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6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company
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2nd Battalion Canadian Machine Gun Corps
Personnel Database - L
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Labreche, Harvey Charles, 145393, Private (1890-1918)
LaCasse, André, 1051486, Private (1894-)
Lackie, Joseph Dalton, 69527, Private (1893-)
La Croix, William M., 748088, Private (c1897-)
Ladd, William, Private
Laidlaw, Peter Marshall, 739701, Private (1892-1917)
Laister, Leopold R., 73469, Company Sergeant-Major (1888-)
Laliberte, Edmond, Captain (1875-)
Lambert, Joseph, 57110, Private (1888-)
Lampron, Dalph, 748090, Private (1885-1918)
Lane, Harry Elvin, 709399, Private (1890-)
Lane, Robert William, 175213, Private (1878-1917)
Langley, Harry, 787410, Sergeant (1895-)
Larocque, Israel, 416280, Private (1895-1918)
Laurendeau, Hector, 448473, Private (1897-)
Lawrence, Charles, 1001007, Private (c1896-1918)
Lawrence, Frederick, 164134, Private (1891-)
Layton, Francis, Lieutenant (1888-)
Leaker, Arthur William, 529240, Private (1898-)
Leaman, James Archer, 2304469, Private (1885-)
Le Bouffe, Felix Napoleon, 793107, Private (1897-)
Leduc, Sylvio, 1090201, Private (1898-)
Lee, -, Private
Leftwich, Herbert J., 408137, Corporal (1891-)
Leighton, Mr.
Le Maistre, Charles P., 69501, Private (1895-)
Lepage, George, 920032, Private (1898-)
Levesque, Joseph Hector, 61260, Private (1894-)
Lewis, Arthur Edward, 116398, Private (1872-1918)
Lewis, John Frederick, 104685, Private (1889-)
Lifford, William Henry, 174628, Private (1894-)
Lightle, Hallie Alonzo, 488660, Sergeant (1895-)
Linden, -, Private
Lindsey, Richard, 1045027, Brigade Sergeant-Major, M.M. (1894-)
Little, Harry Leroy, 709393, Private (1896-)
Livingston, Alexander, 252125, Private, M.M. (1881-)
Livingston, Percy Harold, 226598, Private (1897-)
Locke, Russell Pierce, Lieutenant (1888-)
Lockhart, -, Lieutenant
Logan, Harry Tremaine, Major (1887-)
Lord, Alfred Edward, 246723, Private (1885-)
Loriot, J.E. Antoine, 660566, Private (1898-)
Louchs, Arthur, 1090374, Private (1899-)
Loucks, Chester Angus, 726081, Private (1894-)
Loyer, Arthur, 1092039 (& #410548), Private (1896-1918)
Lundale, Samuel, 216120, Private (1895-)
Lyle, Frank Henry, 257777, Private (1894-)

Labreche, Harvey Charles, 145393, Private (1890-1918)

Harvey Charles Labreche was born on 4 February 1890 at Warren, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 77th Overseas Battalion (via the 43rd Regiment D.C.O.R.) at Ottawa, Ontario on 11 November 1915, at which time he had been married for two years, with a child, and was working as a labourer.  He listed his mother? Lily May Labreche of 540 Rochester Street, Ottawa, Ontario as next-of-kin.

Private H.C. Labreche was killed in action on 2 October 1918, and was buried at Haynecourt British Cemetery, Nord (Grave Ref. II.C.I).


LaCasse, André, 1051486, Private (1894-)

André LaCasse was born on 15 May 1894 at Toronto, Ontario, son of Edward LaCasse.  He enlisted in the 243rd Overseas Battalion at Punnichy, Saskatchewan on 29 November 1916, at which time he was working as a farmer at Gen. Del. (presumably General Delivery) Lastock, Saskatchewan.  He listed his father, then of Gen. Del. Havre, Montana, USA.

Private A. LaCasse was wounded on 21 September 1918.


Lackie, Joseph Dalton, 69527, Private (1893-)

Joseph Dalton Lackie was born on 19 (or 20) December 1893 at Upham, Kings County, New Brunswick, son of James Lackie.  He enlisted in the 26th Battalion at St. John, New Brunswick on 24 November 1914, having served with the 62nd Regiment for three months.  At this time, he was single, and active militia member, and working as a labourer at Upham, Kings County.  He listed his father, also of Upham, as next-of-kin.

Private J.D. Lackie was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.  He signed a second attestation paper with the D.A.P.M. (M.D. No. 7) at St. John, New Brunswick on 31 May 1919, stating that he had previously served with the 26th (New Brunswick) Battalion.  He was single, working as a farmer at Upham, and listed Mrs. Charity Lackie, also of Upham, as next-of-kin.


