranks were gassed and taken to the hospital."  He must have recovered sufficiently to go back to duty, because in October he reappears in the Nominal Roll, with a Military Cross (awarded on 24 September), attached to No. 1 Company.  In November, he was with "C" Battery, where he remained until March 1919.


McCabe, Leonard Ray, 663334, Private (1897-)

Leonard Ray McCabe was born on 25 July 1897 at Mono Township, Dufferin County, Ontario, son of Archie McCabe.  He enlisted in the 164th Battalion at Shelburne, Ontario on 7 February 1916, having served for six weeks in the Shelburne Home Guard.  He was unmarried and working as a book-keeper and time-keeper at Shelburne, Ontario, and listed his father, then of Laurel, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private L.R. McCabe was wounded on 1 October 1918.


McCamus, John Arthur, Major (1890-)
 
John Arthur McCamus was born on 28 January 1890 at Gore's Landing, Ontario.  At the time of his enlistment with the 81st Battalion, C.E.F. at Toronto, Ontario on 23 December 1915, he was an actuary, living with his mother, Mrs. SA McCamus at 53 Edna Avenue, Toronto.  He stated that he was a member of an active militia, the 22nd Regiment (The Oxford Rifles).
On 23 July 1916 Lieutenant McCamus reported to the 6th Brigade CMG Company at Reningelst with 7 O.R. as reinforcements from England.  This is the last mention of him in the War Diary of the 6th, and it appears that he probably moved to the 4th Brigade CMG Coy. shortly after that date.  Certainly he was with the 4th at Tyne Cot on 4 November 1917 [from 6th Bde. CMG Coy. Operation Order].  He must have received a promotion to Captain before 25 March 1918, when the first mention of him occurs in the War Diaries of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps.  Then, at the end of that month, the Nominal Roll shows him with the Military Cross, which presumably he had been awarded some time prior to that date.  On 6 April he is shown as being O.C. of "E" Battery in the newly formed No. 2 Company, and at 9 p.m. on 12 April he was placed in temporary charge of No. 3 Coy.  The Nominal Roll at the end of April shows him as O.C. of that company.

By 7 August 1918 he had received another promotion, to the rank of Major, and on 7 November 1918 he proceeded to a course at Camiers.  The Nominal Roll for November 1918 indicates that he was then in Hospital, but by December he was back in charge of No. 3 Company.  The last mention of Major McCamus in the War Diaries is in the Nominal Roll for February 1919, when he was noted as being on Special Duty.


McCarron, Harold Devere James, 82, Private (1893-)

Harold Devere James McCarron was born on 18 May 1893 at Wallaceburg, Kent County, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 33rd Overseas Battalion at Chatham, Ontario on 18 January 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a butcher.  He listed Irene McCarron, also of Wallaceburg, as next-of-kin.  In a second attestation paper completed on 19 March 1917 at Windsor, Ontario, he stated that he had served for six months with the 33rd Battalion.  At this time, he listed his brother, Russell J. McCarron of c/o Dominion Sugar Co., Wallaceburg, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private H.D.J. McCarron was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


McClare, Ernest Ethelbert, 3030171, Private (1899-1918)

Ernest Ethelbert McClare was born on 1 June 1899 at Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., son of Ernest and Ethel McClare.  He enlisted in the 1st Depot (Reserve) Battalion 1st C.O. Regiment at Toronto, Ontario on 23 August 1917, at which time he was unmarried, living at 40 Woodbine Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts, U.S.A., and working as a machinist.  He listed his mother, also of 40 Woodbine Street, Roxbury, as next-of-kin.

Private E.E. McClare died on 29 October 1918, of wounds received, and was buried at Brookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey, United Kingdom (Grave Ref. III.E.II).  His parents were listed by the CWGC datbase as being of Nova Scotia at that time.


McClellan, Charles Warren, 3031600, Private (1896-)

Charles Warren McClellan was born on 27 June 1896 at Winnipeg, Manitoba, son of Charles McClellan.  He enlisted in the 1st Depot Battalion 1st C.O.R. at Toronto, Ontario on 31 December 1917, at which time he was single, living at 1725 West Wilson Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. and working as a clerk.  He listed his father, then of Pontiac, P.O. Illinois, U.S.A., as next-of-kin.

Private C.W. McClellan was gassed on 9 September 1918.


McCoombs, Lester Lionel, 2005063, Private (1893-1918)

Lester Lionel McCoombs was born on 20 September 1893 at Eastport, Midway, Nova Scotia, son of Samuel and Elizabeth McCoombs.  He enlisted in the A.M.C. Re-inforcements at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 10 May 1917, at which time he was unmarried, living at Milton, Queens County, Nova Scotia, and working as an agent.  He listed his father, also of Milton, Queens County, as next-of-kin.

Private L.L. McCoombs died on 20 October 1918 of wounds received in action, and was buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. LXVIII.J.3).


McCorkell, Joseph (Joe) Edward, Major (1891-)
 
Joseph Edward McCorkell was born on 29 April 1891 at Ottawa, Ontario.  He enlisted at Belleville, Ontario on 7 May 1915, having served first as a Corporal, then as a Lieutenant, in the 15th Regiment A.L.I.  He was then working as a druggist, and gave his next-of-kin as his wife, Lillian Myrtle McCorkell, of P.O. Belleville, Ontario.

An Operation Order dated 13 September 1917 shows that Lieut. J.E. McCorkell was acting commander of the 2nd Division Machine Gun Depot at that time, while the 6th Bde. CMG Company was engaged in training.  By early November he had moved to the 6th Bde CMG Coy., been promoted to the rank of Captain, and was "Liaison Officer of Barrage and Local Defense Guns" and "Liaison Officer with G.O.C., 4th Infantry Brigade".

(Left) Maj. Joe McCorkell shaking hands with H.R.H. the Prince of Wales

On 28 March, he was "authorized to wear badges of rank of Major pending confirmation of acting rank."  The March Nominal Roll for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps shows him as second-in-command of the battalion.  Then, at the end of May 1918, he was O.C. No. 2 Company.  On 3 July he "returned from leave", presumably in England, and three days later assumed command of the battalion when Lieut.-Colonel Weir went on leave.

On 25 July, when the O.C. returned, he reassumed command of No. 2 Company until 16 August, when the second-in-command of the battalion, Major A. Graham went sick, and he took over again.  Major Graham returned to the battalion on 28 August, when Major MCorkell returned to No. 2 Company.

On 19 September 1918, Major McCorkell was evacuated to hospital with a fractured knee.  This must have healed quickly, for he was back with No. 2 Company by November.  In December he was on leave, but returned to the battalion until at least the end of March 1919.


McCormick, -, Private

Private McCormick was in the same Section and machine-gun crew as Private Donald Fraser, whose diary has been published (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books), and his name is mentioned on numerous occasions.  Fraser recounts the following incident while the company was based in trenches in the Bajolle-Souchez Sector, at the northern end of Vimy Ridge: "Monday, 25 December 1916 - A very amusing incident occurred during this lively bombardment when two of our gun crew tried to escape the shelling which very nearly got them.  They occupied one of the dug-outs adjoining the communication trench about twenty-five yards away.  A shell exploded within fifteen feet of them, throwing a fountain of earth up in the air to fall on top of their dug-out.  We said to each other, watch Aimoe and McCormick get out of the dug-out in a hurry, but there was not a stir.  In a few minutes another one came over and just missed them.  In a flash McCormick rushed out of the dug-out, down the trench towards us and turning sharply into the short trench leading to the emplacement, threw himself into it.  He was immediately followed by Aimoe who had his tunic on his arm, his braces streaming in the wind and he was in such a hurry to get round the bend in the trench that he did a perfect Charlie Chaplin on one foot.  No sooner did he land in the emplacement when a third shell exploded right in front of it wrecking the emplacement and tossing the gun out of the way and scattering corruption all over them.  It was a scream to see them, consternation and fright written all over their features.  Scrambling from the emplacement they literally flew up the trench a couple of hundred yards away, finally taking refuge in a deep dug-out in the battalion's quarters.  They did not put in an appearance for quite a while afterwards.  Although it was a serious situation and their plight desperate, it was impossible to refrain from laughter."

Donald Fraser recounted events from the Battle of Vimy Ridge in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Monday, 9 April 1917 - Seeing an artillery emplacement, we ran into it at an angle and met a German machine-gunner face to face ... He was very pale and blood was trickling down one cheek ... The gunner held us at bay a few minutes earlier but someone must have winged him and no further attempt at fight was made."
"Seeing the Germans retreating over the plain, McCormick and I grabbed the German gun, a heavy and clumsy thing it was, and carrying it about fifteen yards, turned it around with the intention of shooting the enemy when we found it was out of action.  Thinking the belt was stuck, we cut it and tried to re-thread it, but it would not run.  At this point Sgt. McGirr of our section jumped in between us from the rear and tried to get away a burst, but it was useless.  A closer inspection revealed that the block was removed and, apparently, thrown away.  McGirr had a piece of chalk and when we left him he was writing on the gun 'Captured by the 6th Brigade Machine-Gun Company.'  I heard later that this was rubbed out and the capture was claimed by the 27th Battalion."  Later, after they had established their own machine-gun in a position in the Bois-de-la-Ville, "Between the shelling, McCormick and I made frequent visits to our gun to see that it was still there and intact."

He also tells of a rather close call a few weeks later: "A singular and lucky thing occurred today.  Heiny was bombarding us and was coming too close to be pleasant, with the result that we took shelter in a German dug-out.  McCormick and myself were the first to get into the dug-out, but in a few minutes six battalion men crowded us down to the bottom. It was originally intended to be a deep dug-out, but Fritzie only got time to construct about eight steps and a landing.  I was sitting on the bottom step and the others sprawled right on the top.  As we lay there waiting for a let up in the shelling, a shell bounced off a dug-out beside us and slid into our dug-out, from the northeast corner, curved round the shoulder of the top man on to the lap of another and settled down on the third bottom step.  Fortunately it did not explode or we would have been blown into minced meat.  A yell was let out as the shining, silver-coated shell slid into out midst, and immediately one after another, holding their breath, beat it up the steps and bolted down the trench.  When McCormick rose to get up, I saw the shell lying on the step and yelled at him to take the thing out.  You would have thought that he was hypnotized, for automatically down went his hand instantly and he picked up the shell and, climbing up the steps, [he] gingerly laid it down at the entrance to the dug-out and ran away.  The rest of the day the battalion men gave it a wide berth."

The next three incidents were during the Battle of Lens: 
"Tuesday, 3 July 1917 - ... Our officers and the sergeant who led us in had a very hazy idea of the location of the position we had to occupy.  It was clear that they had lost their way and after walking us around several streets, finally decided that we position the gun in a vacant space adjoining a villa.  We relieved nobody.  We are supposed to be in supports.  The gun position was ridiculous.  McCormick and I sood decided that we would find a proper position before long.  All that concerned the officer and sergeant was to get away ... We were supposed to relieve Imperial troops, the Sherwood Foresters, but whether the gun crew beat it away or we could not locate them is a mystery.  I am inclined to think we landed on the wrong street and we were left to make the most of it."

"Wednesday, 4 July 1917 - In the morning I started down the street with a view to finding a basement for shelter and sleep.  The first two I looked into were too badly damaged to get in and out; the third had an accumulation of debris and rubbish, but the fourth was the very thing the doctor ordered.  It was as clean as a whistle.  We soon made a change over and as McCormick's whole idea of army life was a suitable place to stay and sufficient time to play cards therein, he was in his element with the location and in a few minutes he unearthed the cards and was calling for a game."

