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6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company
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2nd Battalion Canadian Machine Gun Corps
Personnel Database - J
Please contact Brett Payne if you have further details relating to any soldier mentioned on this page.
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Jack, George, Lieutenant, M.M.
Jackson, -, Private
Jackson, Alfred Wallace, 788869, Private (1896-)
Jackson, David Stuart, (Orig. #475110), Lieutenant
Janvenne, Philias, 246045, Private (1893-)
Jay, John William, 2621824, Private (1887-)
Jaycock, Henry Thomas, 3205048, Private (1894-)
Jenkin, John Arthur, 291194, Private (1894-)
Jenkins, Alfred Henry, 276543, Private (1889-)
Jensen, Louis Peter, 424373, Private (1894-1916)
Johnson, Harry Arthur, 902205, Private, M.M. (1892-)
Johnson, John Louis, 141703, Corporal (1893-)
Johnson, Karl Payson, 283141, Private (1898-)
Johnston, Eric Franklin, Captain (Chaplain) (1889-)
Johnstone, Charles Peter, 113328, Sergeant, M.M. (1875-)
Johnstone, Robert, 414588, Private (1890-1916)
Jollymore, Harry Henry, 715387, Corporal, M.M. (1893-)
Jonasson, Magnus, 294370, Private (1891-)
Jones, Ernest Robinson, 1018500, Private (1892-)
Jones, Harrison, 739309, Private (1878-1918)
Jones, John, 706215, Private (1885-)
Jones, William Frederick, 415581, Private (1893-)
Jones, William Kellam, 763053, Private, M.M. (1894-)
Joyce, Harold George, 709283, Private (1897-1918)
Judge, Frank Oliver, 880421, Private (1898-)

Jack, George, Lieutenant, M.M.
 
The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Lieut. G. Jack, M.M. (Military Medal) in "M" Battery No. 3 Company, where he remained until the end of March 1919 (although he was shown as being on leave in October 1918).

Jackson, -, Private

Donald Fraser mentions Private Jackson in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books).  The following is an incident during the Battle of Lens, when a call came to help with retrieving a wounded man: "Tuesday, 21 August 1917 - The officer appeared again and ... asked for four of us to go up as stretcher bearers and bring out Harry Stevenson who was very badly wounded.  McCormick, Jackson, Nick and I responded to the call ... Manville was our guide.  A bombardment by Fritz was on when we started up the communication trench and it increased in intensity the further up we went.  Altogether we had about a mile to go.  The trench, an old German one, was wide and not very deep, badly knocked about by shell fire and in parts full of broken strands of wire which proved troublesome.  Snipers were busy.  Shells were either whizzing past us or dropping all around, miraculously missing us.  We overtook the other party and I was a little in the rear of Ladd when a shell roared by Ladd missing him by the barest inch and crashed into the foot of the side of the trench - a dud.  Ladd pulled in his stomach as if to dodge it and slowly turning round revealed the whitest face I ever saw in my life.  He tried to grin, but it was a very, very sickly-looking grin ... After a very harassing time, we made another stop at section headquarters about seventy yards to the left of the communication trench ... On both sides of us, a little distance away, were buildings occupied by the enemy and we were warned not to show ourselves or attempt any shooting.  The whole idea was that as soon as Harry Stevenson was picked up and taken away, the gun crews would retire as we were surrounded ... A council of action was held and in a few minutes it was decided that, as soon as possible, two with a stretcher would run to an old German dug-out about fifty yards away where Harry Stevenson lay grievously wounded and pick him up and bring him in.  Bud Willox and Elwood volunteered for the job ... the two dashed out with the stretcher and in a few minutes reappeared with Harry who was absolutely all in.  After that it was decided that McCormick and Jackson would lead off with the stretcher and fifty yards would be followed by Nick and myself as relief stretcher bearers and later on by one of the crews who would beat it out.  Jackson and McCormick grabbed the stretcher and away they went, then Nick.  When I reached the entrance to the trench, I turned around, waved to those behind, and was gone.  After a long, arduous spell with many squeaks and narrow shaves and the lives almost scared out of us, we reached the dressing station.  One has to go through such an experience to really understand what it is to carry a wounded man through a double bombardment and without supporting straps ... Before long Nick and I had to relieve the other two.  After several exchanges Nick's fingers lost their grip entirely and he dropped his end of the stretcher shaking up Harry badly.  The three of us handled the situation for the rest of the way.  During the last few hundred yards McCormick kept yelling at Jackson and myself 'Stick to it, stay with it, you only have a little way to go now' as if he were a cheer leader at some sporting event.  At that, it took all the guts we could command to pass through that inferno of din and explosion.  If we had delayed our departure from the outpost a few minutes longer, I am afraid Stevenson's fate would have been sealed as he would have been abandoned.  A few days later information reached us that Harry died at Etaples ... After turning Harry over to the Red Cross, we retired to our cellar and were given a tot of rum.  Never did rum taste so good!"

