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6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company
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2nd Battalion Canadian Machine Gun Corps
Personnel Database - C
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Caddell, Thomas H, 75770, Private (1889-1916)
Cahoon, William John, 475033, Private (1884-)
Cairns, William Hilton, 422209, Private (1886-1916)
Caissie, Saturine/Saturnin, 794089, Private (1895-)
Caldwell, Lionel, 69194, Sergeant, M.M. & Bar (1895-)
Callahan, Alexander, 902463, Private (1894-1918)
Callender, John Slimmon, 687075, Private (1886-)
Cameron, Allan Hector, Lieutenant (1889-)
Cameron, Coulson, 02690 (Orig. #400075), Corporal (1896-)
Cameron, James Nichol Campbell, 288110, Pte. (1885-1917)
Campbell, Angus Joseph, 633246, Private (1892-1918)
Campbell, Charles Worell, 2099833, Private (1889-)
Campbell, James, 769621, Sergeant, M.M. (1885-)
Campbell, Stewart John, 424326, Private (1895-1917)
Carmichael, Alexander Gordon, 288609, Lance Corporal (1887-)
Carmichael, Duncan Stewart, 878085, Lance Corporal (1884-)
Carleton, Earl Neil, 652215, Private (1897-)
Carnegie, John Alexander, 54243, Private (1898-)
Carpenter, Samuel, 904081, Private (1897-)
Carr, William Allanson, Lieutenant
Carrier, Joseph L., 672212, Private, M.M. (1896-)
Carrier, Leo Arthur, Lieutenant (1888-)
Carriere, Arthur, 101351, Private (1887-1918)
Carrigan, William, 666470, Private (1880-1918)
Carter, -, Sergeant
Carter, Hugh Baker, Lieutenant (1889-)
Carter, Robert, 663730, Private (1895-)
Cartwright, -, Sergeant
Casler, Allen, 675580, Private (1894-)
Cass, Thomas Austin, 2060346, Private (1898-)
Cassils, James Andrew, 2418364, Private (1884-)
Chaif, Louis John, 660524, Private (1898-)
Chaif, William George, 65171, Private (1894-)
Chaisson, William Benjamin, 713084, Private (1898-)
Chamberland, Eugene, 61221, Company Sergeant-Major, D.C.M. (1889-)
Chapman, Ernest, 901556, Private (1895-)
Chappell, Percy, 136431, Private (1894-)
Chesley, Leon Adney, 749137, Private (1896-)
Chestnut, Percy Lannon, 139787, Private (1894-)
Christian, Howard Tennyson, 408415, Sergeant (1892-1918)
Christie, Emery William, 542200, Private (1895-)
Christie, John, 68001, Sergeant, M.M. (1888-)
Clapp, Percy James, 454238, Acting Brigade Sergeant-Major (1891-)
Clark, David Donovan, 75946, Lance Corporal (1885-1916)
Clark, James Donald, 928875, Private (1891-1918)
Clark, Kenneth Arthur, 2114918, Corporal (1888-1918)
Clarke, James Thomas, 488684, Private (1893-)
Clarke, Wilmot Gercon, Captain (Chaplain, C.C.F.) (1866-)
Clayton, Frederick, 862453, Private (1897-)
Cleghorn, Andrew Graham, (Orig. #25938), Captain (1890-)
Clement, Joseph, 445079, Private (1886-)
Clerk, Harold Robb McIntyre, 3107005, Private (1882-)
Climie, -, Private
Cline, Leslie James, 240455, Private (1888-1918)
Clue, Alfred W., 603113, Private (1897-)
Coates, George Alfred, 832381, Private (1898-)
Coiley, Montague Alfred, 602326, Corporal (1893-)
Colbeck, William Luther, 663542, Private (1898-)
Coleby, Harold, 53446, Private (1893-)
Colgan, David William, 440611, Private (1891-)
Collins, Percy Henry, 55805, Sergeant, M.M. (1893-)
Colwell, Cyril Henry, Lieutenant (1898-)
Comstock, Grant Willard, (Orig. #15350), Lieutenant, M.C. (1889-)
Conan, Frank John, 1018639, Private (1888-)
Connelly, Charles, 448056, Private
Connolly, Charles Henry, 488682, Private (1895-)
Connolly, Patrick, 67041, Private (1892-)
Connors, Charles Patrick, 715911, Private
Constant, Albert Edward, 713111, Private (1897-)
Cooke, William Herbert, 506668, Private (1892-)
Cooper, -, Sergeant
Cootes, Edward, 1018488, Private (1895-)
Cordey, Gerald Gordon, 414433, Private (1892-)
Cosgrove, George Thomas, 874155, Private, M.M. (1889-)
Costello, George Joseph, 175361, Private (1886-)
Cottingham, Harold Edward, 766166, Sergeant
Cotton, Robert Lawson, 712725, Private (1881-1968)
Couillard, Ernest, 889643, Lance Corporal (1896-1918)
Coulett, Earnest, 794068, Private (1898-1918)
Counahan, Patrick Harold, 57815, Sergeant, M.M. (1893-)
Couvrette, Lucien, 228936, Private (1892-)
Cowan, Frank William, 663701, Private (1895-)
Cowan, Peter, (Orig. #76248), Lieutenant (1880-)
Cowan, William, 818113, Private (1897-)
Coward, William Victor, 769464, Private (1896-1918)
Cox, Harry Vernon, 240364, Private (1894-)
Cox, Vernon Olen, 200302, Private, M.M. (1894-)
Cox, William Rutherford, Lieutenant (1887-)
Craig, Roy Ernest, 817958, Private (1888-)
Crawford, Andrew, 414559, Sergeant
Cream, Clyde, 414560, Private (1892-)
Creighton, Howard Alexander, Captain, M.C. (1895-)
Crouse, William Amile, 733845, Private (1895-)
Crowe, Harry Alfred, 911960, Private (1895-)
Cruse, Charles Harrison, 256256, Private (1887-)
Cuff, Leonard A., Lieutenant (1885-)
Cumming, Joseph McCombie, (Orig. #75010), Lieutenant (1887-)
Cunningham, Everett Augustus, 753567, Private (1896-)
Currall, Frederick, 65235, Private (1892-1918)
Curran, William George, 163810, Private (1896-)
Currie, Alex P., 878231, Private (1891-)
Curtis, Lawrence Arthur, 877725, Private (1897-)
Cutler, Alfred, 69159, Sergeant (1892-)
Cuzner, George, Captain (1876-)

Caddell, Thomas H, 75770, Private (1889-1916)

Thomas Caddell was born on 31 January 1889 in Carlisle, England, son of Thomas and Mary Caddell. [Family Notes]  When he enlisted in the 29th Battalion at Vancouver, B.C. on 9 November 1914, he stated that he was in an Active Militia; it is possible that the notation "11th Fus 5017" on the top left of his attestation paper relates to this service.  He also said he was an electrician, and showed his brother Robert Caddell, of 5 Tilbury Road, Carlisle, as his next-of-kin.  He appears to have married some time during the war, because he left a widow Cissie Caddell, of Vancouver.

He was one of four soldiers in the company - the others were Privates Batts, Smith and Jensen - killed on 10 June 1916, during what was referred to in the War Diary as "considerable artillery activity."  Nothing further is known regarding the circumstances of his death, but his name is commemmorated on Panel 32 of the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.


Cahoon, William John, 475033, Private (1884-)

William John Cahoon was born on 2 April 1884 at Toronto, Ontario, and enlisted in the 90th (Winnipeg Rifles) Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 27 July 1915.  At the time he was a member of an active militia, and was working as an express messenger.  He listed his mother, Mrs. S. Cahoon of 49 Beatrice Street, Toronto, Ontario as his next-of-kin.

Private W.J. Cahoon was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Cairns, William Hilton, 422209, Private (1886-1916)

William Hilton Cairns was born on 6 May 1886 at Winnipeg, Manitoba, son of William Cairns.  He enlisted in the 30th Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 20 March 1915, at which time he was a butcher, and his father was living at Medicine Hat, Alberta.

Private W.H. Cairns was killed on 28 September 1916, during the Battle of Flers-Courcelette.  Donald Fraser mentions the incident in his Diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "The Brigade Machine-Gunners came out tonight, being relieved by the gunners of the 4th Brigade.  Two of our members were killed - Cairns and Hubert - and two were shell-shocked.  Fritz had been busy shelling between Pozieres and Contalmaison and must have struckj quite a number of our men as this was a crowded and busy quarter."  Cairns was buried at Adanac Military Cemetery, Miraumont (Grave Ref. II.D.9).