"Tuesday, 21 August 1917 - Word was sent down to our position, which adjoined the communication trench, for four stretcher bearers to carry Harry Stevenson out.  This was the second call on our gun crew for assistance ... He looked around and spoke to Ladd and Reid telling them to get their equipment on and be ready to go up to the front in a few minutes.  Ladd took the matter philosophically, but not so Reid.  The order stunned him.  He looked at me and in a quivering voice said he did not see why he should have to go because he was a new man and did not have any war experience.  McCormick piped in, 'Now is your opportunity to get the experience."  Reid's gloom only deepened ... McCormick, Jackson, Nick and I responded to the call ... [Nick's] pet wish was to mix it with the Germans.  McCormick, so far, toned him down by telling him not to be in a hurry as he would get lots of opportunities to close with them ... The whole idea was that as soon as Harry Stevenson was picked up and taken away, the gun crews would retire as we were surrounded ... A council of action was held and in a few minutes it was decided that, as soon as possible, two with a stretcher would run to an old German dug-out about fifty yards away where Harry Stevenson lay grievously wounded and pick him up and bring him in. Bud Willox and Elwood volunteered for the job.  Both were husky, resolute fellows.  In a moment or two the place became enveloped in a fog of smoke and brick dust caused by exploding shells and the two dashed out with the stretcher and in a few minutes reappeared with Harry who was absolutely all in.  After that it was decided that McCormick and Jackson would lead off with the stretcher and fifty yards would be followed by Nick and myself as relief stretcher bearers and later on one by one of the crews would beat it out.  Jackson and McCormick grabbed the strecher and away they went, then Nick.  When I reached the entrance to the trench, I turned round, waved to those behind and was gone.  After a long, arduous spell with many squeaks and narrow shaves and the lives almost scared out of us, we reached the dressing station.  One has to go through such an experience to really understand what it is to carry a wounded man through a double bombardment and without any supporting straps ... Before long Nick and I had to relieve the other two.  After several exchanges Nick's fingers lost their grip entirely and he dropped his end of the stretcher shaking up Harry badly.  The three of us handled the situation for the rest of the way ... If we had delayed our departure from the outpost a few minutes longer, I am afraid Stevenson's fate would have been sealed as he would have been abandoned.  A few days later information reached us that Harry died at Etaples ... After turning Harry over to the Red Cross, we retired to our cellar and were given a tot of rum.  Never did rum taste so good."

"Tuesday, 22 August - Nick, the firebrand who failed as a stretcher bearer, was observed last night to have turned very quiet and contemplative and this morning he was the same.  Asking him how did he like his trip up the line in the shelling, he replied that he was not afraid of the Germans, but, oh, the dead! the dead!  Apparently Nick had a nightmare.  McCormick, upon hearing him, shouted over in disguts, 'Never mind the dead ones, it's the live ones you want to keep your eyes skinned for.'  A few days later nick and his lanky pal, who about died of fright getting to the outpost, were returned to the battalion."


McCorrall, -, 65236(?), Private

Pte. McCorrall was wounded on 7 June 1918, as described in the War Diary entry for that day: "65236  Pte McCORRALL, was seriously wounded by a Lewis Gun bullet in the back.  The L.G. was firing at an enemy aeroplane."  The National Archives of Canada on-line CEF database does not show a soldier with this surname and regimental number, so perhaps both are incorrect.


McCoss, Frederick Sleigh Roberts, 237666, Private (1893-1918)

Frederick Sleigh Roberts McCoss was born on 30 June 1893 at Aberdeen, Scotland, son of David B. & Anne/Annie McCoss.  He enlisted in the 204th Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 27 April 1916, at which time he was working as an office clerk, and living at 11 Washington Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.  He listed his next-of-kin as his mother, then of 11 Roslin Terrace, Aberdeen, Scotland.

Private F.S.R. McCoss died on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Sun Quarry Cemetery, Cherisy, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. B.27).  The address of his next-of-kin at this time, according to the CWGC on-line database, was 13 Roslin Terrace, Aberdeen, Scotland.


McCracken, Lyle Gardner, 654186, Private (1897-1918)

Lyle Gardner McCracken was born on 19 July 1897 at Brussels, Huron County, Ontario, son of Fred McCracken.  He enlisted at Brussels, Ontario on 6 July 1916, at which time he was single, living at Brussels, Ontario, and working as a painter.  He listed his father, also of Brussels, as next-of-kin.

Private L.G. McCracken died on 31 August, from wounds received on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Mont Huon Military Cemetery, Le Treport, Seine-Maritime (Grave Ref. VII.E.6A).


McCubbin, William Earl, 542154, Corporal, M.M. (1895-)

William Earl McCubbin was born on 21 March 1895 at Vancouver, British Columbia.  He enlisted in the 11th Regiment (The Irish Fusiliers of Canada) at Vancouver, B.C. on 6th June 1916, at which time was living with his mother, Minnie McCubbin, at 31, 15th Avenue East, Vancouver, and working as a baker.

Corporal W.E. McCubbin was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.


McCullough, John Alexander, 301367, Captain, M.C. (1885-)

John Alexander McCullough was born on 10 September 1885 at Wales, Ontario.  At the time of his enlistment in the 37th Overseas Battery C.F.A. at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 30 August 1915, he was serving as a Sergeant in the 34th Fort Garry Horse - a note on his attestation paper states that he was "qualifying for Lieut. at present time" - while working as a salesman.  He was married, and lived with his wife Mrs. R.F. McCullough at 136 Edmonton Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Notes on his "Officer's Declaration Form" show that J.A. McCullough was taken on strength, and appointed to the rank of Lieutenant, with the 60th Overseas Battery C.F.A. at Regina, Saskatchewan on 22 March 1916.  At this time he stated that he was living with his wife Rosalind McCullough at21 St. Elmo Apartments, 177 Colony Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, and that his profession was "advertising manager".  He was transferred to the 76th Depot Battery C.F.A. on 1 June 1916, and then on 23 November 1916 he was transferred again, this time to No. 4 Section, Divisional Ammunition Column.

Lieut. J.A. McCullough (also McCulloch) is shown in "M" Battery of No. 3 Company in the first Nominal Roll compiled for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, dated April 1918.  Later rolls and orders show him as battery commander. The War Diary notes that he was wounded at 10 a.m. on 17 May 1918, although he remained at duty.

Then on 8 August, during the Battle of Amiens, by then a Captain, he is mentioned again: "The existence of these nests gave a chance of many deeds of valour being performed by our Officers and Gunners.  Probably the most outstanding of these was the exploit of Capt. J.A. McCULLOCH, O.C. 'M' Battery, who with little or no assistance rushed three nests one after the other.  While taking the crew of the third gun, he was seriously wounded in the arm but would not drop out of the fight.  A little later he was also seriously wounded in the leg and had to retire, handing over his Battery to Lieut. I.G. MacLAREN."  He was awarded the Military Cross on 24 September 1918, and appears to have played no further role in the history of the Battalion.


McDiarmid, Harold William, 414605, Private (1895-1917)

Harold William McDiarmid was born on 30 January 1895, son of William and Mary J. McDiarmid of Carleton Place, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 40th Battalion at New Glasgow, Nova Scotia on 30 March 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as an engineer.  He listed his mother, still of Carleton Place, as next-of-kin.

Private McDiarmid died on 14 April 1917, aged 22, of wounds received during the Battle of Vimy Ridge, and was buried at Etaples Military Cemetery (Grave Ref. XXII.H.18).  Donald Fraser recounts the events of that day in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Monday, 9 April 1917 - The shelling became hotter again and realizing that it was unsafe lying in shell holes in the open, a couple and myself ran to a dug-out a few yards away from which smoke issued.  One entrance was blown in.  I only went down two or three steps when I was forced back by the smoke.  McDermid [sic], a Nova Scotian, was not satisfied with my effort and he decided to enter the dug-out.  Meanwhile I returned to near the shell hole that I left.  McDermid could not stand the smoke and followed me stopping about two yards behind, when shrapnel came over our heads and burst, as I thought, a considerable distance behind me.  McDermid uttered a cry, and as I turned he had a despairing look in his eyes.  Thinking he was shell-shocked or frightened out of his wits, I felt slightly disgusted and paid no further attention.  A moment later, observing that there were signs of a forward move, I went back to our gun crews in the shell hole and collected my load.  It transpired later that McDermid was mortally wounded having received shrapnel in the lower part of the body and the upper part of the thighs.  He died later at the base.  His brother was killed further along the ridge on the same day ..."


MacDonald, Harold Thomas, 642721, Sergeant (1894-)

Harold Thomas MacDonald was born on 6 April 1894 at Toronto, Ontario, son of Philip MacDonald.  He enlisted in the 157th Overseas Battalion at Collingwood, Ontario on 20 December 1915, at which time he was single, working as a clerk, and living at Collingwood, Ontario.  He listed his father, also of Collingwood, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant H.T. MacDonald was wounded on 23 September 1918.


MacDonald, John Emerson, 256203, Private (1890-)

John Emerson MacDonald was born on 29 May 1890 at Newton, Ontario, son of Hugh MacDonald.  He enlisted in the 12 M.D., 1st Saskatchewan Depot Battalion at Regina, Saskatchewan on 10 November 1917, after having had a medical examination in Regina five days earlier.  He was single and farming at Huntoon, Saskatchewan, and listed his father, of Newton, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

John Emerson MacDonald was wounded on 3 October 1918.


McDonald, John Hugh, 3034548, Private (1893-)

John Hugh McDonald was born on 3 July 1893 at Ogdensburg, New York, U.S.A.  He enlisted in "C" Company of the First Depot Battalion, First Central Ontario Regiment at Toronto, Ontario on 11 November 1917, having received a medical examination at Iroquois Falls on 25 March.  He was single, working as a fur trader at Alexandra, Ontario, and listed his mother Mrs. Anna McDonald, also of Alexandra, as next-of-kin.

Private J.H. McDonald was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


MacDonald, William, 2600832, Private (1891-)

William MacDonald was born on 9 May 1891 at Inverness, Scotland, son of John MacDonald.  He enlisted in the Divisional Cyclist Depot (Calgary Draft) at Sarcee? Camp on 11 October 1917.  He was unmarried and working as a policeman in the R.N.W.M. Police at Calgary, Alberta, where he had been for three years.  He listed his father, then of Central Street, Inverness, Scotland, as next-of-kin.

Private W. MacDonald was gassed on 14 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled with gas shells in forward area and caused strong concentration.  13 O.R's gassed.  Shells used by enemy were all H.E. containing small portion of gas."


MacDonald, William Duncan, 1090093, Private (1898-)

William Duncan MacDonald was born on 30 April 1898 at Williamstown, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 253rd Battalion at Cornwall, Ontario on 27 December 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at Williamstown.  He listed his mother Mrs. Janet MacDonald, of R.R. No. 1, Box 6, Williamstown, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private W.D. MacDonald was detached to the 6th Battalion, C.E. Unit Group No. 10 "G" Ottawa on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


MacDonnell, Gladwyn, 733858, Corporal, M.M. (1899-1918)

Gladwyn MacDonnell was born on 14 May 1899 at Woods Harbour, Skel?, Nova Scotia, son of Frank E. MacDonnell.  He enlisted in the 112th Overseas Battalion at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia on 15 February 1916, at which time he was single and working as a fisherman in Yarmouth.  He stated that he had previously served as a recruit with the 29th Battalion C.F.A., and listed his father, still of Woods Harbour, as next-of-kin.

Corporal G. MacDonnell was awarded the Military Medal on 24 May 1918.  He died on 13 August 1918, from wounds received on 10 August during the Battle of Amiens, and was buried at Villers-Bretonneux Military Cemetery, Somme (Grave Ref. V.AA.9).  His next-of-kin at this time was his father Frank E. MacDonnell, of Lower Wood Harbor, Shelburne Co., Nova Scotia.


MacDonnell, John Harold, 733863, Private (1895-)

John Harold MacDonnell was born on 5 May 1895 at Woods Harbour, Shel. County, Nova Scotia, son of Frank E. MacDonnell.  He enlisted in the 112th Overseas Battalion at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia on 15 February 1916, having previously served as a recruit in the 29th Battalion C.F.A.  He was single, worked as a fisherman at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, and listed his father, also of Woods Harbour, as next-of-kin.

Private J.H. MacDonnell was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McDowell, William, 288976, Private (1890-)

William McDowell was born on 16 February 1890 at Dromore, County Down, Ireland, son of Thomas McDowell.  He enlisted in the 221st? Overseas Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 7 February 1917, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at Kenton, Manitoba.  He listed his father, of Dromore, County Down, Ireland, as next-of-kin.

Private W. McDowell was wounded in October 1918.