It is possible that this soldier is the Private A.W. Jackson listed below.


Jackson, Alfred Wallace, 788869, Private (1896-)

Alfred Jackson Wallace was born on 16 February 1896 at Deux Rivieres, Ontario, son of William Jackson.  He enlisted in the 130th Overseas Battalion at Pembroke, Ontario on 22 February 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a lumberman at Deux Rivieres.  He listed his father, also of Deux Rivieres, as next-of-kin.

It is possible that Private A.W. Jackson was mentioned in Private Donald Fraser's Diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books) (see above).

Private A.W. Jackson was detached to the 6th Battalion, C.E. Unit Group No. 10 "G" Ottawa on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Jackson, David Stuart, (Orig. #475110), Lieutenant
 
David Stuart Jackson was born on 11 January 1893 at Winnipeg, Manitoba.  He enlisted at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 28 July 1915, at which time he was working as a clerk and stated his next-of-kin to be his mother, Mrs. Fannie Jackson, of 499 Corydon Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Lieut. Jackson is shown as being in "E" Battery of No. 2 Company in the April 1918 Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, although his initials are shown there as being W.L.  In later Operation Orders and Nominal Rolls, a D.S. Jackson appears in "E" Battery, and it's possible that the first entry was an error, particularly as I can find no potential candidate for W.L. Jackson in the National Archives of Canada CEF Database.  He is shown as being on leave in September.  He remained with this unit until the end of March 1919.


Janvenne, Philias, 246045, Private (1893-)

Philias Janvenne was born on 28 July 1893 at Ottawa, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 207th Battalion at Ottawa, Carleton County, Ontario on 13 March 1916, at which time he was single, working as a driver, and living at 301 St. Andrew Street, Ottawa, Ontario.  He listed his mother Mrs. F. Janvenne, of the same address, as next-of-kin.

Private P. Janvenne was detached to the 6th Battalion, C.E. Unit Group No. 10 "G" Ottawa on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Jay, John William, 2621824, Private (1887-)

John William Jay was born on 23 March 1887 at Gunnislake, Cornwall, and enlisted into the Infantry Draft of the British-Canadian Recruiting Mission at Calgary, Alberta on 4 September 1917.  He was married and working as a miner at 316 Goldberg Block, Butte, Montana, USA, having served for two years as a gunner in the R.F.A. (Royal Field Artillery).  He listed his wife, Mrs. Bessie Jay of 4 Cornwall Street, St. Bere Alston, South Devon, England, as next-of-kin.

Private J.W. Jay was wounded on 17 August 1918.


Jaycock, Henry Thomas, 3205048, Private (1894-)

Henry Thomas Jaycock was born on 22 March 1894 at Mitcham, Buckinghamshire, England.  He enlisted in the 1st Depot Battalion Albert Regiment at Calgary, Alberta on 21 December 1917, having had a medical examination at Lethbridge, Alberta the previous day.  He was single, working as a farmer at Enchant, Alberta, and listed his mother Mrs. Sarah Jaycock, also of Enchant, as next-of-kin.