Caissie, Saturine/Saturnin, 794089, Private (1895-1934)

Saturine/Saturnin Caissie (or Cassie/Cassy) was born in February 1895 - although although other sources suggest that he was born on 22 Feb 1898 - at Savoy Settlement, Northumberland County, New Brunswick, son of Edward Caissie. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in "B" Company, 132nd Battalion at Chatham, New Brunswick on 5 April 1916, having been a member of an active militia, probably the 73rd Regiment.  He stated that he was working as a labourer and living at Fair Isle, Alnwick Parish, North County, New Brunswick, and listed his next-of-kin as his father, also of Fair Isle, Alnwick.

Private S. Caissie was wounded on 4 May 1918.  The War Diary entry for this date states that the "enemy bombarded area around Mercatel from dawn to 6 a.m. with ... gas shells. Men most affected were those in forward areas. No casualties incurred."  Perhaps the date shown in the list of casualties is incorrect.

Saturnin Caissie died on 29 May 1934 at East st. John, New Brunswick.


Caldwell, Lionel, 69194, Sergeant, M.M. & Bar (1895-)

Lionel Caldwell was born on 23 July 1895 at New Carlisle, Restigouche County, Quebec. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 26th Battalion at St. John on 24 November 1914, when he stated that he was a clerk, and listed his next-of-kin as his mother Annie Caldwell, of Chandeler, Quebec.

Sergeant L. Caldwell was awarded a bar to the Military Medal on 12 March 1918 (a later listing of awards, dated January 1919, states - probably incorrectly - that the date of this award was 19 November 1918).  He was wounded during the Battle of Arras on 28 August 1918.


Callahan, Alexander, 902463, Private (1894-1918)

Alexander Callahan was born on 20 February 1894 at Manchester, Guysborough, Nova Scotia, son of Berton/Burton J. & Susan Maria Callahan. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 193rd Overseas Battalion at New Glasgow, Pictou County, Nova Scotia on 2 May 1916.  At this time he was working as a farmer at New Glasgow, and listed his next-of-kin as his father, of Manchester, Guysboro, Nova Scotia.

Private A. Callahan died on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.  His name is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial, and the CWGC on-line database lists his next-of-kin at that time as his parents, then of South Manchester, Guysborough County, Nova Scotia.  His name is also commemorated in Manchester Cemetery, Guysborough County.


Callender, John Slimmon, 687075, Private (1886-)

John Slimmon Callender was born on 16 August 1886 at Glasgow, Scotland. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 172nd Battalion at Kamloops, British Columbia on 5 November 1915, having previously served with the 102nd R.M.R.  At the time, he was working as a farmer, and listed Adam Callender of Borough Polloks Fields, Glasgow, Scotland as his next-of-kin.  On 20 October 1916, he was transferred to the 131st Battalion.

Private J.S. Callender was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Cameron, Allan Hector, Lieutenant (1889-)

Allan Hector Cameron was born on 18 February 1889 at Peterborough, Ontario, son of Jno. A. Cameron.  He enlisted with the 247th Battalion at Peterborough, Ontario on 25 August 1916, at which time he was working as a travelling salesman, living with his father at 292 Stewart Street, Peterborough, and was an active member of the 57th Militia.

Lieut. A.H. Cameron was with "G" Battery of No. 2 Company (attached from the 21st Battalion) in April 1918 when the first Nominal Roll for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps was compiled.  He remained in that battery until the end of March 1919, although he was shown as being on leave in July 1918.


Cameron, Coulson, 02690 (Orig. #400075), Corporal (1896-)

Coulson Cameron was born on 28 May 1896 at Toronto, Ontario.  He enlisted at Niagara Camp, Ontario on 28 May 1915, having spent six months in the Governor General's Body Guards.  He was unmarried and working as a glove cutter.  He listed Mrs. E. Cameron of 58 Caroline Street, Toronto, Ontario, as his next-of-kin.

Corporal C. Cameron was wounded on 2 October 1918.


Cameron, James Nichol Campbell, 288110, Private (1885-1917)

James Nichol Campbell Cameron was born on 16 September 1885 at Dundee, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 221st Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 17 March 1916, when he was working as an insurance agent and living at 319 Oakwood Avenue, Winnipeg.

Private J.N.C. Cameron died on 10 November 1917, and was buried at Passchendaele New British Cenetery, Zonnebeke (Grave Ref. IX.E.21).  The 6th Brigade CMG Company War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Weather stormy with heavy rain.  The 2nd Cdn Div again attacked on the left sector.  Barrage guns in positions taken up on the 9th opened fire in accordance with Fire Organization Table attached.  Zero hour was 6.05 a.m.  Attack was successful but units were subjected to one of the heaviest barrages they have yet endured.  On account of the heavy rain which set in during the early morning and converted the countryside into a quagmire the men suffered severely from exposure, the heavy shelling causing trenches and shelters to cave in and burying men, guns, and ammunition.  It was impossible to keep guns clean.  Casualties for the day were 3 O.R's killed."


Campbell, Angus Joseph, 633246, Private (1892-1918)

Angus Joseph Campbell was born on 29 September 1892 at Greenfield, Ontario. He enlisted at Alexandria, Ontario on 9 January 1916, having served in the 59th Regiment and in the P.?.D.G.s.  He was working as a farmer, living in Greenfield, and stated that his next-of-kin was his mother, Mrs. Flora Campbell.

The War Diaries of the 2nd Battalaion CMG Corps show that Pte. A.J. Campbell went missing on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.  He is not shown as having died on the CWGC on-line database, so presumably he was wounded, or turned up shortly afterwards.  Analysis of the reports submitted on operations between 8 and 10 August by the O.C.s of the Machine-Gun Companies suggests that Pte. Campbell was one of nine soldiers who went missing, probably due to the thick mist, and may well have been wounded, during the advance of No. 3 Company on 9 August.


Campbell, Charles Worell, 2099833, Private (1889-)

Charles Worell Campbell was born on 28 April 1889 at Rollo Bay West, Lot 43, Prince Edward Island. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the King's County Siege Artillery Draft at Souris, King County, PEI on 27 November 1916, having served in the 37th C.F.A.  He was unmarried, working as a railroad brakeman at Rollo Bay West, and listed his mother Mrs. Agnes Campbell, also of Rollo Bay West, PEI, as next-of-kin.

Private C.W. Campbell was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Campbell, James, 769621, Sergeant, M.M. (1885-)

According to the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary, T/Sgt. J. Campbell (#76903) was recommended for a Military Medal by the O.C., Major Sansom for his efforts in the operations between 9 and 15 October 1918.  This appears to be the Sgt. J. Campbell (#769621) who was later listed as having received this award on 19 November that year.

James Campbell was born on 24 May 1885 at Glasgow, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 124th Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 4 January 1916, at which time he was married, living at 74 Wolseley Street, Toronto, Ontario, and working as a teamster.  He listed his wife Annie Campbell, also of 74 Wolseley Street, Toronto, as next-of-kin.


Campbell, Stewart John, 424326, Private (c1895-1917)

Stewart John Campbell was born on 10 December 1895 at Toronto, Ontario. At the time of his death, his CWGC obituary staes that he was the son of "Isobella Somers formerly Campbell & the late Robert John Campbell, of Gilbert Plains, Manitoba."

Private Campbell was killed on 18 August 1917.  The War Diary merely states that "This relief was greatly delayed by enemy shelling ... During relief Ptes E.U. Bishop and Campbell were killed," but Donald Fraser, in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books) gives more detail about the incident: "Thursday, 16 August - At 9.00 p.m. we moved forward, two crews of our section taking up advanced posts 50 to 100 yards behind our front line.  When we arrived at Company Headquarters, Fritz put up a barrage and immediately our signals of distress from the front line went up and a reply from our artillery and machine-guns followed.  For a considerable time there was a terrific noise and one could not hear himself speaking.  Fritz, however, did not attack and when the bombardment quietened down, our crews went forward but were caught in a second barrage.  Everyone escape with the exception  of Elmer Bishop who received shrapnel in the back killing him.  One of Section 3 guns was knocked out ... Later in the morning we relieved the 4th Machine-Gun Company.  When changing over, Campbell, who took my positions when I was away on rest, was killed.  He was standing inside the building when a piece of shrapnel came through some open space in the ruins hitting him in the region of the heart and lungs.  He lived only about ten minutes.  It was a peculiar casualty.  Most of the fellows were bunched up around the entrance engaged in conversation only a couple of yards from Campbell when the fatality occurred.  There was no noise of the impact and no cry from Campbell.  It happened so quietly that we did not notice at the moment what took place.  We were somewhat puzzled how he got hit as he was in a more sheltered position than any of us."
"Friday, 17 August - ... Later on in the day another lot went out to look for Elmer Bishop but it appeared a burial party had picked him up.  Quite a number of our dead were lying around.  In addition to Campbell and Bishop, Muirhead was slightly gassed and Drysdale and Forbes were wounded."  He was buried at Fosse No. 10 Communal Cemetery Extension, Sains-en-Gohelle (Grave Ref. II.A.31).


