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HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     529

CHRISTIAN H. DIETRICH. In the death of Christian H. Dietrich Marshall County lost one of its most valued citizens. His entire life was spent within its borders, and for a number of years he was in control of one of its leading industries, and possessing a keen appreciation of the ethics of commercial life, he commanded the respect of his fellow men for his uprightness and true worth. Bremen was thus proud to claim him among her native sons, his birth occurring here on the 27th of April, 1852, the second son and third child of John and Elizabeth Dietrich, who were natives of Switzerland. They came to the United States and to Bremen in 1852 and inscribed their names high on the roll of Marshall County’s early pioneers and honored citizens. In the schools of his native city of Bremen the son Christian obtained a part of his educational training, completing his studies in the Hillsdale College of Michigan, and after leaving the school room he became associated with his father in business, to which he was later admitted as a partner, and he continued an active factor in the industrial life of Bremen until within about three years before his death. He was a man of large heart and broad humanitarian principles and his public career and private life were alike above reproach.

 

On the 13th of December, 1877, Mr. Dietrich was united in marriage to Mary A., a daughter of John and Hannah (Volnagle) Link, who came to Marshall county during an early day in its history, when their daughter Mary, a native of Ohio, was but five years old, and she has spent the remainder of her life within its borders. Three sons and a daughter were born to Mr. and Mrs. Dietrich: Oliver, born January 16, 1880; Laura E., born December 18, 1884; Theodore J, May 14, 1887, in Tampa, Florida; and Willis Link, December 12, 1895. Mr. Dietrich was a member of the Evangelical Emanuel church, and was a Democrat politically. He left to his widow a large estate, and in addition to other property she owns a business block in Nappanee and two business houses in Bremen. Mr. Dietrich died January 6, 1904, and the community mourned the loss of one of its truest and best citizens.

JOHN E. WHITESELL, section foreman for the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroad, now residing at Donelson, is one of Marshall County’s native sons, his birth having occurred in West Township, October 17, 1865. He is the eldest son of Joseph Whitesell, of whom extended mention is made on another page of this volume. The days of his boyhood and youth were passed on the old family homestead and the district schools of West Township afforded him his educational privileges. When not busy with his textbooks he worked in the fields and early learned the value of untiring industry as a foundation for success. When he had attained a man's estate he was married on the 10th of October, 1885, the lady of his choice being Miss Minnie Smith, who was born in Elkhart county, Indiana, and was brought to Marshall county by her parents when twelve years of age. She is a daughter of Harvey J. and Elizabeth (Thaxton) Smith. Her father was a farmer of West Township, owning, clearing and improving a tract of land there.

 

The young couple began their domestic life upon a rented farm in Polk Township, where they lived for two years, on the expiration of which

 


530                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

period Mr. Whitesell entered the railroad service. He has been with the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroad Company for eighteen years and his long connection therewith indicates clearly his fidelity to duty, his ability and the confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen. He has erected a home in Donelson, where he now resides, and he also owns a farm in West Township, comprising thirteen acres of land.

 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Whitesell have been born two sons and two daughters, GoIdie, Charley, Jennie and Pearl, The family is well known in Donelson and this part of the county and have the warm regard of many friends here. Mr. Whitesell has been a life-long Democrat and takes an active interest in the work of the party. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic lodge and the Court of Honor and is loyal to the teachings of these organizations, which have their basic elements in mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness.

NORMAN S. NORRIS, D. D. S. One of the acknowledged leaders in the ranks of the dental fraternity in Marshall county is Dr. Norman S. Norris, who has practiced in Culver since his graduation from one of the best known dental colleges in the state, the Indiana Dental, in 1904, and he has since steadily advanced in the profession. The Doctor was born in West Township, Marshall County, Indiana, September 6, 1879. His father, Harvey Ransom Norris, is also a native son of Marshall county, born near Lake Maxinkuckee in 1851, and his mother, nee Louisa Adler, was born in Stark county, Ohio, and both are now living and residents of Union township.

 

Dr. Norman S, Norris, the youngest born of their four children, three sons and a daughter, spent the early years of his life on his parents old homestead, attending first the district schools of the neighborhood, and then the Markle high school, in which he graduated in 1898. During the two years following his graduation from the high school he taught school, and then entering the Indiana Dental College at Indianapolis he graduated there from in 1904, beginning at once his practice at Culver. The Doctor is a member of the Northern Indiana Dental Association, and also has membership relations with the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the blue lodge at Culver. His political views are in harmony with the principles of the Republican Party.

 

On the 22d of July 1907, he married Matilda Hawkins, a daughter of Ezra and Mary Cabling. Hawkins. Dr. Norris has been a life-long resident of Marshall County, and during the years, which have passed since he entered professional life, he has won for himself a place of distinction in the dental fraternity in this community. He has an office well equipped with modern appliances, and keeps in touch with the advancement that is constantly being made in the profession.

ELIJAH C. MARTINDALE, a prominent and well-known attorney, has practiced at the bar of Plymouth since 1882. He entered upon the study of law under the preceptorship of Enoch Sturgeon at Rochester, Indiana, and was admitted to practice in 1879. For a shore time there- after he was located at Argos, but in 1882 he was elected the prosecuting attorney of Marshall and Fulton counties and removed to Plymouth in

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     531

the same year. He served two terms in that position. In his private practice his ability has won him a distinctively representative clientage.

 

Although so long and prominently identified with the interests of Marshall County, Mr. Martindale is a native son of Cass County, Indiana, born on the 2d of February 1850, to Isaac Martindale. The father was born in North Carolina, but removed with his parents when a small boy to Ohio, where he followed agricultural pursuits and was also a minister in the Methodist Episcopal church, his death occurring when he had reached the age of fifty-three years. He was of Welsh descent. Mrs. Martindale bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Cornwell and was born in Virginia. Her father, John Cornwell, served as a soldier in the War of 1812. She was an only child and came with her mother to Indiana when thirteen years of age, and in Hancock County of this state she gave her hand in marriage to Isaac Martindale. The young couple continued their residence in Hancock county for several years and then removed to Cass county of this state, the birthplace of their son Elijah, the youngest of their five children, three sons and two daughters, who grew to mature years, and three of the number are now living: Sarah, the wife of George W. Kessler, of Rochester, Indiana; Isaac, who resides in Fulton county, this state, near De Long, and Elijah C.

 

When a little lad of four years Elijah C. Martindale accompanied his parents on their removal to Fulton county, and he received his educational training in the Rochester high school. He was first married in 1872, Samantha Bridges becoming his wife, and her death occurred in Kansas inn 1873. In 1879 he married Anna M. Stair, and they have one living son, Frank E. Their elder son, Fred C., died when twenty-two years of age. Mr. Martindale upholds the principles of the Democratic Party, being an active worker in its ranks, and he is a member of the order of

Ben Hur. He ranks high at the bar and in political circles, and Plymouth numbers him among her leading and influential citizens.

FRANKLIN M. KYSER is one of the prominent and influential farmers of West township, where he was born on the 26th of May, 1855, to Andrew J. and Elizabeth (Kemmerer) Kyser, both natives of the commonwealth of Ohio, born, reared and married in Summit county. In 1855, with their two children, they came to Marshall County, Indiana, and established their home on the banks of the Yellow river in West Township. The eighty acres of land which Mr. Kyser there purchased he cleared and improved, but later sold the tract and bought two hundred acres of land in Union township, of which he cleared and improved about one hundred and sixty acres. From there he moved to Center Township and purchased a farm of fourteen acres, and on the little homestead in that township he spent the remainder of his life. His name is recorded among the honored pioneers of Marshall County, and from a sincere and deep felt interest in its welfare he labored for all that would prove of public benefit until his busy and useful life was ended.

 

He was an active worker in the ranks of the Democratic Party, and was a member of the United Brethren church, remaining one of its most faithful disciples until his death at the age of seventy-seven years. Five

 


532                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

sons and one daughter blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Kyser, of whom four were born in Marshall County.

Franklin M. Kyser, the third child and third son in order of birth obtained his educational training in the schools of Union township. The first land, which he owned consisted of eighty acres in West township and in 1884 he moved to his present homestead of one hundred and forty acres, the most pf which he has cleared, and he has placed many improvements on the land. In West Township, in 1879, Mr. Kyser married Caroline Morlock, the daughter of G. A. and Elizabeth Morlock, prominent early residents of Marshall County. Three children, two sons and a daughter, were born to Mr. and Mrs. Kyser in West township Franklin A., Ora E. and Estella E, Mr. Kyser has given a life-long support to the principles of the Democratic party, taking an active part in the work of its local ranks, and he is a member of the German Baptist church.

WILLIAM HILDEBRAND, D. V. S. To Dr. William Hildebrand belongs the distinction of being the oldest practicing veterinary surgeon in Marshall County, his identification with the profession here covering a period of over thirty years. In that time he has established a large and lucrative practice, extending to Laporte, Starke, St. Joseph and Marshall Counties, and enjoys the most extensive practice of any veterinary surgeon in northern Indiana. He is often called to large cities in consultation, and is widely and most favorably known throughout this section of the state.

Dr. Hildebrand is of German descent, his ancestors having been residents of Pennsylvania, whence they removed to Ohio, and various members of the family, in after years, made their way from the Buckeye state to Indiana. The Doctor is the twelfth of the thirteen children born to his parents, Jacob and Hannah Hildebrand. Two of the number died in infancy, and four daughters and two sons are still living. All of the children were born in Stark County, Ohio. The paternal grandparents of Dr. Hildebrand were Henry and Mary Hildebrand, while the grandparents on his mother's side were Jacob and Barbara Shively. His father, Jacob Hildebrand, was born August 29, 1796, and died of paralysis August 26, 1880; the mother, formerly Hannah Shively, was born March 6, 1803, and also died of paralysis, September 12,1885, having been speechless for the seven years prior to her decease.

 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Hildebrand are as follows: Joseph, born February 15, 1825, who married Rebecca Orendorf and died July 12, 1899; Eliza, who was born August 28, 1826, and died in March, 1829; Samuel, who was born October 11, 1828, married Christenia Ullery and died in 1898; Jonas, born May 24, 1830, who married Hannah Klingeman and died April 1, 1905; Rebecca, who was born August 14, 1831, and became the wife of Abraham Stump; Sophia, who was born April 11, 1833, and is now Mrs. John Stump; Anna, born June 13, 1835, who died in infancy, March 14, 1838; Hannah, who was born June 13, 1837, and married Calvin Bates; Barbara, born October 19, 1838, who was united in marriage with Jesse Thomas and died ,

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                         533

 

October 24, 1904; Lydia, born July 24, 1840, who never married and died of consumption February 10, 1867; Jacob, born November 25, 1842, who at the age of eighteen was elected to the ministry of the Brethren church, married Mary Ullery May 2, 1872, later moved to Polk township, Marshall county, w here he was elected presiding elder of Pine Creek church, and who is still a faithful member of his faith; William, of this sketch; and Sarah, who was born June 11, 1845.

 

William Hildebrand, the youngest son of this family, was born in Stark County, Ohio, on the 16th of June 1843. When ten years of age he came with the family to St. Joseph County, Indiana, and there reached maturity. In 1869 he removed to Polk Township, Marshall County, locating two miles and a half west of La Paz, and here, for thirty years he followed his profession as a veterinary surgeon. Since 1906 he has resided in La Paz.

 

On the 10th of October 1867, Dr. Hildebrand married Maria McComb, who was born near South Bend, St. Joseph County, Indiana, on the 17th of December 1844, and her death occurred at her home near Teegarden, January 13, 1903. The deceased had been a faithful member of the Brethren church for thirty-eight years, and her life furnished a beautiful example of Christian love and patience. The three children by this marriage are: Cyrus D., engaged in business in partnership with his brother, at Teegarden; who wedded Clara E. Ritzman, January 31, 1900; Ida May, who married Ira Clark, and they reside half a mile north of La Paz; and John W., who is in the implement business at La Paz; also owner and manager of La Paz Telephone Company. Both the sons are teachers by profession and were born in Marshall County.

 

After the death of his first wife Dr. Hildebrand married Rachel Seward, of Mishawaka, Indiana. The ancestors of the Doctor have long been communicants of the Brethren church, and he himself has been a member of the denomination since his sixteenth year, having for years been prominent in its religious and charitable work;

 

MRS. MARIA (McCOMB) HILEBRAND was descended on her mother's side from Mr. Daniel Cripe and Barbara (Reprogle) Cripe, and Peter Roof and Margaret (Reprogle) Roof, the above being the great-grand-parents of the subject of this sketch. Peter Roof, of Revolutionary fame, was born January, 1753; died in South Bend, Indiana, October 25, 1834. Margaret Reprogle Roof was born May 1751; died in South Bend, October 10, 1836. Daniel Cripe and his wife, Barbara, are buried in Dayton, Ohio. John Cripe, grandfather of Mrs. Hildebrand, son of Daniel and Barbara (Reprogle) Cripe, was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, August 5, 1788; died near South Bend, Indiana, February 25, 1847. December 26, 1813 he was married to Eva Roof, daughter of Peter and Margaret Roof, who was born in June, 1790, and died December 12, 1863, They lived for a while in Dayton, Ohio, and in 1830 brought their family to St. Joseph county, Indiana, and settled a short distance north of what is now South Bend. The children of John and Eva Cripe, who lived to maturity, were christened as follows: Eva, Daniel, Margaret, Mary, John, Peter, David, Jacob and Fannie.

 

Eva Cripe was the mother of our subject.

 


534                                                      HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

Margaret Roof, the great-grandmother, was stolen by the Indians when a girl fifteen years old. She and a brother were going in the evening to meet their mother, who was coming home from one of the neighbors. While going through a wooded section the Indians sprang from behind trees and caught the girl. The brother escaped. She was with the Indians seven years. They sold her to some French traders and they in turn sold her to some English merchantmen of the lakes, who set her free at Detroit, Michigan, which was then but a fort. She, together with a woman who was given her freedom at the same time, walked back to their homes in Pennsylvania. Peter Roof, her husband, was also held captive by the Indians two years during his boyhood. She often told of a feast day while with the Indians. After being without food for several days, the Indians held council about taking her life. It was agreed that they would journey the next day in quest of food and if they found nothing they would take her life. Near evening the next day they found a horse that had died on the highway. Here they feasted. In a short time, following the advice of the Indian who had been the means of saving her life, she was sold to the French.

 

On her father's side she descended from William and (Riley) McComb. Lambert McComb, the paternal grandfather, descended from this union and was born in Maryland about 1787. He died in Napa, California, June 1850. Lambert McComb, of Scotch-Irish parentage, married Hannah Hague in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, in January 1812. She was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, December 23, 1787, on the banks of the Brandywine, where the battle of Brandywine was fought ten years previous, and died in Napa, California, January 20, 1887. She was the daughter of Hague and Ruth (Mendenhall) Hague, English Quakers, descendants of William Penn's colonists. After they were married they went to Steubenville, Ohio. In 1815 they moved to Holmes County, where William McComb, the father of our subject, was born. Later they moved to Crawford County, thence in 1829 they came to Indiana and settled in St. Joseph County, near what is known as Old Portage, on July 5 of that year. They brought with them thirty-six cows, eighteen sheep and eighteen hogs. In the fall of 1847 they sold their properties in Indiana and started for the Pacific Coast. A letter was published in one of the Niles papers that set forth the beauties and climate of Napa Valley, California. After visiting some of their old neighbors on their way west they found themselves in Independence, Missouri, laying in a supply of provisions for the overland journey to the Pacific. While here they met Colonel James Clyman, the author of the letter, which set forth the attractions of California. He piloted the party in exchange for his food. They landed in Napa Valley on the 12th of September 1848. The children of Lambert and Hannah Hague McComb were christened as follows: Araminta, Martha, William, Isaac, Hanah, Jacob, Rebecca, Benjamin and Joseph. William McComb, father of Mrs. Hildebrand, was born in Holmes County, Ohio, January 31, 1818, and came to Indiana with his parents. He died near South Bend, Indiana, December 8, 1885.

