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6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company
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Eady, Norman, 788644, Private (1889-)
Eastham, Alfred, Major (1886-)
Eccles, Robert Leslie, 751445, Private (1891-)
Eckford, Hector Henry, 100939, Private (1890-1917)
Eddison, Harry, 406517, Private (1889-)
Edge, Alfred Wurtz, 240701, Private (1898-1917)
Edmond, Robert, (Orig. #2021231), Lieutenant (1888-)
Edmunds, W. Richard, (Orig. #33160), Lieutenant (1894-)
Edwards, Mathew, 3105357, Private (1887-)
Edwards, Walter George, 675851, Private (1890-)
Egan, John, 2223345, Corporal, D.C.M. (1892-)
Eisner, Stanley, 734290, Private (1891-)
Eland, Edward Laws, 859381, Private (1887-1918)
Elliott, Frank Archibald, 766368, Sergeant, D.C.M. (1895-)
Ellis, James Edward, 164648, Private (1892-)
Ellis, John Warren, 172380, Private (1888-)
Ellis, Robert Starr, 255899, Private (1889-)
Ells, Ralph Anley, 283039, Acting Corporal (1891-)
Elser, William J., 113200, Private (1894-)
Elwood, - (Curly), Private
Eng, Victor Esserick, 256171, Private (1887-)
Estey, Bryam, 709196, Private (1896-)
Estey, George Archibald, 817050, Private (1897-)
Euloth, Albert William, 902175, Private (1895-1945)
Eustace, Frank, 423395, Sergeant (1890-)

Eady, Norman, 788644, Private (1889-)

Norman Eady was born on 2 January 1889 at Renfrew, Ontario, son of W.C. Eady.  He enlisted in the 130th Overseas Battalion at Renfrew, Ontario on 17 May 1916, having been working as a conductor in Renfrew, Ontario.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, also of Renfrew.

Private N. Eady was wounded on 14 August 1918, after the Battle of Amiens.


Eastham, Alfred, Major (1886-)

Alfred Eastham was born on 6 December 1886 at Bootle, Liverpool, England. [Family Notes]  He enlisted at Calgary, Alberta on 26 April 1915, when he showed his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Helen Eastham of Vernon, British Columbia, and his own profession as "Gentleman".  He also stated that he had served in the 103rd Rifles, and that he was in an Active Militia.  The 6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company War Diary shows Alfred Eastham to have arrived with the company, with four other junior officers - Lieuts. Basevi, Beck, McLelan and White - and presumably for the first time, at 7.30 p.m. on 1 February 1916.  Lt. Eastham appears to have been the first O.C. of No. 1 Section, which is first mentioned as such in the War Diary on 12 February, when they "went for firing practice."  Eastham with four machine-gun crews went on their first posting as No. 1 Section to the 28th Battalion on 18th February, and were in strong points at Dikkebus the following day.

On 23 March 1916, he became acting O.C. while the O.C. Captain Taylor was on leave until 3 April, when he became second-in-command.  Two days later, the O.C. was injured by shrapnel, and Eastham took over once again.  He went on leave from 11 to 21 May, and was relieved of command of the company when Capt. Taylor returned from England on 9 July.  On 21 July he "sustained injuries from fall off his horse and was admitted to hospital in Renelighst"; the injuries, however, were minor, and he returned to duty nine days later.  However, at this stage, he no longer appears to have been the O.C. of No. 1 Section; his duties seem to have been more in the line of second-in-command.  At some stage in August, he was promoted to the rank of Captain.  He went on leave again from 27 October until 9 November, when he took over permanent command of the Company.  On 27 December he was on leave once more, returning on 7 January 1917.  On 10 January, Captain Eastham proceeded to Pernes on a "Special Course" for five days.  At some stage in January 1917, possibly between 15 and 16 January, he was promoted to Major.  On 2 May 1917, Major Eastham "proceeded to the transport lines sick."  He had returned to the company by 13 May.  On 21 May he was granted 30 days' leave in England, from which he returned on 21 June.  On 28 July Major Eastham "proceeded on course of M.G. Work at Camiers"; when he returned on 25 August, he "assumed command of machine gun Groups in the line as Group Commander 2nd Divl. Groups", part of the reorganization of the machine-gun companies into the 2nd Canadian Divisional Machine Gun Battalion.  On 4 September, he was "admitted to Field Ambulance sick", and was subsequently invalided to England.


