Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   
 
6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company
&
2nd Battalion Canadian Machine Gun Corps
Personnel Database - B
Please contact Brett Payne if you have further details relating to any soldier mentioned on this page.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

Bacon, James Harold, 126516, Private (1893-1918)
Bagnall, Harold, 712254, Private (1894-)
Bain, Ernest Foote, 469080, Private (1898-)
Bain, Gregor Edward, Lieutenant (formerly CSM) (1893-)
Baird, John William, 406878, Sergeant (1893-)
Baker, Charles, 788296, Private (1897-)
Baker, E., Captain
Balfour, Walter Mackie, Lieut.-Colonel (1880-)
Ball, John, 415018, Sergeant, C.de G. (1888-)
Ballantyne, James, 470384, Private (1893-)
Banks, Daniel, 769306, Private (1889-1918)
Banks, David Ludlow, 709190, Sergeant (1891-)
Barber, Stephen, 214102, Private (1881-)
Barbour, Ralph S., 712474, Private (1896-)
Bardsley, Hugh Mack, 415473, Private (1895-)
Barker, Ernest George, 252030, Private (1887-)
Barlow, -, Corporal
Barnard, Charles Russell, 409082, Private (1899-)
Barry, Patrick Joseph, 712582, Private (1897-)
Bartley, -, Private
Basevi, James, (Orig. #453), Major, D.S.O. (1890-1962)
Batts, Arthur, 141867, Private (d. 1916)
Baxter, Samuel Joseph, 1563, Acting Sergeant, M.S.M. (1875-)
Bayers, Louis Benjamin, 488791, Private (1893-)
Bears, Daniel Hume, 69041, Private (1893-)
Beatty, William, Lieutenant (1891-)
Beaudoin, Frédéric-Rodolphe DeLovelace, 503824, Private (1897-1977)
Beck, Cyril Lloyd, Lieutenant (1893-)
Beckman, William Albert, 3310374, Private (1886-)
Beettam, Harry George, 237169, Private (1898-)
Belanger, Joseph, 887805, Private (1896-)
Bell, A.B., 276584, Private (c1899-1918)
Bell, Arthur Egbert, 853362, Lieutenant (1890-1918)
Bell, W.G., Lieutenant
Belshaw, Thomas Gladstone, 898161, Private (1886-1917)
Belton, Alexander Kirkwood (Kirk), 770247, Private (1896-1918)
Benbow, William Henry, 442607, Private (1896-)
Benham, -, Private
Benson, Joseph, 451183, Sergeant, M.M. (1886-)
Bent, Leverett Holden, 734568, Private (1896-1918)
Berard, Phillipe, 748654, Private (1898-)
Berg, Peter, 294546, Private (1894-)
Bergh, Christian, 2109864, Private (1881-)
Bergstrom, Charles, 187512, Private (1896-)
Bickmore, Leslie Alfred, 928478, Private (1892-1918)
Biddell, Cecil Henry, Lieutenant (1887-)
Bierd, Ernest Cartwright, 424444, Sergeant (1887-)
Bierd, Victor Lawrence, 12683, A/Sergeant, M.M. & Bar (1891-)
Bigelow, Frederick A., 415021, Private (1895-)
Biggane, John, 303117, Private (1893-1918)
Bingham, George Hugo Krauz, Lieutenant
Binns, -, Sergeant
Birch, John W., 928385, Private (d. 1918)
Bishop, David Reeves, 2162305, Private (1896-)
Bishop, Elmer Uriah, 104148, Private (1894-1917)
Bishop, George William Henry, 643471, Private (1893-)
Bishop, Joseph (Joe) Horton, 446181, Private (1893-1917)
Bjornson, Otto Johan, 101072, Private (1879-1918)
Blair, Adam Archibald, 457153, Private (1885-)
Blair, Colin Weldon, Lieutenant, M.C. (1895-)
Blair, Hugh Campbell, 454461, Private (1889-)
Blake, Albert George, 874646, Private (1884-1918)
Blanchard, Joseph, 712794, Private (1897-)
Boddie, Robert David, 73288, Sergeant (1889-)
Boivin, Hiles, 2398303, Private (1895-1918)
Bole, James Gordon, Lieutenant (1890-1918)
Bolton, Francis Russell, Lieutenant (1892-)
Bonsall, Walter Edward, 633918, Corporal, M.M. (1890-)
Bouliane, Francois, 416478, Private (1895-)

Boulter, Arthur William, 445250, Private (1897-)
Bourget, Romulus, 61553, Private (1886-1950)
Bourgette (or Bourget), John, 417716, Sergeant (1887-)

Bowen, Harold James, 246307 (also #411412), Private (1895-)
Bowness, Leland, 712423, Private (1897-)
Bowrey, James Milne, 57787, Sergeant (1879-)
Bradfield, Donald Carman, 172118, Private (1894-1917)
Bradford, Leland Earle, 447377, Lieutenant, M.M., D.C.M. (1893-)
Brady, George, 120215, Pruvate (1897-)
Brampton, Arnold Scott, 100669, Corporal, M.M. (1893-)
Brandow, Bert, 405002, Private (1896-)
Brawders, Richard, 428182, Private (1893-1917)
Braynion, John Davidson, 445748, Private (1897-1917)
Brennan, F., 449041, Private
Brieby, Oscar Carl, 2413323, Private (1888-)
Brière, Omer, 61207, Private (1894-)

Briggs, Albert Edgar, 911996, Private (1897-1918)
Broadbridge, William George, Lieutenant (1896-)
Brookham, Amos Edward, 805016, Corporal (1893-)
Brooks, Benjamin, 1003391 (Orig. #55576), Private (1892-)
Brown, Albert, 405202, Sergeant (1894-)
Brown, Benjamin Roy, 225877, Sergeant, M.M. (1896-)
Brown, Frank Clay, 3106614, Private (1885-)
Brown, Frank/Francis Xavier, 713187, Private (1896-1955)
Brown, Ralph, 414539, Private (1897-)
Brown, W.A., Lieutenant
Brunelle, Ernest, 121594, Private (1893-)

Bruton, James, 171046, Sergeant, M.M. (1884-)
Bryan, Ray Fenwick, 749045, Private (1890-)
Bryant, John Edwin, 55578, Private (1891-)
Buckler, Augustus, 542188, Private (1897-)
Buckley, Frederick, 3105040, Private (1884-)
Buckley, Wilfred Arthur, 902440, Private (1896-)
Budd, David James, 71570, Corporal, M.M. (1890-)
Burchell, Joseph Robert, Captain (1890-)
Burge, Peter John, 663141, Private (1896-)
Burgess, Charles, 174968, Private (1873-1918)
Burke, Harvey, 189865, Private (1892-)
Burke, Robert Leslie, 189330, Private (1890-)
Burnie, Joseph, 141861, Sergeant, M.M. & Bar (1891-)
Burns, Ray, 796209, Private (1883-1918)
Burt, Frank Valentine, 193270, Sergeant, M.M. (1892-)
Burt, Sidney James, 404997, Private (1890-)
Burtle, George, 252630, Private (1876-)
Burton, Harry Seaman, 841826, Private (1895-)
Burton, Thomas, 888328, Private (1894-)
Bush, Herbert Joseph, Lieutenant (1887-)
Bush, Joseph Edward, 850678, Private (1894-1918)
Butt, Selby J., 409427, Private (1896/7-)
Byrne, William, 622702, Corporal (1896-)

Bacon, James Harold, 126516, Private (1893-1918)

James Harold Bacon was born on 24 November 1893 at Minto, Wellington, Ontario. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 71st Battalion at London, Ontario on 14 September 1915, at which time he was working as a farmer.  He listed his next-of-kin as Abraham Bacon, of Palmerston, R.R. 3.

Private J.H. Bacon died on 16 May 1918, and was buried at Wailly Orchard Cemetery (Grave Ref. II.E.23).  A list of casualties compiled at the end of May states that he was wounded on 16 May, and later died of his wounds.  It is possible that he may have been involved in the following incident, recounted in the War Diary for 16 May: "8.30 am A large party of Infantry on working party walked along railway (in view) and draw some shelling which caught a few men of their party, and made several hits near 'H' Battery Headquarters."


Bagnall, Harold, 712254, Private (1894-)

Harold Bagnall was born on 1 October 1894 at Hazel Grove, Queens County, Prince Edward Island, son of Joseph Edwin & Euphemia Bagnall. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 105th Battalion at Charlottetown, P.E.I., on 19 November 1915, at which time he was working as a farmer, and living at Hazel Grove.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, also of Hazel Grove.

Private H. Bagnall was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Bain, Ernest Foote, 469080, Private (1898-)

Ernest Foote Bain was born on 17 November 1898 at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, son of Nathan Bain. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 64th Overseas Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 19 August 1915, at which time he was single and working as a printers devil.  He listed his father, still of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private E.F. Bain was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Bain, Gregor Edward (Teddy), (Orig. #79454), Lieutenant (formerly Company Sergeant-Major) (1893-)

Gregor Edward (Teddy) Bain was born at Craigellachie, Banffshire, Scotland on 1 June 1893, son of Gregor Edward Bain, and served for three years (1909 to 1911) in the Scottish Horse Yeomanry (13th Battalion Territorial Force - The Black Watch) before becoming a bank clerk.  He enlisted in the 31st Battalion at Youngstown, Alberta on 19 November 1914, when he stated his next-of-kin as his father, then living at Balerchin, Perthshire, Scotland.

Teddy Bain must have transferred to the 6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company from 31st Battalion by late September, because he was the Company Sergeant-Major there when Donald Fraser arrived on 22nd of that month [The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, 1998, CEF Books].  He is mentioned again in the War Diaries on 15 and 31 October 1916 while the company was based in the Bajolle-Souchez sector.

The next time he is mentioned is on 9 December 1916, as follows: "Lt. Bain returned from leave."  It appears that he had received a commission in the interim.  Between 25 December 1916 and 15 January 1917 Lt. Bain went on a Machine Gun course at Camiers.  Over the next eight months or so, he seems to have moved around a bit, with the War Diary noting that he was "reposted" to the company from the M.G. Base Depot on 15 June and during September.  In February he was Billeting Officer, and on 2 August, O.C. of No. 2 Section.  Between 16 and 22 September, Lt Bain proceeded on a course to the Corps Gas School, and then between 27 September and 11 October he went on leave to England.  From 28 October to 24 November attended an M.G. Course at Pernes, and then on 18 January 1918, he proceeded on a further 14 days leave to England.  That was the last mention of him in the War Diaries.


Baird, John William (alias John Webster), 406878, Sergeant (1893-)

John William Baird was born on 9 June 1893 at Wellington, New Zealand.  He enlisted in the 86th Battalion at Hamilton, Ontario on 11 May 1915, having served for three years in the Wellington Volunteers - 5th (Wellington Rifles) Regiment.  At the time of his enlistement, he was working as a rigger, and listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. S. Batman, of 48 Bettington, Millers Point, Sydney, New South Wales.  According to a note on his attestation form, he was later transferred to the 36th Battalion.  A further note attached to his service records consists of a signed declaration, as follows: "I, John William Baird, do solemnly and sincerely declare that I was enlisted on the 28-10-14, under the name of JOHN WEBSTER, which name I now declare to be incorrect ... Declared ... in the FIELD this 2nd day of JULY, 1918."

Private J.W. Baird was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.  The National Archives of Canada on-line CEF database shows his final rank as Sergeant, so he presumably returned to duty and received his promotion before demobilisation.


Baker, Charles, 788296, Private (1897-)

Charles Baker was born on 31 December 1897 in South Staffordshire, England, son of John Downs Baker.  He enlisted in the 130th Overseas Battalion at Armprior, Ontario on 11 March 1916, at which time he was working as a farmer at Armprior.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, of Wolverhampton, South Staffordshire.  He was subsequently transferred to the 130th Battalion on 31 May 1916.