 

Eva (Cripe) McComb, daughter of John and Eva (Roof) Cripe, was born in Dayton, Ohio, March 2, 1816; came to Indiana with her

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                                      535

 

Parents in 1830, married William McComb September 12, 1839, and died April 7, 1897, leaving nine children, among them Maria (McComb) Hildebrand, who was born December 17, 1844, married William Hildebrand October 19, 1867, and died January 13, 1903.

 

The children of William and Eva (Cripe) McComb were as follows: Elizabeth, born June 29, 1840; John, born October 5, 1841, died May 25, 1901; Lambert, born April 25, 1843; Maria, born December 17, 1844, died January 13, 1903; Samuel J., born February 2, 1848; Eva E., born August 25, 1855; Hannah L., born May 25, 1857; Sarah A., born April 20, 1859; William F., born October 8, 1891.

 

OLIVER CLINE is well known as an agriculturist of German Township and also as an office holder, filling the position of assessor at the present time. He is, moreover, a representative of one of the old families of the county, for his birth occurred August 18, 1861, on the farm, which is still his place of residence. His father, John Cline, came to Marshall County at a very early day and aided in the development and improvement of this portion of the state. For a long period he was associated with its agricultural interests but is now living retired, making his home in Bremen. He was born in Pennsylvania, May 26, 1826, and was only about two years of age when he left the state of his nativity and went with his parents to Ohio, where he was reared. It was probably the year 1845 that witnessed his arrival in Marshall County, wither he came with his father, Daniel Cline, and his family. Daniel Cline first purchased a tract of land in St. Joseph County and cleared and improved the same. Having arrived at years of maturity, John Cline was married in Marshall County to Miss Katherine Ringle, who was born in Ohio. Following their marriage Mr. Cline purchased the farm upon which his son Oliver now lives, having here one hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land. A part of this he cleared of the virgin forest and converted the tract into productive fields. This farm was formerly the property of his wife’s father, John Ringle, who was one of the early pioneers of German Township and entered the land from the government. Not a furrow had been turned or an improvement made upon the place when it came into his possession, but with characteristic energy he began to cut away the trees and place the land under the plow. As stated, it was upon this farm that Mr. and Mrs. Cline began their domestic life. As the years passed seven children were added to the family circle, but four of the number are now deceased, one having died in infancy. The father has been a life-long Republican and is a stalwart champion of the principles of the party. His religious faith is that the United Brethren Church.

 

Oliver Cline, who was the fourth in order of birth in his father’s family, was early trained to habits of industry and enterprise. He was reared upon the home farm and was educated in the schools of German Township. He was married February 16, 1888, to Miss Sarah Reed, a native of Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Edward Reed, who was a blacksmith by trade and was of German descent. In their family are three children, one son and two daughters: Oscar R., Lulu V., and Valara V.

 

The home farm is a valuable tract of land one hundred and ninety-seven acres, of which one hundred and thirty-seven acres is under cultivation

 

536                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

and well improved with modern equipments and conveniences. Most of the improvements were made here by Mr. Cline and his father and the, neat and thrifty appearance of the place today indicates his careful supervision and practical methods. Moreover he is recognized as a citizen of worth and value, who has done effective and far-reaching service for his fellow townsmen as road supervisor for nine years, while in 1904 he was elected assessor and is still filling the position. His political allegiance is given the Democratic Party and he is a member of the United Brethren church. His entire life record is one, which reflects credit upon the history of a worthy pioneer family and wherever Oliver Cline is known he is held in high esteem.

 

COLEMAN E. WATKINS derives his income from farming and stockraising interests. He makes his home in Polk Township, where he owns eighty acres of the old family homestead and another tract of eighty acres. Here he is making a specialty of the raising of Holstein cattle and Poland China hogs and his success as a live stock dealer has made him well known.

 

Mr. Watkins is one of the native sons of Polk Township, his birth having occurred on his grandfather’s farm on The 25th of May 1873. He is a son of Jackson Watkins, now a retired farmer, who was formerly identified with agricultural interests in this county, but is now enjoying well earned rest at Oroville, California. He was born in Logan County, Ohio, in March 1847, and was a son of Christopher Watkins, a native of Ohio, who became a pioneer farmer of Polk Township. Coming to Marshall county at an early day he cast in his lot with the early settlers and aided in reclaiming the district for the uses of the white race, meeting all the hardships and privations of frontier life but courageously carrying on the task of clearing the land and converting it into uses of civilization. He was married in this county to Miss Margaret Kuhn, and they were the parents of five children, of whom two are now deceased.

 

Jackson Watkins was but three years of age when he was brought by his parents to Indiana, the family taking up their abode upon the farm, which is still his home. The grandfather there purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in the midst of the forest, built a log house and with the aid of his sons cleared away most of the timber. He was a Democrat in his political views and staunchly advocated the measures for the early development and improvement of this part of the state. While spending his boyhood days under the parental roof Jackson Watkins mastered the branches of learning taught in the district School of Polk Township. The little schoolhouse was built of logs and the methods of instruction were somewhat primitive. He made the best possible use of his opportunities. Having arrived at years of maturity he was married in North township to Miss Minerva Young, who was reared in that township, where her father, Philo Young, settled at a very early day in the development of this part of the state. He bought and shipped stock to the Buffalo and Chicago markets. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Jackson Watkins have been born five children, of whom Coleman E. is the eldest. One of the number died in infancy and Christopher P. and Louisa Bell are also deceased. A daughter, Maggie May, twin sister of Christopher, is still living. In his

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     537

 

political views Mr. Watkins has always been a Democrat. He continued a resident of this county for many years and contributed in substantial measure to its agricultural development but is now living retired in sunny California in the enjoyment of a well-earned rest.

 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life for Coleman E. Watkins in the days of his boyhood and youth. He attended the schools near his father's home and when not busy with his textbooks aided in the work of the fields. On the 3d of April 1895, he secured a companion and helpmate for life's journey through his marriage to Miss Maggie I. Hanson, a native of Polk Township and a daughter of Andrew Hanson, who was born in Denmark. Having come to America, he followed farming in Polk Township and also engaged in merchandising in Teegarden. Mrs. Watkins, however, was reared in Polk township and by her marriage has become the mother of four sons and two daughters, namely: Lyman Hale, Edith Louise, Edna May, Russel Guy, Claude Eugene, and Earl. All were born on the old family homestead.

 

Mr. Watkins now owns and cultivates eighty acres of the old homestead and in addition has another tract of eighty acres. He makes a specialty of raising Holstein cattle, Poland China hogs and mammoth bronze turkeys. He sells his stock all over the county and has built up an extensive and profitable business as a live stock dealer. In his business methods he is systematic and his careful supervision is indicated in the fine appearance of his farm. In politics he is a Democrat, interested and active in the work of the party, and fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias and with the Grange. His entire life has been spent in this county and he represents one of its oldest and most honored pioneer families, for the name of Watkins has been associated with the history of this part of the state for more than a half century. The work begun by his grandfather and carried on by his father is now being continued by Coleman E. Watkins, a worthy and much respected representative of the agricultural interests.

 

CHRISTIAN RHOADE, a farmer and stock raiser of German Township, was born April 16, 1861, in this part of Marshall county. From an early period in the development of this portion of the state the Rhoade family has here been represented. The paternal grandfather was one of the first of the pioneers of German township. He came from Germany, his native country, in the early '30s and settled in that section of Marshall County, which in honor of the fatherland had been called German Township. That the conditions that here existed were those of the frontier is indicated by the fact that much of the land was still in possession of the government and the grandfather entered a claim to eighty acres, which he afterward cleared and cultivated. He built a log cabin and thus established his home in the midst of the forest, while year after year he performed the work of clearing away the timber and bringing the land under a high state of cultivation.

 

George Rhoade, father of Christian Rhoade, is now a retired farmer of Bremen, but for many years was closely associated with agricultural interests in this part of the state. He was born in Germany in 1831 and

 

 


538                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

there spent the first six years of his life, after which he came with his parents to the new world and through the period of his boyhood and youth shared with the family in all of the hardships and privations incident to the settlement of the frontier. His education was acquired, in one of the old-time log schoolhouses of German township but his opportunities in that direction was somewhat limited, owing to the condition of the schools in this new community and also owing to the fact that his labors were needed upon the home farm. Having reached adult age, he was married in this neighborhood to Miss Katherine Swersberger, a native of Germany, who was reared in Madison Township, St. Joseph County, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. George Rhoade became the parents of twelve children, six sons and six daughters, of whom Christian was the sixth in order of birth. All were born in German township and were educated in the public schools near their father's home. In his farming operations George Rhoade prospered and as his financial resources increased he added to his original claim until he owned one hundred and sixty acres of rich and valuable land. Of this he cleared about one hundred and twenty acres, bringing his farm under a high state of cultivation, while his thrift and determination were manifest in the fine appearance of the fields. As the years went by he attained a gratifying measure of prosperity that now enables him to live retired. Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise he has been a stalwart champion of Republican principles and active in support of the party. Like many citizens of his nationality, he belongs to the Evangelical church.

 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life for Christian Rhoade in his boyhood and youth. While attending the public schools, through the periods of vacation he worked in the fields and his practical training developed his latent powers and proved an excellent preparation for the farm work, which he is now carrying on. He was married in 1886 to Miss Ellen Feckler, who was born in Madison Township, St. Joseph County, Indiana, and was there reared, her people being early settlers of that locality. Following their marriage Mr. Rhoade lived upon a farm in St. Joseph County, where he successfully conducted a sawmill until 1892, when he removed to his present place of residence, having eighty acres of land in German township. He cleared about thirty acres of this and has made all of the improvements upon the Property, so that its excellent appearance is attributable entirely to his own labors. His life record proves that success is not a matter of genius but is the outcome of clear judgment, experience and unwearied industry.

 

Mr. Rhoade is a believer in Republican principles but is not so bound by party ties that he feels he must always vote for the party candidates. On the contrary, he considers the capability of the men who are named for office and casts his ballot accordingly. His fraternal relations are with the Knights of the Maccabees. Welt known in Marshall and St. Joseph counties, he has an extensive circle of friends and his many good qualities insures their warm regard.

 

JOHN R. DIETRICH, a member of the firm of John R. Dietrich & Company, merchants, bankers and grain dealers of Bremen, was born in Switzerland, September 20, 1848, the eldest son of John and Elizabeth

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                         539

 

(Feitz) Dietrich, both of whom also had their nativity in that country, where they were reared and married. In 1852 they made the voyage to the United States and came direct to Marshall County, Indiana, establishing their home one-mile west of Bremen. There the husband and father continued his agricultural labors until in 1855 when he opened a small furniture store in Bremen, thus being numbered among the city's earliest merchants. He continued actively identified with its business interests during a period of fifteen years, his trade gradually enlarging and expanding during that period, and at its close, in 1876, he transferred the business to his sons, John, Christian and Peter E., his death occurring a number of years later, in 1889. The wife and mother survived until 1894.

 

Their son, John R. Dietrich, was but a lad of three and a half years when he became a resident of Bremen, receiving his education in its public schools and also in the Bryant and Stratton Business College of Chicago. In 1872 he became interested in the business which his father had established in the pioneer days of this city, and in 1876 his brothers, Christian and Peter, were admitted to a partnership therein, but in 1904 Peter withdrew to become a banker and the firm is now known as John R. Dietrich & Company. Mr. Dietrich of this review also owns eight hundred and eighty acres of land in Marshall and St. Joseph counties.

 

On the 13th of November 1872, he was united in marriage with Anna Neff, a daughter of Jonas Neff, and their four children are Urban J., Lloyd, Harold and Pearl. The eldest son, Urban. Dietrich is in business with his father, and the daughter is the wife of Martin Horine, who is also connected with the firm of John R. Dietrich & Company, a resident of Bremen. Mr. Dietrich casts his ballot in favor of the men and measures of the Democratic party, and for nine years served his city as a member of its school board and for three years as a member of the city council. His residence in Marshall county covers the long period of fifty-three years, years largely devoted to its best interests and upbuilding, and he now has the honor of residing within its borders during a longer continuous period than any other resident.

 

J, 0. FERRIER. The name of J. 0. Ferrier is well known to residents of Marshall County, as the senior member of the firm of J. 0. Ferrier & Sons, dealers in lumber, lath, shingles, sash, doors and blinds, cement blocks, cement, builders' hardware, drain tile and sewer pipe. Further, he is highly honored for his strong moral and religious convictions, which he earnestly inculcates and thereby acts as a constant and uplifting force in his residence, community. Mr. Ferrier was born in Carroll County, Indiana, on the 18th of August 1858, and is a son of George E, and Rebecca (Bennett) Ferrier, the father a native of the same county, and the mother, of Hancock County, Indiana. The father lived to the age of sixty-seven years, and the mother died at thirty-five. They were the parents of three sons, of whom J. 0. Ferrier is the eldest. George E. Ferrier married a second time, and two sons and one daughter were born to this union.

 

J. 0. Ferrier was reared in Carroll county, Indiana, and received his early education in the public schools of that section, later going to the

 


540                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

high school at Battle Ground, that state, and completing his studies at Valparaiso. For about five years he was a merchant of Flora, Indiana, and thereafter, until the age of forty he was engaged in farming. In November 1898, he established a lumber business at Culver, and after a few years associated himself with his son, Clark I., in the formation of the present firm. In addition to carrying a large and complete stock of goods at Culver, the house has a branch at Lakeville, Indiana, where is located a large storage yard. The elder Ferrier is also the proprietor of a town addition consisting of eighty-nine lots, which is known by his name and is being quite rapidly settled. It has been accepted by the town board, is nicely laid out, and lots are readily selling at from $100 to $300. Although a Republican in general politics, Mr. Ferrier is a strong anti-saloon man, believing that in local affairs the temperance question should be paramount. He was at one time a member of the town board, but after serving one term refused firmly thereafter to accept a renomination. Rather he prefers to devote himself to the upbuilding of his church interests, and the advocacy of temperance. He has long been a member of the Christian church, in which he is now an elder. He belongs to no secret societies, but has a wide acquaintance and is universally respected for his earnest and unflinching morality.

 

On January 27, 1885, Mr. Ferrier was united in marriage with Miss Rosa I. Gwinn, daughter of Clark C. and Martha (Runyon) Gwinn. Two sons have been born to this union, one of whom, as stated, is associated with his father in business; the other died in infancy.

 

HENRY SCHLOSSER. In connection with industrial interests the reputation of Henry Schlosser is not limited by the confines of Bremen or Marshall county, his name being well known in this connection in many towns of Indiana and as far as South Chicago, where he has offices and sales rooms at 9140 Erie avenue. The firm of Schlosser Brothers, consisting of Henry, Jacob, Gustave and Samuel Schlosser, transact the largest creamery business of any firm in the entire state of Indiana. They became associated with this enterprise in August 1884, establishing a creamery and wholesale produce business on a corner of the old homestead farm in German Township, and with the passing years their trade has grown to extensive proportions, they now having creameries at Bremen and Plymouth. The firm also owns a farm of five hundred and thirty acres in Kankakee County, Illinois, and in Chicago they own their own wholesale houses. In tracing the careers of those who have achieved success in the business world and at the same time stand high in the public esteem it is found in almost every case they are those who have risen by their own efforts, their diligence and perseverance. These qualities are possessed in a large measure by Henry Schlosser, who by reason of his marked ability is numbered among. the leading businessmen of Marshall County.