Carleton, Earl Neil, 652215, Private (1897-)

Earl Neil Carleton was born on 21 May 1897 at Bruce Township, Bruce County, Ontario, and enlisted in the 160th Overseas Battalion at Tiverton, Ontario on 7 April 1916.  At the time he was working as a farmer, and living at R R #3, Tiverton, Ontario.  He listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Robert Carleton, of Underwood, Ontario.

Private E.N. Carleton was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Carmichael, Alexander Gordon, 288609, Lance Corporal (1887-)

Alexander Gordon Carmichael was born on 13 February 1887. [Family Notes]

Private A.G. Carmichael was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.  He must have recovered sufficiently to return to duty, and be promoted, prior to his demobilization, since the National Archives CEF database lists his final rank as Lance Corporal.


Carmichael, Duncan Stewart, 878085, Lance Corporal (1884-)

Duncan Stewart Carmichael was born on 6 April 1884 (although attestation paper states 1886) at Whycocomagh, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 185th Overseas Battalion (Cape Breton Highlanders) at Broughton, Cape Breton County, Nova Scotia on 7 April 1916, at which time he was single and working as a merchant at Whycocomagh.  He listed his sister Sadie Carmichael, also of Whycocomagh, as next-of-kin.

Private D.S. Carmichael was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Carnegie, John Alexander, 54243, Private (1898-)

John Alexander Carnegie was born on 19 April 1898 at Victoria, Ontario, son of John Hilliard Carnegie.  He enlisted in the Div. Cyclists at Toronto, Ontario on 9 February 1917, stating that he had been serving in the 48th Highlanders as a Private for one year.  He was a student, living with his parents at 109 Hilton Avenue, Toronto.

Private J.A. Carnegie was wounded on 27 May 1918.  The War Diary shows that the infantry "made a daylight stealth raid on enemy posts and captured three prisoners," which the Machine-Gun Battalion no doubt supported with direct and/or indirect fire, but it is not clear whether this action led to the casualty.


Carpenter, Samuel, 904081, Private (1897-)

Samuel Carpenter was born on 24 December 1897 at Salt Spring Island, British Columbia, son of James Carpenter.  He enlisted in the 194th Overseas Battalion at Edmonton, Alberta on 24 February 1916, at which time he was single, living at 864, 1st Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, and working as a labourer.  He listed his father, of Yates, Alberta, as next-of-kin.

Private S. Carpenter was wounded on 26 September 1918.


Carr, William Allanson, Lieutenant

Lieut. W.A. Carr is shown in "D" Battery of No. 1 Company in the July 1918 Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps.  He temporarily took command of the battery in the field on 16 August, as is described in the War Diary entry for that day: "The day passes unusually quiet in the line except that in the late afternoon the 19th Infantry Battalion attacked the enemy driving them back over 1,000 yards.  As the battalions on either side did not conform to this movement, the flanks were unprotected. The officer Commanding No. 1 Company Major J. BASEVI instantly placed batteries to cover said gaps. At 6 p.m., 'D' Battery now under Command of Lieut. W.A. CARR moved to protect the Right flank and this officer although recently absorbed from the Infantry did exceptionally good work. At 10 p.m. also it became necessary to protect the Left flank and 'B' Battery was thrown to this gap. The Other two Batteries were brought up in close Support in case of need."

The Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Lt. Carr in "B" Battery, although on leave, but he returned to "D" Battery the following month and remained there until the end of March 1919.


Carrier, Joseph L., 672212, Private, M.M. (1896-)

Joseph L. Carrier was born on 31 March 1896 at St. Anselme de Beauce, Quebec, son of Cleophas Carrier.  He enlisted in the 167th Battalion at Quebec City, Quebec, on 12 February 1916, having served for a year with the 54th Regiment.  He was working as a fireman, living at 26, 4eme Rue Limoilou, and listed his father, still of St. Anselme de Beauce, as next-of-kin.  He was transferred to the 189th Battalion on 15 September 1916.

Private J. Carrier was recommended for a Military Medal by the O.C., Major Sansom for his efforts in the operations between 9 and 15 October 1918.  The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary shows that he received this award on 19 November 1918.


Carrier, Leo Arthur, Lieutenant (1888-)

Leo Arthur Carrier was born on 29 March 1888 in Quebec.  He enlisted at Valcartier Camp, Quebec on 24 September 1914, after having served as an officer for three years in the 61st Regiment.  He stated that he was an active member of the 1st Battalion C.F.A. Militia, and that he was married and working as a bookkeeper.  He listed his wife, Mrs. L.A. Carrier of 66 Maisonneuve Avenue (presumably in Quebec), as next-of-kin.

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Lieut. L.A. Carrier in "C" Battery No. 1 Company.  The following month he was shown as Transport Officer of No. 1 Company, where he remained until February 1919, when he was shown as having been admitted to hospital.


Carriere, Arthur, 101351, Private (1887-1918)

Arthur Carriere was born on 12 March 1887 at St Scholastique, Cote Deux Montagnes (Country of Two Mountains) Quebec, son of Joseph & Zephirine Lacroix Carriere.  He enlisted in the 66th Overseas Battalion at Edmonton, Alberta on 22 September 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer and blacksmith.  His original medical examination had been done on 22 September 1915 at Grande Prairie.  He listed his father, also of St Scholastique, Quebec, as next-of-kin.  On 30 April 1916, he was transferred to the 233rd Battalion, and then to the 178th Battalion on 17 March 1917.

Private A. Carriere was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, and died a few days later on 1 September.  He was buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. LXVI.G.6).


Carrigan, William, 666470, Private (1880-1918)

William Carrigan was born in 1880 at Arichat, Richmond County, Nova Scotia. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 165th Overseas Battalion at Antigonish, Nova Scotia on 27 March 1916.  He was working as a fisherman, and listed his next-of-kin as his wife, Elizabeth Carrigan, then living in Arichat.

Private W. Carrigan died on 10 August 1918, aged 32 (?), and was buried at Villers-Bretonneux Military Cemetery, Somme (Grave Ref. IIIA.BB.2).  His widow was living at Harbor Boucher, Antigonish Co., Nova Scotia.


Carter, -, Sergeant

"12 January 1917 - Sgt. Carter in charge of guides for relief of No. 2 and No. 4 Sections in the Bajolle-Souchez Sector."  Excerpt from Battalion War Diary.


Carter, Hugh Baker, Lieutenant (1889-)

Hugh Baker Carter was born on 16 March 1889 at Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, son of W.J. Carter, who was a contractor, principally constructing buildings for the railways which were pushing westward in Canada.  The family moved from Prince Albert to Calgary, Alberta when Hugh was of pre-school age.  Then, at about the age when he was due to start school, his father accepted an attractive job in Montreal.  This was where Hugh's main schooling took place.  His mother died at the early age of 45 in 1901, and two years later the father decided to go west again, settling in Edmonton, Alberta, where Hugh completed his schooling.   [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 31st Battalion at Calgary, Alberta on 17 November 1914, at which time he was working in the retail lumber trade, and had served in the 103rd C.R. for six months.  He showed his next-of-kin as his father, then living at 395, 3rd Street, Edmonton, Alberta.

Lt. Hugh Baker Carter reported for duty to the Company Headquarters at Mont-St. Eloi from G.H.Q. Cadet School on 13 April 1917.  On 19 April, No. 2 Section under Lts. Dickie and Baker relieved No. 1 Section on outpost duty.  On 3 May, during an attack made by the company, Lts. Carter and Wallbridge had four guns in reserve at Vancouver Road, but Lt Carter was later called in to support the attack: "Lts Carter and Wallbridge took up two fresh gun crews owing to Casualties and damages and rearranged section. Lt Carter did exceptionally fine work." (War Diary)  On 22 July, Lieut. H.B. Carter was admitted to the Field Ambulance, after having been gassed.