Private H.T. Jaycock was wounded on 9 October 1918.


Jenkin, John Arthur, 291194, Private (1894-)

John Arthur Jenkin was born on 6 May 1894 at Alymer West, Ontario, son of John S. Jenkins.  He enlisted in the 222nd Overseas Battalion at Deloraine, Manitoba on 8 January 1916 at which time he was single and working as a farmer at Deloraine.  He listed his father, also of Deloraine, Manitoba, as next-of-kin.

Private J.A. Jenkin was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Jenkins, Alfred Henry, 276543, Private (1889-)

Alfred Henry Jenkins was born on 24 February 1889 at London, England, son of Alfred Henry Jenkins.  He enlisted in the 217th Overseas Battalion at Regina, Saskatchewan on 25 July 1916, at which time he was single and working as a farmer at Balcarres, Saskatchewan.  He listed his father, then of 59 Chatham Street, London, England, as next-of-kin.

Private A.H. Jenkins was wounded on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Jensen, Louis Peter, 424373, Private (1894-1916)

Louis Peter Jensen was born on 28 March 1894 at Copenhagen, Denmark, and enlisted at Brandon, Ontario on 25 March 1915, having served for a month in the 62nd Militia Regiment.  He was single and working as a moulder, and listed his brother, Hans Jensen of 35 Englandsver, Copenhagen, Denmark, as next-of-kin.

Jensen was one of four soldiers in the company - the others were Privates Caddell, Batts and Smith - killed on 10 June 1916, during what was referred to in the War Diary as "considerable artillery activity."  Nothing further is known regarding the circumstances of his death, but his name is commemmorated on Panel 32 of the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.


Johnson, Harry Arthur, 902205, Private, M.M. (1892-)

Harry Arthur Johnson was born on 16 July 1892 at Newton Mills, Colchester County, Nova Scotia, son of Arthur Johnson.  He enlisted in the 193rd Overseas Battalion at Truro, Nova Scotia on 11 April 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at Newton Mills.  He listed his father, also of Newton Mills, as next-of-kin.

Private H.A. Johnson was mentioned in dispatches on 1 January 1919, and awarded the Military Medal on 11 January 1919.  He was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Johnson, John Louis, 141703, Corporal (1893-)

John Louis Johnson was born on 20 June 1893 at Copenhagen, Denmark.  He enlisted at Niagara, Ontario on 2 August 1915, when he was working as a plumber.  He stated his next-of-kin to be John Johnson of Birkenhoj, Elsinore, Denmark.

Corporal J.L. Johnson was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Johnson, Karl Payson, 283141, Private (1898-)

Karl Payson Johnson was born on 13 January 1898 at Chieveuil, Hants County, Nova Scotia, son of Dr. John Albert Johnson.  He enlisted at Wolfville, Kings County, Nova Scotia on 18 March 1916, at which time he was an unmarried student living in Wolfville.  He listed his father, then of Parrishore, Cumb. County, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private K.P. Johnson was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Johnston, Eric Franklin, Captain (Chaplain) (1889-)

Eric Franklin Johnston was born on 11 Jun 1889 at Carlton Place, Ontario, son of J.R. Johnston.  He enlisted in the 201st Overseas Battalion at Camp Borden, Ontario on 1 April 1916, stating that he served in his High School Cadets, and then spent a year at Military College in North Carolina.  He was a Methodist clergyman, living at home, and had been in the C.O.T.C. for a year.  He showed his next-of-kin as his father of 509 Palmerston Blvd., Toronto, Ontario.  This was later changed to his wife, Jessie Louise Johnston.  He was initially assigned a rank of Lieutenant, but was later promoted to Captain, perhaps on his transfer to the 198th Overseas Battalion.