 

He was born on the farm on which he now resides March 28, 1863, a son of Jacob and Eva Margaret (Karrer) Schlosser, both of whom were born in Germany. They were married in New York city and came direct to Marshall County, Indiana, this being about 1855, and locating on .a farm in section 2, German township, they spent the remainder of their

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                                      541

 

lives here, the mother dying in 1892 and the father in 1906. They be- came the parents of eight sons and one daughter, all of whom grew to man and womanhood, and all are yet living with the exception of one son and all are residents of Marshall county with the exception of two, who reside in South Chicago.

 

Henry Schlosser, their fourth child and fourth son, was reared on the old homestead farm in German township, where he was born, attending the district schools of the neighborhood until his fifteenth year, and he remained at home until reaching the age of maturity, assisting on the farm and also working at the carpenter's trade for some time, his father taking care of his earnings. In August, 1884, in company with his brother Philip, he engaged in the creamery and wholesale produce business, and their name is now prominently associated with the enterprise throughout northern Indiana. In company with his brother William, Mr. Schlosser also owns a farm of one hundred and twenty acres. He is a Republican in his political affiliations, and in German township, which has a Democratic majority; he was elected to the office of trustee and is the present incumbent of the position.

 

Mr. Schlosser was first married to Mary A. Dugan, of Eldon, Missouri, who died a short time afterward, and in 1893 he wedded Mrs. Emma Martin, of North township, Marshall county, Indiana, and they have two daughters, Lottie D. Martin and Lula E. Schlosser, the elder daughter of Mrs. Schlosser by her former marriage. Mr. Schlosser is a member of the Evangelical Association, and has served his church in the capacity of a steward.

 

LEWIS L. LEMERT is prominently identified with the business interests of Teegarden, Indiana, where he owns an interest in a large grain elevator, was also the proprietor of a brick yard for fifteen years, and he has a partnership interest in the Walkerton Telephone Company. He has also built several homes in and around Teegarden, and in 1888; he purchased of Thomas Blake a general store here and continued as its proprietor for nine years.

 

Mr. Lemert was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, April 3, 1840, and there his father, William Lemert, was engaged in agricultural pursuits, his home being on a stream called Waughtomo. But he was a native son of Virginia, from whence he removed to Ohio, and was there married to one of Pennsylvania's native daughters, Nancy Cessna. She was reared in both states, and by her marriage to Mr. Lemert she became the mother of nine children, one of whom died in infancy, and Lewis L. was the youngest son in order of birth. Mr. Lemert, Sr., was a life-long Democrat, a member of the New Light church, and his death occurred in Ohio when he had reached the age of seventy-six years.

 

When Lewis L. Lemert was twenty-one years of age the Civil war was inaugurated, and in his native commonwealth of Ohio, where he had also attained to years of maturity and received his education, he enlisted in 1861 in Company D, Sixteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he served for sixteen months, and in that time participated in the battle of Tazewell, Tennessee, and in many skirmishes. After his return from the army he went to California and worked for two and a half years in

 

542                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

quartz mills, returning thence to the east and to Marshall County, Indiana in the fall of 1865. From that time forward Mr. Lemert has been prominently identified with its business interests, promoting the material welfare of his community and giving an active and liberal support to all measures, which tend to its advancement. He first purchased eighty acres of land in Polk Township, on which he erected a little log cabin home and began the arduous task of clearing and improving his land, while at the same time he added to his original purchase until he became the owner of one hundred and twenty acres. Selling this farm, he purchased another in Polk Township of sixty acres. This he also improved and placed under an excellent state of cultivation, and in 1888, as above stated, he moved to Teegarden and has since been prominently identified with its varied interests.

 

The marriage of Mr. Lemert was celebrated in Marshall County in 1868, Matilda McVicker becoming his wife. She was born in Kosciusko County, Indiana, and resided there until her eighteenth year, when she came with her mother to Marshall County and Mrs. McVicker purchased eighty acres of land in Polk Township. In political matters Mr. Lemert upholds the principles of the Democratic Party, and he is a member of the Adventist church.

 

HARRY L. UNGER, a prominent attorney and a justice of the peace in Plymouth, was born in Etna Green, Kosciusko County, Indiana, October 17, 1878, a son of Sylvanus S. and Frances M. Unger. The father was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, and after coming to Marshall county he became identified with the saw milling interests of Tippecanoe township, but he is now living retired in South Bend. He has been twice married, first to Mary Stauffer, by whom he had two children, Mary and Francis. Two children have also been born of his second marriage, Harry L., the subject of this review, and Dottie, the wife of Jesse A. Zehner, of Plymouth. Mrs. Unger was born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, but was reared in Indiana, and she is now the proprietor of a millinery store in South Bend.

 

When Harry L. Unger was about eight years of age he was brought by his parents to Marshall county, Indiana, the family home having been established on a farm seven miles west of Plymouth, where the young lad attended the district schools and later the graded schools of Donaldson. He was also a student in the Valparaiso University, where he pursued the teachers and commercial courses, and thereafter taught for five years in West township, Marshall county, and one year: in Kosciusko county, Indiana. Deciding to ally his interests with the legal profession he began the study of law in the office of Jacob 0. Kantz in Nappanee, and later became a student in the Indiana law school of the University of Indianapolis, where he completed his studies and was admitted to practice in the supreme and appellate courts of the state of Indiana and also in the United States district court of the state. His practice was first in partnership with Jacob 0. Kantz, his old preceptor, in Nappanee, with whom he remained for one year and then came to Plymouth in 1905. In the meantime, however, he had traveled over the west in search of a location, and deciding upon Plymouth as the scene of his future operations he

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     543

 

opened a law office here and has since been numbered among the city’s leading law practitioners. He is a stanch Democrat in his political affiliations, and is now its representative ill the office of Justice of the peace.

 

In 1903 Mr. Unger was united in marriage to Zorah A. Rosenberger, a daughter of William Rosenberger. They are the parents of one son, Harry L., Jr., born July 21, 1907. Mr. Unger has membership relations with the Knights of Pythias order in Nappanee, Lodge No. 287, and he also assisted in organizing and is now a member of the Court of Honor in Donaldson.

 

E. E. PARKER, M. D. A life-long resident of Marshall county and widely known as a successful practitioner of medicine even beyond its limits, Dr. E, E. Parker is a native of Maxinkuckee, Indiana, born on the 18th of December, 1879. He has amply fulfilled the destiny of the substantial American citizen, which to make an honorable name for himself by long years of faithful industry and straightforward work among the associates who know him best. It is the conclusive test of a stalwart character. To this faithfulness and industry, Dr. Parker has added natural aptitude and thorough professional training, so that his success and high standing seemed predestined. His father, Eli Parker, settled in Marshall County about 1860, opened a general store at Maxinkuckee, and largely invested his profits in land, so that his death at the age of sixty-five removed from the community a substantial, as well as a highly honored citizen. By his marriage to a Miss Spangler he became the father of three sons and three daughters, all of whom are living at the present time. Of this family, Dr. Parker is the fifth child and the third son.

 

Dr. Parker was reared in Marshall County, attended the common schools of his native town, and completed his literary training at Butler University. In 1895 he was matriculated at the Indiana Medical College, from which he graduated in 1898, locating for his initial practice at Flora, Indiana. There he continued for two years, when he removed to Culver, since which time he has actively progressed in professional reputation and business. His wife was formerly Miss Dora Moss, daughter of William and Josephine Moss, and to their union have been born two daughters, Kathryn and Josephine. To his professional work have therefore been added the good American traits of domesticity and tender fatherhood. Besides his membership in the Marshall County Medical Society and the Indiana State Medical Association, Dr. Parker enjoys a fraternal identification with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and other societies. Socially, domestically and professionally, he is a strong and constant force in the advancement and uplifting of his home community.

 

JACOB J. CROMLEY. The business interests of Marshall County number among its representatives the Burr Oak merchant, Jacob J. Cromley, who was born in Ohio November 17, 1849. His father, Joel Cromley, a deceased farmer of Union township, was born in the east, in Union county, Pennsylvania, and was reared and married there, Amelia Sampsel becoming his wife, who bore him five children - John F., Jacob J., Sarah, Marion Miles (deceased) and Merrit. The two youngest were

 


544                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

born in Union township, Marshall County, Indiana, and all were reared there. It was about 1847 that Joel Cromley came with his wife and children to Marshall County, purchasing eighty acres of land in Union township and also entering a tract of forty acres. He gradually cleared and improved his land, and on this homestead he spent the remainder of his life and died at the advanced age of eighty-two years. He was a life-long Democrat and a member of the United Brethren church.

 

The public schools of Union township gave to Jacob J. Cromley his early educational training, and in his boyhood days he assisted his father to clear and improve his land. But in 1885 he left the farm to become a merchant, erecting his present store building in Burr Oak. During twelve years he served his township as a trustee, and he is an active worker in the ranks of the Democratic Party, while socially he has membership relations with the Masonic fraternity.

The marriage of Mr. Cromley was celebrated in 1882, Mary, a daughter of John and Nancy Loring of Plymouth, becoming his wife. Mrs. Cromley was born in Grant County, Indiana. Two sons were born of this union, Carl and Donald, but Carl is now deceased, and both were born in Burr Oak.

 

H. M. GARVER. Bremen's popular and well-known liveryman, H. M. Garver, is a representative of a prominent old German family. His grandfather, Frederick Garver, came from the fatherland to America with his father and established his home in Maryland from whence he removed to Ohio, and agriculture was his life occupation. His son, John S. Garver, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, but during his early life he left his native commonwealth for Cass county, Michigan, where he was numbered among the early and honored pioneers. From Cass County he removed to Elkhart County, Indiana, and there married. His death occurred in Marshall County, Indiana, in his eighty-eighth year, he having established his home here in 1855. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Stutzman, was called to the home beyond in her seventy-seventh year. She was born in Medina County, Ohio, and was a daughter of Stephen Stutzman, whose native state was Pennsylvania. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Garver were born twelve children, eleven of whom attained to years of maturity. 

 

H. M. Garver, the third child and second son in order of birth, was born in Elkhart county, Indiana, September 11,1840, there residing until fifteen years of age, when he came to Marshall county and completed his educational training in its public schools. He remained at home until twenty-three years of age, assisting in the work of the farm. He was then numbered among the agriculturists of Union township, Marshall County, until 1876, when he sold his farm there and spent the following year in Plymouth. In 1878 he came to Bremen and entered the livery business, but after one year as a liveryman he transferred his activities to the hotel business, and for twenty-six years he continued as the proprietor of one of Bremen's most popular and best-patronized hostelries, the Garver hotel. But at he close of that period in 1903 he sold his house and after one year of rest from a business life he again entered the livery trade in Bremen, and since 1904 has conducted his popular and well

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                                      545

 

known livery. During the long period of fifty-two years he has been identified with the business interests of this city, and his name has become inseparably associated with its industrial interests.

 

In 1860 Mr. Garver was united in marriage to Caroline Thomas a daughter of Martin Thomas, of Plymouth, but after a happy married life of sixteen years the wife was called to the home beyond. She became the mother of the following children: Melvin, deceased; Elizabeth, the wife of Clayton Huff, of Bremen; John E., of Bozeman, Montana; and Nettie, the wife of Arthur Genevacoe, of Chicago. Mr. Garver married for his second wife Nellie Bowman, who died in 1903, and there were no children by the second marriage. Mr. Carver is prominent in the local lodge of the Masonic fraternity, affiliating with the blue lodge of Bremen, and he is an active worker in the ranks of the Democratic Party.

 

DR. G. F. HITCHCOCK, practicing dentist at Plymouth, Indiana, was born November 6, 1878, and is a native of Ashtabula county, Ohio. His parents, H. F., and Margaret (Newson) Hitchcock, were pioneers in Ashtabula county, where they are both residing at the present time. Their family comprised three daughters and one son, the subject of this sketch being the only son.

 

Dr. Hitchcock received his education in the local grammar schools and in the high school at Jefferson, Ohio. In 1901 he received his diploma from the dental department of the Western Reserve University, in Cleveland, and the year immediately following moved to Plymouth, Indiana.

 

In 1904 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Kendall, a daughter of William and Harriet Kendall, who are old settlers in the town of Plymouth.

 

Dr. Hitchcock is a member of the Indiana State Dental Society, and of the Delta Sigma Delta Fraternity. He is a Blue Lodge Mason, and a member of the St. Thomas Episcopal Church at Plymouth. He enjoys a rapidly increasing practice in dentistry, and is well known throughout Plymouth and vicinity.

 

JONAS HAAG, a retired farmer, who in former years was closely associated with agricultural interests but is now making his home in Tyner, where he is successfully conducting a hotel, was born in Stark County, Ohio, July 2, 1845. His father, Jacob F. Haag, now deceased, was an agriculturist of Ohio. He was born, reared and married. However, in Germany, and his wife bore the maiden name of Barbara Zeigler, also a native of the fatherland. They became the parents of twelve children, eight sons and four daughters of whom one was born ere their emigration to the new world. The father died in June 1856, having for about three years survived his wife, who died in May 1853.

 

Jonas Haag was the sixth son and the eighth child in his father's family. He was reared in the usual manner of farm lads, early taking his place in the fields and assisting in the labors of the farm until after the outbreak of the Civil war. He was but seventeen years of age when on the 3rd of August 1862, he enlisted as a member of Company B, One Hundred and Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, continuing with that regiment until mustered out at the close of the war. With his command he went

 


546                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

to the front and saw active duty upon the battlefields of the south, also participating in the long, hard marches and the monotonous waits that came in the winter season. He was on active duty in the battles of Cov- ington, Kentucky; Knoxville, Tennessee; Buzzards' Roost, Dallas, Resaca, Atlanta, Lovejoy Station, Columbia, Franklin, Nashville, the battle of Fort Anderson and of Old Town Creek. He participated in the entire Georgia Campaign, was with Sherman on the march from Atlanta and was also at Wilmington. When the war was over he was mustered out at Cleveland, Ohio, in J line, 1865, and returned with a most creditable military record.

 

When the country no longer needed his aid Mr. Haag went to Stark County, Ohio, where he resided until 1874. Not long after his return home on the 23d of November, 1865 he was united in marriage to Miss Susan E. Scheafer, who was born in Ohio and was there reared. Her parents were of Pennsylvania Dutch descent. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Haag have been born four children: Nettie I., Cordie A., Clara E. and Ira E., but the youngest daughter is now deceased.

Mr. Haag and his family continued to make their home in the Buckeye state until November, 1874, when they removed to Marshall county, Indiana, settling in Polk township, near Tyner. There he cultivated a rented farm for some time and in 1881 took charge of the county farm, of which he was in control for four years. Carefully saving his earnings, he then purchased a farm in Polk township of fifty-one acres and improved most of that tract, continuing its cultivation and development until 1901, when he sold the property and removed to Tyner, where he has since opened the hotel that he now conducts. He also carries on a livery and feed stable and both branches of his business are proving profitable. He keeps a well-appointed hostelry and is a popular, host, doing everything in his power for the comfort and convenience of his guests.

 

In his political views Mr. Haag is an earnest Republican, thoroughly in sympathy with the party and its principles, but at local elections where no issue is involved he casts an independent ballot, regarding only the capability of the candidates. Fraternally he is connected with the Grand Army of the Republic, and religiously with the United Brethren church. He takes much interest in his association with his old army comrades and in recalling the scenes of tented fields at their campfires, and he is today as loyal and devoted to his country as when he followed the old flag upon southern battlefields.

 

WILLIAM H. TROUP, a farmer and stock-raised of German township, is well known as a leading citizen of Marshall county, and is now filling the office of county commissioner, He was born in Elkhart county, Indiana, October 6, 1862. His father, John B. Troup, was an early farmer of that County and was a carpenter by trade. His birth occurred in Canada, where he was reared and educated and in that land he married Miss Elizabeth Sherk, also a native of Canada. On coming to Indiana, John B. Troup settled in Elkhart county when it was still a pioneer district and there in the midst of the forest he cleared and developed a farm, aiding in the reclamation of the wild land for the uses of the white race.

 


547                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

He spent the last three years of his life in Marshall County. In his family were nine children, five Sons and four daughters.