McFarlane, Ernest George, 455646, Private (1897-)

Ernest George McFarlane was born on 23 January 1897 at Edinburgh, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 59th Battalion at Barrie Field, Ontario on 6 October 1915, at which time he was single and working as a farm labourer.  He listed his next-of-kin as his mother Mrs. Alice McFarlane, of Edinburgh, Scotland.  Although he stated at his attestation that he was not a member of an active militia, not had he any previous military service, a note at the top of his attestation paper states, "ex-14th Regt."

Private E.G. McFarlane was gassed on 17 August 1918.


McGillivray, Murdie, 1090059, Private

Private M. McGillivray was wounded on 11 October 1918.


McGirr, Ernest Alyn, 75018, Sergeant (1895-1917)

Ernest McGirr was born 4 July 1895 in Vancouver, British Columbia, the son of William and Alice McGirr [Family Notes].

Donald Fraser reports in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books) on 17 October 1916, that, "Sgts. Tucker and McGirr and Cpl. Hun have been awarded M.M.'s in connection with the Somme offensive."

The following extract from the diary almost refers to McGirr as well: "Thursday, 8 March 1917 - Our Section Sergeant visited his brother at Bricay. He was one of the participants in the big raid that was pulled off a few days ago and was wounded and slightly gassed.  He belonged the the 54th ..."

Then on 10 April 1917, the company took part in the Battle of Vimy Ridge: "On the afternoon No. 4 Section under Lt Williams pushed forward a party with 1 gun in front of Farbus in order to protect the flank of the 27th Bn Station Wood. During this advance Sgt McGirr captured six Germans and a machine gun in a dugout. This gun was immediately placed in position and both guns with those in rear kept up a steady fire on advancing infantry and artillery. Lts Waddington, Williams, Tucker and Hardiman rendered exceptionally good services throughout whole of the operations as did Sgts McGirr and Eustace, L/Cpls Olmstead and Rust, and Ptes Woodean, Climie and Halstead." [War Diary]

Donald Fraser had his own version of the events of that day.  The following is an extract from his diary:
"Seeing an artillery emplacement, we ran into it at an angle and met a German machine-gunner face to face ... He was very pale and blood was trickling down one cheek ... The gunner held us at bay a few minutes earlier but someone must have winged him and no further attempt at fight was made."
"Seeing the Germans retreating over the plain, McCormick and I grabbed the German gun, a heavy and clumsy thing it was, and carrying it about fifteen yards, turned it around with the intention of shooting the enemy when we found it was out of action.  Thinking the belt was stuck, we cut it and tried to re-thread it, but it would not run.  At this point Sgt. McGirr of our section jumped in between us from the rear and tried to get away a burst, but it was useless.  A closer inspection revealed that the block was removed and, apparently, thrown away.  McGirr had a piece of chalk and when we left him he was writing on the gun 'Captured by the 6th Brigade Machine-Gun Company.'  I heard later that this was rubbed out and the capture was claimed by the 27th Battalion."
"A few days after my return to Calgary in the middle of 1918, I read in the Free Library, in an issue of the Vancouver Daily Province, an account of the presentation of medlas to Mrs. McGirr, the sergeant's mother.  McGirr had been awarded the M.M., French Croix-de-Guerre and the D.C.M.  Describing the exploit that earned him the D.C.M. I was surprised to hear that on Vimy Ridge he captured an enemy machine-gun and, turning the gun around, shot the retreating enemy.  It took a minute or two to sink in that this referred to the incident already mentioned that McCormick and I were mixed up in.  However, McGirr was a first-class lineman and was ready for any occasion.  In fact he did not require to take part in the Lens action as he was supposed to leave at the time for a commission.  In his anxiety to get into the show, he persuaded Sgt. Ball to change places with him, so Ball stayed back at Headquarters and McGirr went forward to his doom."

Private Fraser again notes in his diary, together with his personal views, the award on 30 May 1917 of medals for the Vimy offensive: "... today we are notified of the Vimy honours for the company.  Decorations are fast falling into disrepute as most of them by far are given for no outstanding service, and as a certain number of awards are allotted to each unit, they have to be distributed.  At Vimy there was absolutely nothing out of the ordinary done by our fellows.  The artillery took such good care of the enemy that there was nothing much for us to do but to move to our objective with little opposition.  In spite of this ... Sgt. McGirr [was given] the D.C.M. ... It is too bad that the decorations are not granted for bravery exclusively."

Sgt. Ernest McGirr died on 21 August 1917, aged only 22, of wounds received during the Battle of Lens.  He was buried at the Bruay Communal Cemetery Extension (Grave Ref. H.38).  Fraser notes the incident in his diary: "Our section was unlucky; a shell exploded and mortally wounded Sgt. McGirr ... the sergeant was notorious for his recklessness.  Previously he was chasing and firing at a Heinie who disappeared among some buildings.  It was intended that he stay back at the transport lines as word was expected that he would go out for his commission, but he insisted on getting into the scrap despite remonstrances."


McGowan, John McGregor, 164513, Corporal

Corporal J.M. McGowan was wounded on 29 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


McGregor, Gregor, 799339, Corporal (c1891-1918)

Private G. McGregor died on 26 June 1918, aged 26, and was buried at the Bagneux British Cemetery, Gezaincourt, Somme (Grave Ref. III.C.4).  He was the son of Mr & Mrs J. McGregor of Feshie Bridge, Kincraig, Inverness-shire, Scotland.  This cemetery was being used at this time by the 3rd, 29th and 56th Casualty Clearing Stations, the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital, based in the citadel at Doullens, and the 2nd Canadian Division.  There is no further information as to the nature of the incident which led to his death.


McInnis (or McInnes), Guy, 712764, Private

Private Guy McInnis was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


McIntosh, George Cunningham, 542269, Private

Private G.C. McIntosh was wounded on 11 August 1918, shortly after the Battle of Amiens.


McJunkin, John Edward, 183562, Private

Private J.E. McJunkin was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McKay, David Ross, 2413301, Private

Private D.R. McKay was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McKay, Hugh Samuel, 712291, Private

Private H.S. McKay was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McKenzie, J., Lieutenant

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Lieut. J. McKenzie in "H" Battery No. 2 Company, although sick in hospital at the time.  He presumably did not recover sufficiently to return to duty, as he does not appear again the War Diary.


MacKenzie, Neil Roy, 877579, Private

Private Neil Roy MacKenzie (or McKenzie) was wounded on 17 August 1918.  He was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McKenzie, Robert Malcolm, Lieutenant

Lieutenant R.M. McKenzie was in "A" Battery of No. 1 Company 2nd Battalion CMG Corps from April 1918 until the end of March 1919.  In September 1918, the Nominal Roll shows that he was Acting O.C. of the battery.


McKie, William H., 285529, Private

Private W.H. McKie was gassed on 19 September 1918.


McKinnon, Arnold Laughlin, 832303, Private

Private A.L. McKinnon was detached to No. 3 Section, D.A.C. Unit Group 5, "D" Moncton, New Brunswick on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McKinnon, John, 651586, Private

Private J. McKinnon was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McKinnon, Murdoch Joseph, 878417, Private

Private M.J. McKinnon was wounded on 10 October 1918.


McKinnon, Ross, 684682, Private

Private R. McKinnon was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


MacLaggan, Peter Young, 445256, Corporal (1885-1966)
 
Peter Young MacLaggan was born on 20 October 1885 at Taymouth, York County, New Brunswick, son of Miles/Myles and Margaret McIntosh MacLaggan. [see Family Notes]  The family moved about 8 miles to Nashwaak Bridge shortly afterwards.  He enlisted in the 55th Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 16 July 1915, having served in the 71st Regiment for one year.  He was unmarried and working as a farmer, and listed his father, then of Nashwaak Bridge, New Brunswick, as next-of-kin.  On 26 July 1915, he was transferred to Valcartier Camp in Quebec, where they presumably underwent further training.  They sailed for England aboard the S.S. Corsican from Montreal on 30 October 1915, apparently stopping at Quebec City on the following day, and arrived at Devonport a mere ten days later on 9 November.
Between then and 6 April 1916, when he was transferred to the Brigade Machine Gun Base (36th Battalion) at West Sandling, he was presumably training somewhere in the south of England.  Then, on 23 June, he was transferred from the 36th to the 86th Battalion, and again on 17/18 July from the C.M.G. Depot to the 6th Canadian Machine Gun Company in France.  Ten days later, he left base for where the unit was located in the field, arriving there on 30 July 1916.  From 28 October until 8 November 1917, he was on leave in England.  A post-war newspaper clipping stated that he had been gassed at the Battle of Passchendaele, which was in early November 1917.

On 20 April 1918, shortly after the 6th Brigade CMG Coy. had been absorbed into the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, Pete MacLaggan was "promoted to Corporal to complete Establishment."  It seems probable that Corporal Pete MacLaggan and Sergeant Les Payne were in the same machine gun crew at the Battle of Amiens.  In a letter to Les dated August 9th 1928, written from Nashwaak Bridge, N.B., he states: 'Ten years ago today and yesterday we were in the battle of Amiens. I haven't seen any of the old Machine gun company for years and years.'

On 7 September 1918, he was evacuated to the 23rd Casualty Clearing Station, having received gun shot wounds in the back and leg.  He was transferred to the 14th A.T. (Ambulance Train?) on the following day, and then to the 25th General Hospital at Hardelot on 9 September.  A week later, his father was informed of his wounds by cable.  However, he seems to have recovered quickly - at the end of September he was moved to No. 1 Convalescent Depot at Boulogne, and then on 8 October to No. 10 Convalescent Depot at Ecault.  On 23 October, he was discharged and R Camp, and returned to the Machine Gun Depot on 24 October.  They then sent him back to his unit on 29 October, although he only actually arrived there on 2 November, just in time to be granted 14 days leave in the U.K. 

He appears to have spent at least some of his leave in Scotland.  On 12 November, the day after the war had ended, he posted a letter to his brother Roy from Edinburgh describing the Lord Mayor's show on that day.  He mentioned having been in London, where he went to a concert at the Albert Hall and saw the queen: "There was an awfull crowd in London the streets were packed from nine in the morning till dark, in places you couldent move at all.  I was to a concert in London in the Albert hall and saw the Queen, this hall holds twelve thousand so you can imagine its quite a building."  He also described a little of the fighting that year, in particular the Battles of Amiens and Arras: "Well I suppose you will expect me to tell some about the fighting.  I wasn't in a great deal of it this fall.  I was through the Amiens battle on Aug 8th it was a great day in the morning the ground as far as you could see was covered with tanks, and guns moveing up ammunition limbers and cavalry.  One brigade went so far and stopped another one over it and another over the first two.  We were with the bunch that went farthurist and the cavalry had everything cleaned up when we got there.  Then I was through the fighting at Arras on Aug. 26th and was wounded at the Nord Canal just in front of Buissy."  [N.B. spelling as in original letter]

He returned from leave to his unit in France on 23 November 1918.  The War Diary notes that he was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilization.  On 10 April, his service records show that he proceeded to England, after which the enigmatic note, "Sailing 64-C-58 & S.O.S. "J" Wing, Canadian Corps Camp, Witley to Canada", dated 10 May 1919.  Presumably this was the date of his embarkation for Canada, because he was paid aboard the S.S. Olympic on 16 May.  He was demobilized at St. John, New Brunswick a day later, giving his proposed address as Nashwaak Bridge, York County, New Brunswick.

Peter MacLaggan married his cousin Margaret (Maggie) Jean MacLaggan (1883-1971).  On 20 August 1919, Peter MacLaggan of Nashwaak Bridge received his Forest Ranger's Certificate.  Then, on 26 October 1922, he was awarded a New Brunswick Scaler's License.  On 2 Dec 1925, he was appointed a temporary scaler with the New Brunswick Ministry of Lands and Mines, his duties including "the proper scale and tally of all wood products cut from Crown lands in [his] district ... see[ing] to it that the cutting regulations are adhered to" and included the duties of fire and game warden.  By 4 Feb 1937, when he was described as a Forest Ranger of 748 Charlotte Street, Fredericton, he was appointed Commissioner for the Ministry, allowing him to take affidavits to be read in the Supreme Court.
Pete MacLaggan and Leslie Payne remained lifelong friends, even though they probably never saw each other again.  During the Battle of Britain in the Second World War, when there was an imminent danger of a German invasion of England, plans were made to evacuate children to the colonies, in particular Canada.  There was obviously still a sufficiently strong bond present for Les to ask Peter to take in his young son and daughter.  Peter replied by telegram that he would be happy to look after the children, although this never actually happened because the invasion never took place, and there was no evacuation.