La Croix, William M., 748088, Private (c1897-)

William M. La Croix (or LaCroix) was born on 3 September 1896, 1897 or 1898 - depending on which version of attestation paper one believes - at Danville, Quebec, son of Joseph La Croix.  He enlisted in the 150th Battalion at Danville, Quebec on 9 February 1915, at which time he was working as a labourer at Danville, and listed his father, of Danville, as next-of-kin.  This attestation paper is marked, "Discharged".  A second attestation paper signed at Danville, Quebec on 2 December 1915, stated that he had previously served with the 5th C.M.R.  He was unmarried, working as a labourer, and listed his mother, also of Danville, as next-of-kin.  On 23 September 1916, he was transferred from the 117th Battalion to the 150th Battalion.  A third attestation paper, dated 2 November 1916 (later changed to 2 November 1916), showing his enlistment in the 150th Battalion, stated that he was single, working as a carpenter in Danville, and listed his father, still of Danville, as next-of-kin.

Private W.M. La Croix was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Ladd, William, Private

Donald Fraser mentions Private Ladd in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books).  The following is an incident during the Battle of Lens, when a call came to help with retrieving a wounded man: "Tuesday, 21 August 1917 - ... an officer appeared in our cellar and said he required a couple of men to replace casualties, one of which was Elmer Bishop.  He looked around and spoke to Ladd and Reid telling them to get their equipment on and be ready to go up to the front in a few minutes.  Ladd took the matter philosophically, but not so Reid.  The order stunned him ... the officer breezed into the cellar and called out.  'Are those two fellows not ready yet?' ... In a moment they were off with a guide to the fray ... The officer appeared again and ... asked for four of us to go up as stretcher bearers and bring out Harry Stevenson who was very badly wounded.  McCormick, Jackson, Nick and I responded to the call ... Manville was our guide.  A bombardment by Fritz was on when we started up the communication trench and it increased in intensity the further up we went.  Altogether we had about a mile to go.  The trench, an old German one, was wide and not very deep, badly knocked about by shell fire and in parts full of broken strands of wire which proved troublesome.  Snipers were busy.  Shells were either whizzing past us or dropping all around, miraculously missing us.  We overtook the other party and I was a little in the rear of Ladd when a shell roared by Ladd missing him by the barest inch and crashed into the foot of the side of the trench - a dud.  Ladd pulled in his stomach as if to dodge it and slowly turning round revealed the whitest face I ever saw in my life.  He tried to grin, but it was a very, very sickly-looking grin.  We hurried past the spot in case of a delayed explosion.  A little further on we became so exhausted with stooping and rushing that we dropped into a dug-out on the left to catch our breath.  After a very harassing time, we made another stop at section headquarters about seventy yards to the left of the communication trench."

On 4 November 1917, as they were preparing for the attack on Passchendaele village, Fraser found some time to contemplate the make-up of his crew: "Expecting to remain here until the end of the Passchendaele action, I found time to check up on the crew and the gun and noted the following:

No. 14 Gun Crew Gun Particulars
1. Fraser, D. 1. Tripod and Crosshead C48348
2. Ladd, Wm. 2. Gun L862
3. Reid 3. Field Mount C79931
4. Linden 4. Lock A313
5. Orme 5. Lock (Spare) 47734
6. Goodman, C.W. 6. Feed Block 41788
7. Bartley 7. Feed Block (Spare) A45
8. Fage
Crew members 4, 5, 6 and 7 were new men and at the present date I have no recollection of them.  Although I was the longest in France and Belgium Fage was longer with the Machine-Gun Company and was latterly transferred to my crew from No. 15."

The War Diary contains the following entry for 5 November 1917: "Supplies for Mobile Guns were sent up by a Pack Train of 26 Annimals. This train was heavily shelled near Zonnebeck Station causing several casualties. 1 man missing and 6 men wounded, one of whom afterwards died of wounds. 5 Animals were killed and 5 wounded. Despite the shelling, train reformed and proceeded to destination safely delivering all the guns, tripods and supplies with the exception of 24 hours rations for No. 2 Section. 3 loads of S.A.A. and 2 of water were also lost. No. 2 Section was therefore on short rations during the next 48 hours. During this trip Pte T Wolfenden showed an excellent example. Although severely wounded he stayed at his post and safely delivered his load at the Dump. Afterwards collapsing on the return trip."