 

William H. Troup, the youngest of his father's children, was reared and educated in Elkhart County and received thorough training in the work of the farm. Ere leaving the county of his nativity he was married in 1884 to Miss Sarah Dausman, who was born in that County and was of German lineage. They became the parents of one Son, Albert. The wife and mother died on the 17th of August 1891, and in 1893 Mr. Troup was again married, his second union being with Miss Anna Herriman, who was born in German township, Marshall County.

 

It was in the year 1890 that William H. Troup came to Marshall County and located upon the farm, which has since, been his place of residence. He bought eighty acres of land and in the midst of the green woods developed a home. Clearing away the timber, he prepared the land for the plow, enhanced its productiveness by ditching and drainage and as the years have gone by he has cultivated his fields and made all of the improvements upon his place, including the erection of the dwelling, the barns and sheds that furnish ample shelter for grain and stock. In his work he has shown remarkable skill and unfaltering industry, making a farm out of a place that had been condemned and shunned as worthless land. In addition to his home place he bought twenty acres of, land but has since sold that tract. He possesses the resolute spirit that enables him to carry forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes and he is accounted one of the leading businessmen and enterprising citizens of Marshall County.

 

Mr. Troup has followed in the political footsteps of his father and has given unfaltering support to the democracy. From early manhood he has been deeply interested in the political questions and situation of the country and is recognized as one of the local leaders in party ranks. In 1901 he was elected road supervisor and in 1904 was chosen county commissioner. He has been very active, in the party, and his service in public office has been characterized by the utmost fidelity to duty. He is a member of the German Baptist church and a man whose honesty of purpose and fidelity to principle are above question.

 

MARCUS A. JACOBY. Since a very early epoch in its history the Jacoby family have been prominently identified with the history of Marshall County, and the name is an honored one within its borders. The ancestry is traced to the Keystone state of Pennsylvania, from whence John and Elizabeth (Brown) Jacoby, both Pennsylvanians by birth, journeyed to Ohio in 1831, and lived in Marion County until 1847, when they continued their westward journey to Marshall County, Indiana, and settled in Center township. They died here some fifteen years later and were laid to rest ill what is known as the Jacoby burying ground. These brave and hardy pioneers of Marshall county reared a large family of children, named as follows: William, Daniel, John, Christian, Peter, Anna, Elizabeth and Abbie.

 

Their son, John Jacoby, was born in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, August 5, 1822, and on the 11th of April, 1850, he married Serena Ray and located on section 3, Center township, where they both spent the

 


548                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

remainder of their lives, the former dying on the 15th of March, 1904, and the latter on the 15th of August, 1905, aged seventy-five years. For many years they traveled together the pathway of life, sharing side by side the pleasures and trials, which checkered their busy and useful lives, and the two who were so closely united on this earth were not long separated by death. In their family were the following children, Eliza, now Mrs. Morrison, of Indian Territory; Adelbert; Marcus A., the subject of this review; Elizabeth, who died in infancy; Phoebe Alice, Mrs.

Rhodes; Sarah Jane, Mrs. Lee; and Morris, deceased. Mr. Jacoby followed farming as a life occupation, evolving with the passing years a fertile and well improved farm from the dense woods, owning at his death a valuable homestead of three hundred and six acres. His political support was given to the Republican Party, and both he and his wife were members of the German Reformed church. She was born in Union county, Indiana, but came, with her parents, John and Phoebe (Goble) Ray, to Marshall County in 1835.

 

Marcus A. Jacoby, a son of John and Serena (Ray) Jacoby, was born in Marshall County, Indiana, June 18, 1857, and was reared on the old homestead in Center Township. February 19 1880, he married Sarah Alice Lee and moved to his present estate of one hundred and fifty-four acres, where he is extensively engaged in farming and stock raising. They have two children, Lillie Myrtle and John C., and the daughter is now Mrs. Heim. Mr. Jacoby gives his political Support to the Republican Party, and both he and his wife are members of the German Reformed church, of which his paternal grandfather was one of the founders in Marshall County.

 

HOY L. SINGREY. The name of Hoy L. Singrey is recorded among the officials of Marshall County, which he is now representing in the office of auditor. He was born in Morrow County, Ohio, November 20, 1857, and there his father, David M. L. Singrey, also was born, and was a son of John Singrey, a native of Maryland but numbered among the early pioneers of Morrow County. His father was born in Switzerland. David M. L. Singrey married Charlotta Bonar, who was born in Ohio, as was also her father, John Bonar, and of their five children who grew to years of maturity three sons and a daughter are now living.

 

Hoy L. Singrey, the eldest child, spent the first sixteen years of his life in his native county of Morrow, moving then with the family to Noble county, Indiana, but subsequently he returned to Ohio. It was in 1883 that he again made the journey to the Hoosier state, this time establishing his home in Whitley County, later spending one year in Kosciusko county, and in 1892 he came to Marshall County and became the station agent for the Nickel Plate Railroad Company. For over twenty years he continued to discharge the duties of a station agent, and from 1892 to 1904 he was located at Argos. At the close of that period he was elected the auditor of Marshall County, entering upon the duties of the office on the 1st of January. He has also served six years as a member of the school board.

 

In 1883Mr. Singrey was united in marriage to Mary B. Brown, a daughter of William and Frances Brown, of Delaware, Ohio, and they

 


549                                                      HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

have a son and a daughter, Paul Herbert, employed in the auditor's office with his father, and Violet L., at home. Mr. Singrey is an active worker in the ranks of the Democratic Party and is a member of the Masonic order in Plymouth.

 

T. FRANK KNOBLOCK, a member of the hardware firm of Huff & Company is a representative of two of the oldest families of Marshall County and is a native son of Bremen, born on the 17th of March 1865. His father, Benjamin Knoblock, claimed Stark county, Ohio, as the place of his nativity, but during his boyhood days he came with his father, Jacob Knoblock, to Bremen and later became prominently identified with its business interests, first as a miller, later as a merchant and during his later years was a contractor and builder; His death occurred at the age of fifty-eight years. Mr. Knoblock married Elizabeth; a daughter of Daniel and Eliza Ringle, early pioneers of Marshall County, Indiana, and which is also the birthplace of their daughter Elizabeth, who has reached the sixty-third milestone on the journey of life. They became the parents of two sons, the younger being Buford Knoblock, a contractor of Mishawaka.

 

The elder son, T. Frank Knoblock, after attending the schools of his native city of Bremen, pursued a business course at the Va1paraiso University, and for about eight years after leaving that institution taught in the schools of Bremen and German township. At the close of that period he became a bookkeeper in the office of the Holland Radiator Company, his connection therewith covering a period of about eight years. He then served as superintendent of the construction of the water works plant, and for about six years after its completion continued in the office of Superintendent, while during the past eight years he has been the town clerk, entering upon the duties of that office in 1890. He is a Democrat in his political affiliations, and takes an active interest in the local work of his party. In 1904 Mr. Knoblock formed a partnership in the hardware business with William Huff, Sr., and after his death his son Ervin became interested in the business, the firm being now known as Huff & Company. They carry a large stock of general hardware and are enjoying a large and remunerative patronage.

 

On the 29th of May 1887, Mr. Knoblock was united in marriage to Eva Huff, a daughter of William and Eliza Huff, and they have five children, Herbert E., Lois, Leona, Lucille and Arlena. Mr. Knoblock is identified with the fraternal life of Bremen by his membership with the Knights of Pythias and the Knights of the Maccabees orders. He has been a life-long resident of his native city of Bremen with the exception of two years spent in Chicago with the A. H. Andrews Company and with his four years connection with the Louisville Fertilizer Company.

 

JOHN M. OLDS, the city clerk of Plymouth, entered upon the duties of that position in the fall of 1905, and he is also prominently identified with the business interests of the city as the foreman of the Weekly Chronicle. He was born in Winamac, Indiana, February 4, 1868. His father, William Olds, was a native of New York, but when a young man he came to Indiana, and in 1858 journeyed to California and there enlisted

 


550                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

for service in the Civil war, entering in 1861 the First California Volunteer Infantry, and continued as a brave and loyal soldier until the close of the conflict in 1865, receiving his discharge at New Mexico. He lived to be only thirty-seven years of age. Mrs. Olds bore the maiden name of Sarah C. Stailey and was a daughter of Michael and Elizabeth Stailey. She was born in Pennsylvania, but was reared in Indiana, whither her parents had removed in 1843, locating at Winamac, and her death occurred at the age of fifty-seven years. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Olds were born three children, two daughters and a son, but only one of the daughters is now living, Mrs. William R. Stailey, of Chicago.

 

John M. Olds, the only son and the eldest child, spent the early years of his life in his native city of Winamac, and there learned the printer's trade. Going to Chicago in 1886, he pursued his vocation there until his removal to Plymouth in 1899, and in this city he was first connected with the Clizbe Manufacturing Company as their shipping clerk for one year. In 1902 he became the foreman of the Weekly Chronicle his present position, discharging its duties in connection with those of city clerk. He takes an active part in the public affairs of his community, and is also prominent in its social circles, his fraternal relations connecting him with the Knights of the Maccabees.

 

Mr. Olds married, in 1893, Dora J. Anderson, a daughter of John A. and Ida Anderson. He votes with the Republican Party, and to him be- longs the honor of being its first representative in the office of city clerk in Plymouth.

 

PERRY E. SARBER is a prominent farmer and stock-raiser, being the proprietor of "Yellow River Stock Farm," located in section 36, Union township. His is also a familiar figure in the county in connection with the Marshall Home Fire Insurance Company; of which he has served as treasurer for a number of years. Born in Allen County, Ohio, on January 1, 1851, Mr. Sarber is the son of Edward and Isabel (Ridenour) Sarber, the father having been a native of Pennsylvania, who spent most of his life as an Ohio farmer, and his mother, of German descent, who was both born and reared in the Buckeye state. The elder Mr. Sarber attained considerable local prominence as a Democrat, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and died at the age of seventy-seven years.

 

Perry E. Sarber was born, reared, educated and married in the Buck- eye state, his marital union to Miss Eliza J. Smith occurring April 27, 1877. His wife is a native of Champaign county, Ohio, and the children of this union are as follows: Grace B., now Mrs. C. H. Grube; Harry C. arid Harley E, the two sons being natives of Marshall County. On Christmas day of 1879 Mr. Sarber located in Bourbon, Marshall County where he opened a livery stable, conducted it for a year, and then sold the business and moved to West Township. There he purchased a farm of sixty-seven acres and operated it until 1889, when he disposed of the property and removed to his present location. His place then consisted of one hundred and sixty acres, to which he has since added a tract of thirty acres. This fine estate of one hundred and ninety acres has been brought to its full producing capacity, both land and building improvements being the work of Mr. Sarber’s physical and mental energies,

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                          551

 

guided by practical intelligence. He now devotes most of his attention to the breeding of fine stock, but is also widely known in the community as a Democrat and a citizen of strong and good influence. He has served for two terms as councilman of the county, and has otherwise attained to local prominence.

 

C. M. SLAYTER is a representative of the business interests of Plymouth, engaged in the grocery and queens ware trade, and he has also been a life-long resident of Marshall County. His birth occurred in its township of West December 4, 1852, the youngest of the three sons of William Slayter, one of the best known of the early pioneers of Marshall County. As a youth he attended the district schools of the neighborhood and assisted his father with the work of the farm, remaining at home until he had reached the age of maturity, and from that time until the year of 1901 he followed agricultural pursuits in Center Township. For two and a half years following the close of that period he was the proprietor of a restaurant, and since that time he had been a grocery and queensware merchant in the city of Plymouth. His business interests are extensive, but at the same time he has taken an active interest in the local affairs of his community, voting with the Republican Party, and at one time he accepted the office of assistant postmaster of Plymouth, continuing in the office for eighteen months, but this is the only position he has ever been induced to accept.

 

Mr. Slayter married Catherine, a daughter of Edward and Hannah (Wickizer) Cavender, and the only child of this union is a daughter, Gertrude M., the wife of Milton C. Cook, of Plymouth, Indiana. The family reside in a pleasant and commodious residence in Plymouth, and in addition Mr Slayter also owns an estate of one hundred and sixty acres in Marshall county, the old Slayter homestead, with twenty acres additional. He is a member of the Masonic order, affiliating with its commandery and its auxiliary, the Eastern Star, and also member of the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Foresters. He is a member of the German Reformed church.

 

L. FREDERICK PONADER has been identified with the business interests of Bremen since 1875. He came to this city and allied his interests with its early pioneers in that year, first working at the carpenter's trade, which he had previously learned, and many of the residences and business buildings of Bremen and surrounding country stand as monuments to his ability. He continued in this vocation for fourteen years, and at the close of the period, in 1885, he embarked in the grocery and restaurant business, opening a small store, but gradually he has enlarged his interests until now he is the proprietor of one of the largest department stores in the city. His four Sons are also interested in the business, and they also furnish employment to eight others. In: their department store they handle all kinds of merchandise and also conduct a bakery, and the store forms an important part of the business life of the city.

 

Bremen's leading merchant, Frederick Ponader, was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 17, 1845, a son of Restler and Barbara (Ponader) Ponader, also natives of the fatherland. The father spent his entire life in his

 


552                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

native country, but the mother came to the United States and spent her last days in Bremen. In their family were two children, a son and a daughter, the latter being Christena, the wife of John Huff, of Bremen. Fred, the son and younger child, received his educational training in the German and French schools of his native land, and coming to America in 1870 he first located in South Bend and worked at any employment which he could find to do, spending a short time with the Studebakers. After one year in that city he came to Bremen and entered upon his successful business career here. In addition to his proprietorship of the largest store in Bremen he is one of the directors of the Union State Bank of this city and is a stockholder in the Bremen and La Paz elevators and is extensively engaged in the buying and shipping of grain. Mr. Ponader came to America a poor boy, but he has steadily worked his way upward, gaining success and winning the public confidence, and his history furnishes a splendid example of what may be accomplished through determined purpose, laudable ambition and well directed efforts.

 

In 1870 Mr. Ponader married Henrietta Lang, who was born and reared in Germany, but in 1870 she immigrated to America, coming direct to South Bend, and in the same year she gave her hand in marriage to Mr. Ponader. Her death occurred in 1904, leaving five children: Edward, Theodore, Carl, William and Ella. The sons are all in business with their father and have assisted in building up the business to its present large proportions. Throughout the period of his residence in the United States Mr. Ponader has been a prominent member of the Lutheran church.

 

MILES VANVACTOR. In the history of Marshall County there are none more worthy of mention among its representative citizens than Miles VanVactor of Center Township, where he is rightfully numbered among its most honored and oldest citizens. He was born in Union county, Indiana, October 26, 1831, the oldest child of David and Harriet (Warren) Van Vactor. The father was a native of Pennsylvania, and with his father, Joseph, he came to Union county, Indiana, in a very early day. He was there married to Harriet Warren, a native of Ohio, and they became the parents of the following children: Miles, Riley, Mary Jane, Joseph, a resident of Center Township, Sarah, the wife of William Pomeroy, of Plymouth, Hiram, and two who died in infancy. In 1835 the family became residents of Marshall County, settling in the dense woods in Center Township, on the Michigan road, where the parents spent the remainder of their days. Here the sturdy pioneers cleared from the forest a good farm and reared their children to lives of usefulness and honor, and in those early days the Indians were still numerous in this community.

 

It was amid such pioneer surroundings that Miles VanVactor grew to manhood's estate, assisting his father and brothers to clear the farm and cultivate the fields, in the meantime attending for a limited time the old log schoolhouse. He remained under the parental roof until his marriage in 1882, Claracy Pomeroy becoming his wife. She was born in Marshall County and was reared on the farm now owned and occupied by Mr. VanVactor. She was a daughter of Grove Umstead Pomeroy, an old and prominent pioneer of the county. Mrs. VanVactor died in 1891,

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     553

 

aged forty-five years, leaving four children: William, a leading farmer of Center township; Cora, the wife of Alonzo Stephenson, also an agriculturist of Center township; Umstead, who is married and farming on the old homestead of his father; and Hubert, residing in Chicago.