Private C. Baker was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Baker, E., Captain

Captain E. Baker was attached to the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps from the CMG Pool in June 1918, and appears to have remained with the battalion until September 1918.


Balfour, Walter Mackie, Lieut.-Colonel (1880-)

Walter Mackie Balfour was born on 10 March 1880 at Newburgh, Fifeshire, Scotland, son of James & Elizabeth Balfour.  He enlisted in the 3rd C.M.R. Regiment at Medicine Hat, Alberta on 25 May 1915, at which time he was married and working as a lumber merchant.  Strangely, he listed his next-of-kin as James Balfour, of Lindries, Craigie, Perth, Scotland, rather than his wife. [Family Notes]

The War Diary for the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps notes that Lieut.-Colonel W.M. Balfour, D.S.O., Commander of the Canadian Machine Gun School Depot at Seaford in England, and Major Forbes M.C. Chief Instructor were attached from 26 to 27 June 1918, "with a view to adjusting their views as to training required for re-enforcements and etc.", after which they "left unit to join 1st Battalion CMG Corps."  During this visit, "the Sections put on an exhibition of field work with marked ability and success."


Ball, John, 415018, Sergeant, C.de G. (1888-)

John Ball was born on 3 December 1888 at Bristol, Somerset, England.  He enlisted in the 40th Battalion at Sydney Mines, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia on 31 March 1915, at which time he was married and working as a miner.  He listed his wife, Mrs Martha Ball of "Psuy Sts"?, Sydney Mine, as next-of-kin.

An Operation Order dated 10 February 1918 shows "Sergeant Ball" commanding No. 4 Section of the 6th Brigade CMG Company in the Mericourt Sector.  It is presumed that he was Sgt. John Ball #415018.  Sgt. J. Ball was awarded the Croix de Guerre on 16 January 1919.


Ballantyne, James, 470384, Private (1893-)

James Ballantyne was born on 26 September 1893 at Johnstone, Scotland, son of A. Ballantyne.  He enlisted in the 64th Overseas Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 17 September 1915, at which time he was single and working as a farmer.  He listed his father, of Johnstone, Scotland, as next-of-kin.

Private J. Ballantyne was gassed in 9 September 1918.  He must have recovered sufficiently to return to duty, as the War Diary shows him to have been detached to 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilization.


Banks, Daniel, 769306, Private (1889-1918)

Daniel Banks was born on 21 January 1889 at Wick, Scotland, son of William & Catherine Banks.  He enlisted in the 124th Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 27 December 1915, at which time he was working as a piano maker, and living with his parents at 277 Arthur Street, Toronto, Ontario.  He listed his mother as his next-of-kin.

Private D. Banks died on 26 August 1918, aged 28, and was buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. VII.D.28).  The Battalion War Diary does not mention his being wounded, although he presumably died in hospital, of wounds received.  His parents' address at the time of his death was 55 Woodycrest Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.


Banks, David Ludlow, 709190, Sergeant (1891-)

David Ludlow Banks was born on 1 April 1891 at Durham Bridge, New Brunswick, son of Thomas & Martha Banks. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 104th Battalion (via the 64th Overseas Battalion) at Sussex, Kings County, New Brunswick on 25 September 1915, at which time he was single and working as a labourer.  He listed his mother Mrs. Thomas Banks, still of Durham Bridge, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant D.L. Banks was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Barber, Stephen, 214102, Private (1881-)

Stephen Barber was born on 28 May 1881 at Faversham, Kent, England.  He enlisted in the 99th Battalion at Windsor, Ontario on 11 March 1916, giving his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Esther Barber, of Mount Dennis, Ontario. [Family Notes]  He was then living in Detroit, Michigan, USA, and working as a machinist.

Private S. Barber was wounded on 12 May 1918.  The War Diary has the following entry for 12 May which possibly relates to Pte. Barber: "4.00 pm Enemy put 40 to 50 4.1's in S.16.a. some being close to 'G' Battery.  Shelled DUBLIN and BATH Guns and put DUBLIN Gun out of action and wounded one other rank.  The Gun was replaced by a new Gun at the position by 1.00 p.m."  However, a list of casualties compiled at the end of May shows two other soldiers wounded on this day - Ptes. A.J. Vandusen and J. Hall - either of whom could also have been the casualty referred to in the extract shown above.


Barbour, Ralph S., 712474, Private (1896-)

Ralph S. Barbour was born on 2 August 1896 at Alma, Lot 3, Prince Edward Island, son of David Barbour. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 105th Overseas Battalion at Summerside, P.E.I. on 17 March 1916, at which time he was single and working as a carpenter at Alma.  He listed his father, still of Alma, Lot 3, P.E.I., as next-of-kin.

Private R.S. Barbour was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Bardsley, Hugh Mack, 415473, Private (1895-)

Hugh Mack Bardsley was born on 27 March 1895 at Halifax, Nova Scotia. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 40th Battalion at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 10 August 1915, at which time he was single, working as a painter, and an active member of the 66th (Princess Louise Fusiliers) Militia Regiment.  He listed his mother, Charlotte W. Bardsley of 36 Columbus Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private H.M. Bardlsey was wounded on 10 October 1918.


Barker, Ernest George, 252030, Private (1887-)

Ernest George Barker was born on 30 January 1887 at Sault St. Marie, Ontario, son of Henry Barker.  He enlisted in the 209th Battalion at Swift Current, Saskatchewan on 10 February 1916, at which time he was working as a farmer at Neidpath, Saskatchewan.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, also of Neidpath.

Private E.G. Barker was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Barlow, -, Corporal

An Operation Order dated 9 February 1917 states that Corporal Barlow would be Orderly Sergeant on the following day.


Barnard, Charles Russell, 409082, Private (1899-)

Charles Russell Barnard was born on 6 January 1899 at Owen Sound, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 37th Battalion at Niagara on the Lake, Ontario on 11 June 1915, at which time he described himself as a student.  He listed his next-of-kin as C.E. Barnard of 794, 10th Street West, Owen Sound, Ontario.

Private C.R. Barnard was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Barry, Patrick Joseph, 712582, Private (1897-)

Patrick Joseph Barry was born on 10 June 1897 at Morell, Prince Edward Island. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 105th Overseas Battalion at Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island on 12 January 1916, at which time he was single and working as a farmer at St Peter's Bay, Prince Edward Island.  He stated that he was an active member of the 82nd Militia Regiment, and listed his brother, Bernard Barry of Goose River, Prince Edward Island, as next-of-kin.

Private P.J. Barry was wounded on 6 September 1918.


Bartley, -, Private

On 4 November 1917, as they were preparing for the attack on Passchendaele village, Fraser found some time to contemplate the make-up of his crew (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Expecting to remain here until the end of the Passchendaele action, I found time to check up on the crew and the gun and noted the following:

No. 14 Gun Crew Gun Particulars
1. Fraser, D. 1. Tripod and Crosshead C48348
2. Ladd, Wm. 2. Gun L862
3. Reid 3. Field Mount C79931
4. Linden 4. Lock A313
5. Orme 5. Lock (Spare) 47734
6. Goodman, C.W. 6. Feed Block 41788
7. Bartley 7. Feed Block (Spare) A45
8. Fage
Crew members 4, 5, 6 and 7 were new men and at the present date I have no recollection of them.  Although I was the longest in France and Belgium Fage was longer with the Machine-Gun Company and was latterly transferred to my crew from No. 15."
Basevi, James, (Orig. #453), Major, D.S.O. (1890-1962)

James Basevi was born on 21 September 1890 in Plymouth, England, probably a son of William Henry Basevi and ? Gill. [Family Notes]  He appears to have married Louisa G Merriman, who was born 3 Aug 1894 in Canada, and enlisted at Calgary, Alberta on 23 January 1915 in the 50th Battalion (2nd Reinforcements), at which time his wife was living at 319-22nd Avenue W., Calgary, Alberta.  He described himself then as an architect, and records show that he had previously served as an acting corporal in the 15th Horse.  James was a member of a distinguished Jewish family.  His father was born c. 1865 in India, probably the son of officer in the Royal Artillery, Charles Edward Basevi.  In 1875, this family was based at the barracks at Sheerness, Isle of Sheppey.  C.E. Basevi was, in turn, born in 1837, one of several sons of George & Frances Agnata Basevi of Brighton.  George Basevi (1794-1845) was an architect and surveyor, and cousin to Benjamin Disraeli.

The 6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company War Diary shows Lieutenant James Basevi to have arrived with the company, along with four other junior officers - Lieuts. Beck, Eastham, McLelan and White - and presumably for the first time, at 7.30 p.m. on 1 February 1916.  After a spell attached to the 31st Battalion, James Basevi returned to the company on 5 March.  By 3 April, he was O.C. No. 2 Section, and from 11 to 21 May he temporarily assumed command of the company while the O.C. Major Eastham was on leave.  On 3 July James Basevi proceeded on a course of "Instruction in Mechanism of Vickers Gun" at Camiers, returning by 15 April.  From 4 to 9 November, Lt. Basevi again assumed command of the company, during the temporary absence of the Commanding Officer and second-in-command.  On 19 November, he proceeded on leave to England, from which he returned on 6 December.

On 17 January 1917 Lieut. James Basevi, along with Lt. GS Douglas and six men, joined the 14th CMG Coy, a newly formed unit in the 2nd Canadian Division.  Between then and March 1918, when this Company was combined with the 4th, 5th and 6th CMG Companies to form the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, he was promoted twice, to Major.  The War Diary of the 2nd Bn CMG Corps picks up the story at the beginning of March 1918.  On 10 March Major Basevi returned from 30 days leave in England to assume command of the 14th CMG Coy.  On 6 April, when the Battalion was reorganized into two Companies, each with four Batteries, Major James Basevi was appointed O.C. of No. 1 Company (formerly the 14th & 5th Coys.)  On 24 May he was mentioned in dispatches.  On 14 June 1918 Major Basevi was in the vicinity when a gas shell hit the trench, and was relieved of command of the Company while recovering.  It's not clear how long he was off duty, but the Nominal Roll of officers for July shows him back in charge of the Company.

On 9 August, during the Battle of Amiens, No. 1 Company was with the staff of the 5th Canadian Infantry Brigade during the attack on Vrely, when the G.O.C. and Staff Captain of the 5th CIB and the Brigade Major and GSO 3 of the 3rd Canadian Division were killed.  The War Diary states that, "Major Basevi who altho not a member of the Brigade Staff was Senior Officer present and realizing the critical situation, assumed Command."  On 19 September, Basevi was acting second-in-command of the Battalion, while Major A Graham was on leave.  Major Basevi was awarded the D.S.O. on 30 September 1918.  On 3 October he temporarily took charge of the Battalion for a day after Lieutenant-Colonel JG Weir left to attend a Senior Officers' Course at Aldershot, and before the arrival of his replacement Major EW Sansom.  On 21 Dec 1918, Major Basevi - now shown with a Military Cross, although this was probably a mistake - proceeded on leave to England, but had returned to his Company by 15 January 1919.  The Nominal Roll for 31 January 1919 shows Major James Basevi still with the Battalion, but it is assumed that he was demobilized and returned to Canada shortly thereafter, because the Nominal Roll for February shows Captain L.F. White having taken over command of No. 1 Company.

James Basevi began a career in film-making as an art director and special effects supervisor with MGM in 1924.  In the early 1940s, he became Head of the Art Department at 20th Century Fox.  In 1943, he shared an Academy Award with William Darling for their Art Direction of "The Story of Bernadette".  He was given credits in numerous films between 1925 and 1956, and was nominated for Oscars a total of five times between 1939 and 1945.  James Basevi died on 27 March 1962, aged 71, and his wife on 14 Apr 1974, both in Los Angeles, California.  It is not known whether they had any surviving descendants.


Batts, Arthur, 141867, Private (d. 1916)

Arthur Batts was one of four soldiers in the company - the others were Privates Caddell, Smith and Jensen - killed on 10 June 1916, during what was referred to in the War Diary as "considerable artillery activity."  Nothing further is known regarding the circumstances of his death, but his name is commemmorated on Panel 32 of the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.


