Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

James Jackson Black 


 

Information from National Park Service Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System Website -

Black, James - CSA - Infantry - 1st Regiment, South Carolina Infantry (McCreary's) (1st Provisional Army); Co. L;  In - Private; Out - Private

1st Regiment, South Carolina Infantry (McCreary's) (1st Provisional Army)

1st Infantry Regiment, Provisional Army completed its organization at Richmond, Virginia, in August, 1861. Most of the officers and men had served in the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, a six-month command, which was mustered out of service in late July. The men were from Charleston and Columbia, and the counties of Darlington, Marrion, Horry, Aiken, and Florence. Assigned to General Gregg's and McGowan's Brigade, the unit fought with the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days' Battles to Cold Harbor. It was then involved in the difficult Petersburg siege north and south of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. This regiment lost 20 killed and 133 wounded during the Seven Days' Battles, had fifty-three percent disabled of the 283 engaged at Second Manassas and Ox Hill, and had 4 killed and 30 wounded at Sharpsburg. It sustained 73 casualties at Fredericksburg and 104 at Chancellorsville, then lost thirty-four percent of the 328 at Gettysburg. There were 16 killed, 114 wounded, and 7 missing at The Wilderness, and 19 killed, 51 wounded, and 9 missing at Spotsylvania. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 18 officers and 101 men. The field officers were Colonels Maxey Gregg, Daniel H. Hamilton, and Charles W. McCreary; Lieutenant Colonels T. Pinckney Alston, Andrew P. Butler, Edward McCrady, Jr., Washington P. Shooter, and Augustus M. Smith; and Major Edward D. Brailsford.


Black, James - CSA - 1st Regiment, South Carolina State Troops
 (6 months, 1863-4) ; Company G; In -  Private; Out -  Private;

1st Regiment, South Carolina State Troops

Crute's Compendium contains no history for this unit


Black, James - CSA - 3rd Regiment, South Carolina Reserves

 (90 days 1862-63); Company A; In - Private; Out - Private; 


3rd Regiment, South Carolina Reserves (90 days 1862-63)

Crute's Compendium contains no history for this unit.


Black, James - CSA - Infantry - 5th Regiment, South Carolina Infantry
Company I ; In - Private; Out - Private;


5th Regiment, South Carolina Infantry

5th Infantry Regiment, assembled during March and April, 1861, contained men recruited in Laruens, Lancaster, Spartanburg, and Union counties. It was ordered to Virginia and, serving in D.R. Jones' Brigade, saw action at First Manassas. Later it was placed in General R.H. Anderson's, M. Jenkins', and Bratton's Brigade. It participated in the campaigns of the army from Williamsburg to Fredericksburg, then served in Longstreet's Suffolk operations and with D.H. Hill in North Carolina. Moving again with Longstreet, the unit did not arrive in time to take part in the Battle of Chickamauga, but was engaged at Knoxville. Returning to Virginia, it was conspicuous at The Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Cold Harbor, in the trenches of Petersburg, and around Appomattox. This regiment reported 3 killed and 23 wounded at First Manassas and totalled 650 men in April, 1862. It sustained 21 casualties at Williamsburg, 81 at Gaines' Mill, 73 at Frayser's Farm, 39 during the Maryland Campaign, and 102 at Wauhatchie. In 1864 it lost 18 killed, 95 wounded, and 16 missing during The Wilderness Campaign, and from June 13 to December 31, there were 11 killed and 65 wounded. On April 9, 1865, the unit surrendered 19 officers and 263 men. The field officers were Colonels A. Coward, John R.R. Giles, and Micah Jenkins; Lieutenant Colonels Andrew Jackson, G.W.H. Legg, and John D. Wylie; and Majors Thomas C. Beckham, William M. Foster, and William T. Thomson.
 



Black, James - CSA - Infantry - 16th Regiment, SC Infantry, (Greenville Regiment); Company C;
In - Corporal; Out - Private;

16th Regiment, South Carolina Infantry (Greenville Regiment)

16th Infantry Regiment, recruited in Greenville County, was organized and mustered into Confederate service in December, 1861. It moved to Charleston and for a time was stationed at Adams Run under General Hagood. During December, 1862, the unit was ordered to Wilmington, North Carolina and in May, 1863, to Jackson, Mississippi where it was assigned to General Gist's Brigade in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. After sharing in the defense of Jackson, it was stationed at Rome, Georgia, during the Chickamauga Campaign. Later it joined the Army of Tennessee, fought in the Atlanta Campaign, and endured Hood's winter operations in Tennessee. The 16th ended the war in North Carolina. In December, 1863, it totalled 559 men and 452 arms, lost many in Tennessee, and surrendered on April 26, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Charles J. Elford and James McCullough, Lieutenant Colonel W.B. Ivor, and Major Charles C. O'Neill.

A great site for the 16th by Steve Batson.
 


Black, James - CSA - Sharpshooters - Palmetto Sharpshooters Regiment, SC, (Jenkins') (1st Palmetto); Company G; In - 3 Lieutenant; Out - Lieutenant;


Palmetto Sharpshooters Regiment, South Carolina (Jenkins') (1st Palmetto)

Palmetto Regiment Sharpshooters was organized in April, 1862, with transfers from the 2nd, 5th, and 9th South Carolina Infantry Regiments. Send to Virginia, the unit was assigned to General R.H. Anderson's, Jenkins', and Bratton's Brigade. It fought with the army from Williamsburg to Fredericksburg, served at Suffolk and in North Carolina, then saw action at Chickamauga and Knoxville. Returning to Virginia, it continued the fight at The Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Cold Harbor, endured the hardships of the Petersburg trenches, and ended the war at Appomattox. It lost 9 killed and 74 wounded at Gaines' Mill and sixty-eight percent of the 375 engaged at Frayser's Farm. The regiment reported 2 casualties at South Mountain, 65 at Sharpsburg, 4 at Fredericksburg, and 44 at Wauhatchie. It surrendered 29 officers and 356 men. The field officers were Colonels Micah Jenkins and Joseph Walker; Lieutenant Colonel John W. Goss; and Majors William Anderson, William W. Humphreys, and Franklin W. Kilpatrick.
 





 


Return to Military Index

Return to Home Page

    

Compilation Copyright 2003 - Present

 By Linda Blum-Barton & Toby Barton