 

Since 1863Mr. VanVactor has resided on his present homestead, his estate consisting of two hundred and eighty acres of the most fertile and best-improved land to be found in the county. He has done many a hard day's work, has contributed to the development of the county and 'is well and favorably known. He is a Republican politically, but has never sought office.

 

DANIEL C. VOREIS. In the year 1835, when Marshall county was a wild, western region, on the very border of civilization, there came to reside within its borders a brave and sturdy pioneer from Rush county, Indiana. James Voreis, the grandfather of the present sheriff of Marshall County, Daniel C. Voreis. He entered land in Green Township, and with the passing years inscribed his name indelibly on the pages of its early history. In 1836, the year following his arrival, he brought his family here, and thus Marshall County became the birthplace of his son, Jonas L. Voreis, the father of Daniel. He was here reared and educated and in its township of Green was united in marriage to Rachel A, Marks, who was born in Miami county, Indiana, and is now living here at the age of sixty- three years; but the husband and father is deceased, dying in 1902, at the age of fifty-seven years. There were eight children in their family, six sons and two daughters: James L.; Daniel C.; Uretha B.; Francis M. ; Otto M. : Delbert C. ; Grace M. and Oscar, and all are living at the present time, and six are residents of Marshall county.

Daniel C. Voreis, their second son in order of birth, was born in Green township, Marshall county, December 22,1873, and he spent the first sixteen years of his life on the farm, going thence to Union township, working for his father in the manufacture of brick and tile, remaining at home until reaching the age of maturity. In 1900 he was made the deputy sheriff under Clinton A. Bondurant, and served in that capacity for four years, and in 1904 made an tll1successfttl race for sheriff on the Democratic ticket, and was defeated by 365 majority, the largest of any candidate on the ticket; but was elected two years later by 595 majority, the largest of any candidate on the ticket. He is now discharging his duties of that important office.

On April 28, 1900, Mr. Voreis was married to Lydia Mangus, a daughter of Hiram and Sarah Mangus, of Polk township, Marshall County, Indiana, and they have one son, Wilford E. Mr. Voreis is a life- long resident of Marshall County; a representative of one of the earliest and most prominent pioneer families, and those who know him best are numbered among his warmest friends.

 

JAMES L. MOSHER, a farmer in Union township, was born in Erie County, New York, February 18, 1842. His father, Jeremiah Mosher, who for many years was identified with the farming interests of Marshall County but now deceased, was born and attained to mature years in the Empire state, but was married in Vermont to Sarah M. Craine, a native

 

554                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

daughter of the state. They became the parents of seven children, four sons and three daughters, of whom five are now deceased, and two were born in Marshall County, Indiana. In 1855 Jeremiah Mosher immigrated with his family to Indiana and established his home in Stark County, where he purchased a farm of two hundred and fifty acres. After spending three years there the family came on to Marshall County, this being in 1858, and Mr. Mosher bought one hundred and sixty acres in Union township. The land was then in its primitive state, but with the aid of his sons he in time cleared and improved it, and also added thereto a tract of eighty acres, the death of this Marshall county pioneer occurred when he had attained the age of sixty-two years. His political allegiance was given to the Republican Party.

 

The boyhood days of James L. Mosher were spel1t in attending both the district and subscription schools of Union township and assisting to clear and cultivate the home farm. In 1862 he offered his services to the Union cause in the Civil war and enlisted in the Twenty-first Indiana Light Artillery, Twenty-first Battery, and served for three years. In that time he took part in many of the hard-fought engagements of the war, including the historic battle of Chickamauga. After the war had ended Mr. Mosher returned to his home in Marshall County and received his discharge at Indianapolis June 25, 1865.

 

He had married on the 17th of August 1862, Sarah J. Thompson, who was born in Union township to one of the community's earliest pioneers, William E. Thompson. He was born in the south land of Kentucky and came to this county about 1837, locating on a farm in Union township. His father was William Thompson, who entered a farm here and became prominently identified with the county's early history. William E. Thompson married in Union township Martha McDonald, a member of another of its pioneer families, and they became the parents of eleven children, six sons and five daughters, four of whom are now deceased. All were born in Union township, and Mrs. Mosher was the eldest of the children. William E. Thompson in time became a large landowner here, but in his later years removed to Nebraska. He was an active worker in the local ranks of the Democratic Party, and was a member of the Adventist church.

 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Mosher located on their present homestead of eighty acres, and here their five children were born: Ada B., Miriam A., Esther M., James A. and Tracy P., but two, Esther and James, have passed away. Mr. Mosher is an independent voter, and is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, Miles H. Tibbetts Post, No. 260, of Plymouth, Indiana.

 

DR. HOMER H. TALLMAN, La Paz's leading physician, is an Iowan by birth, born in Linn county, that state, November 13, 1873, but is a representative of a southern family from Virginia, the birthplace of his paternal grandfather, Nathaniel Tallman. John C. Tallman, his father, was born in Franklin County, Ohio, November 26, 1848; and when a young man journeyed west and was in many of the western states, finally locating in Linn County, Iowa. He wedded on the 1st of January 1873, Margaret J. Ebright, in Franklin County, Ohio.

 

555                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

From Linn county John C. Tallman went to Marion, that state, and worked for J. W. Kendall ; was later the manager of the retail depart - ment of the wholesale and retail hardware firm of C. E. Armstrong & Company at Clinton, Iowa, for three years; for a time was identified with the retail hardware and later the grocery trade of Grinnell, Iowa, and after a residence in both Rockford and Evanston, Illinois, engaged in the grocery and market business; he traded for the John W. Thomas farm in North township, Marshall county, Indiana. After a time he sold that land and bought the J. N. McNeil farm east of La Paz in North Township, which he now owns. He is a carpenter and contractor in La Paz. Mrs. Tallman is also living. A son and a daughter were born to them, and the latter, Mary Effie, is the wife of Clarence G. Hale, of Chicago.

 

Dr. Tallman, the elder of the children and the only son, was about seven years old when his parents moved to Marion, Iowa, and there he first attended school, a pupil of Mrs. Lydia Knott. He was also a student in the Clinton schools, and completing the grammar grade at Rochelle, Illinois, he entered the high school at Grinnell, Iowa, and spent two years there. He was next a student in the Northwestern University at Evanston, where he studied medicine and graduated in 1900, while in June of the following year he came to La Paz. In the meantime he has spent two years in practice in Chicago, but with that exception has practiced continuously in this city. He is a member of the Marshall County and the American Medical Associations and of the Masonic order, affiliating with the blue lodge of Lakeville, No.353, F. & A. M., and the chapter and commandery of Plymouth. He is also a member of La Paz Lodge, No.56, K. 0. T. M.; Lodge No.4325, M. W. of A.; La Paz Lodge, No.613, A. 0. 0. G., and Lawndale Lodge, No, 3, N. A. U. He is the medical examiner of all these lodges mentioned, and is also the surgeon for the Baltimore & Ohio railroad and for the Industrial Portland Cement Company, of Syracuse, Indiana. Dr. Tallman is a Republican politically and belongs to the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity of Northwestern University.

 

JACOB VOLLMER is one of the oldest and best known business men of Bremen, having been identified with its interests for over fifty-nine years, but he is now living retired from the active duties of life, although he owns large interests in the live stock business and real estate, owning about six hundred acres of land in Marshall and St. Joseph counties. The Vollmer family has been identified with the interests of Marshall County since an early day in its history. Jacob Vollmer, Sr., was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, but when ten years of age he was brought by his parents to America, and their first home in this country was in Stark county, Ohio, where Jacob Vollmer married Philebena Appel, who was born in Byron, Germany, and she was also ten years of age when brought to this country. From Stark County Jacob Vollmer journeyed to Marshall County, Indiana, in about 1846, and took up his abode in German township, where he was prominently identified with agricultural interests until his retirement and his removal to Bremen. His death occurred when fifty-nine years of age, and his wife reached the age of sixty-seven

 


556                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

years ere called to the home beyond. In their family were five daughters and two sons, all of whom attained to years of maturity.

 

Jacob Vollmer, their eldest son and second child, was born in German township, Marshall County, Indiana, December 7, 1848, and he remained at home and assisted in the farm work until the age of twenty-one years. He then began teaming and lumbering in and around Bremen, and after about ten years thus spent he entered the retail lumber and manufacturing business in Bremen. During his sixteen years connection with that industry he became well known in the business circles of Marshall County, but at the close of the long period he sold his interests and retired from the active business world.

 

In 1904 Mr. Vollmer married Anna Backus, a daughter of August Backus. In political matters he votes with the Democratic Party and takes an active part in the public life of his community, and is a member of the Lutheran church.

 

HON. CHARLES KELLIS0N. Probably no one is better known in the city of Plymouth, Indiana, than Hon. Charles Kellison, a prominent attorney of that city, He is a native of the state of New York, having been born in Steuben County, June 17, 1850. His father, James Kellison, was born in Pennsylvania and removed, with his parents, to New York when but ten years of age. For the larger part of his life he was in the lumber trade. He is of Scotch and German ancestry. Elizabeth (Meek) Kellison, mother of our subject, was the daughter of James Meek, of English descent, and was born in Yates County, New York. She passed to her reward at the age of seventy-nine years. There were seven children born to this union, one daughter and six sons. Of these four grew to maturity, and three are living at this writing: Robert, a farmer in Steuben county, New York; James L., a farmer in the same county; and Charles, the youngest son, and the subject of this sketch.

 

Mr. Kellison was reared in New York and obtained his elementary education in the public schools. At the age of eighteen he began the study of medicine at the University of Michigan, and was graduated in his twenty-second year. He began the practice of his profession at Scio, New York, where he remained for two years. In 1874, before removing to Indiana, he became a student of law in the office of Hon. Hamilton Ward, of New York, and in October of that year came to Indiana and located at Decatur, in Adams County. Here he taught school for a time, and later became a law student of Judge David Studebaker, being admitted to the bar in 1876.

 

In April, 1877, he was united in marriage to Miss Ella Cross, a daughter of Abel Cross, a farmer in Adams County, In this same year Mr. Kellison moved to Plymouth, and entered into the practice of law and has devoted the last thirty years to this profession.

 

For years Mr. Kellison has taken an active part in the political affairs of the state and county. He stumped Adams county, in 1876, and later a goodly part of northern Indiana, for the Democratic Party, and has been honored by the people in the election to the state legislature for two terms (1884-1888) as representative from Marshall county. In 1896 he was

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     557

 

nominated for Congress, and, although not elected, reduced the majority of his opponent 2,700 votes over the previous election.

 

Mr. Kellison has two children: Herbert, and Mamie, the wife of Cecil G. White, of Los Angeles, California.

 

For years a member of the Knights of Pythias, Mr. Kellison assisted in the organization of Lodge No.65, at Decatur, Indiana, and was also a charter member of Lodge No.117, at Plymouth. He is a member of the State Bar Association and, July 10, 1907, delivered the annual address at the session of that honorable body. He is widely known and universally respected by his fellow citizens.

 

CHRISTIAN SElLER was born on the west shore of Lake Brienz, near Interfaken, Canton-Bern, Switzerland, March 18, 1838, and in the house in which he first saw the light of day his father, Christian Seiler, was born on the10oth of August 1806, while his mother, Anna Fautz, was born August 15, 1810, in Gsteigweiler, two miles from Interlaken. They were married in the spring of 1837, and in the historic old home in Switzerland there were born to them Christian, Frederick, Anna, Susan and Margaret. In the year of 1853, when their eldest son was fifteen years of age, the family set sail for the United States, and after spending twenty-eight days on the Ocean the weary travelers reached the harbor of New York, where they remained over Sunday and then proceeded on their way, via the Erie railroad, to Buffalo, thence by boat to Toledo and Cleveland, Ohio, by the Lake Shore railroad to South Bend, Indiana, where they arrived on the 1st of December 1853, and four days later, with ox teams and wagon owned by Uncle John Dietrich, continued their journey to their destination in Bremen. There Mr. Seiler, Sr., purchased of his brother-in-law eighty acres of land one mile west of Bremen, the purchase price being seven hundred dollars. But he was only able to pay three hundred dollars in cash and for the remaining four hundred his son Christian was bound but to his Uncle Dietrich for five years. At the expiration of that period, on the 10th of June 1859, the young lad went to Olney, Richland county, Illinois, where he worked at his trade of carpentering and cabinet making with excellent Success until his removal to Bremen in 1860. Here he resumed the work of his trades and continued their work with increasing success until he was obliged to put aside all personal consideration and lend his services to his country in its Civil war. He enlisted in October 1861, in Company K, Twenty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and with his regiment he participated in the battle of Shiloh, the siege of Corinth and the engagements at Perryville, Stone River and Chickamauga. From the 1st of May 1863, until the 28th of October, following, he was the color bearer for the regiment, but while going to Bridgeport, Tennessee, he was injured and was obliged to surrender the flag. He was taken to the field hospital and this ended his career for active service, although he remained with his regiment at Chattanooga, Tennessee, during the summer of 1864, and on the 5th of November of that year was there honorably discharged from the service.

 

On his return to Bremen, Mr. Seiler resumed the work of his trade and thus continued until he erected a storehouse and shop in 1871 and engaged in the furniture and undertaking business, but after eleven years

 


558                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

in that business he sold his interest therein. Throughout the period of his residence in Marshall County Mr. Seiler has been prominently identified with its public affairs and his prominence and well known reliability have led to his selection for many positions of public trust. The first office which he filled was that of Township Assessor, continuing in that office from 1870 to 1874, and from 1876 to 1882 he was a member of the school board. From 1884 until 1887 he served in the capacities of clerk and treasurer of Bremen, and in 1890 was elected to the office of justice of the peace, but did not qualify. Since 1884, covering a period of twenty-three years, he has been a notary public. He is also prominent in the fraternal as well as the social and political life of Marshall County and has membership of the Grand Army, Hartzog Post, No. 400, and served as its commander in 1895.

 

On the 15th of February 1866, Mr. Seiler married Mary Ann Beyler, who was born in German Township February 15, 1846, and there were born to them the following children: Frederick W., deceased; Margaret E., the wife of John Hanes, of Kokomo, Indiana; Ida Anna, the wife of Andrew De Vore, of Bourbon, this state; Edward Clayton, deceased; Clara E., the wife of John Bolden, of Indianapolis, Indiana; Emma E., the wife of Stacy Snyder of Bourbon; Josephine, the wife of Birch W. Lewellen, of Muncie, Indiana; and Jeannette M., who died March 25, 1902. At the present time there are five daughters living. In 1881 Mr. Seiler made the journey to his old home in Switzerland, renewing again after so many years the acquaintances and scenes of his youth, and he remained at his old home about three months. In April 1891, his wife died, thus severing a union of many years, and he is spending his remaining days in the old Seiler home in Bremen.

 

PROSPER A. BALL, of the firm of Ball & Company, dry goods and clothing merchants of Plymouth, is one of the well-known and highly respected merchants of the city. He is a native of Indiana, his birth occurring January 14, 1869. His father, Philip Jacob Ball, was a native of Germany, and after coming to the Untied States, settled at Plymouth in 1875. Here he entered the dry goods and clothing business in partnership with a Mr. Carabin, which partnership continued until 1890, when it was dissolved, and the firm became known as Ball & Company, the sons, Prosper, Jerome and Alpha J., being admitted as members. The elder Mr. Ball died in 1902, and since that time the three sons have continued the business under the same firm name. Our subject is in charge of the dry goods department, Jerome conducts the ladies’ ready-to-wear department and Alpha is in charge of the clothing department and also looks after the financial affairs. The store is the largest in Plymouth and employs about fifteen people. It is well known about the vicinity and is doing a continually increasing business.