Baxter, Samuel Joseph, 1563, Acting Sergeant, M.S.M. (1875-)

Samuel Joseph Baxter was born on 11 June 1875 at Hamilton, Ontario. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 5th Field Amm. at Toronto, Ontario on 23 November 1914, at which time he was married and working as a street car conductor.  He listed his wife, Kathrine Baxter of 43 Alberta Street, Mount, Hamilton, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Acting Sergeant S.J. Baxter was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal on 1 January 1919.


Bayers, Louis Benjamin, 488791, Private (1893-)

Louis Benjamin Bayers was born on 14 March 1893 at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 30 November 1915, at which time he was working as a labourer, and an active member of the 63rd Militia Regiment.  He listed his next-of-kin as his mother Elizabeth Bayers, of John Street, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

Private L.B. Bayers was wounded and gassed on 17 August 1918.


Bears, Daniel Hume, 69041, Private (1893-)

Daniel Hume Bears was born on 18 March 1893 at Brooklyn, Lot 61, Prince Edward Island. [Family Notes]  He enlisted at St. John, New Brunswick on 2 November 1914, having previously served in the Canadian Heavy Artillery.  At the time of his enlistment, he had been an active militia member of the 1st Auzon for two months, was unmarried, and working as a labourer.  He listed Thomas Bears, also of Brooklyn, Lot 61, P.E.I., as next-of-kin.

Private D.H. Bears was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Beatty, William, Lieutenant (1891-)

William Beatty was born on 18 December 1891 at Hamilton, Ontario.  He enlisted at Prince Albert on 22 December 1914, at which time he was working as a carpenter, and listed his next-of-kin as his brother Elgin Beatty, of Carlisle, Ontario.  He stated that he was at the time serving in the 52nd (Militia) Regiment.

On 4 September 1917, Lieutenant William Beatty reported for duty with the 6th Bde. CMG Company.  On 14 October, he was transferred to the 14th Bde. CMG Coy, where he appears to have remained for the remainder of the year.  In September 1918, Lt. Beatty is shown on the Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, as in "C" Battery of No. 1 Company and seems to have continued in that unit until March 1919.


Beaudoin, Frédéric-Rodolphe DeLovelace, 503824, Private (1897-1977)

Frédéric-Rodolphe DeLovelace Beaudoin was born on 2 January 1897 at Montreal, Quebec.  He enlisted on 24 February 1916 with the Canadian Engineers Training Depot, Military District No 4, at Montreal, Quebec, at which time he was single and working as a clerk.  He listed his mother Mrs. E.A.J. Beaudouin, of 300a Christopher Columbus (address later changed to 1179 St-André Street), Montreal, as next-of-kin.  He was taken on strength with the 22nd Battalion on 27 August 1917.

On 30 March 1918, Pte. Beaudouin was transferred to the Canadian Machine Gun Corps.

F.-R. Beaudouin died at the National Defence Medical Centre, Ottawa on 12 August 1977.
[Information from 22nd Battalion History kindly provided by Major J.M.G. Gagné, and Death Notice provided by Jeff Bileski]


Beaune, Clifford Henry, 737158, Private (1897-)

Clifford Henry Beaune was born on 24 October 1897 at Stoney Point, Essex County, Ontario, son of Joseph Beaune. [Family Notes]  He enlisted at Lethbridge, Alberta on 12 August 1916, at which time he was single and working as a farm labourer at Nobleford, Alberta.  He listed his father, then of Winnifred, Alberta, as next-of-kin.

Private C.H. Beaune was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Beck, Cyril Lloyd, Lieutenant (1893-)

Cyril Beck was born on 9 January 1893 at Edmonton, Alberta, son of Justice N.D. Beck (of 9917-116th St, Edmonton in 1915).  He enlisted in the 1st Reinforcing Draft of the 38th Ottawa Battalion - via the 101st Regiment - at Edmonton, Alberta on 4 May 1915, when he described himself as a student-at-law, and as having served as a Lieutenant in the 101st Regiment.  On attestation, he was assigned to the 2nd University Coy., but he appears to have been transferred at some stage to the P.P.C.L.I. before joining the CMGC.

The 6th Bde. Canadian Machine Gun Coy. War Diary shows Lieutenant Cyril Beck to have arrived with the company, along with four other junior officers - Lieuts. Basevi, Eastham, McLelan and White - and presumably for the first time, at 7.30 p.m. on 1 February 1916.  Lieut. Beck is not mentioned again in the War Diaries for the 6th Bde CMG Coy. or the 2nd Bn. CMG Corps, so presumably he was posted elsewhere, shortly after his arrival in February 1916.


Beckman, William Albert, 3310374, Private (1886-)

William Albert Beckman was born on 15 February 1886 at Hamilton, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 2nd Depot Battalion, 2nd C.O.R. Regiment at Brantford, Ontario on 16 January 1918, at which time he was single, living at 123 Hunter Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, and working as an electrician.  He listed a friend Miss McPherson, also of 123 Hunter Street West, as next-of-kin.


Beettam, Harry George, 237169, Private (1898-)

Harry George Beettam was born on 24 August 1898 at Toronto, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 204th Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 20 March 1916, at which time he was working as a sheet metal worker, and living with his mother, listed as his next-of-kin, at 552 Gladstone Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.

Private H.G. Beettam was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Belanger, Joseph, 887805, Private (1896-)

Joseph Belanger was born on 2 April 1896 at Battleford, Saskatchewan, and enlisted in the 232nd Battalion at Battleford on 19 January 1916. [Family Notes]  He listed his next-of-kin as Bernard Belanger - almost certainly his father - of Lac La Biche, Saskatchewan, and stated that he was working as a labourer.

Private J. Belanger was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Bell, A.B., 276584, Private (c1899-1918)

Private A.B. Bell died on 28 August 1918, aged 19, during the Battle of Amiens, and was buried at Sun Quarry Cemetery, Cherisy, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. D.21).  His next-of-kin are shown by the CWGC on-line database to have been the late Mr & Mrs R.H. Bell, of Grenfell, Saskatchewan.


Bell, Arthur Egbert, 853362, Lieutenant (1890-1918)

Arthur Egbert Bell was born on 6 September 1890 at Oro Station, Simcoe, Ontario, son of Arthur Allan & Mary Jane Bell. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 177th Overseas Battalion at Barrie, Ontario on 16 March 1916, stating his next-of-kin to be his wife, Vera May Bell, of Barrie.  He was working as a school teacher, and had served as a Lieutenant with the 35th Regiment in Simcoe for two years.  He then spent six weeks as a cadet, and was appointed to the rank of Lieutenant and taken on strength at Barrie on 6 February 1917, at which time he was living with his wife at 248 Blake Street, Barrie, Ontario.

Lieut. A.E. Bell is shown in "L" Battery of No. 3 Company in the May 1918 Nominal Roll.  In July 1918, he was still there, and the Nominal Roll for that month notes that he was attached from the 19th Battalion.

The War Diary entry for 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, contains the following entry: "10.00 a.m. ... Casualties No. 3 Company. Lieut. Jas. [sic] Bell killed and Lieut. C.H. Biddell wounded."  A report accompanying the War Diary has the following additional information: "At 2.45 a.m. 26.8.18. 'L' Battery (Lieut C.W. Comstock) was in position in N.2.a. and at 'Z' hour moved forward close to the first wave of infantry.  As the Battery approached NOVA SCOTIA Trench it was held by enemy M.G's.  Our guns were brought into action on this part of the trench and with the assistance of the bombers the situation was soon cleared.  Lieut Bell on the right of the Battalion front rushed an enemy M.G. and captured the crew.  He had been severely wounded prior to this but persisted in carrying on."  The CWGC on-line database confirms that this was indeed Lieut. A.B. Bell, and that he died of wounds received.  He was buried at Tilloy British Cemetery, Tilloy-les-Mofflaines (Grave Ref. II B.19).


Bell, W.G., Lieutenant

Lieutenant W.G. Bell was shown as being attached to No. 1 Company of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps in November 1918.  At the end of  December 1918 and in mid-January 1919 he was shown as attached from the CMGCRD to "B" Battery of No. 1 Company.  There are two potential officers listed in the National Archives of Canada CEF database with this surname and initials.


Belshaw, Thomas Gladstone, 898161, Private (1886-1917)

Thomas Gladstone Belshaw was born on 9 May 1886 in Alabama, USA, son of Robert and Martha Belshaw.  He enlisted at Hillcrest, Alberta on 21 Februaury 1916, when he was working as a merchant and noted his next-of-kin as his wife Mabel Belshaw, of Hillcrest.

Private Belshaw was killed on 3 November 1917, just prior to the company going into line for the attack on the village of Passchendaele.  The 6th Bde. CMG Coy. War Diary notes: "No. 898161 Pte. Belshaw T.G. was killed by H.E. shrapnel while acting as runner."  His name is commemmorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial (Panel 32).  His widow was at this time living at 2027, 35th Avenue South West, Calgary, Alberta.


Belton, Alexander Kirkwood (Kirk), 770247, Private (1896-1918)

Alexander Kirkwood Belton was born on 9 February 1899 at Toronto, Ontario, one of twin sons of Francis S. and Margaret (Maggie) Jane Belton. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 124th Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 14 February 1916, at which time he was working as a bank clerk.  He stated that he had served as a private in the R.G. Militia, and listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Margaret Belton, of 556 Christie Street, Toronto.

Private A.K. Kirkwood was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, and died a month later on 28 September 1918.  He was buried at Brookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey, United Kingdom (Grave Ref. III.B.7).  The CWGC data base lists his next-of-kin as Margaret Kirkwood Belton & the late Frank Sydney Belton of Toronto.  It also states that he was previously wounded at Vimy Ridge.


Benbow, William Henry, 442607, Private (1896-)

William Henry Benbow was born on 21 May 1896 at Bery, Montgomeryshire, Wales.  He enlisted in the 54th Overseas (Kootenay) Battalion at Vernon Camp, British Columbia on 6 May 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a machinist.  He listed Mrs. M.A. Benbow of 25 Pier Street, Aberystwyth, Wales, as his next-of-kin.

Private W.H. Benbow was gassed on 14 September 1918.  The War Diary for that day includes the following: "Enemy shelled with gas shells in forward area and caused strong concentration.  13 O.R's gassed.  Shells used by enemy were all H.E. containing small portion of gas."


Benham, -, Private

The following is an etry from The Journal of Private Fraser (ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Tuesday, 7 November 1916 - When out for rations, Benham of No. 14 Crew was wounded.  The weather was wretched, rain falling every day and flooding the trenches causing them to cave in.  Rubber boots are being used and working parties are kept busy day and night."  The company was at this time in trenches in the Bajolle-Souchez Sector, at the northern end of Vimy Ridge.


Benson, Joseph, 451183, Sergeant, M.M. (1886-)

Joseph Benson was born on 22 January 1886 at Hamilton, Scotland.  He enlisted in the 58th Battalion at Niagara Camp, Ontario on 30 June 1915, at which time he was married and working as a canvasser.  He stated that he was a member of an active militia, and listed his wife, Margaret Benson of 290 A, Simcoe Street, Toronto, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant J. Benson was gassed on 9 September 1918.  A list of awards compiled in January 1919 shows that he was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.  His rank at that time was "A/B.S.M." (Acting Brigade Sergeant-Major).


Bent, Leverett Holden, 734568, Private (1896-1918)

Leverett Holden Bent was born on 7 October 1896 at Bridgetown, Nova Scotia, son of William A. Bent.  In 1910, the family were living at Central Street, Stoneham, Massachusetts. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 112th Battalion at Windsor, Nova Scotia on 19 July 1916.  At the time, he was working as a teamster and belonged to an active militia.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, then of 15 Maple Street, Stoneham, Massachusetts, USA.