Peter Young MacLaggan died in Fredericton, York County, New Brunswick on 9 June 1966, and was buried at the Rural Cemetery Extension on Woodstock Road (Section 9b).  Margaret died on 3 March 1971, and was buried near her husband.  Peter & Margaret did not have any children.

Sources:
Family Papers of Bud Payne, Marondera, Zimbabwe
Family Papers & Photo Albums of Margaret Pugh, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada
CEF Service Records, from the National Archives, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada


MacLaren, Irvine Grey, Lieutenant, M.C.
 
Lt. MacLaren was mentioned in a 5th CMG Coy. Operation Order relating to events planned for 8 November 1917.  In February 1918, when the 5th Bde. CMG Company relieved the 6th Bde. CMG Coy. in the Mericourt Sector, he was commander of "A" Battery.  In March 1918, when the companies were reorganized into the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, he was with "M" Battery, No. 3 Company.

On 8 August 1918, during the battle of Amiens, Lt. MacLaren took over command of "M" Battery when the O.C. Captain McCulloch was seriously wounded, first in the arm, and then in the leg.  The War Diary reports include the following: "Lieut. McLAREN after jumping off followed the Railway track with his Section and reached his objective very quickly, capturing several M.G's on the way up."

The September Nominal Roll shows Lt. I.G. MacLaren being in "M" Battery.  On 15 September, the O.C. Captain E.J.K. Norris was wounded slightly in the head while visiting gun positions near the Railway Embankment, and Lt. I.G. MacLaren took over command temporarily.  He was awarded the Military Cross on 24 September 1918.  By November Capt. Norris had returned to take over the company once more.

On 25 March 1919, Lieutenant I.G. MacLaren was detached to the 25th Battalion at Charlottetown for the purposes of demobilization.


MacLaren, J.J., Lieutenant

Lieut. J.J. MacLaren is shown in "M" Battery of No. 3 Company in the first Nominal Roll compiled for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, dated April 1918.  He is probably the same person as the J.G. MacLaren in "M" Battery in May and July 1918, but a different person from the Lt. I.G. MacLaren shown in later months.


McLaren, John David, 901395, Private (c1895-1918)

Private J.D. McLaren died on 11 October 1918 from wounds received, aged 23, and was buried at Queant Communal Cemetery British Extension, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. D.36).  The CWGC database shows his next-of-kin as his parents, William Edward & Mary Ann McLaren of Pictou, Nova Scotia.


McLaughlin, Nelson, 712635, Private

Private N. McLaughlin was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


MacLean, George, 904458, Private

Private George MacLean was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


McLean, Hubert James, 175332, Lance Corporal

The War Diary entry for 25 May 1918 indicates that Corporal H.J. McLean, along with three others, was wounded, although there is no indication of the circumstances of these casualties.


MacLean, Hugh, 2600821, Private

Private H. MacLean was wounded on 9 October 1918.


McLean, James Albert, 3180345, Private

Private J.A. McLean was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McLean, John, 171175, Sergeant

Sergeant John McLean was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


McLean, Roddie, 877871, Private

Private R. McLean was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McLelan, A.G., Lieutenant

The 6th Bde. Canadian Machine Gun Coy. War Diary shows Lieutenant AG McLelan to have arrived with the company, along with four other junior officers - Lieuts. Basevi, Beck, Eastham and White - and presumably for the first time, at 7.30 p.m. on 1 February 1916.  Shortly afterwards he was attached to the 29th Battalion, from which he returned on 6 March.  He probably went with a draft of new men on another attachment, this time with the 27th Battalion, on 17th March, and then returned on 25th March.  On the following day, he appears to have been put in charge of No. 2 Section, which relieved No. 1 Section in strong points that day.  On 3 April, however, he went into line in charge of No. 4 Section, and he was still O.C. of that section at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette on 15 September 1916.  There is no further mention of Lietenant McLelan in the War Diaries of the 6th Bde. CMG Coy. or the 2nd Bn. CMG Corps, so perhaps he was wounded during the action at the Somme, or transferred to another unit shortly thereafter.


McLennan, William Edgar, 712294, Lance Corporal

Private William Edgar McLennan was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.  The National Archives of Canada on-line database shows him with the rank of Lance Corporal, so he must have been promoted before the end of the war.


McLeod, John Milton, 712928, Private

Private J.M. McLeod was wounded on 10 October 1918.


MacLorg, F.C., Lieutenant

On 5 and 6 April 1916, during the Battle of St Eloi Craters, Lt. FC MacLorg, at that time in the 28th Infantry Battalion, was in charge of various Lewis gun crews which were temporarily operating under the command of the 6th Brigade CMG Company.


McMasters, Seldon Cummings, 414611, Private

Private S.C. McMasters was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McMillan, Thomas, 423086, Private

Private Thomas McMillan was wounded on 27 September 1918, during a retaliatory enemy artillery bombardment.


McMillan, William Hunter, 174892, Private

Private W.H. McMillan was wounded on 6 October 1918.


McNairney, Charles Frampson, 73651, Private, M.M.

Private C.F. McNairney was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.


McNamara, William Stafford, 240325, Private

Private W.S. McNamara was wounded on 1 October 1918.


McNeil, Roderick, 878316, Private

Private R. McNeil was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


MacNeil, Stephen Joseph, 1015593, Private (c.1870-1918)

On 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, Private S.J. MacNeil was reported missing in action.  He presumably died that day, because his body was later recovered and buried at Tilloy British Cemetery, Tilloy-les-Mofflaines (Grave Ref. II.B.6).  The CWGC on-line database states that he died aged 48, and was the son of Capt. Alexander MacNeil & Mary MacDonald MacNeil.


McNeill, Stephen Roderick, 2060319, Private

Private S.R. McNeill was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


McNeilly, William, 2355324, Private

Private William McNeilly was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


McPherson, John Angus, 536520, Private

On 19 May 1918, the Battalion War Diary noted that Private J.A. McPherson was "slightly wounded but remained at duty."  There is no further indication of the action which caused this casualty.  He was wounded again on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


McQueen, Arthur, 2418348, Private

Private A. McQueen was wounded in October 1918.


McRae, Duncan, 1000731, Private (d. 1918)

Private Duncan McRae died on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Sun Quarry Cemetery, Cherisy, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. D.22).


McWhirter, David Lean, 832576, Private

Private David Lean McWhirter was wounded on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Mader, Morris William, 733758, Private (1898-)

Morris William Mader was born on 15 October 1898 at Mahone Bay, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted in the 112th Overseas Battalion at Lunenburg on 7 January 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a labourer at Mahone Bay.  He listed his mother Mrs. Amy Mader, of Bridgwater, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private M.W. Mader was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Madore, William (Willie), 417623, Private (1892-)

William Madore was born on 18 August 1892 at Newfoundland.  He enlisted in the 41st Battalion at Montreal, Quebec on 27 May 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a mechanic.  He listed his mother, Elizabeth Mador of 1479 St Andre Street, Montreal, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private W. Madore was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Mahaffy, Alexander Francis, Lieutenant (1891-)
 
Alexander Francis Mahaffy was born on 30 July 1891 at Mitchell, Ontario, son of Thomas Mahaffy.  He enlisted in the 231st Overseas Battalion at Sidney, British Columbia on 6 September 1916, at which time he was already an active member of the 231st Battalion Militia (Yukon Infantry Company), and was working as a teacher in Sidney, British Columbia.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, then of Cromarty, Ontario.

Lieut. A.F. Mahaffy is shown in "F" Battery of No. 2 Company in the first Nominal Roll compiled for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, dated April 1918.  The September 1918 Nominal Roll shows him in "L" Battery, No. 3 Company, but on leave.  A month later, he was still in "L" Battery, where he remained until March 1919.  In late December Lt. Mahaffey was appointed "Officer in charge of Education", which attempted to keep the soldiers out of trouble after the war had finished by teaching them new skills.  A December report noted: "There are 165 students in attendance".


Mahoney, Edward Leavette, (Orig. #663064), Lieutenant (1893-)

Edward Leavette (or Levette) Mahoney was born on 26 April 1893 at Waverley, Ontario, son of Robert John Mahoney.  At the time of his enlistment at Oakville, Ontario on 15 December 1915, he was living with his parents at 209 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario - his father was specified as next-of-kin - but had been working as a rancher in South America.  On 28 February 1916, he was attested as an officer - with the rank of Lieutenant - in the 76th Overseas Battalion at Barrie, Ontario.  He stated that he had served in the cadets, and was an active member of the 20th Halton Rifles.

On 25 July 1916 Lieutenant Edward Mahoney reported to the 6th Brigade CMG Company at Reningelst as a reinforcement from England.  The next mention of him is in an Operation Order dated 12 January 1917 in connection with No. 4 Section, of which he was presumably O.C.  On 24 January 1917 Lieut. Mahoney proceeded on leave, after which there is no further mention of him in the War Diaries.


Manson, William George, Lieutenant (1894-)

William George Manson was born on 20 August 1894 at Nanaimo, British Columbia, son of William Manson.  He was attested as a Lieutenant into the 2nd Depot Battalion at Victoria, British Columbia on 18 May 1918, having served for one year in the C.O.S.C. at the University of Toronto.  At the time of his enlistment, he was an active member of the 68th Regiment, E.G.O.R. and was a student.  He listed his father, then of 1404 Harrison Street, Victoria, British Columbia, as next-of-kin.

Lieut. W.G. Manson was first listed in the Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps for November 1918, when he was attached to No. 2 Company.  In December 1918 and January 1919, he was listed under "E" Battery (attached from the CMGCRD).


Manville, -, Private?

Donald Fraser mentions Manville in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books).  The following is an incident during the Battle of Lens, when a call came to help with retrieving a wounded man: "Tuesday, 21 August 1917 - ... an officer appeared in our cellar and said he required a couple of men to replace casualties, one of which was Elmer Bishop.  He looked around and spoke to Ladd and Reid telling them to get their equipment on and be ready to go up to the front in a few minutes ... In a moment they were off with a guide to the fray ... The officer appeared again and ... asked for four of us to go up as stretcher bearers and bring out Harry Stevenson who was very badly wounded.  McCormick, Jackson, Nick and I responded to the call ... Manville was our guide.  A bombardment by Fritz was on when we started up the communication trench and it increased in intensity the further up we went.  Altogether we had about a mile to go.  The trench, an old German one, was wide and not very deep, badly knocked about by shell fire and in parts full of broken strands of wire which proved troublesome.  Snipers were busy.  Shells were either whizzing past us or dropping all around, miraculously missing us.  We overtook the other party and I was a little in the rear of Ladd when a shell roared by Ladd missing him by the barest inch and crashed into the foot of the side of the trench - a dud.  Ladd pulled in his stomach as if to dodge it and slowly turning round revealed the whitest face I ever saw in my life.  He tried to grin, but it was a very, very sickly-looking grin.  We hurried past the spot in case of a delayed explosion.  A little further on we became so exhausted with stooping and rushing that we dropped into a dug-out on the left to catch our breath.  After a very harassing time, we made another stop at section headquarters about seventy yards to the left of the communication trench ... After a short rest it was agreed that we should pusch on, but only one at a time.  Manville, the guide, led the way.  One by one over the open they went a short distance and then dropped into the trench.  I was the last to leave.  After getting into the trench I soon lost sight of my predecessor and when I struck a side trench on the right where the infantry had fallen back and were crouching in funk holes in uneasiness, my puttee got caught on some trench wire and I bent down to fix it.  All this time shells were falling and the atmosphere was thick with brick and plaster dust from the buildings as they crumpled under shell fire.  At this point Manville arrived back on the scene and told me to hurry, that the crews were all packed up and ready to leave, warning me that as soon as we reached the Lens-La Bassee Road, a sunken road, to cross quickly to the other side and sneak along it as Fritzie had observation on the nearer side and his snipers would plug us if seen.  Soon we reached the end of the trench which terminated at the road, and right in the trench at the corner lay a dead Canadian and a dead German not more than a yard apart.  Manville jumped over them and ran quickly to the other side of the road and I followed him.  About seventy yards further dcown the road, we entered a wrecked building through a hole in the wall.  Here our fellows were packed and very anxious looking ..."