Eccles, Robert Leslie, 751445, Private (1891-)

Robert Leslie Eccles was born on 23 June 1891 at Grey County, Ontario, son of James Eccles.  He enlisted at Berlin, Ontario on 1 March 1916, at which time he was single, working as a machinist, and living at 85 Louisa Street, Berlin, Ontario.  He listed his father, then of Holstein, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private R.L. Eccles was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Eckford, Hector Henry, 100939, Private (1890-1917)

Hector Henry Eckford was born at Powassen, Ontario on 18 August 1890, son of Andrew Eckford.  He enlisted in the 66th Overseas Battalion at Edmonton, Alberta on 17 July 1915, at which time his father was living at Vermillion, Alberta.  He described himself as a Bridgeman.

18 April 1917 - "Ptes Eckford and Williams were killed by shell in gun position." [War Diary].  This event was recounted by Donald Fraser in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books), as follows: "Thursday, April 19, 1917: The enemy is still shelling the road in front of our positions and killed one man and three horses this morning.  Eckford and Williams of our No. 2 Section, when changing relief, were killed during the morning by a shell bursting beside them."  Private H.H. Eckford was buried at Vimy.


Eddison, Harry, 406517, Private (1889-)

Harry Eddison was born on 29 September 1889 at Leeds, Yorkshire, England. [Family Notes]  He enlisted at Hamilton, Ontario on 15 April 1915, at which time he was working as a railroader.  He listed his sister, Mrs. E. Chadwick of 35 New Camp Road, Leeds, England, as next-of-kin.

Private H. Eddison was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Edge, Alfred Wurtz, 240701, Private (1898-1917)

Alfred Wurtz Edge was born at Manswood, Georgetown, Halton County, Ontario on 26 April 1898, son of J. Franklin Edge.  He enlisted in the 205th Battalion at Hamilton Ontario on 20 November 1916, stating his occupation as Driver, and his next-of-kin as his father, then living at 405 Victoria Avenue North, Hamilton, Ontario (subsequently changed to Waterdown P.O., Ontario).

Private Edge is shown in the CWGC on-line database to have died on 5 November 1917, and buried in the Nine Elms British Cemetery at Poperinge.  The 6th Brigade CMG Company War Diary contains the following entry for 5 November 1917, a day on which the company was preparing for an attack on the village of Passchendaele: "Supplies for Mobile Guns were sent up by a Pack Train of 26 Annimals. This train was heavily shelled near Zonnebeck Station causing several casualties. 1 man missing and 6 men wounded, one of whom afterwards died of wounds. 5 Animals were killed and 5 wounded. Despite the shelling, train reformed and proceeded to destination safely delivering all the guns, tripods and supplies with the exception of 24 hours rations for No. 2 Section. 3 loads of S.A.A. and 2 of water were also lost. No. 2 Section was therefore on short rations during the next 48 hours. During this trip Pte T Wolfenden showed an excellent example. Although severely wounded he stayed at his post and safely delivered his load at the Dump. Afterwards collapsing on the return trip."