Private L.H. Bent died of wounds received on 9 August 1918 (War Diary states 8 August), and was buried at Crouy British Cemetery, Crouy-sur-Somme, Somme (Grave Ref. V.D.18).


Berard, Phillipe, 748654, Private (1898-)

Phillipe Berard was born on 27 April 1898 at Rock-Forest, Quebec, son of Moise Berard.  He enlisted in the 117th (Eastern Townships) Overseas Battalion at Sherbrooke, Quebec on 15 February 1916, at which time he was single and working as a labourer at Waterville, Quebec.  He listed his father, still of Rock-Forest, Quebec, as next-of-kin.  A handwritten note next to the date of birth, stated to be 27 April 1897, on his attestation form states, "Actual age claimed on August 30th 1917.  Birth Certificate shews date of birth 27 April 1898."

Private P. Berard was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Berg, Peter, 294546, Private (1894-)

Peter Berg was born on 28 March 1894 at Minnesota, USA, son of Tom Berg.  He enlisted in the 223rd Overseas Battalion at Viking, Alberta on 4 July 1916, at which time he was single and working as a farmer at Viking, Alberta.  He listed his father, also of Viking, as next-of-kin.

Private P. Berg was wounded on 6 September 1918.


Bergh, Christian, 2109864, Private (1881-)

Christian Bergh was born on 16 September 1881 at Chasteburg, Vernon County, Wisconsin, U.S.A.  He enlisted in the A.M.C. Training Depot No. 13 at Edmonton, Alberta on 10 April 1917, at which time he was single, living at St. James Hotel, and working as a farmer.  He listed his brother James Bergh, of 2538 Taylor Street East?, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A., as next-of-kin.

Private C. Bergh was wounded on 10 October 1918.


Bergstrom, Charles, 187512, Private (1896-)

Charles Bergstrom was born on 1 Dec 1896 in Sweden.  He enlisted in the 90th Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 12 November 1915, at which time he was working as a carpenter, and living with his mother at 286 Rieitta Street, Winnipeg.  He stated his next-of-kin as his mother, Maria Bergstrom.

Private C. Bergstrom was gassed on 17 August 1918.


Bickmore, Leslie Alfred, 928478, Private (1892-1918)

Leslie Alfred Bickmore was born on 13 December 1892 at Aldershot, Hampshire, England. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 153rd Battalion at Drayton, Ontario on 25 January 1916, at which time he was working as a farmer at Drayton, and listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Annie Bickmore, of 32 Gilderson Street, Woolwich, England.

Private L.A. Bickmore died on 29 August 1918 - although the Battalion War Diary states 28 August - during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Ligny-St. Flochel British Cemetery, Averdoingt, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. II.F.13).


Biddell, Cecil Henry, Lieutenant (1887-)

Cecil Henry Biddell was born on 1 July 1887 at Catford, S.E. London, England, son of the Reverend Henry Biddell. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 195th Overseas Battalion at Regina, Saskatchewan on 11 March 1916, at which time he was working as an assistant surveyor and draughtsman, and living at 2146 Robinson Street, Regina.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, then of St. Paul's Vicarage, Belgrave Square, Nottingham, England.  He stated that he was active in the 95th Saskatchewan Rifles, but had also served for two years as a Private in the 12th Middlesex (Prince of Wales' Own) Volunteer Rifles.

Lieut. C.H. Biddell is shown as being in "K" Battery of No. 3 Company in the April 1918 Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, on attachment from the 28th (Canadian Infantry) Battalion.  He does not appear again in the War Diaries of this unit, so presumably he returned to the 28th Battalion shortly thereafter.


Bierd, Ernest Cartwright, 424444, Sergeant (1887-)

Ernest Cartwright Bierd was born on 28 September 1887 at Fort Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan, son of Harry Ernest Bierd and older brother to Victor Lawrence Bierd.  He enlisted at Minnedosa on 8 February 1915, at which time he described himself as a Farmer, and his next-of-kin as his father, then of Foxwarren, Manitoba.

An Operation Order dated 8 April 1917 and attached to the 6th Bde. CMG Coy. War Diary contains the following: "Sixteen men already detailed under Sgt Surtees will form first reinforcements. Sixteen men under Corporal Bierd will form Divisional Reserve. Separate instructions will be issued as to time and place where above parties will report."  These were part of the preparations for the attack on Vimy Ridge, which was due to take place on the following day.

Donald Fraser mentioned this event in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Friday, 1 June 1917 - Some more decorations have been given away, this time for the Fresnoy engagement.  Cpls. Beard [sic], Clapp and Morrison [were] the receivers ... No one, not even ourselves, knew what the medals were for."

In his report on his section's part in the attack on Passchendaele between 5 and 8 November 1917, attached to the company War Diary, Lt. H.J.L. Pearce included the following: "[5 November] Dug funk holes & rested there without casualties until 6 p.m. when we went over with the two crews about 25 yds apart. Sgt. Bierd taking command of No 9 Gun Crew & Cpl. Owens of No. 8 Crew ... During the whole operations [I] would expecially draw your notice the work of Sgt. Bierd who showed untiring energy & cheerfulness amongst the men of the crews, looking after the wounded & getting them out though himself wounded refused to leave the line until he had made a personal search for a missing man."  At some time during the month of December, then Acting Sergeant E.C. Bierd was decorated with a Bar to the Military Medal. 


Bierd, Victor Lawrence, 12683, A/Sergeant, M.M. & Bar (1891-)

Victor Lawrence Bierd was born on 12 October 1891 at Regina, Saskatchewan, son of Harry Ernest Bierd, and younger brother to Ernest Cartwright Bierd.  He enlisted at Valcartier Camp, on 23 September 1914, describing himself as a farmer, and his next-of-kin as his mother Mrs. H.E. Bird, of Foxwarren, Manitoba.

On 12 March 1918, Acting Sergeant Victor Lawrence Bierd  was awarded a Bar to the M.M.


Bigelow, Frederick A., 415021, Private (1895-)

Frederick A. Bigelow was born on 31 July 1895 at Truro, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted in the 40th Battalion at Aldershot, Mingo County, Nova Scotia on 9 June 1915, having served for nine months with the 94th Regiment.  He was an active militia member, unmarried and working as a miner.  He listed his mother, Mrs. J.C. Bigelow of Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Private F.A. Bigelow was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Biggane, John, 303117, Private (1893-1918)

John Biggane was born on 17 November 1893 at Cork, Ireland, son of John & Ellen O'Grady Biggane.  He enlisted in the 1st Depot Battalion 1st C.O. Regiment at Toronto, Ontario on 14 November 1917, at which time he was single, working as a rubber weigher, and living at 39 Domonick Street, New York City, New York, U.S.A.  He listed his mother, Ellen Biggane of Robert Street, Mitchelstown, Cork, Ireland, as next-of-kin.

Private J. Biggane was killed in action on 11 October 1918, and was buried at Mill Switch British Cemetery, Tilloy-les-Cambrai, Nord (Grave Ref. C.24).


Bingham, George Hugo Krauz, Lieutenant

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps Nominal Roll for September 1918 shows Lieut. C.N. Bingham in "B" Battery No. 1 Company.  In October 1918, a Lieut. G.E.K. Bingham is shown in "B" Battery.  The National Archives on-line CEF database shows no suitable candidates for the first of these two, but there is a possible match with the second: Lieut. George Hugo Krauz Bingham.


Binns, -, Sergeant

5 August 1916 - Voormezele - "Sgt Binns casualty shrapnel in thigh." [6th Brigade CMG Company War Diary]


Birch, John W., 928385, Private (d. 1918)

Private John W Birch died on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Sun Quarry Cemetery, Cherisy, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. C.17).


Bishop, David Reeves, 2162305, Private (1896-)

David Reeves Bishop was born on 13 December 1896 at Murray Harbour, Prince Edward Island. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the Cyclist Platoon at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 2 February 1917, at which time he was single and working as a labourer at New Glasgow, Nova Scotia.  He listed his mother, Mrs. Hannah Bishop of Mount Buchanan, Prince Edward Island, as next-of-kin.

Private D.R. Bishop was wounded in October 1918.


Bishop, Elmer Uriah, 104148, Private (1894-1917)

Elmer Uriah Bishop was born on 7 July 1894 at Algonquin, Ontario, brother of Joseph Horton Bishop.  He enlisted in the 68th Overseas Battalion at Regina, Saskatchewan on 6 August 1915, at which time he was working as an express clerk, and stated his next-of-kin as his brother William Bishop, of Algonquin, Ontario.

Private Elmer Bishop was killed on 18 August 1917.  The War Diary merely states that "This relief was greatly delayed by enemy shelling ... During relief Ptes E.U. Bishop and Campbell were killed," but Donald Fraser, in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books) gives more detail about the incident: "Thursday, 16 August - At 9.00 p.m. we moved forward, two crews of our section taking up advanced posts 50 to 100 yards behind our front line.  When we arrived at Company Headquarters, Fritz put up a barrage and immediately our signals of distress from the front line went up and a reply from our artillery and machine-guns followed.  For a considerable time there was a terrific noise and one could not hear himself speaking.  Fritz, however, did not attack and when the bombardment quietened down, our crews went forward but were caught in a second barrage.  Everyone escape with the exception  of Elmer Bishop who received shrapnel in the back killing him.  One of Section 3 guns was knocked out ..."
"Friday, 17 August - ... Later on in the day another lot went out to look for Elmer Bishop but it appeared a burial party had picked him up.  Quite a number of our dead were lying around.  In addition to Campbell and Bishop, Muirhead was slightly gassed and Drysdale and Forbes were wounded."  He was buried at Aix-Noulette Communal Cemetery Extension (Grave Ref. E.M.18).


Bishop, George William Henry, 643471, Private (1893-)

George William Henry Bishop was born on 28 December 1893 at Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England.  He enlisted in the 157th Overseas Battalion at "Coomtown" on 14 February 1916, and had his medical examination at Barrie, Ontario on 3 March 1916.  He was unmarried and working as a farmer at Berton, R.R. No. 2.  He listed Emily Burgess of Diamond College, The Layne, Rolvenden, Kent, England, as his next-of-kin.

Private G.W.H. Bishop was wounded on 4 October 1918.


Bishop, Joseph (Joe) Horton, 446181, Private (1893-1917)

Joseph Horton Bishop was born on 28 October 1893 at Algonquin, Ontario, brother of Elmer Uriah Bishop.  He enlisted at Calgary, Alberta on 27 April 1915, when he was working as a clerk.  He stated that he had previously served with the 41st Regiment at Brockville, Ontario, and that his next-of-kin was his brother William Bishop, then of Algonquin, Ontario.

Private Joe Bishop was killed on 5 November 1917. The War Diary contains the following entry for this date: "Supplies for Mobile Guns were sent up by a Pack Train of 26 Annimals. This train was heavily shelled near Zonnebeck Station causing several casualties. 1 man missing and 6 men wounded, one of whom afterwards died of wounds. 5 Animals were killed and 5 wounded. Despite the shelling, train reformed and proceeded to destination safely delivering all the guns, tripods and supplies with the exception of 24 hours rations for No. 2 Section. 3 loads of S.A.A. and 2 of water were also lost. No. 2 Section was therefore on short rations during the next 48 hours. During this trip Pte T Wolfenden showed an excellent example. Although severely wounded he stayed at his post and safely delivered his load at the Dump. Afterwards collapsing on the return trip."