On Thursday, 24 August 1917, Fraser made the following entry in his diary: "Early this morning we were relieved and another fellow and I reached the billets at Sains[-en-Gohelle] first, arriving around 2.00 a.m.  Manville was wounded coming out and Orr was slightly gassed."


Manzer, Turney Clarence, 817925, Private (1895-)

Turney Clarence Manzer was born on 11 December 1895 at Covered Bridge, York County, New Brunswick.  He enlisted in the 140th Overseas Battalion at St John, New Brunswick on 8 March 1916, having served for three years in the 71st Regiment.  He was unmarried and working as a lumberman at Covered Bridge, and listed his mother Mrs. Carrie Manzer, also of Covered Bridge, as next-of-kin.

Private T.C. Manzer was wounded on 1 October 1918.


Markle, Laverne Austin, 240153, Private (1895-)

Laverne Austin Markle was born on 28 February 1895 at Copetown, Ontario, son of Thomas Markle.  He enlisted in the 205th Battalion at Hamilton, Ontario on 13 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried, living with his father at 115 Breadalbane Street, Hamilton, Ontario, and working as a car repairer.  He listed his father as next-of-kin.

Private L.A. Markle was wounded on 29 September 1918, but remained at duty.


Marks, Frank W., 3317086, Private (1896-)

Frank Marks was born on 30 October 1896 at Oshawa, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 2nd Depot Battalion C.O. Regiment at Oshawa, Ontario on 8 January 1918, having received a medical examination at the same location on 10 October 1917.  He was sungle, living at 440 Centre Street, Ottawa, Ontario, and employed as an "auto mounter".  He listed his mother Martha Marks, also of 440 Centre Street, Ottawa, as next-of-kin.

Private F. Marks was wounded on 10 October 1918.


Marotta, Arthur, 660542, Private

Private A. Marotta was wounded in october 1918.


Marrenger, Alfred P., 856752, Private (1897-)

Alfred Marrenger was born 10 May 1897 (or 1898 according to another version of his attestation paper) at Toronto, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 136th Battalion at Boumanville, Quebec on 4 May 1916 (and again in the 178th Battalion at Montreal, Quebec on 28 September 1916), at which time he was unmarried and working as a mechanic, and living with his mother, Albina Marrenger, at Lagauchetiere 292, Montreal.  Later he was a painter, and his mother was living at 95 Dorcester Street, Montreal.

Private A. Marrenger was wounded on 11 August 1918, shortly after the Battle of Amiens.


Marsh, William Heywood, 2486318, Private (1894-)

William Heywood Marsh was born on 12 November 1894 in Quebec.  He enlisted in the M.D. 10 Divisional Cyclist Platton at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 4 July 1917, at which time he was single, working as a boot salesman, and living at the Y.M.C.A., Vaughan Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba.  He listed his mother, Annie Mary Marsh of 131 Grand Allée, Quebec City, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private W.H. Marsh was wounded on 9 October 1918.


Marshall, Charles Pooley, 488718, Sergeant (1894-)

Charles Pooley Marshall was born on 22 May 1894 at Lowestoft, Suffolk, England.  He enlisted at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 4 November 1915, at which time he was married and working as a shoemaker.  He listed his wife, Mrs. Claudine Marshall of Creighton Avenue, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Corporal C.P. Marshall was wounded on 2 October 1918.  The National Archives CEF database lists him with a final rank of Sergeant, so presumably he recovered sufficiently to return to duty.


Marshall, George Leslie, (Orig. #19611), Lieutenant (1893-)

George Leslie Marshall was born on 9 June 1893 at Halifax, Yorkshire.  He enlisted in the 10th Battalion aboard the S.S. Scandinavian on 1 October 1914.  He had been working as a clerk for the C.P.R. and listed his next-of-kin as Cecil Marshall of 635 Langside Street, Winnipeg.  Later, this was changed to his wife, Mrs. Marshalll, of 40 Palermo Road, Harlesden, London N.W.10, England.  He was, according to a note on his attestation paper, assigned to the Machine Gun Section at some stage.

Lieutenant G.L. Marshall, of No. 1 Section, "J" Battery, No. 3 Company, was mentioned in a report accompanying the Battalion War Diaries, relating to events on 26 August 1918: "Lieut. MARSHALL by his coolness under very trying conditions was of great assistance and all ranks deserve great credit for work done in this advance," and again on 27 August: "At 6.00 a.m. 27th this Battery was ordered to attack again with the 4th Canadian Inf. Brigade ... At ZERO No. 1 Section under Lieut Marshall moved forward with one Company of the 18th Battalion ... Heavy Machine Gun fore was encountered during the whole of this advance and there was also considerable direct Artillery fire. The Battery followed the Infantry closely and took up forward positions for direct overhead fire Fire was quickly opened on men and horses seen on opposite side of the river range - 1000 yards, some men were seen to escape over the hill. The enemy soon began to shell the gun positions with H.E. and gas causing some casualties, and as the attack was not to be pushed then, the guns were moved to the Sunken Road in rear, and dug in."

Lieut. Marshall was on leave in October 1918, but remained with "J" Battery until March 1918, when he became Assistant Adjutant.


Martin, Edward Austin Hamilton, Lieutenant (1892-)

Edward Austin Hamilton Martin was born on 23 January 1892 at Hamilton, Ontario, son of Kirwan Martin.  He enlisted in the 37th Battalion at Niagara, Ontario on 11 June 1915, having served for 10 months with the 2nd Regiment Q.O.R. of Canada.  At the time of his enlistment he was single, an active militia member, and working in the law profession.  He listed his father, then of 254 Aberdeen Avenue, Hamilton, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Lieut. E.A.H. Martin was shown in the November and December 1918 Nominall Rolls of Officers as attached to the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps.  In January 1919, the NR showed him attached to "J" Battery, No. 3 Company from CMGCRD.


Martin, Frank, 414167, Sergeant (1892-)

Frank Martin was born on 24 March 1892 in Labrador, son of Thomas Martin.  He enlisted in the 40th Battalion at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 5 May 1915, having served as a militia member with the 63rd Regiment from August 1914 until April 1915.  He was unmarried, working as a labourer, and listed his father, then of Sandwich Bay, Labrador, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant F. Martin was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Martyn, Ross Howard, 524324, Private (1898-)

Ross Howard Martyn was born on 5 July 1898 at Ripley, Ontario, son of Angus Martyn.  He enlisted at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 1 February 1917, at which time he was a single law student, living in Ripley, Ontario.  He listed his father, also of Ripley, as next-of-kin.

Private R.H. Martyn was wounded in October 1918.


Mash, Alfred, 113389, Private (1896-)

Alfred Mash was born on 17 March 1896 at London, England, son of Charles Mash.  He enlisted in the 5th P.L.D.G. at Ottawa, Ontario on 29 July 1915, having previously served for 11 months with the 43rd D.C.O.R.  He was unmarried, an active militia member, and working as a cabinet maker.  He listed his father, then of Laurentian Ville, P.O. City, Ottawa, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private A. Mash was detached to the 21st Canadian Battalion Unit Group 12, "H" Kingston on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Matheson, Alexander, (Orig. #522803), Lieutenant (d. 1918)

Lieut. Alexander Matheson died on 29 September 1918, aged 22, and was buried at Queant Communal Cemetery British Extension, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. C.38).  The CWGC database lists his next-of-kin as his parents, Colin & Margaret Matheson of Ravenshill, Achtemeed, Strathpeffer, Ross-shire, Scotland.

His name is not mentioned in the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary or lists of casualties.


Matthews, James Emmett Thomas, 1015577, Private (1900-)

James Emmett Thomas Matthews was born on 27 February 1900 at Dawson, Yukon Territory, son of James Matthews.  He enlisted in the 231st Overseas Battalion at Sidney on 1 July 1916, at which time he was unmarried and described himself as a student.  He listed his address as Dawson, and his mother, Mrs. James Matthews, also of Dawson, as next-of-kin.  His medical examination was carried out on 30 May 1916 at Dawson, Yukon Territory.

Private J.E.T. Matthews was wounded on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Matthews, Raymond, 434898, Private (1895-1916)

Raymond Matthews was born on 15 August 1895 at Belleville, Ontario, son of Alfred Matthews.  He enlisted at Calgary, Alberta on 8 February 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a clerk.  He listed his father, then of 533, 13th Avenue East, Calgary, Alberta, as next-of-kin.

Raymond Matthews was killed at Hooge near Ypres on 7 June 1916, probably from wounds received during an artillery bombardment in the Battle of Mount Sorrel.  He was buried at the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery (Grave Ref. VII. B. 32A.), which is located 12 kilometres west of Ypres, on the road to Poperinge.  The cemetery was used during this period by the various Allied casualty clearing stations, since it was out of the extreme range of most German field artillery.  His death in action is also commemorated on the 1914-1918 Masonic Honour Roll, a virtual memorial of Ontario Freemasons who were killed during WW1.  This shows that he was a member of the Wellington Lodge No. 46, Chatham.


Mawer, Victor, 623097, Private (1897-)

Victor Mawer was born on 6 April 1897 at Carshalton, Surrey, England, son of Henry Mawer.  He enlisted in the 44th Overseas Battalion at Camp Hughes, Ontario on 7 October 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a clerk.  He listed his father, then of 8 Lynn Street, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, as next-of-kin.

Private V. Mawer was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Mayor, Warren Waldo, 526837, Private (1894-)

Warren Waldo Mayor was born on 4 April 1894 at Sydney, Australia, son of W.C. Mayor.  He enlisted in the A.M.C. Training Depot No. 4 at Montreal, Quebec on 12 October 1916, having previously served for one year with the 4th Garrison Artillery in Australia.  He was unmarried, working as a chemist, and living c/o S.L. Stafford, Belvidere Street, Lennoxville.  Hed listed his father, then of 14 Barrack Street, Sydney, Australia, as next-of-kin.

Private W.W. Mayor was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Meeks, Jack (John) Quinn, 59649, Brigade Sergeant-Major, D.C.M. (1894-)

Jack (John) Quinn Meeks was born on 26 June 1894 at Kirkintulloch, Scotland.  He enlisted at Kingston, Ontario on 17 November 1914, having served with the 42nd Regiment for a year.  At the time of his enlistement he was single and working as a labourer.  He listed W.M. Hill Meeks of Amprior, Ontario as next-of-kin.

B.S.M. Jack Meeks was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal on 24 September 1918.


Meil, Balfour Logey, 1045319, Private (1894-)

Balfour Logey Meil was born on 19 October 1894 at Cleveland, Ohio, USA, son of Balfour Logie Meil.  He enlisted in the 241st Overseas Battalion at Windsor, Ontario on 13 September 1916, at which time he was living with his parents at 1441 East 82nd Street, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, and working as a carpenter.  He specified his father as next-of-kin.

Private B.L. Meil was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Mellish, -, Sergeant

In his "Report of Operations of Attack on Passchendaele" from 3 to 9 November 1917, Lt. W.G. Broadbridge, the O.C. of No. 3 Section mentions putting 12 carriers in charge of Sgt. Mellish.


Mellish, Sherman Lee, 216161, Private (1890-)

Sherman Lee Mellish was born on 20 June 1890 at Montague, Prince Edward Island, son of J.T. Mellish.  He enlisted in the 100th Battalion (Winnipeg Granadiers) at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 14 January 1916, with five years Imperial Service.  He was living at McLaren Hotel, Winnipeg and working as an accountant, and was an active member of the 100th Winnipeg Grenadiers.  He stated his next-of-kin as his father, of Montague, P.E.I.

Private S.L. Mellish was wounded on 11 August 1918, shortly after the Battle of Amiens.


Mercer, Angus G., Lieutenant
 
Lieutenant A.G. Mercer is shown in "K" Battery of No. 3 Company in the first Nominal Roll compiled for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, dated April 1918, attached from the 29th (Canadian Infantry) Battalion.  He remained with this unit for the rest of the year, being shown on leave during November 1918, and through to March 1919.