Donald Fraser was also involved in this incident, and includes a graphic description of the events in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "On the evening of the 4th, our transport went up the line and met with such opposition that a number were wounded and others so badly shaken and shell-shocked that they were either unfit or unwilling to proceed the following night.  Our crew was, therefore, called upon for assitance.  Leaving Fage in charge of the tent and belongings, the rest of us assumed our new duties and new they certainly were.  For the first time we had each to lead up a horse to a forward dump carrying an assortment of goods.  The transport men left behind soon had the horses loaded up and ready.  Roughly there must have been something like 14 or 15 in our little convoy ... We started out and I found myself second last in the line. My horse was loaded up with cans of water, four on each side ... Up the road we went ... Shell holes were everywhere and most contained slimy, muddy water.  The terrain was a wilderness of mud.  Thank goodness, however, the road was fairly firm.  We were warned to space out which caused quite a distance between the first and the last man ... The artillery was firing as we passed and Fritz was returning the fire.  We soon saw that it would take practically a direct hit to do any damage.  We watched the shells send up fountains of mud and water as they exploded.  For quite a distance you could see eruptions taking place at various points resembling geysers or mud volcanoes ... Near the top, shells were falling beside the road ... According to the map, I would say that we were in the vicinity of Zonnebeke.  Emerging from the hollow, we crept slowly up the ridge ... We were gradually getting through, when I sensed it was about time the next salvo was coming and with it trouble, and sure enough the shells came.  I was thown by the force of the explosion on to my face into the gutter at the side with the rest of me sprawled around the edge ... I was badly dazed and partially choked by mud and water ... my mind quickly cleared and I looked around and saw my horse lying dead half over my right thigh and pinning me down.  We were tossed from one side of the road to the other.  Glancing ahead I observed the horse in front dead and its attendant also.  He was Joe Bishop, a brother of Elmer who was killed several weeks before at Lens.  Joe was taken off the gun crew and given a supposedly safe job with transport.  Ahead of him was Ladd.  His horse was dead also and he, himself, was wounded and trying to rise.  I turned around to see how the fellow behind me fared.  I saw him and his horse motionless in death."

It appears that this "fellow behind" Fraser must have been Private Edge, as there appear to have been no other soldiers from the company killed on that day.


Edmond, Robert, (Orig. #2021231), Lieutenant (1888-)

Robert Edmond was born on 21 August 1888 at South Shields, Durham, England, son of Thomas Edmond.  He was drafted into the 1st Depot Battalion, B.C. Regiment at Vancouver, British Columbia.  He was, at the time, working as a blacksmith's helper, and wasliving at Brittania Beach, B.C.  He noted his next-of-kin as his father, of 95 Ford Street, South Shields, Durham, England.

Lieut. R. Edmond first reported to the 2nd Battalion CMGC Corps for duty on 25 March 1918, and was attached to the 6th CMG Company.  There is no further record of him in the War Diary.


Edmunds, W. Richard, (Orig. #33160), Lieutenant (1894-)

Richard Edmunds was born on 23 December 1894 at Banbury, Oxfordshire, England.  He enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 4 December 1914, at which time he was working as a clerk, and had served for four years with the Q.O.R.  His next-of-kin was listed as Helen Edmunds of 1977 Queen Street East, Toronto.

Lieut. W.R. Edmunds is shown in "G" Battery of No. 2 Company in the first Nominal Roll compiled for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, dated April 1918, as well as in successive rolls until August 1918, after which he no longer appears.


Edwards, Mathew, 3105357, Private (1887-)

Mathew Edwards was born on 25 October 1887 at Pendlebury, Manchester, Lancashire, England. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 1st Depot Battalion 2nd C.O. Regiment at Toronto, Ontario on 15 October 1917, having served as a Private for four years in the East Lancashire Regiment.  He was married, living at 27 Fairlawn Avenue, Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and working as a polisher.  He listed his wife Mary Jane Edwards, also of 27 Fairlawn Avenue, Pawtucket, as next-of-kin.

Private M. Edwards was wounded on 2 October 1918.


Edwards, Walter George, 675851, Private (1890-)

Walter George Edwards was born on 24 October 1890 in Wiltshire, England, and enlisted in the 168th Overseas Battalion at Woodstock, Ontario on 4 April 1916.  He was working as a farmer at Woodstock, and listed his mother, Mrs Mary Edwards, of Urchfont, Wiltshire, as next-of-kin.