Donald Fraser was also involved in this incident, and includes a graphic description of the events in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "On the evening of the 4th, our transport went up the line and met with such opposition that a number were wounded and others so badly shaken and shell-shocked that they were either unfit or unwilling to proceed the following night.  Our crew was, therefore, called upon for assitance.  Leaving Fage in charge of the tent and belongings, the rest of us assumed our new duties and new they certainly were.  For the first time we had each to lead up a horse to a forward dump carrying an assortment of goods.  The transport men left behind soon had the horses loaded up and ready.  Roughly there must have been something like 14 or 15 in our little convoy ... We started out and I found myself second last in the line. My horse was loaded up with cans of water, four on each side ... Up the road we went ... Shell holes were everywhere and most contained slimy, muddy water.  The terrain was a wilderness of mud.  Thank goodness, however, the road was fairly firm.  We were warned to space out which caused quite a distance between the first and the last man ... The artillery was firing as we passed and Fritz was returning the fire.  We soon saw that it would take practically a direct hit to do any damage.  We watched the shells send up fountains of mud and water as they exploded.  For quite a distance you could see eruptions taking place at various points resembling geysers or mud volcanoes ... Near the top, shells were falling beside the road ... According to the map, I would say that we were in the vicinity of Zonnebeke.  Emerging from the hollow, we crept slowly up the ridge ... We were gradually getting through, when I sensed it was about time the next salvo was coming and with it trouble, and sure enough the shells came.  I was thown by the force of the explosion on to my face into the gutter at the side with the rest of me sprawled around the edge ... I was badly dazed and partially choked by mud and water ... my mind quickly cleared and I looked around and saw my horse lying dead half over my right thigh and pinning me down.  We were tossed from one side of the road to the other.  Glancing ahead I observed the horse in front dead and its attendant also.  He was Joe Bishop, a brother of Elmer who was killed several weeks before at Lens.  Joe was taken off the gun crew and given a supposedly safe job with transport.  Ahead of him was Ladd.  His horse was dead also and he, himself, was wounded and trying to rise.  I turned around to see how the fellow behind me fared.  I saw him and his horse motionless in death."

Joseph Bishop was buried at Potijze Chateau Grounds Cemetery, Ypres (Grave Ref. I.C.29).  Potijze was within the Allied lines during practically the whole of the First Word War and although subject to incessant shell fire, Potijze Chateau contained an advanced dressing station. Potijze Chateau Grounds Cemetery was used from May 1915 to September 1918. [CWGC web site]


Bjornson, Otto Johan, 101072, Sergeant (1879-1918)

Otto Johan Bjornson was born on 9 April 1879 at Ellbok, Sweden, son of John & Ingrid Bjornson.  He enlisted in the 66th Overseas Battalion at Edmonton, Alberta on 22 July 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a "mechanic bridge builder".  He listed his next-of-kin as Mrs. Jenmog A.J. Falle of Moose, North Dakota, U.S.A.

Sergeant O.J. Bjornson died on 9 October 1918, of wounds received, and was buried at Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Ficheux, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. IV.E.23).


Blair, Adam Archibald, 457153, Private (1885-)

Adam Archibald Blair was born on 15 November 1885 at Liverpool, Lancashire, England. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in "A" Company of the 60th Battalion at Montreal, Quebec on 8 June 1915, at which time he was single and working as a cook.  He listed his mother, Mrs. M.E. Blair of 146 Galt Avenue, Verdon, as next-of-kin.

Private A.A. Blair was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Blair, Colin Weldon, Lieutenant, M.C. (1895-)

Colin Blair was born on 31 December 1895 at Toronto, Ontario, son of Mr & Mrs Gordon M. Blair, later of Montreal.  The attestation paper has subsequently been altered to show his next-of-kin as his mother, then of New Brunswick, so his father may have died during the war.  He was an engineer at the time of his enlistment in the 96th Battalion at St. John, New Brunswick on 26 November 1914.

He probably spent some of the early part of the war in the 26th Battalion, because his first mention in the 2nd Bn CMG Corps War Diary in March 1918 shows Lt. C.W. Blair attached to "H" Battery No. 2 Company from that infantry unit.  He remained with "H" Battery for the remainder of his WW1 service.  The following is an extract from the War Diary entry for 9 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens: "It was while filling the gaps on the left, that Lieut. C.W. Blair (2 Company) conceived the idea of placing the guns of his section to enfilade a Sunken Road across which the enemy had to pass either in advance or retiring. His idea bore fruit in a few minutes for the Australians on our left beginning to advance shortly afterwards, large bodies of enemy retreating were caught in deadly fire from these guns and were exterminated. On examination of the ground some time after the event showed many dead bodied of men who were killed at that time."

On 24 September he was awarded the Military Cross.  The last entry showing him in the unit is the Nominal Roll dated 28 March 1919.


Blair, Hugh Campbell, 454461, Private (1889-)

Hugh Campbell Blair was born on 3 December 1889 at Clinty Finnian, County Antrim, Ireland, son of James Blair.  He enlisted at Lindsay, Ontario on 12 May 1915, at which time he was single and working as a fireman.  He listed his mother, then of 49 Peel Street, Lindsay, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private H.C. Blair was wounded in October 1918.


Blake, Albert George, 874646, Private (1884-1918)

Albert George Blake was born on 8 September 1884 at Wearside, Ware, Hertfordshire, England.  He enlisted in the 184th Overseas Battalion at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 11 March 1916, st which time he was single, living at 537 Bannatyne Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, and working as a tinsmith.  He listed his brother, William Blake of Rapid City, Manitoba, as next-of-kin.

Private A.G. Blake was wounded on 27 September 1918, during a retaliatory enemy artillery barrage.


Blake, George, 175116, Private (1893-1917)

George Blake was born in Northampton, England on 24 March 1893.  He attested into the 86th Battalion at Welland, Ontario on 23 August 1915.  At the time of his enlistement, he was working as a labourer, and was serving in an active militia, the 44th Regiment.  His next-of-kin was stated to be his mother, Mrs. W. Blake of Port Dover, Ontario.

Private Blake was killed on 6 November 1917, during the Battle of Passchendaele.  The War Diary for the 6th Bde. CMG Coy. includes the following entry for this date: "The Mobile guns under Lieut. Pearce had taken up a favorable position in Rear of the 28th Bn. being settled in funk-holes by 12.30 a.m. At Zero hour these 2 guns went over in rear of Bn. and got into positions ... Guns were in position at 8 a.m. with a clear field of fire of 1000 yards. Guns were dismounted as soon as it was seen that the infantry had reached objective and were again mounted at dusk. These guns were subjected to heavy shelling with numerous casualties. No. 8 gun having only its No. 1 L/Cpl J.M. Donald left. Although wounded he stuck to his post until Battery was relieved. Total Casualties for the day were 3 O.R's killed 20 O.R's wounded and 1 O.R. missing."  George Blake must have been one of those killed or missing.  His name is commemmorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial (Panel 32).


Blanchard, Joseph, 712794, Private (1897-)

Joseph Blanchard was born on 1 November 1897 at De Blois, Lot 2, Prince County, Prince Edward Island, son of Oliver Blanchard. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 105th Battalion at Summerside, P.E.I. on 4 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a fisherman at Traveller's Rest, P.E.I.  He listed his father, also of Traveller's Rest, as next-of-kin.

Private J. Blanchard was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Boddie, Robert David, 73288, Sergeant (1889-)

Robert David Boddie was born on 21 January 1889 at Aberdeen, Scotland, son of James Boddie.  He enlisted in the 28th Battalion at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan on 28 October 1914, at which time he was working as a farmer.  He was unmarried, and showed his next-of-kin as his father, then of Port Errol, Aberdeen.

An operation order dated 3 July 1917 contains the following instruction: "Lt. Withrow and Sgt Boddie will act as guides and bring the Company to Coy Hdqrs."  On 17 September that year the War Diary includes a mention of Sgt. R.D. Boddie 73288 having been awarded the Military Medal three days earlier.  During the preparations for the attack on Passchendaele village, the War Diary has the following details: "No. 4 gun under command of Sgt. R.D. Boddie moved to a reserve position to be used only if necessary."


Boivin, Hiles, 2398303, Private (1895-1918)

Hiles Boivin was born on 3 June 1895 at Sag...ay?, Quebec, son of John Boivin.  He enlisted in the 16th Light Horse Draft at Wolseley, Saskatchewan on 9 April 1917, at which time he was unmarried, living in Wolseley, Saskatchewan, working as a labourer, and an active member of the 16th Light Horse Militia.  He listed his father, then of 213 Tav..? Three Rivers, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private H. Boivin died on 1 October 1918, of wounds received, and was buried at Queant Communal Cemetery British Extension, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. C.56).


Bole, James Gordon, Lieutenant (1890-1918)

James Gordon Bole was born on 17 May 1890 at Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, son of William and Julia A. Bole.  He enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 11 November 1914, at which time he was a student at law and living at home.  He listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Julia A. Bole, of 40 Edgar Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.  He was an active member of the Queen's Own Rifles, a local militia regiment, and had served as a Sergeant for 20 months with the 19th Battalion.

Lieut. J.G. Bole is shown in "B" Battery of No. 1 Company in the May 1918 Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, where he remained until August 1918.  On 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, Lieut. J.G. Bole died and was buried at Quebec Cemetery (Grave Ref. D.25).  The following is an extract from a report accompanying the War Diary: "On the morning of the 28th inst., orders were received that the attack would be continued, the objective being CAGNICOURT. At 12.30 p.m. (ZERO Hour) the attack re-commenced. 'B' Battery on the left, 'C' Battery in the centre, and 'A' Battery on the right. Each Battery disposed their Guns in Echelon, four guns in close support and four in rear support. 'D' Battery was in reserve near Company Headquarters.  The attack progressed favourably until the crest of the hill in O.34 and U.3 was reached.  Here the attacking troops came under extremely heavy machine gun fire from UPTON WOODS and SABLE ?ITS.  This caused very severe casualties amongst the Infantry and Machine Gunners.  'A' Battery lost two Officers, 'B' Battery 3 Officers, and 'C' Battery 3 Officers.  All Batteries also lost heavily in Gunners."


Bolton, Francis Russell, Lieutenant (1892-)
 
Francis Russell Bolton was born on 8 April 1892 at Paris, Ontario, son of Charles Edward & Martha Bolton. [Family Notes]  He enlisted at Ottawa, Ontario on 3 June 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a clerk in the civil service.  He listed Mrs. M.B. Bolton, presumably his mother, c/o Mr. C.W. Bolton, Labor Depot, Ottawa, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Lieut. F.R. Bolton was shown in "E" Battery of No. 2 Company in the October 1918 Nominal Roll.  He was still there in December 1918, but does not reappear after that time.


Bonsall, Walter Edward, 633918, Corporal, M.M. (1890-)

Walter Edward Bonsall was born on 2 August 1890 at Baltimore, Quebec, son of R. Bonsall.  He enlisted in the 154th Overseas Battalion (via the 59th Regiment) at Ottawa, Ontario on 22 Mar 1916, at which time he was single, living at 334 Laurier Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario, and working as a cheesemaker.  He listed his father, also of 334 Laurier Avenue, Ottawa, as next-of-kin.

Corporal W.E. Bonsall was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.


Bouliane, Francois, 416478, Private (1895-)

Francois Bouliane was born on 22 August 1895 at Tadoussac, Quebec, son of Francois Bouliane.  He enlisted with the 41st Battalion at Montreal on 23 February 1915, at which time he single and working as a labourer.  He listed his mother of 553 De Lanaudière, Montreal, as next-of-kin.  He set sail for overseas with that unit on 18 October 1915, and was taken on strength with the 22nd Battalion on 16 April 1916.

Less than three months later, on 7 July 1916, he was evacuated to England with trench fever.  Having eventually recovered, he returned to the 22nd Battalion on 18 May 1917.  In November that year he was slightly wounded by shrapnel in the arm.  On 30 April 1918, he was transferred to the 2nd Battalion C.M.G.C.  Pte. F. Bouliane was demobilized on 25 May 1919.

[Information from 22nd Battalion History kindly provided by Major J.M.G. Gagné]


Boulter, Arthur William (or William Arthur), 445250, Private (1897-)

Arthur William Boulter was born on 3 December 1897 at Currieburg, York County, New Brunswick, son of Thomas Henry and Jane Boulter. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 55th Battalion at Sussex, New Brunswick on 17 July 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, also of Currieburg.