He was invalided to England, where he married one of the nurses looking after him, Gladys, and returned to Canada at the end of the war.  His lungs had been badly damaged and, on the advice of a doctor, they moved to Phoenix, Arizona.  He couldn't stand the intense heat there, and shortly after moved to California, where he died in 1922.  He is buried in Monrovia.  [Personal details kindly provided by Hugh Munro Carter]


Carter, Robert, 663730, Private (1895-)

Robert Carter was born on 19 September 1895 at Amaranth Township, County Dufferin, Ontario, son of Henry Carter.  He enlisted at Shelburne, Ontario on 17 May 1916, at which time he was working as a farmer at R R #1, Waldemar, Ontario.  He stated his next-of-kin to be his father, then also of R R #1, Waldemar.

Private R. Carter was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Cartwright, -, Sergeant

On 28 February 1916, Corporal Cartwright returned from leave.  In an operation order dated 8 April 1917 detailing preparations for the attack on Vimy Ridge, Sergeant Cartwright is mentioned in connection with signaller ans barrage guns.  Then on 3 July 1917, he is mentioned again in an operation order.


Casler, Allen, 675580, Private (1894-)

Allen Casler was born on 20 January 1894 at Norwich, Oxford County, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 168th Overseas Battalion at Woodstock, Ontario on 21 February 1916, having served for one year in the 38th Dufferin Rifles at Brantford.  He was working as a well driller at Burgessville, Ontario, and stated his next-of-kin to be his mother, Mrs. Samuel Casler, also of Burgessville.

Private A. Casler was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Cass, Thomas Austin, 2060346, Private (1898-)

Thomas Austin Cass was born on 8 October 1898 at North River, Queens County, Prince Edward Island. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 105th Overseas Battalion Draft at Charlottetown, P.E.I. on 1 February 1917, having previously served with the Cadet Corps at Queen Square School, Charlottetown.  He was an active member of the 82nd Militia Regiment, unmarried, and working as a farmer at North River, Queens County, P.E.I.  He listed his mother Mary Cass, also of North River, as next-of-kin.

Private T.A. Cass was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Cassils, James Andrew, 2418364, Private (1884-)

James Andrew Cassils was born on 23 March 1884 at Orangeville, Ontario, son of James Cassils.  He enlisted at Regina, Saskatchewan on 16 October 1917, at which time he was unmarried, living at 513, 11th Street, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and working as a farmer.  He listed his father, also of  513, 11th Street, Saskatoon, as next-of-kin.

Private J.A. Cassils was wounded on 2 October 1918.


Cathcart, David, 877797, Private (1895-)

David Cathcart was born on 13 January 1895 at Lingan, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, son of John Cathcart.  He enlisted in the 185th Overseas Battalion (Cape Breton Highlanders) at Glace Bay, Cape Breton County, Nova Scotia on 15 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried, working as a miner at Port Morien, and listed his father, also of Port Morien, as next-of-kin.

Private D. Cathcart was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.

Letter home written by David Cathcart in Germany on 13 Dec 1918.


Chaif, Louis John, 660524, Private (1898-)

Louis John Chaif was born on 3 March 1898 at Montreal, Quebec.  He enlisted in the 163rd Battalion (F.C.) at Montreal, Quebec on 14 March 1916, at which time he was working as an office clerk, and living with his mother, Sarah Bennett - specified as his next-of-kin - at 46 Sanguinet Street, Montreal.

Private L.J. Chaif was wounded on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Chaif, William George, 65171, Private (1894-)

William George Chaif was born on 16 January 1894 at Montreal, Quebec.  He enlisted in the 24th Battalion at Montreal, Quebec on 5 November 1914, at which time he was working as a plumber and had served in the Shawbridge Cadet Corps.  He listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Sarah Smith, of 48 Sanguines Street.

Private W.G. Chaif was wounded on 3 May 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "One gun was hit by shrapnel during barrage and the No. 1 badly wounded."  However there were two others wounded on this day - Ptes. R.S. Wright and P. Daigneault - so any of the three could be the soldier mentioned.  Pte. Chaif must have recovered sufficiently to return to duty, because the War Diary shows him being wounded again on 9 October 1918, during the Battle of Cambrai.  The following extract for that day may refer to the incident: "17.00 'L' Battery was heavily shelled and suffered 12 casualties wounded and many gassed.  They rejoined their Company in Assembly Area ready for operation to River ERECLIN.  Four Guns of this Battery were knocked out."


Chaisson, William Benjamin, 713084, Private (1898-)

William Benjamin Chaisson was born on 20 January 1898 [although his attestation paper states 1896] at Rustico, Queen's County, Prince Edward Island, son of John Chaisson. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 105th Overseas Battalion at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island on 27 March 1916, having previously served in the 82nd Regiment.  He was unmarried, working as a labourer, living at 71 Douglas Street, Charlottetown, P.E.I., and listed his father, also of 71 Douglas Street, Charlottetown, as next-of-kin.

Private W.B. Chaisson was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Chamberland, Eugene, 61221, Brigade/Company Sergeant-Major, D.C.M. (1889-)

Eugene Chamberland was born on 22 May 1889 at Montreal, Quebec, son of Joseph Chamberland.  He enlisted at Montreal on 23 October 1914, when he was working as a butcher.  He showed his next-of-kin as his father, then living at 1657 Ste. Laroche.

Sgt. Chamberland was mentioned in a 5th CMG Coy. Operation Order relating to events planned for 8 November 1917.  On 26 March 1918, he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.  A later list, dated January 1919, of awards given to members of the battalion, shows that by that time he had been promoted to B.S.M. (Brigade Sergeant-Major).  The National Archives of Canada CEF Database shows that his final rank was C.S.M. (Company Sergeant-Major).

Eugene Chamberland may have married Alice Lacroix at Sacre Coeur de Jesus de East Broughton, Quebec on 26 May 1919. [Ref]


Chapman, Ernest, 901556, Private (1895-)

Ernest Chapman was born on 29 December 1895 at Amherst Head, Nova Scotia, son of George Chapman. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 193rd Battalion at Amherst, Nova Scotia on 7 April 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a blacksmith at Amherst Head.  He listed his father, also of Amherst Head, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private E. Chapman was wounded on 5 September 1918, but remained on duty.  He was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilization.


Chappell, Percy, 136431, Private (1894-)

Percy Chappell was born on 19 January 1894 at Radish, Lancashire, England. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 74th Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 4 November 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a labourer.  He listed his mother, Martha Ann Chappell of 60 Markham Street, Toronto, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private P. Chappell was wounded on 11 September 1918, but remained at duty.  The War Diary for that day includes the following: "Enemy gas and H.E., gave Gunners a great deal of trouble and caused 2 (slight) casualties."


Chesley, Leon Adney, 749137, Private (1896-)

Leon Adney Chesley was born on 30 September 1896 at Barford, Quebec.  He enlisted at Sherbrooke on 4 November 1914, having served in the 53rd Militia Regiment.  He was unmarried and working as a shoemaker, and listed Mrs. Ruth Chesley of 179 Green Avenue, Westmount, Quebec, as his next-of-kin.

Private L.A. Chesley was wounded on 2 October 1918.


Chestnut, Percy Lannon, 139787, Private (1894-)

Percy Lannon Chestnut was born on 3 April 1894 at Toronto, Ontario.  He enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 28 December 1915, having previously served in the G.G.B.G. for eight months.  At the time of his enlistment, he was working as a steam fitter, and living with his mother, Annie Chestnut - specified as his next-of-kin - at 232 Pape Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.

Private P.L. Chestnut was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Christian, Howard Tennyson, 408415, Sergeant (1892-1918)

Howard Tennyson Christian was born on 5 August 1892 at Port Perry, Ontario, son of William T. and Pauline Esther (nee Tennyson) Christian.  He enlisted in the 37th Battalion at Niagara Camp, Ontario on 5 June 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a salesman.  He listed his father, then of Smith River, Ontario, as next-of-kin. 

Sergeant H.T. Christian was killed in action on 27 September 1918, during a retaliatory enemy artillery barrage, and was buried at Sains-les-Marquion British Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. II.D.10).  His name is commemorated on a 1914-1918 memorial plaque erected by the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 117 at Parry Sound, Ontario, dedicated on 31 May 1985, and indexed by volunteers from the Sudbury Branch of the OGS in 1999. [Ref]  His death in action is also commemorated on the 1914-1918 Masonic Honour Roll, a virtual memorial of Ontario Freemasons who were killed during WW1.  This shows that he was a member of the Strong Lodge No. 423, Sundridge.


Christie, Emery William, 542200, Private (1895-)

Emery William Christie was born on 18 October 1895 at Argyle Sound, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted in the Cyclist Platoon at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia on 2 September 1916, at which time he was an active member of the 29th Battery C.F.A.  He was unmarried and working as a mill hand at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, and listed his mother, Dorothy Christie of Argyle Sound, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private E.W. Christie was wounded on 11 October 1918.