Mercer, Thomas, 716243, Private

Private T. Mercer was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Metcalfe, Charles Norman, 724183, Private (1886-1918)

Charles Norman Metcalfe was born on 7 July 1886 at Verulam Township, Ontario, son of George Metcalfe.  He enlisted in the 109th Overseas Battalion at Lindsay on 3 April 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at Fenelon Falls, Ontario.  He listed his father, also of Fenelon Falls, as next-of-kin.

Private C.N. Metcalfe was killed in action on 15 September 1918, and was buried at Sun Quarry Cemetery, Cherisy, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. G.8).  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Hostile gas shelling very heavy during day, and aerial activity very marked.  7 am Capt. E.J.K. NORRIS hit in head (slightly) near Railway embankment whilst visiting his guns.  Evacuated to hospital and Lieut. I.G. McLAREN assumed command.  1 O.R. Killed.  And 2 O.R. wounded."


Methot, Alexander, 69556, Private, M.M. (1894-)

Alexander Methot (or Mathot) was born on 26 July 1894 at Dalhousie, New Brunswick.  He enlisted in the 26th Battalion at St. John, New Brunswick on 23 November 1914, at which time he was single and working as a deck hand.  He listed Sylvester Methot of Dalhousie, New Brunswick as next-of-kin.

Private A. Methot was recommended for the Military Medal for his actions during the Battle of Cambrai, between 9 and 15 October 1918, and was indeed awarded the M.M. on 19 November 1918.  He was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1918, for the purpose of demobilization.


Midgley, Emmanuel, 405084, Corporal, M.S.M. (1886-)

Emmanuel Midgley was born at Radford, Yorkshire, England on 2 September 1886.  He enlisted at Niagara Camp, Ontario on 8 June 1915, at which time he was married, working as a clerk, and an active member of the Royal Grenadiers, a militia regiment.  He stated his next-of-kin to be his wife, Annie Margaret Midgley of 17 Ferries Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.

Corporal E. Midgley was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal on 14 June 1918, according to an entry in the War Diary on 11 July 1918, but there are no further details on the nature of the engagement which resulted in this decoration.


Millard, Henry James, 75385, Sergeant (1892-)

Henry James Millard was born on 29 December 1892 at Highgate, London, England.  He enlisted in the 29th (Vancouver) Battalion at Vancouver, British Columbia on 7 November 1914, at which time he was single, an active militia member, and working as a draughtsman.  He listed his mother, Sarah Ann Millard of 19 Flaxman Road, Camberwell, London, England, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant H.J. Millard was wounded on 2 October 1918.


Miller, Edward Perrin, 528995, Private (1895-)

Edward Perrin Miller was born on 15 January 1895 at Godalming, Surrey, England.  He enlisted in the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC) Training Depot at Amherstburg, Ontario on 3 October 1916.  He was living with his mother, Mrs. Elinor Perrin Miller, at 5302 West Andover Street, Seattle, Washington, USA, and working as a freight checker.

Private E.P. Miller was wounded on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Miller, Ray C., 634005, Private (1895-)

Ray C. Miller was born on 6 May 1895 at Finch Township, son of Charles Miller.  He enlisted in the 154th Overseas Battalion at Finch on 5 April 1916, having served as a militia member of the 59th Regiment.  He was unmarried and working as a farmer at Berwick, and listed his father, also of Berwick, as next-of-kin.

Private R.C. Miller was detached to the 21st Canadian Battalion Unit Group 12, "H" Kingston on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Miller, William Dowell, 409642, Corporal, M.M. (1886-)

William Dowell Miller was born on 26 April 1886 at Tillicoultre, Scotland, son of James Miller.  He enlisted in the 37th Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 15 July 1915, at which time he was single and working as a car repairer.  He listed his father, then of 116 Stirling Street, Galeshiels, Scotland.

Corporal W.D. Miller was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.


Millican, George William Harold, (Orig. #406862), Captain (1887-)

George William Harold Millican was born on 10 July 1887 at Hamilton, Ontario, and enlisted at Hamilton, Ontario on 16 April 1915.  He was single and working as a sailor, and listed his sister, Mrs. W. Walker of 28 Guise Street, Hamilton, as next-of-kin.

An Operation Order relating to actvities in early November 1917 shows Lt. Millican in the 5th Bde. CMG Company.  On 6 February 1918, Lt. G.W.H. Millican reported to the 6th Bde. CMG Company and assumed the duties of second-in-command, and with effect from 20 January was appointed Acting Captain.  On 26 February, with several other officers from the company, he attended a lecture in Camblain l'Abbe by General Byng on the Cambrai Offensive.  On 25 March, he assumed command of the company in the absence of A/Major Grantham, who had proceeded to join the 1st Battalion CMG Corps on posting.  The March 1918 Nominal Roll shows Captain Millican as O.C. "G" Battery No. 2 Company.

By 15 April 1918, he had been awarded the Military Cross.  On 21 June, he temporarily took command of No. 2 Company while Vice Major Graham was on a course in Camiers.  Then on 16 August, he again assumed command of No. 2 Company, while Major McCorkell assumed the duties of second-in-command of the battalion.  Three days later, Major McCorkell was evacuated to hospital with a fractured knee and Captain Millican became O.C. of No. 2 Company.  However, on 29 September Capt. Millican himself was wounded in the head by shrapnel, and was relieved of his command.  He appears to have played no further part in the history of the unit.

N.B. Capt. G.W.H. Millican's service records are entered in the National Archives of Canada CEF Database under the surname MILLIGAN.


Mills, Joseph Thomas, 838958, Private (1896-)

Joseph Thomas Mills was born on 26 March 1896 at Tainmouth, Devonshire, England, son of Edward Mills.  He enlisted in the 147th Grey Overseas Battalion at Owen Sound, Ontario, on 13 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at Marmion, Ontario.  He listed his father, of 36 Saxe Street, Tainmouth, Devonshire, as next-of-kin.

Private J.T. Mills was gassed on 7 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for this day includes the following: "Enemy shelled area around BUISSY very heavily and all forward Batteries."


Mills, William, 874333, Private (1898-)

William Mills was born on 3 October 1898 at Griswold, Manitoba, son of James Mills. He enlisted in the 184th Overseas Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 2 March 1916, at which time he was single and working as a farmer at Fisher.  He listed his father, of Pipestone, Manitoba, as next-of-kin.

Private W. Mills was wounded on 10 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "'E' Battery relieved 'F' Battery and 'H' Battery relieved 'G' Battery.  Great deal of difficulty was experienced in making relief owing to guns being changed in their positions.  Six casualties were caused by enemy shelling during relief and two tripods hit."


Millsap, William Elvin, (Orig. #404896), Lieutenant (1895-)

William Elvin Millsap was born on 13 September 1895 at Markdale, Ontario.  He enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 12 May 1915, stating his occupation as "Jobsman (Ceilings)", and his next-of-kin as his sister, Alma Millsap, of 7 Ridout Street, Toronto.

On 27/28 February 1918, Lt. Millsap was transferred from 4th to 5th Bde. CMG Company.  After the re-organization of the companies into the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps in late March 1918, he was in "K" Battery No. 3 Company.  On 6 April, a further re-organization meant that he became Transport Officer for No. 2 Company.  In late August 1918, however, during the Battle of Arras, he appears to have been with "K" Battery, No. 3 Company again, as the following extract from a report accompanying the War Diary demonstrates: "On 28th [August] at 9.00 a.m. 'K' Battery received orders to take up positions in O.21.d.  The Battery moved up under Lieut. W.E. Millsap and encountered very heavy shell fire on the ARRAS CAMBRAI Road but by very skillful handling got through with only one casualty.  When in position orders arrived to put down a barrage to cover the infantry attack at 12.30 p.m.  On completion of this task the Battery withdrew at 3.00 p.m. to N.4.c.7.6. then to await orders.  At 12 midnight 28th/29th the Battery under orders withdrew to M.6.b. near TILLOY."

He remained with "K" Battery until the end of March 1919.


Mitchell, George Edward, 100052, Private (1897-)

George Edward Mitchell was born on 30 July 1897 at Oak Lake, Manitoba.  He enlisted in the 226th Overseas Battalion at Virden, Manitoba on 27 November 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer in Virden.  He listed his uncle, Alex Rowe of Cromer, Manitoba, as next-of-kin.

Private G.E. Mitchell was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Mitchell, Henry, 835293, Private (1893-)

Henry Mitchell was born on 28 January 1893 at Clarendon, Ontario, and enlisted in the 146th Overseas Battalion at Ardoch, Ontario on 29 December 1915.  His medical examination was at Kingston, Ontario on 11 January 1916.  He was unmarried and working as a labourer at Ardoch, and listed his mother Cecila Mitchell, also of Ardoch, as next-of-kin.

Private H. Mitchell was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Mitchell, Herbert, 113399, Private (1888-)

Herbert Mitchell was born on 23 October 1888 at Leeds, Yorkshire, England.  He enlisted in the 8th C.M.R. at Ottawa, Ontario on 29 July 1915, at which time he was married and working as a "trainman"?  He listed his wife Mrs. Gladys Mitchell of Coteau Jct, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private H. Mitchell was wounded on 3 September 1918.


Mitchell, Roy Elgin, 237069, Private (1894-)

Roy Elgin Mitchell was born on 4 August 1894 in Bruce County, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 204th Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 6 March 1916, at which time he had been an active member of the 9th M.H. Militia for four months, and was working as a clerk in Toronto.  He listed his mother, Emily Mitchell of 425 Crawford Street, Toronto, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private R.E. Mitchell was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Mitchinson, Henry, 467079, Corporal (1882-)

HenryMitchinson was born on 30 December 1882 in Cumberland, England.  He enlisted in the 63rd Overseas Battalion at Calgary, Alberta on 24 July 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a brakeman.  He listed his mother, Mrs. S. Mitchinson of Carlisle, Cumberland, England, as next-of-kin.

Corporal H. Mitchinson was wounded in October 1918.


Moffat, James Wallace, 886560, Private (1888-)

James Wallace Moffat was born on 24 December 1888 at Morewood, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 188th Overseas Battalion at Prince Albert, Saskatchewan on 6 April 1916, at which time he was married and working as an agent at Marcelin, P.O. Saskatchewan.  He listed his wife, Annie Moffat of Kilwinning, P.O. Saskatchewan, as next-of-kin.

Private J.W. Moffat was wounded on 9 October 1918.


Monk, Edward, 174088, Private (1882-1917)

Edward Monk was born on 2 June 1882 at Waltham Cross, Essex.  He enlisted in the 86th Machine Gun Battalion at Hamilton, Ontario on 3 September 1915, having served for nine years in the Royal Fusiliers, and a further seven years in the Royal Fusiliers Reserve.  He was working as a labourer, and listed Noel Monk as his next-of-kin.

Private E. Monk died on 10 November 1917, and was buried at Tyne Cot Cemetery, Zonnebeke (Grave Ref. I.C.36).  The 6th Brigade CMG Company War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Weather stormy with heavy rain.  The 2nd Cdn Div again attacked on the left sector.  Barrage guns in positions taken up on the 9th opened fire in accordance with Fire Organization Table attached.  Zero hour was 6.05 a.m.  Attack was successful but units were subjected to one of the heaviest barrages they have yet endured.  On account of the heavy rain which set in during the early morning and converted the countryside into a quagmire the men suffered severely from exposure, the heavy shelling causing trenches and shelters to cave in and burying men, guns, and ammunition.  It was impossible to keep guns clean.  Casualties for the day were 3 O.R's killed."


Montle, Guy Harold, 748342, Corporal (1886-1918)

Guy Harold Montle was born on 25 February 1886 at Stanbridge, Quebec, son of J.M. Montle.  He enlisted at Rock Island, Quebec on 3 January 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer in Rock Island.  He listed his father, also of Rock Island, as next-of-kin.  His medical examination was carried out at Stanstead on 3 January 1916.

Corporal G.H. Montle died on 28 August 1918, aged 32, during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Quebec Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. D.20).  The CWGC on-line database shows his next-of-kin at that time to have been his parents, James M. & Emma I. Montle, of Stanstead, Quebec, Canada.