Private A.W. Boulter was detached to the 26th Battalion, Unit Group No. 3 "C" St. John on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Bourget, Romulus, 61553, Private (1886-1950)

Romulus Bourget was born on 17 October 1886 at Montreal, Quebec, and enlisted with the 22nd Battalion at Montreal on 29 October 1914, having served for two years in the 85th Regiment.  He was the son of Joseph Bourget (bur. 14 October 1910) and Alphonsine Léveillé (bur. 25 Febraury 1907).  He listed his next-of-kin as his sister, Miss Edouardina Bourget, of 475B Champlain, Montreal (who married C. Philips) and stated that he was working as a "chauffeur/mecanicien".

On 7 June 1915, he was promoted to the rank of Lance Corporal, although he resigned to Private three months later on 6 September, presumably immediately prior to leaving for France.  He must have been promoted back to L/Cpl, because he was again reduced to the ranks on 17 September 1917, and transferred to the 2nd Battalion CMGC on 30 April 1918.  Private R. Bourget was wounded accidentally on 10 August 1918.  No details of this incident are available in the Battalion War Diary.

Romulus Bourget was buried on 12 December 1950 at Notre-Dame-des-Neiges Cemetery (Section H, Plot 619), Montréal QC.
[Information from 22nd Battalion History kindly provided by Major J.M.G. Gagné]


Bourgette (or Bourget), John, 417716 (Orig. #409702), Sergeant (1887-)

John Bourgette was born on 29 November 1887 at Gaspe, Quebec, son of Henry Bourgette.  He enlisted with the 37th Battalion at Niagara, Ontario on 7 September 1915 (#409702), at which time he was unmarried and working as a woodsman.  He stated his next-of-kin to be Mrs. Henery Bourgette of Cap Cove, Gaspe, Quebec.  He was subsequently transferred to the 41st Battalion, reassigned the number #417716, and sailed for overseas on 18 October 1915.  He was transferred, first to the 22nd Battalion on 28 September 1916, and then again on 14 January 1917 to the 14th C.M.G. Company.

Sgt. J. Bourgette was wounded in the leg on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.  he was demobilized on 27 March 1919.
[Information from 22nd Battalion History kindly provided by Major J.M.G. Gagné]


Bouthillier, Jean, 417324, Private (1892-)

Jean Bouthillier was born on 25 August 1892 at Valleyfield, Quebec, son of Clement Bouthillier.  He enlisted at Montreal, Quebec on 4 June 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a trunk maker.  He listed his father, still of Valleyfield, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private J. Bouthillier was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Bowen, Harold James, 246307 (also #411412), Private (1895-)

Harold James Bowen was born on 2 October 1895 at Ottawa, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 207th (Ottawa Carleton) Machine Gun Battalion at Ottawa, Ontario on 18 May 1916, having served for six months in the 38th Battalion.  At that time, he was working as a civil servant, and living with his mother, Mrs F. Bowen - specified as his next-of-kin - at 185 Arthur Street, Ottawa.

Private H.J. Bowen was wounded on 27 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Bowness, Leland, 712423, Private (1897-)

Leland Bowness was born on 8 December 1900 at Norboro, Prince Edward Island, son of College Bowness. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 105th Overseas Battalion at Summerside, P.E.I. on 17 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at Kensington, Prince Edward Island.  He listed his father, also of Kensington, P.E.I., as next-of-kin.  The attestation paper gives his birth daye as 8 December 1897, presumably because he would not otherwise have been accepted at the tender age of 15!

Private L. Bowness was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Bowrey, James Milne, 57787, Sergeant (1879-)

James Milne Bowrey was born on 9 July 1879 at Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies, and enlisted in the 20th Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 12 November 1914.  He stated that he had served for three years in the Royal Engineers, and for six months in the Rand Rifles in South Africa.  He was working as a mining engineer, and listed his next-of-kin as Miss M.L. Bowrey, of 49 Sprules Road, Brockley, London S.E., England.

Corporal J.M. Bowrey was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.  Presumably he recovered sufficiently to return to duty, and receive a promotion, before his demobilization, as the National Archives of Canada CEF database lists his final rank as Sergeant.


Bradfield, Donald Carman, 172118, Private (1894-1917)

Donald Carman Bradfield was born on 19 July 1894 at Morrisburg, Ontario, son of Herbert Henry and Bertha C. Bradfield.  He enlisted in the 83rd Overseas Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 27 August 1915, when he was working as a clerk, and listed his next-of-kin as his father, of P.O. Morrisburg. [Family Notes]

He was killed on 23 August 1918, and buried at Fosse No. 10 Communal Cemetery Extension, Sains-en-Gohelle (Grave Ref. II.C.35).  On this day, two mobile sections (Nos. 3 and 4) were relieved in the line, and then carried ammunition up to the gun emplacements.  The remaining two sections remained in position and continued with their indirect fire programmes.  The War Diaries do not mention any casualties, but Fraser does gives some details in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Wednesday, 23 August - The scrapping quietened down considerably last night.  Word was received that Kitson, Esty, and Curly Elwood were wounded and Urquhart was missing.  The battalions have been relieved."


Bradford, Leland Earle, 447377, Lieutenant (formerly Sergeant-Major), M.M., D.C.M. (1893-)

Leland Earle Bradford was born on 11 June 1893 at Corberton, Ontario, son of Thomas H. Bradford.  He enlisted at Calgary, Alberta on 31 July 1915, while working as a cow puncher, and having served with the 29th Saskatchewan Light Horse for two years.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, then living at Watsons (?), Saskatchewan.

Sergeant L.E. Bradford was awarded the Military Medal on 12 March 1918.  On 9 May 1918, the War Diary contains the following entry: "Sgt. Major BRADFORD. D.C.M. was granted a Commission for distinguished service in the field and left for England."  The National Archives of Canada on-line CEF database shows him with a final rank of Lieutenant.


Brady, George, 120215, Private (1897-)

George Brady was born on 16 August 1897 at Cardinal, Ontario, son of Thomas Brady.  He enlisted at Montreal, Quebec on 11 August 1915, at which time he was single and working as a labourer.  He listed his father, then of 541 Frontenee?, Montreal, as next-of-kin.

Private G. Brady was wounded on 9 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "2 am 'F' Battery co-operated with the Artillery in a shoot, firing on bridge heads."


Brampton, Arnold Scott, 100669, Corporal, M.M. (1893-)

Arnold Scott Brampton was born on 2 November 1893 at Middlesboro, Yorkshire, England, son of George A. Brampton.  He enlisted in the 68th Overseas Battalion at Edmonton, Alberta on 9 July 1915, at which time he was working as a farmer.  He listed his next-of-kin as his father, of 19 High Street, Newport, Shropshire, England.

Corporal A.S. Brampton was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.  The War Diary states: "Artillery was very active and stiff bombardments by both sides carried on until 9.35 p.m. ... 100669 Cpl BRAMPTON, A.S., was wounded but remained at duty."


Brandow, Bert, 405002, Private (1896-)

Bert Brandow was born on 10 April 1896 at St. Williams, Ontario.  He enlisted at Niagara Camp, Ontario on 11 June 1915, at which time he was unmarried and working as a sheet metal worker.  He listed his sister, Mrs. Berry of 77 Pine Crest Road, Toronto, as next-of-kin.

Private B. Brandow was wounded on 1 October 1918.


Brawders, Richard, 428182, Private (1893-1917)

Richard Brawders was born on 3 July 1893 at Luffany, Kilkenny Isle, Ireland, son of John & Mary Brawders (later of Mooncoin, Waterford, Ireland).  He enlisted at New Westminster on 20 March 1915, at which time he was a labourer and serving with an active militia, the 11th I.F.  He listed his next-of-kin as his brother Malcolm Brawders of 28 Phillips Street, Salem, Massachusetts, USA.

Private Brawders died on 15 November 1917, and was buried at Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Poperinge (Grave Ref. XII.B.16).  The CWGC on-line database states that he was a member of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps.  As this unit was only formed in March 1918, it seems far more likely that he belonged to the 2nd Brigade CMG Company.


Braynion, John Davison/Davidson, 445748, Private (1897-1917)

John Davidson Braynion was born on 4 February 1897 at Cassilis, South Esk, Northumberland County, New Brunswick, son of Hiram & Agnes Braynion. [Family Notes]  He enlisted on 1 September 1915 at Sussex, New Brunswick; he was then working as a labourer, and stated his next-of-kin to be his father, then living at Cassilis.

On Thursday, 3 May 1917, the company supported the infantry in an attack which formed part of the Battle of Fresnoy.  The War Diary has the following entry for that day: "Weather fine. Company took part in attack as follows. 2 Mobile guns under Lt. Dickie moved forward with the 27th Bn. 2 guns under Lt Waddington moved forward with the 31st Bn. 4 Guns under Lts Carter and Wallbridge were in Reserve at Vancouver Road T28. 8 Barrage guns under Lts Hardiman and Williams kept up indirect fire in accordance with Corps Scheme. Lts Carter and Wallbridge took up two fresh gun crews owing to Casualties and damages and rearranged section. Lt Carter did exceptionally fine work. Sgt A. Surtees was killed."

Then, on Friday, 4 May, the War Diary states: "Weather fine. Guns holding positions in line and Barrage guns firing. 40 000 rounds of ammunition carried up. Lt Waddington was severely wounded. Pte J.D. Braynion was killed."  This agrees with information from the CWGC data base, indicating a date of death of 4 May.  The retaliation by the enemy artillery had been considerable.  The War Diary does not contain any details, but Donald Fraser elaborates in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books): "Friday, 4 May - The enemy began dropping shells in our lines and things were assuming a serious aspect.  Our men had practically no cover and had to lie tight and take full punishment.  Enfilade fire was coming from the direction of Mericourt in the northeast and on particular gun had a perfect register on our trench ... We were completely at the mercy of the artillery.  Our crew had to keep close to the gun; consequently, we ran the gauntlet every time the explosions neared us ... Up and down the trench the enemy kept this type of shelling for a long time, making the situation almost unbearable.  Much more of it and we would have had to retire."

Donald Fraser, in his diary (The Journal of Private Fraser, ed. Reginald H. Roy, publ. 1998, CEF Books), was not directly involved in the action that day, and had some difficulty establishing the details of the day's events: "Saturday, 5 May: Very little information reached me as to how our company fared.  The crews, being located a fair distance apart, it is difficult to know what is transpiring elsewhere.  Three are wounded in No. 2 Section, including Keenan.  Some of the crews became separated and members were arriving back claiming they were the sole survivors; others stated that they did not know what had happened to their comrades.  Here and there they were disorganized by the shelling.  No. 1 Section had a similar number of wounded.  In No. 3 Section Branion, who was wounded on the Somme, was killed, while another was wounded."


Brennan, F., 449041, Private

The 2nd Battalion CMG Corps War Diary shows that Private F. Brennan (449041) was wounded on 17 September 1918.  The National Archives of Canada CEF database does not show any soldier with this surname and number.  The War Diary entry for this day includes the following: "6.30 pm  Heavy artillery fire on right at this time. At this time enemy counter-attacked 52nd Division and re-took MOEUVRES.  Shelling worked over to this Divisional front and enemy used much gas."


Brieby, Oscar Carl, 2413323, Private (1888-)

Oscar Carl Brieby was born on 21 September 1888 at Rothesay, Minnesota, USA.  He enlisted at Regina, Saskatchewan on 24 September 1917, at which time he was unmarried and working as a farmer at Mossbank, Saskatchewan.  He listed his mother, Mrs. C.O. Brieby of Rothesay, Minnesota, as next-of-kin.

Private O.C. Brieby was wounded on 27 September 1918, during a retaliatory enemy artillery barrage.