Christie, John, 68001, Sergeant, M.M. (1888-)

John Christie was born on 30 December 1888 at Cromarty, Scotland, son of Mr. & Mrs. John Christie.  He enlisted at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 30 November 1914, when he stated that he was a farmer, and that he had served for five years in the Royal Highland Garrison Artillery.  He listed his next-of-kin as his mother, of Cromarty, Rosshire, Scotland.

Sgt. J. Christie was awarded the Military Medal on 12 March 1918.  An operation order dated 23 August 1918 showed that he was a Transport Seregant at that time.


Clapp, Percy James, 454238, Acting Brigade Sergeant-Major (1891-)

Percy James Clapp was born on 1 June 1891 at Ottawa, Ontario.  When he enlisted at Picton, Ontario on 10 May 1915, he was working as a clerk, and listed his next-of-kin as his wife Hazel Irene Clapp, of Picton, Ontario.

Donald Fraser mentioned this event in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Friday, 1 June 1917 - Some more decorations have been given away, this time for the Fresnoy engagement.  Cpls. Beard [sic], Clapp and Morrison [were] the receivers ... No one, not even ourselves, knew what the medals were for."

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary shows that A/BSM (presumably Acting Brigade Sergeant-Major) P.J. Clapp was detached to the 21st Battalion, Unit Group 12, "H" at Kingston, Ontario, for the purposes of demobilization on 25 March 1919.


Clark, David Donovan, 75946, Lance Corporal (1885-1916)

David Donovan Clark was born on 24 November 1885 at Bathurst, New Brunswick, son of Elizabeth Donovan Clark.  When he enlisted in the 29th Battalion at Vancouver, British Columbia on 9 November 1914, he was working as a railway conductor.  His wife Mrs. Lulu Clark was living in Golden, B.C.  He had previously served for a year with the 5th Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles (C.M.R.) and was a member of an active militia.

L/Cpl. Clark was killed on 17 December 1916, and was buried at Hersin Communal Cemetery Extension (Grave Ref. I.D.1).  It is likely that he died while being treated at a field ambulance or hospital, of wounds received during increased enemy artillery bombardment of the company's positions during the first half of December.  The War Diary shows numerous casualties during this period.


Clark, James Donald, 928875, Private (1891-1918)

James Donald Clark was born on 1 April 1891 at Puslinch, Wellington County, Ontario, son of James and Margaret Clark.  He enlisted in the 153rd Battalion at Guelph, Ontario on 13 April 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at R.R. No.1, Puslinch, Ontario.  He listed his father, also of R.R. No.1, Puslinch, as next-of-kin.

Private J.D. Clark was killed in action on 1 October 1918, and was buried at Sains-les-Marquion British Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. II.B.6).


Clark, Kenneth Arthur, 2114918, Corporal (1888-1918)

Kenneth Arthur Clark was born on 18 July 1888 at Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England, son of Arthur William Clark, a surgeon, and his wife Louisa Kate.  He enlisted in the No. 1 Overseas C.A.S.C., Training Depot at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 15 January 1917, at which time he was working as a farmer.  He stated his address as Box No. 1, Stonewall, Manitoba, and his next-of-kin as his wife, Mrs. Nora (or Norah) Beatrice Clark.

Corporal K.A. Clark was killed in action on 8 August 1918, aged 30, during the Battle of Amiens, and is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial.  He was survived by his mother, of Wisbech, Cambridgeshire and "Coblentz", St Barnabas Rd., Sutton, Surrey, and his wife, of 47 Locket Rd., Wealdstone, Harrow, Middlesex, England.


Clark, Woodruff, 625308, Private (1880-)

Woodruff Clark was born on 19 January 1880 at Ottawa, Ontario. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 151st Battalion at Wainwright, Alberta on 1 April 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at Clark Manor, Wainwright County, P.O. Alberta.  He listed his brother J.G. Clark, also of Clark Manor, Alberta, as next-of-kin.

Private W. Clark was detached to the 6th Battalion, C.E. Unit Group No. 10 "G" Ottawa on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Clarke, James Thomas, 488684, Private (1893-)

James Thomas Clarke was born on 23 January 1893 at Plymouth, England.  He enlisted at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 21 October 1915, at which time he was married, an active militia member, and working as a foreman.  He listed his wife, Mrs. Davidena Clarke of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private J.T. Clarke was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Clarke, Wilmot Gercon, Captain (Chaplain, C.C.F.) (1866-)

Wilmot Gercon Clarke was born on 8 April 1866 at Brighton Township, Ontario. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 235th Overseas Battalion at Bowmanville, Ontario on 29 May 1916, at which time he was a Methodist clergyman.  He listed his wife Lois A. Clarke of Bowmanville, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Captain W.G. Clarke was shown as Chaplain to the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps in the Nominal Roll for 31 December 1918, having arrived on 20 December from the Canadian Railway Troops, as evidenced by the following entry from the War Diary: "December 22nd 1918 - Church Parade was held in the Cinema at 1000 hours. The Service was conducted by Captain CLARKE our new Padre who reported from Canadian Railway Troops two days ago."  He remained with the Battalion until at least the end of March 1919.


Clayton, Frederick, 862453, Private (1897-)

Frederick Clayton was born on 18 June 1897 at Whitby, Ontario, and enlisted in the 180th Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 18 February 1916.  At the time, he was working as a stenographer, and living with his sister, Mrs Mary Howden - specified as his next-of-kin - at 65 Bloomfield Avenue, Toronto.

Private F. Clayton was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Cleghorn, Andrew Graham, (Orig. #25938), Captain (1890-)

Andrew Graham Cleghorn was born on 3 June 1890 at London, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 14th Battalion at Valcartier on 21 September 1914, when he was working as a marine engineer.  He listed his next-of-kin as Walter L.C. Cleghorn of 629 Abbott Street, London, Ontario.  The Royal Montreal Regimental Museum web site includes a Nominal Roll for "D" Company of the 14th Battalion which shows Pte. Andrew G. Cleghorn of the Cadet Corps.

Lieut. A.G. Cleghorn was Transport Officer of No. 3 Company in April 1918 when the first Nominal Roll for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps was compiled, but does not appear again in the War Diaries.


Clement, Joseph, 445079, Private (1886-)

Joseph Clement was born on 29 December 1886 at St Joseph, Gloucester County, New Brunswick, son of Peter Clement.  He enlisted in the 55th Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 23 June 1915, at which time he was working as a labourer.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, of St ?eoglan, Gloucester County, New Brunswick.

Private J. Clement was wounded on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Clerk, Harold Robb McIntyre, 3107005, Private (1882-)

Harold Robb McIntyre Clerk was born on 26 October 1882 at Duketown, B.W.I. (British West Indies).  He arrived in the United States at Ellis Island, New York on 24 May 1904, aboard the "Altai" from Kingston, Jamaica, having left the latter port almost a week earlier on 18 May.  He described himself as a clerk, and stated his final destination to be Toronto, Canada.  He stated that he was visiting a Rev. Lewis on Elm Street (presumably in New York) for business.  At the time of the 1910 US Federal Census, he was living at 217 Burns Street, Camden, New Jersey, and working as a fireman in a leather factory.  He was married and had two daughters.  He enlisted in the 1st Depot Battalion 2nd C.O.R. at Toronto, Ontario on 1 February 1918, at which time he was married and still working as a leather worker.  He was living with his wife Elizabeth Clerk - specified as next-of-kin - at 503 North 2nd Street, Camden, New Jersey, USA. [Family Notes]

Private H.R.M. Clerk was wounded on 27 September 1918, during a retaliatory enemy artillery bombardment.


Climie, -, Private

10 April 1917 - "A German gun captured by the Section was brought into action by Lt Hardiman assisted by Ptes Halstead and Climie. Hostile parties were dispersed and heavy casualties inflicted ... Ptes. Climie and Halstead ... rendered exceptionally good services throughout whole of the operations." [War Diary]


Cline, Leslie James, 240455, Private (1888-1918)

Leslie James Cline was born on 10 September 1888 at Burlington, Halton County, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 205th Battalion at Hamilton, Ontario on 24 April 1916, at which time he was married and working as a machine hand in Burlington, Ontario. He listed his wife, Jennie Cline of Burlington, as next-of-kin.

Private L.J. Cline was killed on 27 September 1918, during a retaliatory enemy artillery bombardment.  His name is commemmorated on the Vimy Memorial.


Clue, Alfred W., 603113, Private (1897-)

Alfred Clue was born on 16 May 1897 at London, Ontario, and enlisted in the 34th Battalion at London, Ontario on 26 August 1915.  At the time, he was working as a machinist, and listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Josephine Clue.