Fraser was also involved in this incident, and includes a graphic description of the events in his diary: "On the evening of the 4th, our transport went up the line and met with such opposition that a number were wounded and others so badly shaken and shell-shocked that they were either unfit or unwilling to proceed the following night.  Our crew was, therefore, called upon for assitance.  Leaving Fage in charge of the tent and belongings, the rest of us assumed our new duties and new they certainly were.  For the first time we had each to lead up a horse to a forward dump carrying an assortment of goods.  The transport men left behind soon had the horses loaded up and ready.  Roughly there must have been something like 14 or 15 in our little convoy ... We started out and I found myself second last in the line. My horse was loaded up with cans of water, four on each side ... Up the road we went ... Shell holes were everywhere and most contained slimy, muddy water.  The terrain was a wilderness of mud.  Thank goodness, however, the road was fairly firm.  We were warned to space out which caused quite a distance between the first and the last man ... The artillery was firing as we passed and Fritz was returning the fire.  We soon saw that it would take practically a direct hit to do any damage.  We watched the shells send up fountains of mud and water as they exploded.  For quite a distance you could see eruptions taking place at various points resembling geysers or mud volcanoes ... Near the top, shells were falling beside the road ... According to the map, I would say that we were in the vicinity of Zonnebeke.  Emerging from the hollow, we crept slowly up the ridge ... We were gradually getting through, when I sensed it was about time the next salvo was coming and with it trouble, and sure enough the shells came.  I was thown by the force of the explosion on to my face into the gutter at the side with the rest of me sprawled around the edge ... I was badly dazed and partially choked by mud and water ... my mind quickly cleared and I looked around and saw my horse lying dead half over my right thigh and pinning me down.  We were tossed from one side of the road to the other.  Glancing ahead I observed the horse in front dead and its attendant also.  He was Joe Bishop, a brother of Elmer who was killed several weeks before at Lens.  Joe was taken off the gun crew and given a supposedly safe job with transport.  Ahead of him was Ladd.  His horse was dead also and he, himself, was wounded and trying to rise.  I turned around to see how the fellow behind me fared.  I saw him and his horse motionless in death.  Four horses killed, two men killed and two men wounded was the result of the senselessness of the officer who led us in.  He certainly played us into the hands of the enemy."

"After squirming for several minutes, I managed to pull my leg from under my horse and astonishing to say it was not sore, let alone injured.  The right side of my face, however, was burning and stinging as if someone had stuck hot needles into it.  It was full of tiny bits of metal ... Ladd shouted that he was hit in the leg.  Getting up, I said that I would bandage him and then tried to extract the bandage from the frontal corner of my tunic, but at this moment another salvo came over and the explosions so disturbed the air that i had difficulty breathing for a minute or two.  The shells fell short and the small embankment above the ditch seemed to waver before my eyes as the earth erupted.  Ladd cried out that he could not make it and sank to the ground.  I shouted back that iw ould send stretcher bearers as soon as I could ... Reaching the base of the ridge I walked right into the cement blockhouse and told the Red Cross men that Ladd was lying wounded at the top of the road.  They went out with a stretcher but waited up the road a bit for about ten minutes until the shelling ceased and soon afterwards Ladd was brought in ... In a few minutes an ambulance appeared and four or five of us piled in and away we went.  Our first stop was Potijze where we were given hot cocoa and the right sleeve of my tunic was cut away ... the next stop was Ypres where the driver had to report.  Later on a further stop was made at the western end of Vlamertinghe where we were stripped of our uniforms, put into flannels, tagged and had a visit from a padre who asked for the names and addresses or our next of kin.  In quick time we were into another ambulance and whisked away to a casualty clearing hospital beside Poperinghe.  It was operated by the Australian Medical Corps and consisted of several large tents.  We were dropped off here and in a matter of minutes I was under the X-Ray machine ... an anaesthetic was ... given ... Later I awakened in a tent in dim light where about thirty fellows lay on stretchers moaning and groaning ... Two or three times I called out Ladd's name, but apparently he was not in the tent, for no response was received.  In the morning a Red Cross train was at hand and in a short time the carriages were filled ..."

There are two candidates for this William Ladd in the National Archives of Canada CEF Database:
LADD William Allard, 749037
LADD William Dexter Jr., 840425
Without further information, however, it is not possible to tell which of the two was Fraser's companion.


Laidlaw, Peter Marshall, 739701, Private (1892-1917)

Peter Marshall Laidlaw was born on 27 November 1892 at Oneida Township, Ontario, son of John and Margaret Laidlaw (later of Hagersville, Ontario).  He enlisted in the 114th Overseas Battalion at Hagersville, Ontario on 7 February 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer in Hagersville.  He listed his father, also of Hagersville, as next-of-kin.