On 17 August 1918, Captain E.F. Johnston joined the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps as a chaplain, the War diary entry for that day noting his arrival, and stating that he was "formerly a combatant officer of the 198th Battalion".  The September and October Nominal Rolls show him as chaplain (attached from the C.C.F.) but he no longer appears from November 1918 onwards.


Johnstone, Charles Peter, 113328, Sergeant, M.M. (1875-)

Charles Peter Johnstone was born on 24 July 1875 at Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 5th P.L.D.G. at Ottawa, Ontario on 24 June 1915, having previously served with the Southern Rhodesia Volunteers from 1895 to 1900.  He was married, working as a clerk, and listed his wife, Mary Josephine Johnstone of 383 Gloucester Street, Ottawa, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant C.P. Johnstone was awarded the Military Medal on 24 May 1918.  He was detached to the 21st Canadian Battalion Unit Group 12, "H" Kingston for the purpose of demobilisation on 25 March 1918.


Johnstone, Robert, 414588, Private (1890-1916)

Robert Johnstone was born on 22 May 1890 at Glasgow, Scotland, eldest son of Robert & Alison Johnstone.  He enlisted in the 40th Battalion at New Glasgow, Nova Scotia on 31 March 1915, at which time he was single and working as a ward attendant.  He listed his sister, Mrs. Harry Whyley of Stellarton, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private R. Johnstone was killed at about 1 a.m. on 20 April 1916, aged 26, and was member of the No. 14 machine-gun crew.  The exact circumstances of this incident have not been recorded, but it was during the Battle of St. Eloi Craters.  Private Johnstone was the first member of the then fledgling 6th Brigade CMG Company to be killed in action.  His name is commemmorated on Panel 32 of the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.


Jollymore, Harry Henry, 715387, Corporal, M.M. (1893-)

Harry Henry Jollymore was born on 10 April 1893 at River John, Pictou County, Nova Scotia, son of Frank Jollymore.  He enlisted in the 108th Overseas Battalion (Nova Scotia Rifles) at Pictou, Nova Scotia on 29 December 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a seaman at Pictou, Nova Scotia.  He listed his father, also of River John, as next-of-kin.

Corporal H.H. Jollymore was awarded the Military Medal on 24 May 1918.


Jonasson, Magnus, 294370, Private (1891-)
 
Magnus Jonasson (Magnús Jónasson) was born on 15 August 1891 at Saudakrok, Iceland, one of eight children of Jónas Jósef Hallgrímsson (1863-1906) and Þórey Magnúsdóttir (1861-1936), farmers in the county of Skagafjörður, Northern Iceland. [Many thanks to Hálfdan Helgason of Iceland for the correct script!]  Magnús emigrated to Wynyard, Saskatchewan, Canada in 1901, where he lived and worked as a farmer until his enlistment in the 223rd Overseas Battalion at Wynyard on 19 May 1916.  He listed his mother Mrs. "Porsi Magnusdottir Jonasson, of Miklabo, Skagafirdi, Iceland", as next-of-kin.

Private M. Jónasson went missing on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.  Analysis of the reports submitted on operations between 8 and 10 August by the O.C.s of the Machine-Gun Companies suggests that Pte. Jónasson was one of nine soldiers who went missing that day, probably due to the thick mist present - one presumes he was wounded - during the advance of No. 3 Company on 9 August.

Hálfdan Helgason has very kindly provided the photo above, as well as the following further information: "According the book 'Minningarrit íslenskra hermanna' (a book giving information on almost all soldiers of Icelandic origin in North America who fought in WWI), Magnús' regiment took part in several battles in France and in 1918 he was injured (probably the one at Amiens).  Magnús returned home to Canada in good condition and was released from service on 19 June 1919 after three full years.  On 14 November 1920 Magnús, who had taken the surname Johnson, married Margrét Erlendsdóttir Johnson, daughter of an Icelandic settler, and they had five children."