Private A.W. Clue was gassed on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Coates, George Alfred, 832381, Private (1898-)

George Alfred Coates was born on 26 January 1898 at Coates Mill, Kent County, New Brunswick, son of William Coates.  He enlisted in the 145th Overseas Battalion at Moncton, New Brunswick on 22 February 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at Coates Mill, New Brunswick.  He listed his father, still of Coates Mill, as next-of-kin.

Private G.A. Coates was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Coiley, Montague Alfred, 602326, Sergeant (1893-)

Montague Coiley was born on 11 November 1893 in London, England, son of Frederick William Coiley. [Family Notes]  When he enlisted in the 34th Battalion at Woodstock on 11 January 1915, he was working as a machinist, and gave his father as next-of-kin at 18 Mardale St., London.

6th Bde. CMG Company War Diary entry for 17 September 1917 (Maisnil Bouche): "Corps Routine Order No. 1442 dated 14/9/1917 awarded the Military Medal to the following N.C.O's of this unit ... No. 602326 Cpl. M. Coiley."  In the service records of George Henderson (Bud) Willox, it is noted that Pte. Willox was promoted to the rank of Corporal on 9 November 1917, when Cpl. M. Cailly 602326 [sic] was wounded.  The National Archives of Canada on-line CEF database shows his final rank as Sergeant, so presumably he recovered sufficiently to return to duty.


Colbeck, William Luther, 663542, Private (1898-)

William Luther Colbeck was born on 11 May 1898 at East Luther, Dufferin County, Ontario, son of Mr. J.H. Colbeck.  He enlisted in the 164th Battalion at Grand Valley on 13 March 1916, at which time he was single and working as a farmer at Colbeck, RR #1, Ontario.  He listed his father, also of Colbeck, RR #1, as next-of-kin.

Private W.L. Colbeck was wounded on 6 September 1918, but remained at duty.


Cole, Clarence Leon, 715816, Private (1896-)

Clarence Leon Cole was born on 24 June 1896 at Port Greville, Cumberland, Nova Scotia, son of Joseph Cole.  He enlisted in the 106th Battalion (Nova Scotia Rifles) at Parrsboro, Cumberland County, Nova Scotia, at which time he was unmarried and working as a seaman at Port Greville.  He listed his father, also of Port Greville, as next-of-kin.

Private C.L. Cole was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Coleby, Harold, 53446, Private (1893-)

The Battalion War Diary entry for 13 June 1918 states: "Casualties:- 12.30 a.m. 437140 Pte Williamson, A., 53446 Pte Coleby, H. - Slightly wounded.  An artillery Battery H.Q. behind D Battery H Q was shelled with 150 8" shells."


Colgan, David William, 440611, Private (1891-)

David William Colgan was born on 23 September 1891 at Sarnia, Ontario.  He enlisted at Prince Albert, Saskatchewan on 13 May 1915, having served with and being an active member of the 52nd Regiment P.A.V. (Prince Albert Volunteers?).  He stated that he was a farmer, and that his next-of-kin was his mother, Mrs. Sarah Colgan, of Shell Lake, P.O. Saskatchewan.

Private D.W. Colgan was wounded on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Collins, Percy Henry, 55805, Sergeant, M.M. (1893-)

Percy Henry Collins was born on 1 March 1893 at Laytonston, England.  He enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 12 November 1914, at which time he was an active militia member, and was working as a teamster.  He listed his mother, Mrs. Rose Collins of Leathertottle?, Stonegrove, Edgeware, Middlesex, England, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant P.H. Collins was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.


Colwell, Cyril Henry, Lieutenant (1898-)
 
Cyril Henry Colwell was born on 16 February 1898 at South Park, Halifax, Nova Scotia, son of Mr. H.S. Colwell.  He enlisted in the Nova Scotia Forestry Depot, and was assigned the rank of Lieutenant, at Aldershot Camp, Nova Scotia on 4 September 1917, having previously served for four months with the R.S.T., and a further ten months with "C" Battalion of the 63rd Regiment (Halifax Rifles).
At the time of his enlistment, he was still an active member of this militia regiment, and was working as a clerk, giving his address as c/o Colwell Bros. Ltd., Halifax.  He listed his father, also of Colwell Bros. Ltd, Barrington Street, Halifax, as next-of-kin.

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Lieut. C.H. Colwell in "G" Battery No. 2 Company, where he remained until the end of March 1919.

The Records of the Halifax Funeral Home, trascribed by the Genealogical Association of Nova Scotia, shows a Cyril Henry Colwell who died on 8 June 1965.


Comstock, Grant Willard, (Orig. #15350), Lieutenant, M.C. (1889-)
 
Grant Willard Comstock was born in 1889 at Phoenix, Arizona, USA, probably the son of Charles Comstock.  He enlisted at Valcartier, Quebec on 24 September 1914, stating that he was a clerk, and a member of an active militia, the 1st M.R.  He appears, from the notations on the reverse of his attestation paper, to have been initially assigned to "H" Company of the 6th Battalion, 2nd Brigade.

A 6th Bde CMG Coy Operation Order dated 10 February 1918 demonstrates that Lt. Comstock was at that time commanding "C" Battery, 5th Bde CMG Company.  The March Nominal Roll for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps shows him to have been placed in "J" Battery, No. 3 Company in the newly formed unit.  In May, he was the Transport Officer for No. 3 Coy., but by July he had gone back to "J" Battery.  In the Battle of Amiens on 8/9 August 1918, Lt. Comstock was made O.C. of "L" Battery which was used to fire a barrage.  On 26 August, on the Battle of Arras, he was again commanding "L" Battery which moved in with the first wave of the infantry attack.

In September 1918, Lt. Comstock was back with "J" Battery once again, and was made temporary commander of this unit in October.  On 23 October 1918, he was awarded the Military Cross.  In December he moved to "K" Battery, under Captain Pearce, and by mid-January was back with "J" Battery, where he remained until March.


Conan, Frank John, 1018639, Private (1888-)

Frank John Conan was born on 15 December 1888 at St. Mayeaux, France.  He enlisted in the 232nd Overseas Battalion at North Battleford, Saskatchewan on 13 July 1916, at whoch time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at Blaine Lake, Saskatchewan.  He listed his mother, Mrs. A. Conan, also of Blaine Lake, as next-of-kin.

Private F.J. Conan was gassed on 14 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled with gas shells in forward area and caused strong concentration.  13 O.R's gassed.  Shells used by enemy were all H.E. containing small portion of gas."


Connelly, Charles, 448056, Private

Private C. Connelly was gassed on 8 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Considerable shelling reported in forward area causing a few casualties."


Connolly, Charles Henry, 488682, Private (1895-)

Charles Henry Connolly was born on 22 February 1895 at Dublin, Ireland.  He enlisted at McHales Island, Halifax, Nova Scotia on 21 October 1915, at which time he was an active militia member, unmarried, and working as an electrician.  He listed his father, then of Halifax, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private C.H. Connolly was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Connolly, Patrick, 67041, Private (1892-)

Patrick Connolly was born on 11 December 1892 at Toronto, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 25th Battalion at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 6 November 1914, having served with the 5th Royal Highlanders of Canada for ten days.  He had previously worked as a marine fireman, and stated that he had no next-of-kin.

Private P. Connolly was wounded on 11 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Connors, Charles Patrick, 715911, Private

Private C.P. Connors was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Constant, Albert Edward, 713111, Private (1897-)

Albert Edward Constant was born on 19 September 1897 at Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 105th Overseas Battalion at Summerside, Prince Edward Island, on 13 March 1916, at which time he was working as a farmer at Central Bedegue, Prince Edward Island.  He listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Fannie Constant, of 24 New Street, Kenilworth, Worcestershire, England.

Private A.E. Constant was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Cooke, William Herbert, 506668, Private (1892-)

William Herbert Cooke was born on 23 April 1892 at Towcester, Northamptonshire, England.  He enlisted at Edmonton, Alberta on 18 December 1916, at which time he was married and working as a clerk.  He listed his wife, Mrs. Helen Louise Cooke (nee Holland?) of 11824, 89th Street, Edmonton, Alberta as next-of-kin.

Private W.H. Cooke was wounded on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Cooper, -, Sergeant

Sgt. Cooper was mentioned in a 5th CMG Coy. Operation Order relating to events planned for 8 November 1917.