Private P.M. Laidlaw was killed on 6 November 1917, during the Battle of Passchendaele.  The War Diary for the 6th Bde. CMG Coy. includes the following entry for this date: "The Mobile guns under Lieut. Pearce had taken up a favorable position in Rear of the 28th Bn. being settled in funk-holes by 12.30 a.m. At Zero hour these 2 guns went over in rear of Bn. and got into positions ... Guns were in position at 8 a.m. with a clear field of fire of 1000 yards. Guns were dismounted as soon as it was seen that the infantry had reached objective and were again mounted at dusk. These guns were subjected to heavy shelling with numerous casualties. No. 8 gun having only its No. 1 L/Cpl J.M. Donald left. Although wounded he stuck to his post until Battery was relieved. Total Casualties for the day were 3 O.R's killed 20 O.R's wounded and 1 O.R. missing."  Laidlaw must have been one of those killed or missing.  His name is commemmorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial (Panel 32).


Laister, Leopold R., 73469, Company Sergeant-Major (1888-)

Leopold R. Laister was born on 17 February 1888 at Woodstock, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 28th Battalion at Prince Albert on 26 October 1914, having previously served with the 52nd Prince Albert Volunteers.  At this time he was unmarried and working as a chauffeur.  He listed his mother, Mrs S. Laister of 20 Melville Avenue, Toronto, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant-Major Laister is mentioned in several Operational Orders of the 6th Brigade CMG Company during the month of July 1917.  On 4 November, he was shown as being in charge of ration parties.  He proceeded on a machine-gun course at the Corps School in Pernes from 3 January until 8 February 1918.


Laliberte, Edmond, Captain (1875-)

Edmond Laliberte was born on 21 January 1875 at Quebec, son of J.B. Laliberte.  He enlisted in the 41st (F.C.) Battalion at Quebec on 24 March 1915, at which time he was a widower, working in the "iron business", and an active member of a local militia.  He listed his father, then of 145 St. Joseph, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Lieutenant Edmond Laliberte was attached to No. 3 Company of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps in November 1918.  It appears that he was transferred elsewhere shortly afterwards, as he does not reappear in the Battalion War Diary, and is shown in the National Archives of Canada CEF database with the rank of Captain.


Lambert, Joseph, 57110, Private (1888-)

Joseph Lambert was born on 30 June 1888 at West Hartlepool, Durham, England, son of Mr. James Lambert.  He enlisted in the 20th Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 12 November 1914, at which time he was working as a labourer.  He stated that he had seven years previous military service, and that his next-of-kin was Mr. Jas. Lambert of 74 Niagara Street, Toronto, Ontario.

Private J. Lambert was wounded on 7 June 1918: "Artillery (Hostile) was very much more active on whole Divisional Front, especially in support area.  Casualties:- 141795 Pte Tucker, W.  57110 Pte Lambert, J. - Slightly wounded."


Lampron, Adolph (Dolph/Dalph), 748090, Private (1885-1918)

Adolph (or Dolph/Dalph) Lampron was born on 16 April 1885 at Richmond, Quebec.  He enlisted in the 117th (Estern Townships) Overseas Battalion at Danville on 30 November 1915, having previously served with the XI Hussars.  He was unmarried, working as a labourer, and listed his mother Mrs. Dolph Lampron, also of Richmond, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private D. Lampron died on 10 October 1918, of wounds received, and was buried at Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Ficheux, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. IV.F.3).


Lane, Harry Elvin, 709399, Private (1890-)

Harry Elvin Lane was born on 22 March 1890 at Elgin, New Brunswick.  He enlisted in the 64th Overseas Battalion at Sussex, Kings County, New Brunswick on 24 September 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer.  He listed his mother Mrs. R.L. Lane, also of Elgin, as next-of-kin.

Private H.E. Lane was detached to the No. 3 Section, D.A.C. Unit Group 5, "D" Moncton, New Brunswick on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Lane, Robert William, 175213, Private (1878-1917)

Robert William Lane was born on 29 May 1878 in London, England, and enlisted in the 86th Machine Gun Battalion at Welland, Ontario on 16 August 1915.  He stated that he was unmarried, an active member of the 44th Militia Regiment, and working as a plasterer.  He listed his mother, Mrs H. Lane of 237 Catan? Road, Peckham, London S.E., England, as next-of-kin.

Private R.W. Lane was killed on 15 August 1917; his name is recorded on the Vimy Memorial.  War Diary entries shed no light on events surrounding this death.