 

Mr. Prosper Ball was married in 1902 to Miss Minie Rayden, and enjoyed his wedded life but one year, his wife dying in 1903.

 

In his political thought he is a Democrat, and is actively engaged in furthering the welfare of his county in his private and political relations.


 

HISTORY OFMARSHALL COUNTY.                          559

 

CHARLES W. NEWMAN. The success of Charles W. Newman, farmer and dairyman of Union township, is, without doubt, partly based on his stanch ancestry through his paternal forefathers he inherits the shrewdness and versatility of the Connecticut Yankee; while the maternal side contributes the persevering thrift of German blood. His father came into Ohio while yet a young man, and Charles W. was born on the home farm in the Buckeye state on the 25th of August 1854. He was also reared to agricultural pursuits in his native locality, and in 1881 married Mary E. Rickenbaugh, also a native of Ohio. To this union were born the following children: Claude R., John A.; Gale S. and J. Dick, all residents of Indiana.

 

In 1881, the year following his marriage, Mr. Newman removed to Pulaski county, Indiana, and two years thereafter to Cass county, where he engaged in farming for fifteen years. In 1897 he located in Union township, Marshall County, upon a farm of one hundred and fifty-eight acres, the whole of which he placed under cultivation and improved with suitable buildings and modern appliances. In 1906 he removed to the property known as the Culver farm, which he has since brought into an ideal condition as a raiser of dairy and farm products. One of his largest customers is the Culver Academy, which requires a daily supply of one hundred gallons of milk. Mr. Newman has not only met with gratifying success as an agriculturist, in the conduct of his personal affairs, but has earned the general respect of his fellow associates, and at the present time is serving as county chairman of the Farmers' Institute. He is also affiliated with the I. 0. 0. F. and the K. 0. T. M., as a fraternatist, and in his religious faith is a member of the Reformed church.

 

HENRY HUMRICHOUSER, a retired farmer and livestock dealer, was born in York, Pennsylvania, October 29, 1829, a son of William and Rachel (Thompson) Humrichouser. Henry Humrichouser resided in Ashland County, Ohio, until he had reached the age of about twenty years, and in the fall of 1850 he came to Plymouth and worked for Dr. Griffin and Judge Fuller for a year. In the fall of 1851 he returned to Ohio, and from there went to California in 1852, but in 1855 came again to Plymouth and in the following year engaged in the grocery business with N. S. Woodward. In 1859, as a member of the firm Humrichouser & Quivey, he became a mill, grain and stock dealer, and in 1865 he engaged in the grocery and live stock business with J. Dial, their firm name being Humrichouser & Dial. In 1877 Mr. Humrichouser retired from active business and has devoted the time since to superintending his farm inter- ests. He has two fine farms in Center Township and a city residence in Plymouth. He is a director of the Plymouth State Bank, was elected the marshal of the city and was a member of the first fire company of Plymouth.

 

Mr. Humrichouser married in 1858 Miss Rachael Hunter, of Ashland County, Ohio, and she died in Plymouth in 1903. They became the parents of two sons: William, Who died at the age of twenty-one years, and Harry, who was born in Plymouth September 30, 1866.

 


560                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.  

 

EDWARD M. WRIGHT. As a manager of the box factory of Bremen one of Marshall county's leading industrial institutions, Edward M: W right is well known to the residents of both his city and county. He entered the factory when a youth just out of school, starting as an ordinary laborer, learning the business in every department, until in 1897 he was made the manager of the factory and now has entire charge of this institution. Employment is furnished to twenty men, and the factory has done much to promote the industrial activity of Marshall County.

 

Mr. W right was born in New Paris, Indiana, July 8, 1868, the second son of John J. and Sarah F. (Loomis) Wright, prominent and well known residents of this city. When Edward M. was a babe of one year the family came to Bremen, where the little son attained to years of maturity and attended the public schools, completing his educational training by a business course in Hillsdale College of Michigan. He then returned to Bremen and his since been identified with its business interests.

 

On the 4th of August, 1894-, Mr. Wright was united in marriage to Minnie B. Ungry, a daughter of George W. and Elizabeth (Pickens) Ungry, of Bremen. One daughter has been born of this union; Helen D. Mr. Wright is a Republican in his political affiliations and is a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity.

 

JONES GRANT. In an enumeration in Marshall County of those who have gained success in the business world and won public recognition is found. Jones Grant, the present treasurer of Marshall County and a resident of Plymouth. He was born in Stark county, Ohio, January 29, 1843, a son of John and Mary (Gaskill) Grant, natives respectively of New Jersey and Ohio. The father remained in the state of his nativity, engaged in agricultural pursuits, until he removed with his father, Stacy Grant, to Stark County, Ohio, where the family was numbered among the early pioneers. They were of Scotch origin. In 1852 John Grant continued his westward journey to Marshall county, Indiana, establishing his home in the eastern part of the county, where he was engaged in farming until his removal to Wayne county, Iowa, in 1855. His death occurred in Keokuk County of that state when he had attained the age of forty-six years, and his wife was thirty-nine years of age at the time of her death. In their family were eight children, four of whom grew to years of maturity and are living at the present time.

 

Jones Grant, the third child in order of birth, was a little lad of nine years at the time of the removal of his parents to Marshall County, and he grew to mature years in Bourbon and Walnut, continuing his residence in the Hoosier state until the removal of the family to Iowa. After the death of his parents in 1857 he returned to Marshall county, being then about fourteen years of age, and he afterward worked at farm labor by the month until his enlistment for service in the Civil war in 1861, joining Company D, Ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, his military career covering a period of over three years. During that time he participated in many of the historic battles of the war, including Shiloh, Stone River, Chickamauga, Culpeper, Atlanta and many others. While at the front he was four times wounded, first at the battle of Shiloh, next at Stone River, the third time at Woodbury and the fourth at Chickamauga, where he lay

 

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     561

 

on the battlefield without any attention whatever for more than a week. He was finally taken as a prisoner of war, later paroled and sent to the hospital, and was honorably discharged with the rank of corporal in September, 1864, at Chickamauga, Tennessee. Returning to his old home in Marshall County, Mr. Grant resumed his agricultural labors in Walnut Township, and is now the owner of one hundred and ten acres of rich and fertile land in Warren Township. During the long period of forty years he maintained his residence on this farm, in that time transforming the land from its primitive state into one of the finest homesteads of the county. Its work is now carried on by his son, for Mr. Grant's election to the office of treasurer of Marshall County necessitated his removal to Plymouth. He is a Republican in his political affiliations, and he won the election in a Democratic stronghold of five hundred majority.

 

In March, 1865, Mr. Grant married Amanda J. Perry, a daughter of James Perry, and they have three children: Estes, the wife of Emry Bight, of Walnut township; Edwin J ., the deputy treasurer of Marshall county; and Everett F., who is farming the homestead. Mr. Grant is a prominent member of Miles H. Tibbits Post, G. A. R., of Plymouth, and also has membership relations with the blue lodge of Masons in this city. In the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he has long been a prominent and efficient member, he has held all the offices and is now the trustee, and is an active and zealous worker in the cause of Christianity.

 

EDWARD S. KITCH is prominently identified with the real estate and fire insurance interests of Bremen, and he has also been numbered among the county's leading educators, since he entered the schoolroom as a teacher at the age of twenty-one years. His birth occurred in German township, Marshall County, Indiana, February 6, 1868. His father, Martin U. Kitcb, was born in Crawford county, Ohio, but came to Marshall county, Indiana, with his father, John B. Kitch, in an early day, and they established their home in German township, where the former was subsequently married to Amanda M. Lehr, a native of Ohio. The young couple began their married life on a farm in German Township just south of Bremen, and they became the parents of three sons and a daughter.

 

Edward S. Kitch, their second son and second child in order of birth, attended first the public schools of German township and later became a student in the Valparaiso University and the county normal. As above stated, he began teaching at the age of twenty-one years, and has ever since been numbered among Marshall county's prominent and well known educators. He has taught principally in German township, and during ten years of the time he was also engaged in the mercantile business during the summer months. He is now prominently identified with the insurance and real estate business, and in 1899 was appointed to the office of justice of the peace, to which he was re-elected in 1902 and has been the incumbent since that time. He is actively interested in the public life of his community, voting with the Democratic Party, and for two years he was his party’s representative in the office of city clerk of Bremen.

On the 18th of December 1892, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Kitch and Della E. Bates. She is a daughter of James and Mary (Ringle) Bates, prominent old settlers of Marshall County, and Mrs. Kitch was born

 


562                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

in its township of German. They have one daughter living, Vivian I., at home, and their only son, Thornton, died at the age of two years. Mr. Kitch is a charter member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity. He has been a life-long resident of Marshall County and is recognized as one of its distinctively representative citizens.

 

CLINTON HUFF. Since the early days of Marshall county's history the name of Huff has been prominently associated with its milling interests, and Clinton Huff is now efficiently carrying on the work inaugurated by his father, William Huff, many years ago. William Huff, Sr., was a native son of Germany, from whence he was brought to the United States by his parents when but three years of age, and the family located in Ohio. From there they journeyed to Marshall county, Indiana, during an early period in the history of this section of the state, and took up their abode in German township, Here William Huff was united in marriage to one of the township's native daughters, Eliza J. Annis, and they became the parents of ten children, four of whom are now living. Mr. Huff, the father, learned and followed the carpenter's trade, and many of the homes and buildings of German township were erected by him in an early day. He later drifted into the saw-milling business, and he continued actively identified with that vocation until his death on the 21St of August 1895. Mrs. Huff is yet living.

 

Clinton Huff, their eldest Son and fourth child, was reared and received his educational training in Bremen, but his birth occurred in German township November 29, 1865. During the early part of his business career he assisted his father in the mill, and one year before the latter's death he took entire charge of the business, and has since become well known as a miller and farmer, for he is the owner of the old homestead farm in German township, an estate of one hundred and four acres. This is the first farm east of Bremen. He is also a stockholder and one of the directors of the Union State Bank, and is a member of the town board of Bremen. His political affiliations are with the Democratic Party.

 

November 28, 1889, Mr. Huff was united in marriage with Anna M. Bauer, a daughter of John and Margaret (Walter) Bauer, and they have two children, Iola and Wilfred. Mr. Huff has spent his entire life within the boundaries of Marshall County with the exception of one year when he was in Coffee County, Tennessee, in the saw-milling business, and his courteous and genial manner has won him a host of warm friends.

 

CEPHUS FIRESTONE, dealer in harness, buggies, etc., at Plymouth, Indiana, has been in business in that city for over twenty-three years, and has the distinction of being the oldest merchant (in point of continuous business years) at that place. He was born in Elkhart County, Indiana, August 26, 1858. His father, Emanuel Firestone, was a native of Columbiana County, Ohio, and removed to Indiana during the pioneer days, settling in Elkhart County. He was of Pennsylvania German stock. Susan (Harold) Firestone, mother of our subject, was a native of the same county as that in which her husband was born. Both Mr. and Mrs. Firestone died in 1864, when the subject of this sketch was but six years of age,

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                         563

 

Following the death of his parents, Cephus Firestone was taken to the home of Christian Blough, with whom he lived until he attained the age of fifteen years. He attended the public schools, as the opportunity presented itself, until 1876, when he felt that he had reached an age when he must look toward his own support. He chose harness making as a profitable trade and apprenticed himself to a harness-maker at Walkerton, Indiana. He served his allotted time in that capacity, and in 1880 removed to Plymouth, where he entered into the employ of his brother, whom he served until 1884, and in that year purchased his brother's interest in the business and has conducted it independently since.

 

On April 17, 1884, Mr. Firestone was wedded to Miss Eva Wade, daughter of William Wade, of North Township, Marshall County, Indiana. Three children have been born to them: Bert E., George W. and Louis, the last named now deceased.

 

Mr. Firestone is a Democrat, a member of the Masonic order, a Knight Templar, and belongs to the Knights of Pythias and the Royal Arcanum. He is well known throughout his community through his long business service, and is accounted a man of honesty and integrity.

M. A. PESCH, proprietor of the city meat market, Plymouth, Indiana, was born in that city August 8, 1878. His father, Peter Pesch, was a native of Germany and died at Plymouth aged forty-nine years. His mother, Elizabeth (Kleiner) Pesch, also a native of Germany, is still living, and resides at Plymouth.

 

Mr. Pesch was educated in the Plymouth public schools and, after finishing his schooling, was employed for eight years by a local dealer in meats. In 1907 Mr. Pesch severed his business connections with his old employer and engaged in the meat business for himself.

 

Mr. Pesch is a Democrat in politics, and takes an active interest in all that pertains to the public welfare. He has resided in Plymouth since his birth and has many friends in the city and its environs.

 

FRED H. KUHN, one of the prominent businessmen of Plymouth, Indiana, was born in Detroit, Michigan, January 6 1856. His father, Henry Kuhn, was born in Germany, and died in Michigan, aged seventy-three years. . His mother, also of German nativity, lived to be seventy-five years of age. There were five children in the family, one daughter and four sons. Of these the subject of this sketch is the eldest.

 

Mr. Kuhn received his education in the local grammar schools and also attended night school at Detroit and Port Huron. In 1876 he removed from Port Huron to Plymouth and was employed in a meat shop m the latter city. In 1880 he engaged in the meat business on his own account and has conducted the business continuously for the past twenty-seven years. In politics he is a Republican, and takes an active interest the public affairs. He is the present chief of the Plymouth fire department. Mr. Kuhn is interested in fraternal orders, and belongs to the Masonic order, the lodge and Knights Templar, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, Woodmen, Knights of the Maccabees and other orders:

 

In 1880 he was married to Miss Bertha Haslanger, and to this union

 

564                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

three children have been born: Fred H., Jr., Gus R. and B. Irene. Mr. Kuhn erected the building in which he is now conducting his business. He is looked upon by the citizens of Plymouth as one of their most successful and enterprising merchants.

 

GEORGE P. MORLOCK, a trustee of West Township Schools, is actively interested in the cause of education and of all progressive movements that have for their object the betterment of conditions in the community. While his worth as a citizen is widely acknowledged he is also numbered among the diligent and energetic farmers and stock-raisers of West Township, his place presenting a well kept appearance. He was born November 12, 1861, in Union Township, but acquired his education in the schools of West Township, while spending his boyhood days in the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Adam Morlock. The father now deceased, was a resident farmer of West Township for many years. A native of Germany, he was reared in that country, but at the age of twenty-five years, attracted by the favorable reports which he heard concerning America and its opportunities, he sailed for the New World and located in New York. Gradually he made his way westward to Marshall County, where he arrived in 1853, settling in West Township. Here he purchased a tract of land of about forty acres, mostly covered by heavy timber. He cleared the greater part of this, cutting down the trees, burning the brush and grubbing up the stumps. The land was thus prepared for the plow and in due course of time brought forth rich harvests as a reward for the care and labor bestowed upon it. He added all the modern improvements, purchasing the latest improved machinery that was placed upon the market as invention perfected the farm implements and rendered the toil of the agriculturist less arduous and confining. As the years passed and he prospered in his undertakings, he added to his possessions from time to time until his landed holdings embraced six hundred acres, of which he cleared about three hundred acres. He thus took an active and helpful part in the development of the county and was a well-known representative of agricultural life here.

 

George A. Morlock was married in Ohio to Miss Elizabeth Zechiel, who was born in the Buckeye State, and there spent the days of her girlhood, being reared upon a farm. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Morlock were born seven children, five sons and two daughters, of whom the subject of this review is the fourth in order of birth. The others are John, Mrs. Caroling Kyser, Daniel, Mrs. Rose Schively, Joseph and Fred. After coming to this country the father continued to reside upon the old homestead property until the time of his death, which occurred when he was seventy-two years of age. He was a lifelong Democrat, interested in the success and growth of his party, and to various movements and measures for the public good he gave earnest, loyal and efficient support. In early life his religious faith was that of the Lutheran Church, but in later years he identified himself with the German Baptist church.