Cootes, Edward, 1018488, Private (1895-)

Edward Cootes was born on 9 July 1895 at 27 Cirencester Street, Paddington, London, England, and enlisted in the 232nd Battalion at North Battleford, Saskatchewan on 10 June 1916.  At the time he was single and working as a farm labourer in Daysville, Saskatchewan.  He listed his mother, Mrs E. Cootes, still of 27 Cirencester Street, Paddington, London, England, as next-of-kin.

Private E. Cootes was wounded on 16 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Cordey, Gerald Gordon, 414433, Private (1892-)

Gerald Gordon Cordey was born on 14 May 1892 at South Willingham, Lincolnshire, England, son of John W. Cordey. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 40th Battalion at New Glasgow, at which time he was unmarried and working as a labourer.  He listed his father, of South Willingham, as next-of-kin.

Private G.G. Cordey was wounded in October 1918.


Cosgrove, George Thomas, 874155, Private, M.M. (1889-)

George Thomas Cosgrove was born on 19 June 1889 at Deloraine, Manitoba.  He enlisted at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 24 February 1916, at which time he was single and working as a grain buyer.  He listed his mother, Matilda Mary Cosgrove of 165 Evanston Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, as next-of-kin.

Private G.T. Cosgrove was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.


Costello, George Joseph, 175361, Private (1886-)

George Joseph Costello was born on 16 April 1886 at Manchester, Lancashire, England.  He enlisted in the 86th Machine Gun Battalion at Hamilton, Wentworth County, Ontario on 30 March 1916, at which time he was married, living at 299½ Wentworth Street North, Hamilton, Ontario, and working as an insurance agent.  He listed his wife Susanah Costello, also of 299½ Wentworth Street North, Hamilton, as next-of-kin.

Private G.J. Costello was wounded on 12 October 1918.


Cottingham, Harold Edward, 766166, Sergeant

Sergeant H.E. Cottingham was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Cotton, Robert Lawson, 712725, Private (1881-1968)

Private R.L. Cotton was wounded on 2 October 1918. [Family Notes]


Couillard, Ernest, 889643, Lance Corporal (1896-1918)

Ernest Couillard was born on 1 January 1896 at Amqui, Mutane County, Quebec, son of Joseph Couillard & Aurore Bellavance (his wife).  He enlisted in the 189th Battalion at Mutane, Quebec on 6 March 1916, at which time he was working as a "journalier" at Amqui.  He listed his father, also of Amqui, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

L/Corporal E. Couillard died on 4 October 1918, of wounds received on 2 October, and was buried at Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Ficheux, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. IV.D.39).


Coulett, Earnest, 794068, Private (1898-1918)

Earnest Coulett was born on 22 April 1898 at Eel River Bridge, Hardwick Parish, Northumberland County, New Brunswick, son of Robison and Mary Anne Collett.  He enlisted in the 132nd Battalion at Chatham, New Brunswick on 4 April 1916.  He stated that he was an active member of a militia - probably the 73rd Regiment, since the name is at the top of his attestation paper - and that his next-of-kin was his mother, Mrs. Mary Anne Martin, also of Eel River Bridge.

Private E. Coulett (or Collett) died on 8 August 1918.  His name is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial.


Counahan, Patrick Harold, 57815, Sergeant, M.M. (1893-)

Patrick Harold Counahan was born on 16 March 1893 at Bellville, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 20th Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 12 November 1914, having served for five and a half years in the 12th H. Rangers.  He was single, working as a brakeman, and listed his mother, Mrs. Susy? Counahan of 54 Maker? Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant P.H. Counahan was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.


Couvrette, Lucien, 228936, Private (1892-)

Lucien Couvrette was born on 11 April 1892 at Montreal, Quebec, son of Napoleon Couvrette. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 1st Reinforcing Company 5th R.H.C. at Montreal, Quebec on 6 October 1916, at which time he was unmarried, living at 32 Christopher Columbus Street, Montreal and working as a clerk.  He listed his father, then of 1903 Park Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private L. Couvrette was gassed on 14 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled with gas shells in forward area and caused strong concentration.  13 O.R's gassed.  Shells used by enemy were all H.E. containing small portion of gas."


Cowan, Frank William, 663701, Private (1895-)

Frank William Cowan was born on 26 January 1895 at Palermo, Halton, Ontario. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 164th Battalion at Oakville, Ontario on 27 April 1916, at which time he was single and working as a farmer at Palermo, Ontario.  He listed his mother Mary Cowan, also of Palermo, as next-of-kin.

Private F.W. Cowan was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Cowan, Peter, (Orig. #76248), Lieutenant (1880-)

Peter Cowan was born on 8 February 1880 at Falkirk, Scotland. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 29th Battalion at Vancouver, British Columbia on 5 March 1915, when he described himself as a builder.  His next-of-kin was listed as wife, Florence Foote Cowan, of 2487 Eton Street, Vancouver.  He had previously served for ten years in the Glasgow Yeomanry.

Lieut. P. Cowan was appointed Transport Officer for No. 1 Company, 2nd Battalion CMG Corps on 6 April 1918, and appears in the Nominal Roll dated April 1918.  He was on leave during the month of July, and was then wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Cowan, William, 818113, Private (1897-)

William Cowan was born on 6 February 1897 at Glasgow, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 140th Overseas Battalion at West St. John, New Brunswick on 30 March 1916, at which time he was single and working as a farmer at Gagetown, Queens County, New Brunswick.  He listed his brother, John Cowan of Glasgow, Scotland, as next-of-kin.  His attestation paper also contains the following handwritten note: "In case of casualty notify Mrs. Hayward McCain (Friend)."

Private W. Cowan was wounded on 3 October 1918.


Coward, William Victor, 769464, Private (1896-1918)

William Victor Coward was born on 5 May 1896 at Kleinburg, Ontario, son of James Victor and Emily Coward.  He enlisted in the 124th Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 1 January 1916, at which time he was working as a driver and living at 523 Manning Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.  He was unmarried, and listed his next-of-kin as his father, of Kleinburg, Ontario.

Private W.V. Coward died on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Wancourt British Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. VI.D.7). 


Cox, Harry Vernon, 240364, Private (1894-)

Harry Vernon Cox was born on 18 November 1894 at Hamilton, Ontario, son of Edward George Cox.  He enlisted in the 205th Battalion at Hamilton, Ontario on 8 April 1916, stating his next-of-kin to be his father, of 357 Cannon Street East, Hamilton.  He was living with his parents and working as a clerk.

Privates H.V. Cox and H. Shaw were wounded on 15 May 1918, perhaps as a result of the following activity reported in the War Diary fvor that day: "1.45 am Enemy plane dropped five bombs in vicinity of ADAM Gun."  A later list of casualties compiled at the end of that month gave a date of 16 May, but the former date is more likely to be correct.


Cox, Vernon Olen, 200302, Private, M.M. (1894-)

Vernon Olen Cox was born on 26 January 1894 at Cambridge, Hants County, Nova Scotia, son of Robert J. Cox.  He enlisted in the C.E.F. Machine Gun Draft at Saint John, New Brunswick on 13 June 1917, at which time he was single, working as a farmer, and living at Cheowne, Hants County, Nova Scotia.  He listed his father, also of Cheowne, Hants County, as next-of-kin.

Private V.O. Cox was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.


Cox, William Rutherford, Lieutenant (1887-)
 
William Rutherford Cox was born on 3 February 1887 at Upper Stewiacke, Nova Scotia, son of Robinson Cox. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 106th Overseas Battalion, at which time he was an active member of the 76th Militia Regiment, and working as an insurance agent in Upper Stewiacke.  He listed his father, also of Upper Stewiacke, as next-of-kin.

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Lieut. W.R. Cox in "H" Battery No. 2 Company, where he remained until the end of March 1919 (although he was shown as on leave in December 1918).


Craig, Roy Ernest, 817958, Private (1888-)

Roy Ernest Craig was born on 14 August 1888 at Gordonsville, New Brunswick.  He enlisted in the 140th Overseas Battalion at St. John, New Brunswick on 14th March 1916, having previously served for a year at Camp Sussex with the 28th Dragoons.  He was unmarried, working as a farmer at Gordonsville, New Brunswick, and listed his mother Mrs. Ethel Craig [N.B. this was actually his wife], also of Gordonsville, as next-of-kin. [Family Notes]

Private R.E. Craig was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Crawford, Andrew, 414559, Sergeant

Sergeant Andrew Crawford was wounded on 10 October 1918.