Private W.G. Edwards was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Egan, John, 2223345, Corporal, D.C.M. (1892-)

John Egan was born on 20 November 1892 at San Francisco, California, USA.  He enlisted in the Cyclist Platoon at Victoria, British Columbia on 2 May 1917, at which time he was working as a construction clerk, and living with his mother, Sarah Egan, at 675 Dunedin Street, Victoria, B.C.

Private J. Egan was wounded on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens, but remained at duty.  He was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal on 24 September 1918, and must have been promoted to Corporal prior to demobilisation, as that is the rank shown in the National Archives of Canada on-line CEF database.


Eisnor, Stanley, 734290, Private (1891-)

Stanley Eisnor (or Eisner) was born on 6 February 1891 at Marriott's Cove, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted in the 112th Overseas Battalion at Chester on 3 February 1916, at which time he was working as a lumberman, and living with his mother, Eliza Eisner, at Marriott's Cove.

Private S. Eisner was wounded on 17 May 1918, as the following excerpt from the War Diary details: "12.45 [a.m.] Relief of No. 2 Company by No. 3 Company completed without hitch excepting for three other ranks 'M' Battery wounded by shrapnel. Namely:- 240147 Pte Murden. 734290 Pte Eisnor, S. 227741 Pte Willard, J."

Stanley Eisner died in 1966. [
Reference: Consolidated Index to Lunenburg County Probated Wills - by J. Christopher Young]


Eland, Edward Laws, 859381, Private (1887-1918)

Edward Laws Eland was born on 17 January 1887 at Sutton, Brome County, Quebec, son of the Rev. Thomas Laws and Mrs. Evelyn D. Eland.  He enlisted in the 179th Battalion (Cameron Highlanders of Canada) at Winnipeg on 24 November 1915, at which time he was working as a farmer at Warren, Manitoba, and listed his next-of-kin as his widowed mother, then living at Sutton, Quebec.  He stated that he was an active member of the 79th Regiment Militia.

Private E.L. Eland was killed on 3 April 1918.  According to the War Diary entry for that day, "Privates PUDDLE & ELAND were hit by enemy H.E. shell when working improving the trench."  His name is commemmorated on the Vimy Memorial.


Elliott, Frank Archibald, 766368, Sergeant, D.C.M. (1895-)

Frank Archibald Elliott was born on 1 May 1895 at Guildford, Surrey, England.  He enlisted in the 123rd Battalion (Royal Grenadiers) at Toronto, Ontario on 7 December 1915, at which time he was single, working as an electrician, and living at 136 Fairview Avenue, Toronto.  He listed his mother Alice Elliott, then of Shamley Green, near Guildford, Surrey, England, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant F.A. Elliott was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal on 5 October 1918.


Ellis, James Edward, 164648, Private (1892-)

James Edward Ellis was born on 25 February 1892 at Orillia, Simcoe County, Ontario, son of Charles Ellis. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 84th Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 19 October 1915, at which time he was single, living at 355 King Street East, Toronto, Ontario, and working as a construction labourer.  He listed his father, then of 1202 King Street East, Toronto, as next-of-kin.  He was transferred to the 83rd Battalion on 20 March 1916.

Private J.E. Ellis was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Ellis, John Warren, 172380, Private (1888-)

John Warren Ellis was born on 8 November 1888 at Orillia, Simcoe County, Ontario, son of Charles Ellis. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 83rd Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 23 November 1915, at which time he was unmarried, living at 20 Seaton Street, Toronto, Ontario and working as a laundry worker.  He listed his father, then of c/o 355 King Street East, Toronto, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private J.W. Ellis was wounded on 2 October 1918.