 

When six years ago George P. Morelock accompanied his parents on their removal from Union Township, his birthplace, and the homestead farm that was his playground in youth and his training school for life’s practical and responsible duties. He was married in West Township to

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     505

 

Miss Hattie Corse, a daughter of James A. Corse, whose family history is given on another page of this volume in connection with the sketch of Fred Corse. Mrs. Morlock was born in West Township, March 23, 1860, and by her marriage has become the mother of five children: Cecil completed her common school education and received her diploma in the class of 1903; she is a modiste and located in South Bend. Ferne received her diploma in the class of 1904 and she has been a student at the Valparaiso College and is now one of the successful teachers in West Township. Both of the girls have taken instrumental music. Ruth is in the seventh grade; Florence, the Joy of the household, and Guy, but the last named is now deceased.

 

At his father's death Mr. Morlock inherited seventy-three acres of the old homestead, and adding to his possessions, he is now the owner of one hundred and twenty-three acres of rich and productive land, which responds readily to the care and labor he bestows upon the fields. The present improvements are monuments to his thrift and: industry and the farm is equipped with all modern accessories and conveniences, including a comfortable residence and ample shelter in his barns and sheds for grain and stock. In addition to cultivating diversified crops he also raises good grades of horses, cattle and hogs, and his farming interests are managed with business-like dispatch and the work is carefully systematized.

 

Mr. Morlock is interested in community affairs to the extent of giving active and hearty cooperation to many movements, which he believes, will prove of public benefit. He votes with the Democracy and in 1904 was elected school trustee of West Township. He is now making an earnest endeavor to consolidate this school with another, believing that a higher degree of efficiency can be attained in educational work thereby. In community affairs, as in his private business interests, he believes in the continuance of progress and development and always labors with this end in view.

 

THOMAS D. SMITH, M. D. During the past ten years Dr. Thomas D. Smith has been a member of the medical fraternity of Marshall county, practicing at Bremen, but his professional career covers a period of fifteen years. His alma mater is the well-known Cincinnati Eclectic Medical College, graduating with its class of 1892, and during the first year and a half thereafter he was engaged in practice in California, returning thence to Cleveland, Ohio, and continuing on the medical staff of that city for four years. It was at the close of that period, in 1897, that he came to Bremen and enrolled his name among the leading physicians and surgeons of Marshall County.

 

The birth of Dr. Smith occurred in Hancock County, Ohio, November 17, 1864. His father, James P. Smith, was a native of the mother country of England, but during his boyhood days he came with his father, Benjamin Smith, to America and they located in Quebec, Canada, from whence they removed to Wheeling, West Virginia, and from there to Hancock county, Ohio, the birthplace of Dr. Smith. James P. Smith followed the tilling of the soil as a life occupation, and his death occurred in August, 1906, when he had reached the advanced age of eighty-three years.

 


566                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

He had married Christena McGarry, a native daughter of Virginia and a member of a prominent old family of that commonwealth; She was of French and English descent. Mr. and Mrs. Smith had four children who grew to years of maturity, three sons and a daughter, namely: Irwin H., of Marion, Michigan; Anna L. Bunnell, of Mt. Blanchard, Ohio; and Charles C., a physician of Terre Haute, Illinois.

 

Dr. Thomas D. Smith, the youngest of the children, was born in Hancock county, Ohio, November 17, 1864, and his boyhood days were spent on a farm there, in the meantime attending the district schools of his neighborhood, later the high school at Mt. Blanchard, and for one year was a student at Wooster University of Ohio. With this excellent mental training to serve as the foundation of his life work he entered upon the study of the profession to which he dedicated his life's activities, and Marshall County now numbers him among her most able and competent physicians and surgeons. In the line of his profession he is connected with the National Eclectic Medical Association and the State Medical Association.

 

Dr. Smith married, in 1892, Flora Williams, who is a graduate of the same medical institution as her husband, and she is now engaged with him in practice. Dr. Smith has membership relations with the Masonic order, affiliating with its chapter and commandery at Plymouth, and is a member of the Order of Elks of South Bend and of the Woodmen of the World at Bremen.

 

Dr. Smith took a post-graduate course in New York Post-Graduate College in 1892 and 1893, and during that time he was on the staff of physicians of The Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital.

 

Mrs. Dr. Smith was born in Stark county, Ohio, May 27, 1872, and is the only child born to Edward N. and Charlotte (Caldwell) Williams. Her father was a native of New York but reared till manhood in Maryland. He received a good common school education. He saw service in the quartermaster's department during the Civil war and came to Stark County, Ohio, in 1869 and was married there. Edward Williams traces his lineage to Roger Williams; of historic fame in Rhode Island during the Colonial struggle for liberty. The early progenitors of Mr. Williams saw service in the war of the Revolution, which entitles Mrs. Dr. Smith to be eligible to the Sons and Daughters of the Revolution.

 

Mr. Williams is an ardent Republican politically and is a Knight Templar, being a member of this order of Masonry for thirty years. He is of the Presbyterian faith, as was also his wife. He resides in Akron, Ohio. The mother of Mrs. Dr. Smith was a native of Stark County, Ohio, born in 1851 and died in 1891. She was educated in the public schools of Ohio. She traced her lineage to the Spanish, English and Irish and in physique and facial expression was a typical Spaniard. Mrs. Dr. Smith's early primary training was begun in the public schools of Ohio. She then was a student in the classical course at Wooster University for one year, then entered the Women's Medical College at Cincinnati for two terms and later the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical College and graduated in the class of 1893 She then associated with her husband in the practice of her profession till the present. She is the only lady who is a practicing physician and holds a diploma in the county of Marshall, Indiana.

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                                      567

 

 

CHARLES W. RAMSAY, a prominent farmer and stock raiser in West Township, Marshall County, has resided on his present homestead since his return from the front in the Civil War, becoming its owner in the spring of 1865. He was born on the 28th of August 1837, in the state of New York, his ancestors having been identified with the interest of that commonwealth for many generations, and his grandfather, George R. Ramsay, received a grant of land there in compensation for his services in the Revolutionary War. George Ramsay, the son of George R. and the father of George W. Ramsay, inscribed his name among the honored pioneers of Marshall County, but he, too, was a native of the Empire State, there attaining to mature years and becoming identified with its agricultural interests. He was also well known as a cooer, lumberman and as a tavern keeper. Ere leaving his native commonwealth of New York he was there married to Maria C. Ladd, who was born and reared there, and in 1841 they made the overland journey with their family to Indiana. Locating in West Township, Marshall County, Mr. Ramsay became the owner of one hundred and sixty acres, but he had purchased his land before locating here, and he subsequently added forty acres to the original tract. With the aid of his children he cleared most of the land and placed many substantial and valuable improvements, but he was afterward defrauded out of the forty acres. Mr. and Mrs. Ramsey became the parents of thirteen children, six sons and seven daughters. The husband and father was called from this life in 1850, and the mother in 1881, after many years’ residence in Marshall County, during which time they greatly endeared themselves to its residents. He was a member of the fraternal order of Masons, and was a Whig in his political affiliations.

 

Charles W. Ramsay was but a little lad at the time of the removal of the family to Marshall County, and in the old time log schools of West Township, he received his educational training and grew to years of maturity on the old home farm, which he assisted to clear and cultivate. On the 20th of June 1861, he offered his services to his country’s cause as a member of Company E, Seventeenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, his military career covering a period of three years, and during that time he participated in many of the noted battles of the war, including that of Chattanooga. On the 6th of October, in the Wheeler Raid near Shelbyville, he received a gunshot wound in the left side, and on the 21st of June 1864, he was mustered out of service at Columbia Tennessee. Returning thence to his old home in West Township he became the owner of his present homestead and has ever since been busily engaged in its cultivation and improvement.

 

On the 6th of October 1864, Mr. Ramsay married Abigail Miller, who was born in Ohio on October 4, 1839, to Jonathan and Esther Miller, farming people of North Township, Marshall County. She departed this life September 26, 1902. Eight children three sons and five daughters have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Ramsay: George W., Carrie M., Theo A. (deceased), Jesse C., Mary E., Florrie A., Anna A., and one, the first born, who died in infancy.


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                                      568

 

Mr. Ramsay has given a life-long support to the principles of the Republican Party and has taken an active part in the public affairs of his community. He is a member of the military order of the Grand Army of the Republic.

 

MELVIN L COREY. In the commercial and industrial history of Marshall County Melvin L. Corey has taken a prominent place. In 1879 he moved to Argos and bought a half interest in his brother’s hardware store, the firm name being W.D. Corey & Brother. Three years later George J. Alleman bought the interest of W. D. Corey and the new business was conducted for eighteen years under the name of Corey & Alleman. The business rapidly developed into one of the largest and best known in this part of the state.

 

On account of failing health Mr. Alleman sold to George Stevens, and in 1901 Mr. Corey left the hardware business to accept the office of secretary of the National Retail Hardware Association, having already been elected secretary of the Indiana Hardware Association in 1900. The National retail Hardware Association at the time had but seven hundred and fifty members and only five affiliated states, while at the time of this writing it has over twelve thousand members and covers thirty-three states. Fully one-half the mail that enters or leaves Argos can be traced to the association headquarters.

 

The National Hardware Bulletin was started by Mr. Corey in 1901, and is now one of the best-known trade magazines as well as the leading official organization organ in the United States, it having readers in every state and many foreign countries. The printing of this magazine was mainly responsible for the organization and development of the Wickizer-McClure printing plant, one of the best in the state.

 

Mr. Corey was born in Green Township, Marshall County, March 27, 1854, a son of Barney and Barbara A (Douglass) Corey. The father was born in Rhode Island June 4, 1809, and became one of the early pioneer settlers in Marshall County. His death occurred in Green Township, Marshall County in 1866. Five children were born, and three are still living: Sarah A., widow of Belitha Gray, now living in Whitestown, Indiana; Barney J, a resident of Missouri; and Melvin L; the subject of this review.

 

The youngest child, Melvin L. Corey, supplemented his common school training by study in the city schools of Rochester, Indiana, while later he became a student in Walworth Academy, of Walworth, New York, and in 1877 graduated in the Rochester Business College. During the two years thereafter he taught school in the state of New York, and then returning  to Indiana entered upon his successful business career in Argos.

 

Mr. Corey married a native daughter of Marshall County, Mahala Shaffer, but he had previously wedded in 1882 Alwilda Boggs, a daughter of Joel L. Boggs, and her death occurred on the 21st of April 1889, after becoming the mother of one son, Earl. The second union has been blessed by the birth of three children: Lawrence, Lowell and Hattie. Mr. Corey takes an active interest in the public affairs of his community, and for several terms he served as a member of the town board, of which for two terms he was the treasurer,

 

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                         569

 

was for three terms a member of the school board and its president for two terms, and during six or seven years he was the fire chief. His fraternal relations connect him with Argos Lodge, No. 2.12, K. of P., of which he is a past chancellor commander, and with Argos Lodge No.399, A. F. & A. M., in which he is a past master. His political affiliations are with the Republican Party.

 

WILLIAM VOREIS is a self-made man whose life record proves what can be /accomplished by unwearied industry. He was born in Rush County, Indiana, May 27, 1834, and is a son of James and Elizabeth (Pollard) Voreis. The father, who was born in Kentucky, February 2, 1806, became a resident of Rush county, Indiana, in the '20S, being one of the pioneer farmers there. In 1835 he removed to Marshall County and settled on one hundred and twenty acres of timberland in Green Township, which he had previously purchased. He also walked to Laporte and entered a claim to one hundred and sixty acres of timberland which is today in Center township. At that time it was situated in the midst of the dense forest. Upon his property in Green Township Mr. Voreis built his first log cabin and subsequently he entered one hundred arid sixty acres in what is now Union township. He and his wife with their two children took up their abode in the little cabin home, occupying it until he was able to build a frame house. It was on the 15th of January, 1831, in Rush county, that he had married Miss Elizabeth Pollard, a native 0£ this state, who died at the age of thirty-seven years. In their family were seven children: William, Elizabeth, Malinda, Samantha, Jonas, Thomas L. and George W., but only the first and last named are now living. After losing his first wife Mr. Voreis married Mrs. Lucretia Thompson, nee Bodkins. His life was in consistent harmony with his professions as a member of the Christian church, and throughout his business career he manifested unassailable integrity. His first presidential vote was cast for Andrew Jackson, and he always gave his political support to the Democracy.

 

In his boyhood days William Voreis shared in the hardships and trials incident to pioneer life, assisted his father in clearing the wilderness and as opportunity permitted attended the subscription schools, living at home until twenty-six years of age. He then bought one hundred and sixty acres of land where he now resides for eight hundred and fifty dollars. It was covered with a native growth of forest trees and there he built a log cabin. On the 2d of December, 1862, he married Miss Sarah Siple, who was born in Wayne county, Ohio, April 3, 1843, a daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Alleman) Siple, who came to Marshall county at an early day, casting in their lot with the pioneer settlers. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Siple were born nine children, of whom four are now living: Ann, Margaret, John and Jacob. The wife and mother died May 13, 1885, and for his second wife Mr. Voreis chose Mrs. Martha Miller, whom he wedded August 1, 1891. She was born in Green Township, this county, October 20, 1852, and was a daughter of Joseph and Catherine (Alleman) Miller. She wedded first John Wickizer and had one son, John, a resident of Walnut Township, is a teacher and a farmer. He received his diploma from the common schools and was also a student in the Valparaiso College.

 


570                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

He taught one year in the Argos schools. He wedded Miss Cora Davis. Mrs. Voreis' father was born in Pennsylvania June 28, 1906, and died at the age of seventy-eight years, while the mother was born in Ohio and died at the age o thirty-five years. They were married in Wayne county and became the parents of eleven children, of whom four are now living: John, Joseph, William and Mrs. Voreis. In 1852 the father came to Marshall County with his family, settling in Green Township. He was a cooper by trade, but here followed farming and in the community was recognized as a prominent and influential citizen. He voted with the Democracy from the time that age conferred upon him the right of franchise and he cast his first ballot for Andrew Jackson. He, too, belonged to the Christian church.

 

After purchasing his present farm Mr. Voreis and his family lived in the original log cabin until after the birth of four of the children. In 1871 he built a frame dwelling and he now has a good bank barn and other buildings upon his place for the shelter of grain and stock. He has made all of the improvements here and cleared the land from the timber. As the years passed he prospered and he and his sons became owners of seven hundred and twenty acres of well-improved land, all in Green township. He has now, however, given to his sons all of his land save the old homestead of one hundred and sixty acres upon which he resides.

 

Unto Mr. Voreis and his first wife were born five children: Edwin, a prosperous farmer in Green township, was educated in the common schools. He wedded Miss Ella Harrison and they have one daughter, Vera; James, a prosperous farmer on the Voreis homestead, was educated in the common schools, and also at Valparaiso Normal. He wedded Miss Florence Miller and has two children, Ethel and Mabel; Jacob is also a prosperous farmer, and was educated in the common schools. He wedded Miss Stella Castleman, and their three sons are William G., Dale C. and James W. His wife died February 2, 1906. Estella is at home. William died at the age of two years. Mr. Voreis is a stalwart Democrat and has served as township trustee for two terms and as county commissioner for one term. He was brought to this county when about two and a half years of age and has since lived within its borders, covering more than the allotted scriptural age of man. His life has ever been one of industry and integrity, commanding for him the esteem and trust of those with whom he has been associated.

 

LORENZO D. ELEY, M. D. During a period of twenty-two years Dr. Lorenzo D. Eley has been a member of the medical profession, and since 1897 he has practiced in Plymouth. He began his medical studies in Rochester, Indiana, in about 1883, and in 1887 he graduated in the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Keokuk, Iowa. With this thorough preparation for his life work he opened an office at Tippecanoe, Indiana, and continued his practice there until the spring of 1891, going thence to Chicago, and in 1897 he came to Plymouth and has since been in constant practice here.