Cream, Clyde, 414560, Private (1892-)

Clyde Cream was born on 24 June 1892 at Halifax, Nova Scotia, son of William Cream. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 40th Battalion at Amherst, Nova Scotia on 17 March 1915, at which time he was married, an active militia member, and working as a spinner.  He listed Mrs. William Cream, presumably his mother, of Juno, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private C. Cream was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Creighton, Howard Alexander, Captain, M.C. (1895-)

Howard Alexander Creighton was born on 9 May 1895 at Halifax, Nova Scotia, son of Graham Creighton. [Family Notes]  At the time of his enlistment in the 63rd Regiment Reinforcements at McNabs Island, Halifax, Nova Scotia on 1 June 1916, he described himself as a student, living in the family home at 8 Le Marchant Street, Halifax.  He had spent two years serving in the 63rd Militia Regiment (Halifax Rifles) prior to joining up.

A 5th Bde CMG Coy Operation Order dated 4 November 1917 suggests that Lt. Creighton was probably with "B" Section in that unit at that time, as does a 6th Bde CMG Coy order dated 10 February 1918.  He is absent from the earlier Nominal Rolls of the 2nd Bn CMG Corps, and first appears in those in September 1918, in "B" Battery, No. 1 Company.  On 27 September, he was commander of barrage guns in the "E" Sub-Group.

On 9 October Lt. Creighton, O.C. "B" Battery, supported an attack made by the infantry as follows: "25th Battalion reached objective all along front except in corner T.26.a.00.70. where we are held up by our own shell fire. Our heavies and 4.5's are dropping as far back as T.25.b.30.10. T.25.b.40.50. consequently we cannot reach our objective.  There is no enemy in sight. We have met several civilians. There is no hostile shelling. Casualties nil. 'B' Battery present location T.25.b.10.40. Am in touch with Infantry. Timed 0720."  A report on this attack by the Battalion O.C. included an immediate recommendation for Lt. Creighton to be awarded the Military Cross.  The November Nominal Roll shows him as A/Capt. in "B" Battery.  On 16 December 1918, he was awarded the M.C.  By 31 December his promotion appears to have gone through - he is referred to as "Capt." - and he had gone on leave.  He returned to the battalion and remained with "B" Battery until at least the end of March 1919.


Crouse, William Amile, 733845, Private (1895-)

William Amile Crouse was born on 2 February 1895 at Italy Cross, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia, son of Ammiel Crouse. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 112th Overseas Battalion at Bridgewater, Nova Scotia on 1 March 1916, at which time he was working as a chauffeur at Italy Cross.  He stated his next-of-kin to be his father, also of Italy Cross.

Private W.A. Crouse was wounded on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.  He was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Crowe, Harry Alfred, 911960, Private (1895-)

Harry Alfred Crowe was born on 18 April 1895 at Springhill, Nova Scotia, son of James Edward Crowe.  He enlisted in the No. 4 (B.C.) Company, 196th Overseas Battalion (Western Universities) at Vancouver, British Columbia on 15 June 1916, at which time he was a student.  He was living at his parents' home at 4054 Fleming Street South, Vancouver, British Columbia, and listed his father as next-of-kin. [Family Notes]

Private H.A. Crowe was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Cruse, Charles Harrison, 256256, Private (1887-)

Charles Harrison Cruse was born on 15 April 1887 at Liverpool, Lancashire, England, son of John Marton Cruse. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the #12 M.D., 1st Depot Battalion of the Saskatchewan Regiment at Regina, Saskatchewan on 3 December 1917, at which time he was single and working as a farmer at Fusilier, Saskatchewan.  He listed his father, also of Fusilier, as next-of-kin.

Private C.H. Cruse was wounded in October 1918.


Cuff, Leonard A., Lieutenant (1885-)

Leonard Cuff was born on 6 November 1885, and enlisted at Brandon, Manitoba on 17 February 1915.  He was working as a clerk, and was unmarried, listing Elizabeth Cuff, of Go...? Ontario, as his next-of-kin.

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Lieut. L.A. Cuff in "A" Battery No. 1 Company, where he remained until the end of March 1919.  Subsequent mentions include the fact that he was a recipient of the D.C.M. (Distinguished Conduct Medal).


Cumming, Joseph McCombie, (Orig. #75010), Captain (1887-)

Joseph McCombie Cumming was born on 19 May 1887 at Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 29th Battalion at Vancouver, B.C. on 12 November 1914.  At this time he was a lumber broker and a member of an Active Militia.  He listed his next-of-kin as John Cumming of 324 Birks Building, Vancouver.

On 27 May 1916, and on several occasions during the months of June and July, the 6th Bde. CMG Coy. War Diary  shows that Lt Cumming visited various gun positions. On 14 September 1916, two guns under Lt. Cumming (from No 2 Section) were attached to the 28th Battalion for the Battle of Flers-Courcelette on the following day.  On 27 September, the War Diary contains the following: "Lt. J.M. Cumming wounded (Shellshock)".  Presumably after recovering from this, he served with another unit, as his name does not appear again in the 6th Bde or 2nd Bn CMGC War Diaires.


Cunningham, Everett Augustus, 753567, Private (1896-)

Everett Augustus Cunningham was born on 25 August 1896 at Pleasant Lake, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia.  He enliusted in the 112th Overseas Battalion at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia on 21 December 1915, at which time he was an active member of the 29th Militia Battery C.F.A., unmarried, and working as a labourer in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.  He listed his mother, Laura Cunningham, also of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private E.A. Cunningham was wounded on 27 September 1918, during a retaliatory enemy artillery bombardment.


Currall, Frederick (Fred), 65235, Private (1892-1918)

Frederick Currall was born on 25 May 1892 at Birmingham, Warwickshire, England. [Family Notes]  He was a sailor at the time of his enlistment in the 24th Battalion at Montreal, Quebec on 3 November 1914, and stated his next-of-kin to be his mother, Mrs. Ada Steadman, of No. 4 Bk., 38 Newspring Street, Broomfields, Birmingham, Warwickshire, England.

Pte. Fred Currall died on 18 June 1918, of wounds received, and was buried at Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. IV.L.34).  The CWGC on-line database notes that this cemetery was used by the 42nd Casualty Clearing Station during this period.  It is not clear when, or in what circumstances, Pte. Currall received his wounds.


Curran, William George, 163810, Private (1896-)

William George Curran was born on 8 June 1896 at Dungannon, County Tyrone, Ireland, and enlisted in the 84th Battalion at Niagara, Ontario on 2 September 1915.  He stated that he was an active member of a militia, and that he was working as a teamster, listing his next-of-kin as his wife, Margaret Curran, of 170 Berkley Street, Toronto, Ontario.

Private W.G. Curran was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Currie, Alex P., 878231, Private (1891-)

Alex P. Currie was born on 3 January 1891 at Victoria Mines, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, son of Peter Currie.  He enlisted in the 185th Overseas Battalion (Cape Breton Highlanders) at Broughton, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia on 12 April 1916, having served for five months in the 25th Battery and for nine months in the 97th Regiment.  He was single, working as a mechanic (pipefitter) at New Waterford, Cape Breton, and listed his father, also of New Waterford, as next-of-kin.

Private A.P. Currie was wounded on 11 October 1918.


Curtis, Lawrence Arthur, 877725, Private (1897-)

Lawrence Arthur Curtis was born on 22 September 1897 at Ingonish, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted in the 185th Overseas Battalion (Cape Breton Highlanders) at Sydney, Cape Breton County, Nova Scotia, at which time he was married, working as a miner, and living at 106 Cornishtown, Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.  He listed his wife May Curtis, of the same address, as next-of-kin.

Private L.A. Curtis was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Cutler, Alfred, 69159, Sergeant (1892-)

Alfred Cutler was born on 24 September 1892 at London, England, son of Isaac Cutler. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 26th Battalion at St. John, New Brunswick, having spent three years in the Territorials.  At the time he was working as a labourer, and listed his next-of-kin as his father, then of Lyndhurst, Hampshire, England.

Sergeant A. Cutler was wounded on 14 August 1918, shortly after the conclusion of the Battle of Amiens.  He was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C", at St. John, New Brunswick for the purpose of demobilisation, on 25 March 1919.


Cuzner, George, Captain (1876-)

George Cuzner was born on 20 August 1876 at Ottawa, Ontario.  He enlisted in the Army Medical Corps (T.D. No. 11) at Victoria, British Columbia on 6 December 1916, at which time he was working as a physician and surgeon, and living at the Prince George Hotel, Victoria, B.C.  He listed his uncle, Thomas D. Sayer of Aylmer, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Captain G. Cuzner was shown as Medical Officer (attached from the C.A.M.C.) to the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps in the Nominal Rolls for 15 March and 28 March 1919.

George Cuzner died on 26 February 1957 in Vancouver, B.C. (Ref: BC Archives Vital Event Indexes)


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