Moodie, Robert Valentine (Bob), 1976, Corporal (1886-1956)

Robert Valentine Moodie was born on 14 February 1886 at Glasgow, Scotland.  Prior to his enlistment in the Canadian Army Service Corps at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 11 November 1914 with his friends Leslie Payne and Bud Willox, he had served for four years in the Dunbartonshire M.I.  However, when he attested into the C.E.F., he showed his occupation as clerk, and gave his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Moodie, of Leiterellen Stepps, near Glasgow.  After a period of training at McFadden Barracks in Winnipeg, he entrained for St. John, Nova Scotia, where the training continued and he was transferred to No. 7 Company of the 2nd Divisional Train, C.A.S.C.  The unit sailed for England on board the R.M.T.S.S. Grampian on 16 April 1915, arriving at Liverpool two weeks later on 29 April.

They spent the summer of 1915 training at Dibgate and other camps around Shorncliffe Barracks, near Folkestone in Kent.  In June, he spent almost three weeks in Moore Barracks Canadian Hospital and the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Folkestone, with measles.  He was promoted to the rank of Lance Corporal on 1 June 1915.  After nearly six months, and an inspection by the King and Lord Kitchener at Beechborough Park, they were off to France, arriving at Le Havre on the morning of 15th September.  Little is known of his first few months in France, although he was apparently appointed Provisional Corporal on 23 January 1916, while his superior Corporal Bullock was on a Munition Test.

On 7 August 1916, Bob Moodie reverted to the ranks and transferred from the 2nd Div. Train to the 6th Brigade CMG Company.  This was just prior to the company's march to the Somme sector, where they took part in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette.  On 4 October, just as the company was being relieved from a second spell at Sausage Valley, close to the Somme front, he reported to the hospital sick and was evacuated to 75 Field Ambulance.  After being diagnosed with influenza, he was transferred to a 2nd Army Corps Rest Station, where he spent the next 11 days.  He recovered well, but by the time he managed to catch up with his unit, they were already in the western outskirts of Lens, preparing to go into the line in the Bajolle-Souchez Sector at the northen end of Vimy Ridge.  Between 8 and 22 December, he and his friend Les Payne went on leave to England.

Bob Moodie attended a "Prob. Sep." [?] course from 20 September and 23 October 1917.  He took part in the Battles of Vimy Ridge, Lens, Hill 70, and Passchendaele, all part of the 1917 Allied offensive.  In March 1917, when the company was preparing for the attack on Vimy Ridge, Donald Fraser in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books) recounts the following incident: "Tuesday, 27 March 1917 - Tonight a number of us were detailed to carry ammunition (rifle shells) from a dump beside a road leading out from the north side of Neuville St. Vaast to a point several hundred yards further up Vimy Ridge.  As the roads and terrain were in a sodden, muddy condition, we were directed to a spot in a trench where several pairs of long rubber boots lay and were told that we better make use of them when packing up the boxes of shells.  We looked them over carefully and found that they were dor most, partially filled with mud and water and decided against their use.  However, a few hardy souls struggled into them.  We started together on the job, but it was not very long before we separated and got strung out.  Up and down the trail we went, sliding and slipping and emitting curses in the darkness until we found that Moodie, one of the rubber boot fanatics, was in dire distress.  Then our misery turned to levity.  We razzed him every time we passed.  He was all in due to trying to keep upright on his slippery rubber boots, but he was determined that he would not discard them.  Wearily he struggled on.  Bud Willox particularly took great pleasure in taunting him.  Of course it was pitch black and the area was not very healthy; bullets were hissing and pinging around every few moments and we were glad when we saw the last of the boxes.  We had carried 144,000 rounds.  It was fatigue that we will not readily forget."  The War Diary merely states: "Crews engaged in ... carrying up ammunition both for use and to fill Reserve dump."

Then, on Thursday, 10 May: "A shell burst yesterday, partially buried Willoxand Moodie, but they were freed without difficulty."  During a spell of leave between 26 November and 14 December, he was promoted to Lance Corporal on 8 December 1917, due to a vacancy created by the promotion of Lance Corporal Midgley.  Then between 23 February and 25 March he attended a Machine Gun Course.

On 27 May 1918, according to the Battalion War Diary, and while they were based near La Riviere, "The Infantry made a daylight stealth raid on enemy posts and captured three prisoners."  During this raid, Bob Moodie was wounded by a bullet in his right knee near Neuville Vitasse, and evacuated to hospital. After having his wound treated at an advanced dressing station (6 Canadian Field Ambulance), he was moved back by the 46 Field Ambulance, and operated on at the 19 (Imperial) Casualty Clearing Station.  A week or so later, he was transferred to 49 General Hospital, and then to 9 General Hospital at Rouen the following day.  On the 8 June, he was invalided back to England on board the Hospital Ship Clarisbrooke Castle, and admitted to King George Hospital, Stamford Street, London on 9 June.  After two weeks in London, he was sent to 16 Canadian General Hospital at Orpington for three weeks, and then to the Granville Canadian Special Hospital at Buxton in Derbyshire.  He spent three months there recuperating, but when he was examined on 17 October, he was still unfit for duty, with "chronic synovitis" of the right knee.  On 12 November, he was admitted to No. 5 Canadian General Hospital at Liverpool, where he received further treatment.  On the 10 December he was discharged, and must have left for Canada almost immediately, as he arrived at Halifax, Nova Scotia on board the S.S. Essequibo on 20 December.

On 7 January 1919, Bob Moodie was admitted to the Manitoba Military Hospital at Tuxedo Park, Winnipeg, where he had haemorrhoids removed a week later.  He received his discharge from the C.E.F. on 8 February 1919, and was sent to St. Boniface Hospital, from where he was finally discharged on 1 March 1919.  He gave his forwarding address as 596 Gertrude Ave., Winnipeg, although his service records show a further forwarding address of c/o G.W.V.A., 130 North Harold, Fort William, Ontario.

Robert Valentine Moodie died on 26 March 1956.


Moore, Edwin Archibald, 709978, Private (1896-)

Edwin Archibald Moore was born on 1 February 1896 at Lower Queensbury, New Brunswick.  He enlisted in the 104th Overseas Battalion at Sussex, Kings County, New Brunswick on 1 January 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a guide at the Mouth of Kenwick, New Brunswick.  He listed his sister Mrs. B. Moore, of Fredericton, New Brunswick, as next-of-kin.

Private E.A. Moore was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Moore, Frederick Julian, 1003679, Private (1894-)

Frederick Julian Moore was born on 5 January 1894 at Korah Township, Ontario, son of Mr. Ric. R. Moore.  He enlisted in the 27th Overseas Battalion at Sault St. Marie, Ontario on 18 July 1916.  At that time, he was working as a steam engineer, and living at his parents' home at Box 277, Sault St. Marie, Ontario.

The War Diary states that Private F. Moore was wounded during the battalion's support of raids carried out by 5th and 6th Canadian Infantry Brigades on 22 May 1918.  A later list of casualties suggests that he and several other soldiers were actually wounded on 20 May.  The only suggestion of casualties in the War Diary entry for 20 May was as follows: "3.00-4.00 pm Sunken Road at 'A' Battery Headquarters heavily shelled."


Moore, W.M., Lieutenant

Lieut. W.M. Moore is shown for the first time in the November 1918 Nominal Roll, attached to No. 1 Company.  In December, he was attached to "A" Battery within that company (from CMGCRD).  This officer could have been one of at least three different individuals in the National Archives CEF database.


Moores, James, 141505, Private

Private James Moores was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Morden, Reuben, 240147, Private (1898-)

Reuben Morden was born on 15 September 1898 at Fesserton, Ontario, son of W.J. Morden.  He enlisted in the 164th Battalion at Hamilton, Ontario on 4 March 1916.  At the time he was working as a labourer, and living at home with his parents at 280 Locke Street South, Hamilton, Ontario.

Private R. Morden was wounded on 17 May 1918, as the following excerpt from the War Diary details: "12.45 [a.m.] Relief of No. 2 Company by No. 3 Company completed without hitch excepting for three other ranks 'M' Battery wounded by shrapnel. Namely:- 240147 Pte Murden. 734290 Pte Eisnor, S.227741 Pte Willard, J."


Morell, Armand, 660636, Private (1898-)

Armand Morell was born on 30 June 1898 at Ottawa, Ontario, son of William Morell.  He enlisted in the 163rd Battalion (F.C.) at Ottawa, Ontario on 21 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a "journalier".  He stated that he had previously served for six months with the "Souaves Hull", and listed his father, then of 589 St Patrick, Ottawa, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private A. Morell was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Morgan, Arthur, 175231, Private (1892-)

Arthur Morgan was born on 25 June 1892 at Pontypool, Monmouthshire, England.  He enlisted in the 86th Machine Gun Battalion at Welland, Ontario on 31 August 1915, having served for nine months in the 44th Militia Regiment.  He was working as a labourer, and listed his next-of-kin as Mr. Henry Morgan, of Brooklyn, Glascoed, Monmouthshire.

Private A. Morgan was wounded and gassed on 16 August 1918.


Morgan, Marcel Turner, Captain (1885-)

Marcel Turner Morgan was born on 28 May 1885 at Detroit, Michigan, USA.  He enlisted in the 134th Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 3 February 1916, and was assigned the rank of Lieutenant.  He was a member of the 48th Highlanders militia regiment, was working as a broker, and lived with his mother, Mrs. H.C.B. Hart-Smith, at 69 Oriole Road, Toronto, Ontario.

Captain M.T. Morgan was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Morrice, Robert, 424343, Sergeant

Sergeant Robert Morrice was wounded on 7 November 1918.


Morris, James Louis, 912029, Sergeant, M.M. (1883-)

James Louis Morris was born 16 May 1883 in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England.  He enlisted in the 196th Overseas Battalion at Vancouver, British Columbia on 16 September 1916, at which time he was single, working as a gardener, and living at West Hotel, Vancouver, B.C.  He had served for a year with the Aberdeen (CC) Town Guard, and listed his sister Miss Sarah R. Morris (later changed to Mrs. Sarah Haft) of 123 Heyward Street, Cheetham, Manchester, Lancashire, England, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant J.L. Morris was awarded the Military Medal on 24 May 1918.


Morris, Urbin, 210594, Private (1893-)

Urbin Morris was born on 17 November 1893 at Worcester, England.  He enlisted in the 98th Overseas Battalion at Welland, Ontario on 1 December 1915, at which time he was unmarried, living at Fonthill, Ontario, and working as a moulder.  He listed his mother, Mrs. Harriett Morris, also of Fonthill, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private U. Morris was wounded on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Morris, William, 772187, Lance Corporal, M.M. (1897-)

William Morris was born on 17 August 1897 at Kingstown, Dublin County, Ireland.  He enlisted in the 125th Overseas Battalion at Paris, Ontario on 1 November 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farm hand.  He listed his sister, Elizabeth Morris of 37 Botanic Avenue, Glasnevin, Dublin, Ireland, as next-of-kin.

L/Corp. W. Morris was recommended for the Military Medal for his actions during the Battle of Cambrai, between 9 and 15 October 1918, and indeed received the M.M. on 19 November 1918.


Morrison, -, Corporal

On 8 May 1917, the following entry was made in the 6th Brigade CMG Company War Diary: "During the night 7/8th the transport under A/Cpl Morrison did exceptionally good work in bringing up ammunition and rations under very heavy shell-fire both high-explosive and gas shells. 5 men became casualties from gas and all the party were suffering more or less from the effects of gas but succeeded in getting in the full supply of S.A.A. rations and water."

Donald Fraser mentioned this event in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Friday, 1 June 1917 - Some more decorations have been given away, this time for the Fresnoy engagement.  Cpls. Beard [sic], Clapp and Morrison [were] the receivers.  Morrison was in the transport and his activities are always in the rear.  No one, not even ourselves, knew what the medals were for."

In his report on the actions of No. 2 Section during the Battle of Passchedaele, between 5 and 8 November 1917, the O.C. Lieut. H.J.L. Pearce included the following: "Left Transport lines Potijze at 2.30 p.m. on 5th Nov. with Nos. 5 & 6 Crews, No. 2 Section 6th Cdn M G Coy to take up positions of 8 & 9 guns shown on secret map MGB5 after objective had been gained. The guns, tripods, etc. being sent as far as Seine Corner (South) by pack animal, under the command of Corporal Morrison."