Ellis, Robert Starr, 255899, Private (1889-)

Robert Starr Ellis was born on 25 December 1889 at Milton, Queen's County, Nova Scotia. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 210th Overseas Battalion at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan on 12 July 1916, at which time he was single and working as a teamster at Assiniboia, Saskatchewan.  He listed his mother, Mrs. Carrie Ellis, of Milton, Queen's County, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private R.S. Ellis was wounded in October 1918.


Ells, Ralph Anley, 283039, Acting Corporal (1891-)

Ralph Anley Ells was born on 28 May 1889 - although his attestation paper states 1891 - at Black River, Kings County, Nova Scotia, son of Fred Ingram Ells. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 219th Overseas Highland Battalion at Wolfville, Kings County, Nova Scotia on 2 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a clerk at Wolfville.  He listed his father, still of Black River, Kings County, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Acting Corporal R.A. Ells was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Elser, William J., 113200, Private (1894-)

William J. Elser was born on 9 March 1894 at South Petersburg, Virginia, U.S.A.  He enlisted in the 8th C.M.R. at Ottawa, Ontario on 30 July 1915, having previously served for two years.  He was unmarried, working as a farmer, and listed Mrs. Chas. Mills of 21 Slater Street, Ottawa, as next-of-kin.

Private W.J. Elser was detached to the 6th Battalion, C.E. Unit Group No. 10 "G" Ottawa on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Elwood, - (Curly), Private

Donald Fraser mentions Private Elwood in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books).  The following is an incident during the Battle of Lens, when a call came to help with retrieving a wounded man: "Tuesday, 21 August 1917 - The officer appeared again and ... asked for four of us to go up as stretcher bearers and bring out Harry Stevenson who was very badly wounded ... The whole idea was that as soon as Harry Stevenson was picked up and taken away, the gun crews would retire as we were surrounded ... A council of action was held and in a few minutes it was decided that, as soon as possible, two with a stretcher would run to an old German dug-out about fifty yards away where Harry Stevenson lay grievously wounded and pick him up and bring him in.  Bud Willox and Elwood volunteered for the job ... the two dashed out with the stretcher and in a few minutes reappeared with Harry who was absolutely all in.  After that it was decided that McCormick and Jackson would lead off with the stretcher and fifty yards would be followed by Nick and myself as relief stretcher bearers and later on by one of the crews who would beat it out."

Then two days later, the following: "Wednesday, 23 August - The scrapping quietened down considerably last night.  Word was received that Kitson, Esty[sic], and Curly Elwood were wounded and Urquhart was missing.  The [infantry] battalions have been relieved."


Eng, Victor Esserick, 256171, Private (1887-)

Victor Esserick Eng was born on 8 March 1887 at Kensington, Minnesota, USA.  He enlisted in the 210th Overseas Battalion at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan on 18 December 1916, at which time he was unmarried, living at Motlach, Saskatchewan, and working as a farmer.  He listed his mother Mrs. Anne E.P. Felt, also of Motlach, P.O. Saskatchewan, as next-of-kin.

Private V.E. Eng was wounded on 24 September 1918.


Estey, Bryam, 709196, Private (1896-)

Bryam Estey was born on 8 February 1896 at Grand Falls, Victoria County, New Brunswick.  He enlisted in the 64th Overseas Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 24 September 195, at which time he was unmarried and working as a sectionman (ICR).  He listed his mother, Mrs. C.A. Estey of Grand Falls, New Brunswick, as next-of-kin.

Private B. Estey was wounded on 11 October 1918.


Estey, George Archibald, 817050, Private (1897-)

George Archibald Estey was born on 2 Jun 1897 at St. John, New Brunswick.  He enlisted in the 140th Overseas Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 9 November 1915, when he was working as a labourer at St. John, and stated is next-of-kin to be his mother Mrs. Alice N. Estey, of 76 Spar Cove Road (later changed to 19 Isleview Ave.), St. John.

Donald Fraser mentions Private Estey in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books), shortly after the Battle of Lens: "Wednesday, 23 August 1917 - The scrapping quietened down considerably last night.  Word was received that Kitson, Esty, and Curly Elwood were wounded and Urquhart was missing.  The [infantry] battalions have been relieved."