Jones, Ernest Robinson, 1018500, Private (1892-)

Ernest Robinson Jones was born on 29 May 1892 at Midland, Simcoe County, Ontario, son of George Jones.  He enlisted in the 232nd Battalion at Kindersley, Saskatchewan on 17 June 1916, at which time he was single and working as a commercial traveller in Kindersley.  He listed his father, of Midland, Simcoe County, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private E.R. Jones was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Jones, Harrison, 739309, Private (1878-1918)

Harrison Jones was born on 11 March 1878 at Brougton, England, and enlisted in the 114th Overseas Battalion at Cayuga, Ontario on 6 December 1915.  At the time, he was married and working as a paper maker at Cayuga Ontario.  He listed his wife, Mary Alice Jones, of Box 262 Dunnville, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private H. Jones was killed in action on 8 or 9 August 1918 (the CWGC claims 8th, but the 2nd Battalion CMGC War Diary states 9th), during the Battle of Amiens, and was buried at Caix British Cemetery, Somme (Grave Ref. I.C.3).  This cemetery was constructed after the Armistice, by the concentration of graves (mainly of March and August, 1918) from the battlefields and small cemeteries in the neighbourhood.  These included the Caix (Old) British Cemtery (which included the graves of 91 soldiers from Canada), the De Luce British Cemetery (which included eight Canadian soldiers who fell in August 1918), and the Ridge Cemetery, Hangard (where were buried 20 Canadian soldiers who fell on 8 August 1918) [Source: CWGC on-line database].


Jones, John, 706215, Private (1885-)

John Jones was born on 23 November 1885 at Corwen, Wales, son of John Jones.  He enlisted in the 103rd Battalion at Victoria, British Columbia on 13 December 1915, at which time he was single and working as a farmer at Cowichan, British Columbia.  He listed his father, of Bryn Goldoin, Corwen, Wales, as next-of-kin.

Private J. Jones was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Jones, William Frederick, 415581, Private (1893-)

William Frederick Jones was born on 19 December 1893 at Norwood, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, son of Frederick Jones.  He enlisted in the 40th Battalion at Aldershot, Nova Scotia on 15 June 1915, having worked as a railroad man.  He stated his next-of-kin as his father, of Lake Annis, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia.

Private W.F. Jones was wounded on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Jones, William Kellam, 763053, Private, M.M. (1894-)

William Kellam Jones was born on 7 June 1894 at Longford, Ontario, son of Joseph Howard Jones.  He enlisted in the 122nd Overseas Battalion at Huntsville, Ontario on 14 December 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a milk hand at Gravenhurst, Ontario.  He listed his father, also of Gravenhrst, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private W.K. Jones was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918, and later wounded in October 1918.


Joyce, Harold George, 709283, Private (1897-1918)

Harold George Joyce was born on 4 September 1897 at Hopewell Cape, New Brunswick, son of John Joyce.  He enlisted in the 64th Overseas Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 27 September 1915, at which time he was single and working as a seaman.  He listed his father, also of Hopewell Cape, New Brunswick, as next-of-kin.

Private H.G. Joyce died on 28 August 1918, aged 21, during the Battle of Arras.  His name is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial.  His next-of-kin is shown in the CGC on-line database as his parents, John E. & May Joyce, of Hopewell Cape, New Brunswick.


Judge, Frank Oliver, 880421, Private (1898-)

Frank Oliver Judge was born on 16 October 1898 at London, England.  He enlisted in the ?186th Overseas Battalion at Chatham on 4 March 1916, having previously served in the 21st Regiment (Active Militia Special Guard) at Windsor.  He was unmarried, working as a printer, and living at 20 Chatham Street, Windsor, Ontario.  He listed his mother Susan Judge, also of 20 Chatham Street, Windsor, as next-of-kin.

Private F.O. Judge was wounded on 9 October 1918.


This page last updated 21 April 2003
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