Langley, Harry, 787410, Sergeant (1895-)

Harry Langley was born on 10 March 1895 at Bristol, England.  He enlisted in the 130th Overseas Battalion at Smith's Falls, Ontario on 13 March 1916, at which time he was single, working as a benchman (machinist), and living at 9 Centre Street, Smith's Falls, Ontario.  He listed his mother Mrs. Elizabeth Langley, of Grove Road, Fishponds, Bristol, England, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant H. Langley was detached to the 6th Battalion, C.E. Unit Group No. 10 "G" Ottawa on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Larocque, Israel, 416280, Private (1895-1918)

Israel Larocque was born on 21 October 1895 at Michigan, USA, and enlisted in the 41st Battalion at Hull, Quebec on 18 February 1915.  He stated that he was unmarried, an active member of the 70th Militia Regiment (Hull), and working as a labourer.  He listed Hyacith Larocque, of Rocheville?, Co. Wright, Quebec, as his next-of-kin.  A note on his attestation paper suggests that he was subsequently transferred to the 22nd Battalion.

Private I. Larocque died on 8 August 1918, aged 24, during the Battle of Amiens, and was buried at Crucifix Corner Cemetery, Villers-Bretonneux, Somme (Grave Ref. I.A.14).  The Cemetery was begun by the Canadian Corps in August, 1918, and closed in the same month.  His next-of-kin is shown on the CWGC on-line database as his wife, Florence Larocque, of 10 The Gardens, Eastcote Terrace, Stockwell, London, England.


Latour, Alderic, 455340, Private (1896-)

Alderic Latour was born on 1 October 1896 in Ontario.  He enlisted in the 59th Battalion at Cornwall, Ontario on 12 August 1915, at which time he was single and working as a mill operative.  He listed his mother Mrs. Olive Latouro, of P.O. Cornwall, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private A. Latour was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Laurendeau, Hector, 448473, Private (1897-)

Hector Laurendeau was born on 25 November 1897 at Montreal, Quebec, and enlisted in the 189th Battalion at Montreal on 20 September 1915.  He was single and working as a shoemaker, and listed Hormidase Laurendeau, of 20 Delanaudiere, Montreal, as his next-of-kin.

Private H. Laurendeau was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Lawlor, Russell Charles, 922802, Private

Private Russell Charles Lawlor was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Lawrence, Charles, 1001007, Private (c1896-1918)

Private Charles Lawrence died on 28 August 1918, aged 22, during the Battle of Amiens, and was buried at Quebec Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. C.24).  The CWGC on-line database lists his next-of-kin at that time as his parents, William & Louisa Lawrence, of Warren Kiln, Kintbury, Hungerford, Berkshire, England.


Lawrence, Frederick, 164134, Private (1891-)

Frederick Lawrence was born on 20 October 1891 at Woodford, Essex, England.  He enlisted at Naigara Camp, Ontario on 31 August 1915, at which time he was unmarried,a member of an active militia, and working as a gardener.  He listed his mother, Alice Lawrence of 5 Saville Row, Woodford, Essex, as next-of-kin.

Private F. Lawrence was wounded in October 1918.


Layton, Francis, Lieutenant (1888-)

Francis Layton was born on 11 January 1888 at Truro, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted in the 121st Battalion at New Westminster, British Columbia on 1 June 1916, at which time he was working as a Barrister-at-Law, and living at 2133, 5th Avenue West, Vancouver, British Columbia.  He stated that he was a member of the 11th Regiment I.F. of C., and had served with them for 14 months.  He listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. N.J. Layton of Box 217, Truro, Nova Scotia.

Lieut. F. Layton is shown in "F" Battery of No. 2 Company in the first Nominal Roll compiled for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, dated April 1918.  He reappeared in "F" Battery in the roll for November 1918, and then remained with the unit until the end of March 1919.


Leaker, Arthur William, 529240, Private (1898-)

Arthur William Leaker was born on 3 November 1898 at Somerset, England.  He enlisted in the C.A.M.C. (Canadian Medical Corps) at Windsor, Ontario on 28 May 1917, at which time he was working as a clerk, and living with his mother, Mrs Anna Leaker - listed as next-of-kin - at 39 Assumption Street, Windsor, Ontario.

Private A.W. Leaker was wounded on 29 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Leaman, James Archer, 2304469, Private (1885-)

James Archer Leaman was born on 27 June 1885 at Truro, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted in the 1st Depot Battalion 1st C.O.R. (109th Draft) at Toronto, Ontario on 26 July 1917, at which time he was married, working as a railway conductor, and living at 560, 7th Avenue, College Point, New York, U.S.A.  He listed his wife Catherine Theresa Leaman, of the same address, as next-of-kin.

Private J.A. Leaman was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Le Bouffe, Felix Napoleon, 793107, Private (1897-)

Felix Napoleon Le Bouffe (or Lebouffe) was born on 21 February 1897 at Springdale, Newfoundland, son of Richard Alexander Lebouffe.  He enlisted in the 132nd Battalion (via the 73rd Regiment, of which he was an active militia member) at Campbellton, New Brunswick on 19 January 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a labourer at Cambellton, New Brunswick.  He listed his father, then of St Anne De Restigouche, Quebec as next-of-kin.