Euloth (Uloth), Albert William, 902175, Private (1895-1945)

Albert William Euloth (or Uloth) was born on 10 November 1895 at Cole Harbour, Nova Scotia, son of George Adam & Melissa Ann Euloth. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 193rd Overseas Battalion at Canso, Guysborough County, Nova Scotia on 1 April 1916, having previously served with the 94th Regiment.  He was single, working as a labourer at Hazel Hill, Nova Scotia, and listed his father, also of Hazel Hill, as next-of-kin.

Private A.W. Euloth was gassed on 7 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled area around BUISSY very heavily and all forward Batteries."

A headstone inscription at Mount Hermon Cemetery, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia (Lot 14. Block A. Grave 1) states that he was married to Claire J. (1898-1984), and that he was a Private (F/46) with the Veterans Guard of Canada.  He died during the Second World War, on 1 February 1945, aged 49. [Source: Guysboro County Website Wartime Honour Roll]


Eustace, Frank, 423395, Sergeant (1890-)

Frank Eustace was born on 4 April 1890 at Drayton St. Leonard, Oxfordshire, England.  He enlisted in the 44th Overseas Battalion at Sewell on 18th June 1915, stating that his next-of-kin was Susan Eustace of Drayton St. Leonard, and that he was an Iron Maker.

10 April 1917 - Battle of Vimy Ridge: "Lts Waddington, Williams, Tucker and Hardiman rendered exceptionally good services throughout whole of the operations as did Sgts McGirr and Eustace, L/Cpls Olmstead and Rust, and Ptes Woodean, Climie and Halstead." [6th Brigade CMG Company War Diary]

On 17 September 1917, Sergeant Eustace was awarded the Military Medal.  On 2 November 1917, the War Diary shows Sgt. Eustace taking command of No. 3 Section at Seine Corner, just prior to the attack on Passchendaele village: "No. 3 Section 6th Cdn M G Coy proceeded to relieve the corresponding section of the 12th Cdn M G Coy in Battery Position ... This section was under command of Lt. Leslie Withrow who was wounded on the way in. Sgt. F Eustace then took command and completed the relief. Relief was complete by 9 p.m."

Then, in his report on the operations of his unit on the 9/10 November 1917, Lt. C.G. Frost includes the following: "I relieved Lt. Broadbridge, took over stores and guns - also full instructions re barrage for following morning. Sgt. Eustace of Lt. Broadbridge's Section remained to act as my Section Sgt.  I found that my ammunition supply was very short but that there had been dumped near by 45 000 rounds of bulk ammunition.  Accompanied by Sgt. Eustace I made a thorough search for same but was unable to locate it owing to the darkness of the night.  I was however able to locate and salvage 4,000 rounds which Sgt. Eustace & I carried to our gun position.  This gave us eight belts per gun to fire when barrage opened.  We had also 3000 rounds in bulk.  I knew however that 45 000 rds were and I could draw upon when it became lighter ... During the night hostile artillery was very heavy but about 3 a.m. it increased in intensity and became very heavy ... The night was spent in these funk holes which very soon filled with water. I gave each of the men several drinks of rum during the night conserving my supply as much as possible. The following a.m. I sent Sgt. Eustace with a ration party to Tyne Cott. I asked that Sgt. Eustace be relieved as he was very ill. This was impossible. Thus for the remainder of trip I had no NCO's but the men were splendid."

Lt. H.J.L. Pearce had more to say about Sgt. Eustace in his report: "Here we found that, owing to the foresight of Sgt. Eustace he had detailed some of his crews of the Barrage guns to help the Transport unload & two piles were made of Lieut Tuckers crew and my own."  The War Diary shows that Sgt. Eustace was awarded a Bar to the Military Medal during December 1917.  Then he was given a second Bar to the M.M. on 12 March 1918.


This page last updated 7 February 2003
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