Brière, Omer, 61207, Private (1894-)

Omer Brière was born on 7 December 1894 at Weedon, Quebec.  He enlisted with the 22nd Battalion on 24 October 1914 at Montreal, having previously served with the 65th Regiment.  At the time of his enlistment, he was single and working as a saddle maker; he listed his mother Mrs. M. Ménard, of 24 Desjardins Avenue, Maisonneuve, Montreal, as next-of-kin.  He sailed overseas with the 22nd, leaving on 20 May 1915.  He was appointed to the rank of Lance Corporal on 1 July 1915, but reverted to the rank of Private on 25 December that year when he was transferred to the 5th C.M.G. Company.

[Information from 22nd Battalion History kindly provided by Major J.M.G. Gagné]
Briggs, Albert Edgar, 911996, Private (1897-1918)

Albert Edgar Briggs was born on 18 May 1897 at Lakawn, Siam (now Thailand), son of Dr. W.A. and Annabel K. Briggs. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 196th (Western Universities) Overseas Battalion at Vancouver, British Columbia on 27 June 1916.  At this time, he was a student, living at the corner of 25th Avenue and Carnarvon Street, Point Grey, British Columbia, and listed his next-of-kin as his mother, of Marine Heights, P.O. Point Grey, British Columbia.

Private A.E. Briggs served with the 14th Brigade C.M.G. Company until its amalgamation with the 4th, 5th and 6th Bde. Companies into the 2nd Bn. C.M.G. Corps in March 1918.  He died on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Quebec Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. C.14).  His next-of-kin is listed by the CWGC on-line database as having been Annabel K. Briggs & the late Dr. W.A. Briggs (Medical Missionary to Siam), of 3081, 25th Avenue West, Vancouver, British Columbia.


Broadbridge, William George, Lieutenant (1896-)

William George Broadbridge was born on 30 August 1896 at Rochester, New York, U.S.A., son of Carmel Broadbridge.  He enlisted in the 39th Battalion at Cobourg, Ontario on 17 February 1915, at which time he was a student, but had served for two years in the 45th Regiment Coy. Militia.  He stated his next-of-kin as his father, then living in Brighton, Ontario.

Lt. Broadbridge first reported for duty with the 6th Bde. CMG Coy., on transfer from the 15 Bde. CMG Coy., on 30 July 1917.  The War Diary entry for 22 September 1917 includes the following: "During night 22/23 Party under Lt. Broadbridge consisting of 32 O.R's 6th Cdn M G Coy and 32 O.R's 14th C.M.G. Coy established a Dump at T8 a 10.45 and placed in it 500 Boxes S.A.A."  A similar entry occurs in the War Diary entry for 24 September.  On 19 October, Lt. Broadbridge proceeded on leave until 30 October.

On 3 October 1917, shortly before the company's support of an attack on Passchedaele village, Lt. Broadbridge "proceeded to the line and took command of No. 3 Section."  During the attack on 5 November No. 3 Section formed part of No. 2 Battery on barrage work, from positions at Seine Corner and near Augustus Wood.  Two days later, he became O.C. of the battery.  On the morning of 9 November, they moved forward and dug new barrage positions near Haalen Copse, and were relieved at midnight on 9/10 November.  On 25 November he proceeded to the Corps School at Pernes with three O.R.s.

On 6 January 1918, Lt. Broadbridge was admitted to hospital sick.  He had obviously recoverd by October, as he is shown in "H" Battery of No. 2 Company in the Nominal Roll for that month.  He remained in that battery until at least the end of January 1919.


Brookham, Amos Edward, 805016, Corporal (1893-)

Amos Edward Brookham was born on 21 April 1893 at Burd?, Cornwall. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 136th Overseas Battalion at Bowmanville on 10 November 1915, having previously served in the 46th Durham Ontario Regiment.  He was unmarried, living at Bowmanville, and working as a blacksmith.  He listed his mother, Mary Brookham of Otterham, Camelford, Cornwall, as next-of-kin.

Private A.E. Brookham was wounded on 1 October 1918.  The National Archives of Canada CEF database gives his final rank as Corporal, so presumably he returned to duty prior to the end of his service.


Brooks, Benjamin, 1003391 (Orig. #55576), Private (1892-)

Benjamin Brooks was born on 11 March 1892 at Birmingham, Warwickshire, England.  He enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 11 November 1914, having served with the 85th Regiment in Montreal.  He was married and working as a teamster, and listed Florence May Brooks, presumably his wife, of 17 Grace Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, as next-of-kin.  He signed a second attestation paper for the 227th Overseas Battalion at Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario on 9 June 1916, at which time he stated that he had served with the 19th Overseas Battalion for 18 months and was working as a labourer.  He and his wife were living at 1073 Wellington Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

Private B. Brooks was wounded on 1 October 1918.


Brown, Albert, 405202, Sergeant (1894-)

Albert Brown was born on 26 December 1894 Faversham, Kent, England, and enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 19 August 1915.  He was working as a labourer at the time, and listed his next-of-kin as his mother, Phoebe Brown, of 10 Hugo Street, Toronto.

Sergeant A. Brown was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Brown, Benjamin Roy, 225877, Sergeant, M.M. (1896-)

Benjamin Roy Brown was born on 28 August 1896 at Parry Sound, Ontario.  He enlisted in the Depot Regiment C.M.R. at Hamilton, Ontario on 13 June 1916, at which time he was working as a fitter and living with his mother, Mary Brown, at Parry Sound.

Sergeant B.R. Brown was wounded on 27 or 28 May 1918.  There are no further details of the incident in the War Diary, although the service records for Sgt. R.V. Moodie, wounded on the same day, indicate that the casualties took place "during a raid near Neuville St. Vitasse, near Arras."  Sgt. Brown was recommended for the Military Medal after the Battle of Cambrai, between 9 and 15 October 1918, and received the award on 19 November 1918.


Brown, Frank Clay, 3106614, Private (1885-)

Frank Clay Brown was born on 14 October 1885 at Toronto, Ontario, son of Charles C. Brown. He enlisted in the 1st Depot Battalion, 2nd C.O. Regiment at Toronto, Ontario on 28 January 1918, at which time he was single, working as a cook, and living at 1408 Washington Blvd., Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.  He listed his father, then of 811 North 6th Street, Perry, Oklahoma, U.S.A., as next-of-kin.

Private F.C. Brown was wounded on 6 November 1918.


Brown, Frank/Francis Xavier, 713187, Private (1896-1955)

Frank Xavier Brown was born on 6 April 1896 at Piusville, Prince Edward Island, son of Joseph Brown. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 105th Overseas Battalion at Summerside, Prince Edward Island on 18 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried and working as a labourer at Piusville, P.E.I.  He listed his father, still of Piusville, as next-of-kin.

Private F.X. Brown was detached to the 25th Cdn. Battalion, Unit Group No. 1 "A" Charlottetown on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.  Frank Brown moved away from PEI after the war and married Elizabeth Poirier in 1925 at Melrose, Massachusetts.  They had two daughters, and Frank died on 24 February 1995 in Reading, Massachusetts.


Brown, Ralph, 414539, Private (1897-)

Ralph Brown was born on 12 February 1897 at Yarmouth, Cumberland County, Nova Scotia.  He enlisted in the 40th Battalion at Amherst, Nova Scotia on 12 May 1915, at which time he was single and working as a lath sawyer.  He stated his next-of-kin to be Mrs. Reuben Hayes, of 56 Spring Street, Amherst, Nova Scotia.

Private R. Brown was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Brown, W.A., Lieutenant

The Nominal Roll for May 1918 shows Lieut. W.A. Brown as Transport Officer of No. 2 Company. An entry in the War Diary for 7 August suggests that he was in No. 3 Company at that time, but had returned to No. 2 Company by September, and remained in that unit until the end of March 1919.


Brunelle, Ernest, 121594, Private (1893-)

Ernest Brunelle was born on 6 December 1893 at Manchester, Hampshire, U.S.A., son of Philippe Brunelle.  He enlisted in the 69th Battalion on 23 December 1915 at Montreal, at which time he was single, working as a labourer, and listed his father, of St-Camille, Quebec, as next-of-kin.  He sailed overseas with the 69th Battalion, departing on 17 Patril 1916, and transferred to the 22nd Battalion on 29 June 1916.  On 30 April 1918, he was transferred to the 2nd Battalion C.M.G. Corps.

[Information from 22nd Battalion History kindly provided by Major J.M.G. Gagné]
Bruton, James, 171046, Sergeant, M.M. (1884-)

James Bruton was born on 5 November 1884 at Bristol, England, and enlisted in the 83rd Battalion at Toronto, Ontario on 11 August 1915.  At this time he was an active member of the 12th Militia Regiment and was working as a decorator.  He listed his mother, Eliza Bruton, of 54 Elm Grove Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, as his next-of-kin. [Family Notes]

Sergeant J. Bruton was awarded the Military Medal on 24 May 1918.  He was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Bryan, Ray Fenwick, 749045, Private (1890-)

Ray Fenwick Bryan was born on 15 September 1890 at Haltey, Stanstead.  He enlisted in the 117th (Eastern Townships) Overseas Battalion at Coaticook, Quebec on 14 April 1916, at which time he was married and working as a farmer at Ways Mills.  He listed his wife, Lucy Bryan of East Huckford, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private R.F. Bryan was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Bryant, John Edwin, 55578, Private (1891-)

John Edwin Bryant was born on 12 September 1891 at Hamilton, Ontario, son of George E. Bryant.  He enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 28 January 1915, having served for three years in the 19th Regiment.  He was working as a labourer, and listed his next-of-kin as his father, then of 7 Dufferin West, St. Catherines, Ontario.

Private J.E. Bryant was wounded on 26 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Buckler, Augustus, 542188, Private (1897-)

Augustus Buckler was born in 1897 at Codroy, Newfoundland, son of John Buckler, a fisherman (shown in Directories for 1894/7 and 1904).  He enlisted in the Cyclist Platoon M.D.6 at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 14 September 1916, at which time he was single and working as a "donkeyman at sea (engineer)" at North Sydney, Nova Scotia.  He listed his father, still of Codroy, Newfoundland, as next-of-kin.

Private A. Buckler was detached to the 25th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 1 Halifax. "B" on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Buckley, Frederick, 3105040, Private (1884-)

Frederick Buckley was born on 14 October 1884 at Royton/Shaw, Lancashire, England. [Family Notes]  He appears to have emigrated to the US in July 1906, but then returned to England in 1908.  He went out again, to join his brother in New Bedford, Massachusetts, arriving in September 1909.  He enlisted in the 1st Depot Battalion 2nd C.O.R. at Toronto, Ontario on 1 October 1917, having served for three months as a Private in the 91st Highlanders Regiment Militia.  He was married, living at 25 Palm Street, Pawtuckett, Rhode Island, U.S.A. and working as a machinist.  He listed his wife Rita Buckley, also of 25 Palm Street, Pawtuckett, as next-of-kin.

Private F. Buckley was wounded on 1 October 1918.


Buckley, Wilfred Arthur, 902440, Private (1896-)

Wilfred Arthur Buckley was born on 7 April 1896 at Halifax, Nova Scotia, son of Dr. A.F. Buckley.  He enlisted in the 193rd Overseas Battalion at Truro, Colchester County, Nova Scotia on 24 April 1916, at which time he was unmarried, living at 209 South Park Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and working as a bank clerk.  He listed his father, also of 209 South Park Street, Halifax, as next-of-kin.

Private W.A. Buckley was wounded on 14 October 1918.


Budd, David James, 71570, Corporal, M.M. (1890-)

David James Budd was born on 18 March 1890 at Brighton, Sussex, England. [Family Notes]  After spending four and a half years in the Royal Sussex Regiment he enlisted in the 27th Battalion (via the 100th Regiment) at Winnipeg, Manitoba.  He was single, working as a labourer, and listed Alfred George Budd of 17 Albion Street, Portslade, Brighton, Sussex, as next-of-kin.

Corporal D.J. Budd was awarded the Military Medal on 11 January 1919.