Private F.N. Le Bouffe was killed in action on 9 October 1918.  His name is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial.


Lebrun, Charles Edward, 417447, Private (1896-)

Charles Edward Lebrun was born on 28 October 1896 at St. Eustache, Quebec, son of Olivier Lebrun.  He enlisted at Montreal, Quebec on 12 July 1915, at which time he was single and working as a carpenter.  He listed his father, of 482 Rue Rachel, Montreal, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private C.E. Lebrun was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Leduc, Sylvio, 1090201, Private (1898-)

Sylvio Leduc was born on 26 February 1898 at Valleyfield, Quebec, son of Joseph Leduc.  He enlisted in the 253rd (Q.U.H.) Battalion at Cornwall, Ontario on 17 January 1917, at which time he was unmarried and working as a butcher at Monkland, Ontario.  He listed his father, still of Valleyfield, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private S. Leduc was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Lee, -, Private

The War Diary of the 6th Brigade CMG Company includes the following in its description of the events of 9 April 1917, during the attack on Vimy Ridge: "... later in the day Ptes Lee and Relph were caught in fumes from gas shells and were slightly gassed."


Leighton, Mr.

An Operation Order dated 11 November 1918 mentions a "Mr. Leighton" attached to the 31st Battalion.  It is not clear whether he was a member of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps or not.


Leftwich, Herbert J., 408137, Corporal (1891-)

Herbert J. Leftwich was born on 2 February 1891 on the Isle of Wight, England.  He enlisted at Niagara Camp, Ontario on 11 October 1915, at which time he was single and working as a fruit grower.  He listed his mother, Mrs. Eliza Leftwich of 75 High Street, Cowes, Isle of Wight, as next-of-kin.

Corporal H.J. Leftwich was wounded on 11 October 1918.


Le Maistre, Charles P., 69501, Private (1895-)

Charles P. Le Maistre was born on 6 January 1895 at St. Johns, Jersey, Channel Islands, son of P.J.F. Le Maistre.  He enlisted in the 26th (New Brunswick) Battalion at St. John, New Brunswick on 24 November 1914, at which time he was unmarried and working as a clerk.  He listed his father, then of St. Saviours, Jersey, C.I., as next-of-kin.

Private C.P. Le Maistre was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Lepage, George F., 920032, Private (1898-)

George Lepage was born on 6 February 1898 at Windsor, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 199th Battalion (Irish Canadian Rangers) at Montreal, Quebec on 11 October 1916, at which time he was single, working as a paver at Malone, New York, and an active member of the 55th I.C.R. Militia.  He listed his mother, Mrs. M. Lepage of Messina, New York, U.S.A., as next-of-kin.

Private G. Lepage was wounded on 11 October 1918.  He was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Levesque, Joseph Hector, 61260, Private (1894-)

Joseph Hector Levesque was born on 31 October 1894 at Montreal, Quebec.  He enlisted in the 22nd Battalion at Montreal, Quebec on 22 October 1914, at which time he was single and working as a tailor.  He listed his mother, Mrs D. Levesque of 833 Doriva? (presumably in Montreal), as next-of-kin.

Private J.H. Levesque was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Lewis, Arthur Edward, 116398, Private (1872-1918)

Arthur Edward Lewis was born on 19 October 1872 at Bangor, North Wales, son of the Very Rev. Evan Lewis, Dean of Bangor, & his wife Adelaide.  He enlisted in the 11th Canadian Mounted Rifles (C.M.R.) at Vernon, British Columbia on 27 May 1915, having previously served with the 4th Battalion 23rd R.W. Fusiliers.  He was single, working as a teamster, and listed his next-of-kin as his mother, of Beech House, Ellesmere, Shropshire, England.

Private A.E. Lewis died on 30 October 1918, of wounds received on 12 October during the Battle of Cambrai, and was buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. LXVI.M.1).


Lewis, John Frederick, 104685, Private (1889-)

John Frederick Lewis was born on 4 June 1889 at Camberwell, London, England, and enlisted in the 68th Overseas Battalion (via the 60th Rifles) at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan on 2 August 1915.  He was unmarried and working as a farm labourer, listing William Lewis, of 6 Grove Terrace, London, England, as his next-of-kin.

Private J.F. Lewis was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.  He was wounded again on 12 October 1918, during the Battle of Cambrai.


Lifford, William Henry, 174628, Private (1894-)

William Henry Lifford was born on 23 February 1894 at Reigate, Surrey, England.  He enlisted in the 86th Machine Gun Battalion at Hamilton, Ontario on 9 September 1915, at which time he was unmarried, working as a farmer, and an active militia member.  He listed M. Lifford of Kingswood, near Reigate, Surrey, England, as his next-of-kin.