The War Diaries for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps contains references to two separate Morrisons, detailed below, either, both or neither of whom who could equate to the individuals described above.  However, considering that Cpl. D.A. Morrison was a teamster prior to his enlistment, and that Sgt. W.G. Morrison was not shown with any other decoration at the time he was awarded the Croix de Guerre, the former appears to be the more likely candidate.


Morrison, Daniel Angus, 905101, Corporal (1879-)

Daniel Angus Morrison was born on 24 August 1879 at Prince Edward Island.  He enlisted in the 194th Overseas Battalion at Edmonton, Alberta on 23 June 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a teamster.  He listed Neil Samuel Morrison of Post Office, Pinette County, Prince Edward Island, as next-of-kin.

Corporal D.A. Morrison was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown, for the purpose of demobilisation on 25 March 1919.


Morrison, William Gemmell, 117430, Sergeant, C.de G. (1883-)

William Gemmell Morrison was born on 29 April 1883 at Bridge of Earn?, Scotland.  He enlisted at Calgary, Alberta on 13 January 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a carpenter.  He listed his mother Mrs. I. Morrison, also of Bridge of Earn?, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant W.G. Morrison was awarded the Croix de Guerre on 16 January 1919.


Moss, Alexander Henry, 406873, Sergeant, M.M. (1891-)

Alexander Henry Moss was born on 8 July 1891 at Brantford, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 36th Battalion at Hamilton, Ontario on 15 May 1915, at which time he was single and working as a decorator.  He listed his mother, Mrs. Annie Blackie of 201 Orange Street, Newhaven, Connecticut, U.S.A., as next-of-kin.

Private A.H. Moss was recommended for the Distinguished Conduct Medal by his C.O. for his actions in the Battle of Cambrai, between 9 and 15 October 1918, but was awarded the Military Medal on 19 November 1918.  The National Archives of Canada CEF database shows his final rank as Sergeant.


Moulton, Frank, 415377, Private (1897-)

Frank Moulton was born on 23 August 1897 at Beline, Newfoundland, and enlisted in the 25th Battalion at Sydney, Nova Scotia on 13 August 1915.  He was unmarried and working in Beloune as a miner, and listed his mother Elizabeth Moulton, also of Belune, as next-of-kin.

Private F. Moulton was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Mouser, William Lewis, 2356231, Private (1897-)

William Lewis Mouser was born on 1 March 1897 at

Private W.L. Mouser was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Mowll, George Herbert, 71623, Private (1891-)

George Herbert Mowll was born on 30 March 1891 at Dover, England.  He enlisted in the 27th Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 28 October 1914, at which time he was single and working as a mail packer.  He listed his mother, Emily Mowll of 5 St Johns Road, Dover, England, as next-of-kin.

In the 6th Brigade CMG Company War Diary entry for 2 September 1916, while the unit was at Eperlecque, is the following: "Our Brigade orderly No. 71623 Pte. G.H. Mowll accidentally wounded by bursting bomb."


Much, Frank Llewellyn, Lieutenant, M.C. (1881-1918)

Frank Llewellyn Much was born on 17 January 1881 at Brecon, South Wales.  He enlisted in the 4th Universities Company at Montreal, Quebec on 4 September 1915, at which time he was married with two children, and working as a clerk.  He listed his wife, Jessie Mary Much of Queeslet, Wanlock Road, Shrewsbury, England, as next-of-kin.

Lieut. F.L. Much is first mentioned in a 5th Bde CMG Coy. Operation Order relating to preparations for the attack on Passchendaele village on 8/9 November 1917.  He was O.C. 5th CMG Company on 4 March 1918, when they relieved the 4th CMG Coy. in the support area near Lievin.  At the end of March 1918, after the machine-gun companies had been re-organized into the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, Lt. Much was in "C" Battery, No. 1 Company.  On 9 August, during the Battle of Amiens, Lt. Much commanded "B" Battery.  During another attack on 26 August, he was actining O.C. of "C" Battery.  The following is an extract from the War Diary: "The Infantry advance was made slowly and numerous casualties were inflicted by enemy machine gunners. 'B' & 'C' Batteries each detailed four Guns to deal with these nests and they were of great assistance in neutralising enemy fire. On one occasion Lieutenant F.L. MUCH, who was acting O.C., 'C' Battery made a personal reconnaissance over ground which had been made impassable by a most determine group of machine guns.  He moved two Guns to advantageous high ground and got into action unseen by the enemy.  Taken by surprise by frontal and flanking fire their crews attempted to bolt and were wiped out by our fire."

Two days later, on 28 August 1918, he is shown in the War Diary as having been wounded.  The CWGC on-line database, however, states that he died on this day, aged 38, and was buried at Quebec Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. D.19).  Acting Captain F.L. Much was posthumously awarded the Military Cross on 5 October 1918.  His next-of-kin are shown by the CWGC as being his parents, Lt. Col. & the late Helen Much of Brecon, Wales, and his wife, Jessie Mary Much, of Queeslet, Shrewsbury, England.


Muirhead, -, Private

Donald Fraser includes the following entry in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Friday, 17 August 1917 - This morning a party went forward and brought out one of our guns that had been smashed by shrapnel, the muzzle cap being broken and the jacket perforated ... Later on in the day another went out to look for Elmer Bishop but it appeared a burial party had picked him up.  Quite a number of our dead were lying around.  In addition to Campbelland Bishop, Muirhead was slightly gassed and Drysdale and Forbes were wounded."


Mulligan, Albert Edward, 1010247, Private (1886-)

Albert Edward Mulligan was born on 7 September 1886 at Fort Pitt, Montana, USA, son of James Frederick Mulligan.  He enlisted in the 229th Overseas Battalion at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan on 18 November 1916, at which time he was living at Mullraney, Saskatchewan and working as a farmer.  He stated his next-of-kin to be his father, then also of Mullraney (later changed to Melfort, Saskatchewan).  According to a note on his attestation paper, on 10 August 1917, he was transferred to the 243rd Battalion.

Private A.E. Mulligan was wounded on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Munro, -, Sergeant-Major

An operation order dated 12 April 1918 stated that, "Sergeant-Major Munro will act as No. 3 Company Sergeant-Major".


Murphy, -, Private

"20 April 1917 - No. 8 Crew No 2 Section under Cpl Hunn became casualties by shell hitting position. Cpl Hunn's conduct after being wounded is worthy of the highest praise. Crew was replaced 3 hours later." [War Diary]  Donald Fraser describes the incident as follows: "Friday, 20 April 1917 - The gun crew of No. 8 gun were practically cleaned up today.  While they lay sleeping in their improvised dug-outs, a shell landed and the whole six of them were wounded, three rather badly - Cpl. Hunn, Kelly and Murphy.  They would never have been noticed if it were not for an Observation Officer who happened to pass and thought there was something strange about the place.  Going over, he found them in a sorry plight."  The identity of this soldier is not clear from Fraser's book, but it could well be one of those shown below.


Murphy, George William, 817673, Private (1897-)

George William Murphy was born on 18 September 1897 at Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.  He enlisted in the 140th Overseas Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 15 January 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a cook.  He listed his mother, Mrs. Jemima Jane Murphy of West Glassville, Carleton County, New Brunswick, as next-of-kin.

Private G.W. Murphy was gassed on 9 September 1918.


Murphy, James Hay, 113418, Private (1887-)

James Hay Murphy was born on 11 February 1887 at Aberdeeen, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 5th P.L.D.G. at Ottawa, Ontario on 19 February 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a cook.  He listed Miss Dora Murphy of London, England (later Carrigan Road, Chelsea) as next-of-kin.

Private J.H. Murphy was detached to the 6th Battalion, C.E. Unit Group No. 10 "G" Ottawa on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Murphy, John Frederick Faber, 862242, Private (1884-1918)

John Frederick Faber Murphy was born on 2 March 1884 at Toronto, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 180th Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 11 February 1916, having served with the 9th M.H. for five months.  He was unmarried, working as an accountant, and living with his mother, Frances Murphy - listed as his next-of-kin - at 5 Sultan Street, Toronto, Ontario.

Private J.F.F. Murphy died on 27 August 1918, aged 34, having been wounded on the same day during the Battle of Arras; his name is comemmorated on the Vimy Memorial.  His parents are shown on the CWGC on-line database as Joseph J. & Frances Murphy, of 5 Sultan Street, Toronto, Ontario.


Murphy, Norman V., 226626, Private (1892-)

Norman V. Murphy was born on 15 November 1892 at Kingston, Ontario.  He enlisted in the Depot Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles at Kingston, Ontario on 6 October 1915, having previously served for a year in the 47th Regiment, and a month in the 14th P.W.O.R. Guard.  He was unmarried and working as a labourer, and listed his mother Mrs. Margaret Murphy, of 108 Montreal Street, Kingston, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private N.V. Murphy was detached to the 21st Canadian Battalion Unit Group 12, "H" Kingston on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Murray, Ian McDonald, 634099, Private (1897-)

Ian McDonald Murray was born on 23 September 1897 at Stanley, York County, USA.  He enlisted in the 154th Overseas Battalion (via the 59th Regiment) at Cornwall on 1 May 1916, having served for three and a half years in the cadets in New Brunswick. He was an unmarried student living at Drayon?, and listed his mother, Mrs. A.B. Murray of Schuylerville, New York, USA, as next-of-kin.

Private I.M. Murray was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Murray, James Rossland, 629039, Private (1896-)

James Rossland Murray was born on 14 July 1896 at Rossland, British Columbia.  He enlisted at Vancouver, B.C. on 28 June 1915, at which time he was unmarried, working as a store clerk, and an active member of the 11th I.F. of C. Militia.  He listed his mother, F. Murray of 1637, 10th Avenue East, Vancouver, British Columbia, as next-of-kin.

Private J.R. Murray was wounded in October 1918.


Murray, Peter Alphonsus, 652016, Private (1897-)

Peter Alphonsus Murray was born on 3 April 1897 at Culross Township, Bruce County, Ontario, son of Peter Murray.  He enlisted in the 160th Overseas Battalion at Teeswater, Ontario on 17 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried and a student living at teeswater.  He listed his mother, of Hollyrood, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private P.A. Murray was wounded on 2 October 1918.


Murray, William, 71196, Sergeant, D.C.M. (1892-1918)

William Murray was born on 18 September 1892, son of William & Christina Murray (later of The Manse, Turriff, Scotland).

During December 1917, Sergeant W. Murray was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, although later lists of awards accompanying the War Diary suggest that a date of 26 March 1918 for the award.  He was killed in action during the Battle of Amiens on 9 August 1918, aged 26, and buried at Caix British Cemetery, Somme (Grave Ref. I.C.4).  This cemetery was constructed after the Armistice, by the concentration of graves (mainly of March and August, 1918) from the battlefields and small cemeteries in the neighbourhood.  These included the Caix (Old) British Cemtery (which included the graves of 91 soldiers from Canada), the De Luce British Cemetery (which included eight Canadian soldiers who fell in August 1918), and the Ridge Cemetery, Hangard (where were buried 20 Canadian soldiers who fell on 8 August 1918) [Source: CWGC on-line database].


Myers, Emile, 712891, Private (1897-)

Emile Myers was born on 30 April 1897 at St. Louis, Prince Edward Island, son of Simon Myers.  He enlisted in the 105th Overseas Battalion at Summerside, Prince Edward Island on 4 March 1916, at which time he was single, an active militia member, and farming at St. Louis, P.E.I.  He listed his father, also of St. Louis, as next-of-kin.

Private E. Myers was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Myers (or Maer), Joseph, 120644, Private (1897-)

Joseph Myers (or Maer) was born on 24 July 1897 at Denburg, USA.  He enlisted in the 69th Overseas Battalion at Montreal, Quebec on 27 August 1915, at which time he was single and working as a carpenter.  He listed Georgina Morgin of Lasse Eengilla, California, USA, as his next-of-kin.

Private J. Myers was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Myers, Napoleon, 415055, Private (1892-)

Napoleon Myers was born on 23 December 1892 at Tignish, Prince Edward Island.  He enlisted at Sydney, New Brunswick on 25 March 1915, at which time he was working as a tinsmith, and listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Sarah Myers, of Sydney, New Brunswick.

The War Diary entry for 25 May 1918 indicates that Private V. [sic] Myers, along with three others, was wounded, although there is no indication of the circumstances of these casualties.


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