Burchell, Joseph Robert, Captain (1890-)

Joseph Robert Burchell was born on 23 August 1890 at Glace Bay, C.B., Nova Scotia.  He enlisted in the 25th Battalion at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 26 November 1914.  He was working as a surveyor, and had served with the 94th Regiment.  He showed his next-of-kin as Mrs. Margaret Burchell, of Box 197, Glace Bay, C.B.

Lieut. J.R. Burchell is shown as being in "D" Battery of No. 1 Company in the April 1918 Nominal Roll of the 2nd Battalion CMG Corps, on attachment from the 25th (Canadian Infantry) Battalion.  He does not appear again in the War Diaries of this unit, so presumably he returned to the 25th Battalion shortly thereafter.


Burge, Peter John, 663141, Private (1896-)

Peter John Burge was born at Devonport, Cornwall, England on 6 August 1896. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 164th Battalion at Shelburne, Ontario on 14 December 1915, at which time he was farming at Honeywood, Ontario.  He listed his next-of-kin as his brother, Frank Burge, of Woodbridge, Ontario.

Private P.J. Burge was wounded on 8 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Burgess, Charles, 174968, Private (1873-1918)

Charles Burgess was born on 27 April 1873* at Caundle Purse, Dorsetshire, England, son of James and Isabella Burgess. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 86th Machine Gun Battalion at Hamilton, Ontario on 30 September 1915, at which time he was married and working as a labourer.  He stated that he had served for 8 years with the Dorset Regiment, and that his next-of-kin was his wife Annie Burgess, of 117 Hillyard Street, Hamilton, Ontario.
    *This date was provided in his attestation paper.  Other data suggests that he was born c1869.

Private C. Burgess died on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras, and was buried at Wancourt British Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. II.A.18).  The CWGC on-line database lists his next-of-kin as his parents, the late James & Isabella Burgess, and his wife, Annie Burgess, then of 83 Kinrade Avenue, Hamilton, Ontario.


Burke, Harvey, 189865, Private (1892-)

Harvey Burke was born on 29 September 1892 at Blenheim, Ontario, son of Sidney Burke.  He enlisted in the 91st Overseas Battalion at St. Thomas, Ontario on 17 January 1916, at which time he was single and working as a lineman.  He had seen service with the 24th Militia Regiment, and showed his next-of-kin as his father, of Blenheim, Ontario.  A note on his attestation paper states that he was given permission to marry after his enlistment.  He was transferred to the 186th Battalion on 28 February 1916.

Private H. Burke was wounded on 29 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Burke, Robert Leslie, 189330, Private (1890-)

Robert Leslie Burke was born on 5 December 1890 at Blenheim, Ontario.  He enlisted in the 91st Battalion at Chatham, Ontario, on 15 November 1915, at which time he was married and working as a printer in Chatham, Ontario.  He listed his wife of 101 Adelaide Street North, Chatham, Ontario (later changed to Box 41, Blenheim, Ontario) as next-of-kin.  Private Burke was transferred to the 186th Battalion on 28 February 1916.

Private R.L. Burke was wounded on 11 October 1918.


Burnie, Joseph, 141861, Sergeant, M.M. & Bar (1891-)

Joseph Burnie was born in 1891 at Wigton, England.  He enlisted at Niagara, Ontario on 3 August 1915, when he showed his occupation as farm labourer, and listed his next-of-kin as Margaret Kirk. He also stated that he was a member of an active militia.

6th Bde. CMG Company War Diary entry for 17 September 1917 (Maisnil Bouche): "Corps Routine Order No. 1442 dated 14/9/1917 awarded the Military Medal to the following N.C.O's of this unit ... No. 141861  L/Cpl. J. Burnie."  A further list of awards in the 2nd Bn. CMG Corps War Diary shows him having been promoted to Sergeant, and receiving a bar to the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.


Burns, Ray, 796209, Private (1883-1918)

Ray Burns was born on 24 March 1883 at Wilmington, Ohio, U.S.A.  He enlisted in the 133rd Overseas Battalion at Simcoe, Ontario on 3 June 1916, having previously served in the 39th Regiment.  He was unmarried, working as a cook in Simcoe, and listed his uncle, W.C. Smith of 5127 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, as next-of-kin.

Private R. Burns was killed in action on 2 October 1918, and was buried at Sains-les-Marquion British Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. II.B.9).


Burns, William Patrick, 123456, Private (1893-1918)

William Patrick Burns was born on 13 March 1893 at St. Thomas, Ontario, son of Michael Burns.  He enlisted at St. Thomas, Ontario on 13 September 1915, when he was working as a brickmaker.  He stated his next-of-kin to be his father, then living at 45 Manitoba Street, St. Thomas, Ontario. [Family Notes]  Annotations on his attestation paper indicate that he was transferred from the 70th to the 91st Battalion on 6 November 1915.

The CWGC on-line database shows that Private W.P. Burns was a member of the 75th (Central Ontario) Canadian Infantry Battalion when he died on 4 June 1918.  He was buried at Bagneux Britis Cemetery, Gezaincourt, Somme (Grave Ref. II.F.3).  The War Diary entry for this day includes the following: "5.00 pm  Enemy shelled vicinity of Battn. H.Q. 123456 Pte BURNS W.G. [sic] was hit and died within a few minutes.  He had just arrived with new draft."


Burt, Frank Valentine, 193270, Sergeant, M.M. (1892-)

Frank Valentine Burt was born on 14 February 1892 at Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.  He enlisted at Toronto, Ontario on 30 August 1915, at which time he was married and working as a grocery clerk.  He listed his wife, Alice Burt of 171 Bellefair Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Sergeant F.V. Burt was awarded the Military Medal on 19 September 1918.


Burt, Sidney James, 404997, Private (1890-)

Sidney James Burt was born on 20 November 1890 at Plymouth, Devon, England. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 35th Battalion at Niagara Camp, Ontario on 30 June 1915, at which time he was single and working as a printer.  He listed Georgina Burt of 13 Garden Crescent, Plymouth, Devon, England, as his next-of-kin.

Private S.J. Burt was gassed on 24 September 1918.


Burtle, George, 252630, Private (1876-)

George Burtle was born on 9 May 1876 at 39 The Grove, Hammersmith, Shepherds Bush, London, England.  He enlisted in the 209th Battalion at Vanguard, Saskatchewan on 27 March 1916, at which time he was working as a farmer and living at Concord, Saskatchewan.  He stated his next-of-kin to be his mother, Elizabeth Burtle, of London, England.

Private G. Burtle was wounded on 28 August 1918, during the Battle of Arras.


Burton, Harry Seaman, 841826, Private (1895-)

Harry Seaman Burton was born on 27 September 1895 at Burnley, Lancashire, England. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 148th Overseas Battalion at Montreal, Quebec on 20 March 1916, at which time he was unmarried, working as an electrician, and living at 402 Delisle Street, Montreal, Quebec.  He listed his mother, Mrs. Agnes Burton of Box 362, Post Office, Valleyfield, Quebec, as next-of-kin.

Private H.S. Burton was detached to the 24th Canadian Battalion Unit Group No. 7, "F" Montreal on 25 March 1919, for the purpose of demobilisation.


Burton, Thomas, 888328, Private (1894-)

Thomas Burton was born on 2 December 1894 at Parry Sound, Ontario, son of John Burton.  He enlisted in the 188th Battalion at Tisdale, Saskatchewan on 5 April 1916, at which time he was single and working as a farmer at Tisdale.  He listed his father, of New Liscard, Ontario, as next-of-kin.

Private T. Burton was wounded on 10 October 1918.


Bush, Herbert Joseph, Lieutenant (1887-)

Herbert Joseph Bush was born on 15 August 1887 at Coldwater, Simcoe County, Ontario.  When he enlisted in the 143rd Overseas Battalion at Vancouver, British Columbia, he was a student-at-law, living with his mother Mary R. Bush at 1147 Nelson Street, Vancouver. [Family Notes]  He had also been an active member of the 72nd (Militia) Regiment S.H. of C. for eight months.

Lieut. H.J. Bush first reported to the 2nd Battalion CMGC Corps for duty on 25 March 1918, and was attached to the 14th CMG Company.  When the corps was reorganized, he was put into "L" Battery No. 3 Company.  By May, he had been moved to "J" Battery, and was with them during the Battle of Amiens on 8 August 1918.  The following extract from the War Diary relates the actions of that day: "This Battery got away to a good start, but during the advance received several casualties. Capt. SALISBURY with his H.Q. captured two German M.G's. 1 Officer and 10 men., two of our Signallers being wounded while closing in. They turned one of the captured guns upon a Machine Gun strongpoint, which was to a flank and holding up some Infantry. The Bosche Gunners ceased fire and surrendered to our Infantry. Lieut. BUSH sprained his ankle during the advance, but continued to the objective and remained with his crews until evening, when he had to be evacuated.  Three Guns of this Battery were destroyed during the advance.  Upon arrival at objective two guns pushed well forward and got several parties of Huns who were running back.  Casualties: Lieut. BUSH, sprained ankle. Other Ranks. 1 killed and 11 wounded."  There is no further mention of Lieut. Bush in the War Diaries.


Bush, Joseph Edward, 850678, Private (1894-1918)

Joseph Edward Bush was born on 9 August 1894 at Syracuse, Onondaga County, New York, USA, son of Mr. John & Mrs. Kathryn B. Bush.  He enlisted in the 176th Battalion at Bridgeburg, Ontario on 18 May 1916, at which time he was living with his parents at 600 Almond Street, Syracuse, New York and working as a clerk.  He was unmarried listed his parents as his next-of-kin.  On 22 July 1916, he was transferred to the 98th Battalion.

Private J.E. Bush died on 26 August 1918, and was buried at Wancourt British Cemetery, Pas de Calais (Grave Ref. II.C.23).  Notes accompanying his service records, and available on-line, refer to the events preceeding his death: "14 Aug 1917... The circumstances under which Nr. 805678 Pte J E Bush received shell shock were as follows.  While No. 16 Platoon was proceeding alond Fosse 11 Road at 10 pm Aug 4th, a shell of large calibre fell 8 feet to the left of the road, beside the platoon, killing one man, wounding three, and shell shocking Pte. Bush.  Signed F H Cantton? Lt." and "14 Aug 1917 - RAFFLE ... From what I can learn from #16 NCOs this man was fairly close to the shell when it burst ... Has usual efficiency in the line is stated as being FAIR. 8.00 p.m. Signed O.C. D Co."   the terminology used in these notes suggests that Pte. Bush was attached to an Infantry Battalion or other unit at this time.  His death is, however, recorded by the Battalion War Diaries, in a list of casualties compiled at the end of August.


Butt, Selby J., 409427, Private (1896/7-)

Selby Butt was born in 1896 (or Sep 1897, according to the 1921 Census) at Carbonear, Newfoundland.  He enlisted in the 37th Battalion at Niagara Camp, Ontario on 10 Jun 1915, at which time he stated that he was a salesman, and that his next-of-kin was his mother, Mrs. Reid, of New Melbourne, Newfoundland. [Family Notes]

Private S.J. Butt was wounded on 10 August 1918, during the Battle of Amiens.


Byrne, William, 622702, Corporal (1896-)

William Byrne was born on 7 February 1896 at Murray Harbour, Prince Edward Island. [Family Notes]  He enlisted in the 44th Overseas Battalion at Sewell on 8 July 1915 - his medical examination is shown to have been done on the same day, at Winnipeg - at which time he was unmarried and working as a baker.  He listed his mother, Matilda Byrne of P.O. Stellarton, Pictou County, Nova Scotia, as next-of-kin.

Corporal W. Byrne was gassed on 15 September 1918.  The War Diary entry for that day includes the following: "7 pm  Heavy concentration of gas was caused by enemy shelling in BARALLE and BARALLE WOOD."


This page last updated 21 July 2003
Return to the CMGC Personnel Database Contents Page
Return to the 6th Brigade CMGC Contents Page
Copyright © 2002-2016 Brett Payne All Rights Reserved