Private W.H. Lifford was wounded on 2 October 1918.


Lightle, Hallie Alonzo, 488660, Sergeant (1895-)

Hallie Alonzo Lightle was born on 2 November 1895 at Kentville, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 24 September 1915, at which time he was an unmarried student.  He listed William Lightle, also of Kentville, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant H.A. Lightle was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Linden, -, Private

On 4 November 1917, as they were preparing for the attack on Passchendaele village, Fraser found some time to contemplate the make-up of his crew (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Expecting to remain here until the end of the Passchendaele action, I found time to check up on the crew and the gun and noted the following:

No. 14 Gun Crew Gun Particulars
1. Fraser, D. 1. Tripod and Crosshead C48348
2. Ladd, Wm. 2. Gun L862
3. Reid 3. Field Mount C79931
4. Linden 4. Lock A313
5. Orme 5. Lock (Spare) 47734
6. Goodman, C.W. 6. Feed Block 41788
7. Bartley 7. Feed Block (Spare) A45
8. Fage
Crew members 4, 5, 6 and 7 were new men and at the present date I have no recollection of them.  Although I was the longest in France and Belgium Fage was longer with the Machine-Gun Company and was latterly transferred to my crew from No. 15."
Lindsey, Richard, 1045027, Brigade Sergeant-Major, M.M. (1894-)

Richard Lindsey was born on 15 September 1894 at Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A., son of Charles Henry Lindsey.  He enlisted in the 241st Overseas Battalion at Windsor, Ontario on 18 July 1916, having served for three years in the 11th Cavalry at Oglethorpe, Georgia, U.S.A.  He was an active member of the 21st Regiment (Essex Fusiliers), single, and working as a machinist at Windsor Ferry Co., Windsor, Ontario.  He listed his father, then of 1224 Peach Street, Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A. (but later of 36 Main Street, Tallapoosa, Georgia), as next-of-kin.

Acting B.S.M. Richard Lindsey was awarded the Military Medal on 24 May 1918.


Little, Harry Leroy, 709393, Private (1896-)

Harry Leroy Little was born on 2 August 1896 at St. John, New Brunswick.  He enlisted in the 64th Overseas Battalion at Sussex, Kings County, New Brunsick on 5 October 1915, having previously served for eight months with No. 5 Company, Canadian Army Service Corps (C.A.S.C.) overseas.  He was unmarried and working as a barber, and listed his mother Mrs. H. Little of 239 Brussell Street, St. John, New Brunswick, as next-of-kin.

Private H.L. Little was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Livingston, Alexander, 252125, Private, M.M. (1881-)

Alexander Livingston was born on 12 July 1881 at ?Beedale, Argyleshire, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 27th Light Horse at Swift Current, Saskatchewan on 24 December 1915, having served for 11 years in the Argyle Royal Garrison Artillery.  He was unmarried and working as a salesman at Cabri, Saskatchewan, and listed his mother, Mrs. Jessie Livingston of 6 Craigard Road, Oban, Scotland, as next-of-kin.

Private A. Livingston was recommended for the Military Medal for his actions during the Battle of Cambrai, between 9 and 15 October 1918, and was indeed awarded the M.M. on 19 November 1918.


Livingston, Percy Harold, 226598, Private (1897-)

Percy Harold Livingston was born on 22 January 1897 at Kingston, Ontario, son of W.J. Livingston.  He enlisted in the Depot Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles (via "C" Squadron, 4th Hussars) at Kingston, Ontario on 4 November 1915, having served for four months in the 14 P.W.O.R.  He was unmarried, working as a tinsmith, and living at 2 Toronto Street, Kingston, Ontario.  He listed his father, of the same address, as next-of-kin.

Private P.H. Livingston was detached to the 21st Canadian Battalion Unit Group 12, "H" Kingston on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Locke, Russell Pierce, Lieutenant (1888-)

Russell Pierce Locke was born on 2 November 1888 at Sarnia, Ontario.  He enlisted in the No. 2 A.S.C. (Army Service Corps) Training Depot at Toronto, Ontario on 16 March 1917, having served for one year and three months as Mechanical Transport Officer and Assistant Adjutant at No. 2 Depot in Toronto.  He stated that he was working as a barrister-at-law, living at 159 Walmer Road, Toronto, and was an active member of the #12 Company C.A.S.C. Militia.  He listed his mother, Mrs. A.S.C. Locke, also of 159 Walmer Road, Toronto, as next-of-kin.

On 10 May 1917, Lieutenant R.P. Locke was wounded [War Diary]. Since there are no further entries in the War Diaries pertaining to Lt. Locke, it is assumed that he either did not recover sufficiently to return to duty, or moved on to a different unit.


Lockhart, -, Lieutenant

On 5 and 6 April 1916, during the Battle of St Eloi Craters, Lt. Lockhart, from the 26th Infantry Battalion, was in charge of some relief Lewis gun crews who operated temporarily under the command of the 6th Bde CMG Company.


Logan, Harry Tremaine, Major (1887-)

Harry Tremaine Logan was born on 5 March 1887 at Londonderry, Nova Scotia, son of the Reverend John A. Logan, D.D.  He enlisted in the 72nd Overseas Battalion at Vancouver, British Columbia on 13 April 1916, at which time he was an active member of the B.C. University C.O.T.C., and attached to the 72nd S.H. of C.  He had previously served for two years in the King Edward Horse, was working as a teacher, and listed his father, then of 1296, 12th Avenue West, Vancouver, British Columbia, as next-of-kin.

On 31 December 1918, the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll shows Captain H.T. Logan as Officer Commanding No. 3 Company, where he remained until February 1919.


Lord, Alfred Edward, 246723, Private (1885-)

Alfred Edward Lord was born on 28 August 1885 at London, England.  He enlisted in the 207th Overseas Battalion (Ottawa Carleton Regiment) at Ottawa, Ontario on 13 October 1916, having previously served for five years with the 3rd Victoria Rifles at Montreal, Quebec.  He was married, working as a groom, and living at 2196 Boyer Street, Montreal, Quebec.  He listed his wife Mrs. Mary Lord, of the same address, as next-of-kin.

Private A.E. Lord was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Loriot, J.E. Antoine, 660566, Private (1898-)

Antoine Loriot was born on 25 November 1898 at Ste. Anne de Beaupré, Quebec, son of Oscar Loriot.  He enlisted in the 163rd Battalion (F.C.) at Montreal, Quebec, on 17 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried, working as a clerk and living at 2414 Cartier Street, Montreal, Quebec.  He listed his father, also of 2414 Cartier Street, Montreal, as next-of-kin.


Louchs, Arthur, 1090374, Private (1899-)

Arthur Louchs (or Louch) was born on 3 May 1899 at Birmingham, Warwickshire, England.  He enlisted in the 253rd (Q.U.H.) Battalion at Cornwall, Ontario on 27 February 1917.  At the time he was working as a labourer at Brinston, Ontario, and listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. M. Louchs, of 14 Florence Road, King's Heath, England.

Private A. Louchs was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Loucks, Chester Angus, 726081, Private (1894-)

Chester Angus Loucks was born on 1 June 1894 at Minden Township, Haliburton County, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 109th Overseas Battalion at Minden, Ontario on 22 December 1916, at which time he was single and working as a lumberman at Minden.  He listed his mother Flora Loucks, also of Minden, as next-of-kin.

Private C.A. Loucks was wounded in October 1918.


Loyer, Arthur, 1092039 (Orig. #410548), Private (1896-1918)

Arthur Loyer was born on 14 October 1896 at Clarkstown, Ottawa, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 230th Battalion (V.C.F.) at Hull, Quebec on 31 March 1916, having previously served with the 41st Battalion, and having been discharged "with aid Col Fiset"?  He was unmarried, living at 30 Rue Catherine, Clarkstown, Ottawa, and working as a driver.  He listed his mother Julie Loyer, also of 30 Rue Catherine, Clarkstown, as next-of-kin.  On 17 March 1917, according to notes on his attestation paper, Pte. Loyer was transferred to the 178th Battalion.

Private A. Loyer was killed in action on 1October 1918 (although the War Diary states 2 October), and was buried at Canada Cemetery, Tilloy-les-Cambrai, Nord (Grave Ref. I.A.21).


Lundale, Samuel, 216120, Private (1895-)

Samuel Lundale was born on 15 December 1895 at Winnipeg, Manitoba, son of Angus Lundale.  He enlisted in the 100th Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 10 January 1916, having previously served with the 100th Winnipeg Grenadiers, and worked as a cook.  He stated his next-of-kin to be his father, of Mulvihill, Manitoba.

Private S. Lundale was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Lyle, Frank Henry, 257777, Private (1894-)

Frank Henry Lyle was born on 3 July 1894 at St. Eleanors, Prince Edward Island, son of Horace Lyle.  He enlisted in the 1st Depot Battalion, Saskatchewan Regiment at Regina, Saskatchewan on 15 January 1918, havingmbeen medically examined at Saskatoon, Saskatchewan on 5 October 1917.  He was single, working as a salesman in Saskatoon, and listed his father, then of Summerside, Prince Edward Island, as next-of-kin.

Private F.H. Lyle was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


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