 

Although so prominently identified with the interests of Marshall County

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     571

 

Dr. Eley is a native son of Fulton county, Indiana, born on the 28th of June 1855, to Sampson and Hannah (Kemmer) Eley, both natives of Ohio, and of German descent. On the paternal side the family were from Pennsylvania but became residents of Ohio in an early day. Mr. Eley passed away in death at the age of sixty-nine years, but his wife reached the advanced age of eighty-three years before she was called to the home beyond. In their family were seven children, four daughters and three sons, all of whom are living at the present time with the exception of the eldest, who died at the age of sixty-six years.

 

Dr. Eley, their fifth child and second son in order of birth, spent the early years of his life in his native county of Fulton, and after attending its public schools he was a student for two terms at Bourbon College and also spent a similar period in the Rochester high school. For one year after the completion of his education he was a member of the teachers profession, and it was at the close of this period that he entered upon the study of the profession, which he had chosen as his life occupation. His membership with the Marshall County, the Indiana State and the American Medical Societies enables him to keep abreast of the many new discoveries, which are constantly being made in the medical science, and he also has fraternal affiliations with the Masonic order.

 

Dr. Eley married in 1891 Catherine B. Conroy, who was born and reared in Keokuk, Iowa, and they have one son, Conroy. The political affiliations of Dr. Eley are with the Democratic Party, and in 1896 he was the choice of his party for the office of county assessor and he has also served as secretary of the county board of health. He takes an active part in the public life of his community.

 

JACOB MARTIN. The city of Argos, Marshall county, numbers among its leading citizens none who are more intelligent, versatile and substantial than Jacob Martin, for many years engaged in educational work and, in the later period of his career, a leader in the lumber interest of the locality. He was born in Tippecanoe township, of the county named, on the 22d day of May, 1860, being a son of Socrates and Margaret (Tarris) Martin. His parents are both natives of Ohio - the father born in 1834 and the mother in 1836 - and they are now residents of Mentone, Indiana. In 1856 the senior Mr. Martin located in Kosciusko County, Indiana, and became a "Hoosier school master," and in 1860 removed to Marshall County, became identified with its agricultural interests and continued in active pursuits until his retirement to Mentone in 1882. He is an earnest member of the Baptist church, and an old-time Democrat.

 

Jacob Martin is of Scotch-Irish blood and the eldest in a family of five sons and three daughters, all of whom are living. He lived on the farm until 1883, when he moved to Argos, Indiana, where he taught in the public schools until 1889, when he moved to Plymouth, Indiana. He taught in the Plymouth high schools fourteen years, 1889 to 1903. He resigned his position in November 1902, because his continuous and wearing labors had so impaired his health that he was compelled to seek a change of environment and occupation. During this period of his life various indications pointed to the advisability of the adoption of a business career. Among his other outside works of a practical nature was the construction and operation of the first independent telephone exchange

 


572                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

at Warsaw, Indiana. He owned and operated that exchange four years, 1896 to 1900, while teaching in Plymouth. For more than a year succeeding the relinquishment of his duties as a teacher Mr. Martin traveled through the northern and western states, thereby obtaining both required change and recreation, and broadened his outlook over the field of commerce and business. In 1904 he located in Argos, and has since been actively identified with its lumber interests and allied industries. In the following year he assisted in the organization of the Argos Manufacturing Company, a corporation engaged in the manufacture of furniture, and as its president he has evinced strong ability both of an executive and promotional character.

 

On the 7th of October 1883, Mr. Martin married Miss Anna M. Goodwin, who was born in Marshall county January 15, 1858, and is a daughter of William G. and Lavina (Whisman) Goodwin. The father is a native of Kentucky and the mother of Indiana. Both Mr. and Mrs. Martin are members of the Christian church at Argos, and also of Eastern Star chapter No.26, Plymouth. Individually Mr. Martin is an enthusiastic and leading fraternalist. He is a member of Plymouth Kilwinning Lodge No.149, A. F. and A. M., and of the Argos Lodge No.212, Knights of Pythias, having held all of the offices of the latter, and in October, 1907, served as a representative to the grand lodge.

 

L. W, McCLURE was born in Holmes county, Ohio, July 15, 1839, a son of Holladay and Elizabeth (Ross) McClure, both of whom claimed Pennsylvania as the commonwealth of their nativity, In a very early day in its history the father moved to Ohio and became numbered among its honored pioneers, and in 1856 he transferred his residence to Fulton county, Indiana, After remaining there for some time he came to Marshall county, where he was identified with its agricultural interests until 1879. In that year he moved to Argos and lived retired until his death in 1867, aged sixty-five years. He was a member of the Baptist church, and politically was a Jefferson and Jackson Democrat. Mrs. McClure long survived her husband, dying in 1882 when seventy years of age. They were married in their native state of Pennsylvania and became the parents of eleven children, of whom the three now living are: L. W., the subject of this review; Lucinda, the wife of Philip Steverns; and Harriett N., the wife of James Woodard. Mrs. McClure's father was a soldier in the war of 1812.

 

L. W. McClure remained in the parental home until twenty years of age, and learning the carpenter's trade he continued work at that vocation for thirty-five years, At the close of that period he turned his attention to farming pursuits in Walnut township, Marshall county, but on the 2d of August, 1905, he sold his farm, and ha' since lived retired in Argos. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he has held all of the offices, and in his political relations he voted with the Democracy until twenty years ago, since which time he has been allied with the Prohibitionists.

 

On the 3d of August 1861, Mr. McClure married Elizabeth Ormsby, who was born in Fulton County, Indiana, June 25, 1842, a daughter of

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                         573

 

Lyman and Eliza (Robins) Ormsby, and her death occurred at the early age of twenty-eight years, in 1870. She became the mother of three children: Ida, the wife of Luther Bowell; William, who married Alma Eidson and Frankin, who was born April 26, 1868, and died on the 2d of May, 1869. On the 10th of April, 1873, Mr. McClure married Catherine Gipe. She was born in Richland county, Ohio, July 25, 1841, the daughter of Samuel and Martha (Harnly) Gipe, both of whom were born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, the father on the 3d of April, 1810, and the mother in 1814. In the early days Samuel Gipe moved to Van Wert county, Ohio, where he cleared a farm of one hundred acres and continued his residence there until his removal to Marshall county, Indiana, in 1868, purchasing him a farm in West township. His wife died soon after his arrival here, and in 1871 he sold his farm and moved to Roann, Indiana, where he spent his remaining days and died on the 25th of October 1878. He was a member of the German Baptist church and affiliated with the Democratic Party. The death of Mrs. Gipe occurred on the 1st of February 1871, at the age of fifty- seven years. Of their family of twelve children, eight daughters and four sons, nine are now living: Fannie, Catherine, Amos, Pauline, Amanda, Harriett, Emantiel, Lavina and Mary. Mr. and Mrs. McClure are the parents of three children: Edmund L., engaged in baling hay and straw; Orlando, who married Lura Hess, and Myrtle, the wife of Clarence Reed.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Orlando McClure have a family of two children, Katherine Louise and Ray Herbert. He is one of the proprietors of the Wickizer-McClure Printing Company, of Argos, and they are up-to-date printers and their work is of the best. Mr. and Mrs. Reed have one little daughter, Helen McClure.

 

DR. B. W. S. W1SENIAN, postmaster at Culver, Marshall County, is well known throughout this section as a physician of long and substantial standing. The six years of his government service have also proven his executive and administrative capacity and established his reputation as a citizen of broad caliber and continuous progress. He is an Ohio man, born in Hancock county on the 24th of June, 1852, a son of Lorenzo D. and Agnes (Hufford) Wiseman, both natives of the Buckeye state.

 

Tradition makes Sir Richard Wiseman, sergeant surgeon to Charles II, one of the great figures in the early history of English medicine and surgery, .as also one of the founders of the family in that country. Rev. John Wiseman, a great uncle, was a soldier of the Revolutionary war and a participant of that memorable campaign at Valley Forge. This fact entitles the doctor and his descendants to honorable membership in the Sons and Daughters of the Revolution. Samuel Wiseman, his paternal. Grandfather, was a native of Pennsylvania, whence (after the Revolution and when but a boy) he removed with his father's family into Virginia, and from the Old Dominion migrated into the wilds of Ohio about the year 1806. The father, L. D. Wiseman, was born in Fairfield County, that state, in 1812; followed the carpenter's trade in his younger years, and in his early manhood removed to Hancock county,

 


574                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

Ohio, where he resided until 1867. In that year he located at Marmont (Culver), Marshall county, Indiana, where his death occurred January 23, 1890. The deceased was a man of the highest social standing and of deep religious character, faithfully serving the Methodist church for a period of sixty years. He was twice married, first to Frances Hooper, a daughter of Rev. James Hooper, who bore him seven children, and, secondly, to Agnes Hufford, who also became the mother of seven.

 

The fourth child and second son of the second family, the doctor resided in his native county until he was fifteen years of age, when he accompanied his parents to Indiana, locating at Culver in 1867. The education which was preliminary to his professional course he received in the schools of Ohio and Indiana, this including a training in the common schools of these states and in the high schools of Napoleon, Ohio, and Plymouth, Indiana, as well as courses at the Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso. While thus engaged, he also taught school and read medicine under the preceptorship of Drs. Edmunds and Durr, of his hometown. In the winter of 1876-7 he attended lectures in the medical department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and entered practice during the following spring at Mannont. He attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk, Iowa, in the winter of 1879-80, receiving his degree of M. D. in March of the latter year, and in 1884 took a post graduate course at the institution of the same name in Chicago. During the spring and summer of 1881 he was engaged in the practice of his profession at Hanna, Indiana, but returned to Culver. In 1885 he removed to Chicago, where, in addition to his private practice, he became interested in the work of the Convalescent Women's Home of that city. III health in his family compelled him to leave a promising professional field there and relocate at Culver in 1887, and there he has since resided and prospered. He continued to devote himself to his profession with undivided energy and uninterrupted success until 1902, when he was honored with the appointment of post- master at the hands of President Roosevelt, and was reappointed to the position in January 1906. The doctor is a member of the Indiana State Medical Society and of the Marshall County Medical Society, having served for one term as president of the latter, and is also one of the surgeons of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias at Culver, being a member of Indiana Castle Hall No.231.

 

Dr. Wiseman's marriage to Miss Roseline M. Buswell occurred in 1877, and they have become the parents of the following: Charles S., M. D., a graduate of the Fort Wayne College of Medicine and an alumnus of Purdue University, located in active practice at Lakeville, Indiana, and married to Miss Irma Garver, who has borne him one child, Richard Scott; Gertrude A., wife of Clarence Behmer, assistant postmaster at Culver, and who is the mother of Glenn, Ruth and Donald; Donald H. and James S., both deceased; Clara B., who is a graduate of the Culver High School and taught one term in the county; Allie E., in the last year of her high school course and a talented musician, being a performer both on the piano and the violin; Ethel H., also living at home. The parents have fulfilled the duty of good Americans in that they have given

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     575

 

their children not only a thorough mental training, but have not neglected to furnish them with that culture whose nature is indicated by their natural tastes.

 

WILLIAM EVERLY, one of the prominent citizens of Plymouth and of Marshall County as well, is a native Hoosier, having been born in Kosciusko County, Indiana, October 3, 1854. He is a son of Joseph and Sarah Mackay-Everly, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. They were the parents of seven children, four boys and three girls of whom the subject of this sketch is the youngest. His father was of German extraction, and his mother of Scotch-Irish decent. In his general physical and mental make-up he partakes largely of the admirable qualities of the lineage from which he is descended. He is of robust build, six feet in height, black sparkling eyes and ruddy complexion.

 

He was educated in the public schools of Kosciusko county and in the Warsaw High School, and at the age of eighteen, one year after his father's death, which occurred in Kosciusko county, he commenced teaching in the public schools of that county, in which profession he continued for a period of fourteen years. After abandoning his work as a teacher he has since been closely allied to schoolwork, being engaged in the supplying of schools with the much needed apparatus which his former experience as a teacher convinced him was essential to good work. He was reared under the influence of the Christian faith, of which both his father and mother were ardent and devout members. Politically he is and always has been a Democrat, as were all his family from the time of the formation of the Democratic Party. But beyond being elected and serving as trustee of Harrison township, Kosciusko county, the township in which he was born and reared, he has never been an applicant for office, believing the victory he achieved by his election as trustee in a township in which the Republican majority was largely against him was political glory enough for a lifetime.

 

He was united in marriage with Miss Amanda A. Dunnock, November 11, 1877, to whom were born three children, one son and two daughters, only one of whom grew to womanhood – Lola -who is happily married to Harry B. Lamson, of Plymouth, and resides in South Bend, Indiana. His first wife having died October 25, 1902, he was united in his second marriage to Miss Harriet B. Kelly, July 3, 1905, and resides in a palatial mansion in the city of Plymouth.

 

In 1886 he removed from Kosciusko County and settled on a small farm, which by industry and economy he had managed to acquire. In 1895 he entered into the general contracting line of business, and up to the present has occupied a goodly portion of his time in that line of work. Being reared on a farm, his liking for that profession clings to him still, and a portion of his time is devoted to managing his large landed estate, which, having added to his first farm here a little and there a little, now covers an area of five hundred and twenty acres, most of which is among the best lands in this section of the state.

 

In the social and society circles of life he is a popular and prominent figure. He belongs to the Masonic orders in Plymouth, and has filled the highest office in the Masonic lodge, Royal Arch Chapter and Knights

 


576                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

Templar Commandery; is also a member of the Council of Royal and Select Masters, and a member of Indianapolis Consistory, Scottish Rite. He is also a member of the Plymouth lodge, Knights of Pythias.

 

MOSES DAWSON) who is now living retired in Argos but in former years was actively engaged in business as a farmer and stock-raiser of Marshall county, was born in Walnut township, June 29, 1846, his parents being William and Sarah (Greer) Dawson. The father was born in Tennessee, April 26, 1801, and died December 30, 1887, at the advanced age of eighty-six years. His wife, who was born in Virginia May 5, 1814, passed away in November 1848, at the comparatively early age of thirty-four years. They were married in Vigo County, Indiana, having in childhood days become residents of this state. When only five years of age William Dawson accompanied his parents on their removal from Tennessee to Kentucky, and was there reared to manhood. On attaining his majority he accompanied his parents to Indiana, locating in Vigo County, where in 1832 he wedded Sarah Greer. He then removed to Illinois, living in that state until 1836, when he came to Marshall County, Indiana, making the journey across the country with ox-teams. He then located in Walnut Township, near the Bethel church, and purchased eighty acres of land upon which stood a log cabin. In this pioneer home the Dawson family soon began housekeeping, and there they remained until 1849. The wife and mother died in this pioneer home in 1848. Having built a new log cabin, the family took possession of it in the spring of 1849, and it continued to be their place of abode until 1860, when he built a two-story frame house that was his place of abode until 1865, when he removed to the vicinity of Lafayette, Indiana, where he continued until 1880. In that year he became a resident of Argos, where he spent his remaining days, and at the time of his death he was the oldest citizen in Walnut Township, having lived here for sixty-six years. Soon after coming to Marshall county he joined the Baptist church, and when that congregation ceased to have an existence he identified himself with the Methodist Episcopal church, He was a good citizen and Christian man, beloved by all who knew him, He patterned his life closely after the teachings of the church, and at all times commanded the confidence, trust and respect of those with whom he was associated. His political support was given to the Whig party. Unto him and his wife were born nine children, of whom six are yet living, namely: John, Delilah, William, Elizabeth Ann, George R. and Moses.

 

In taking up the personal history of Moses Dawson, we present to our readers the life record of one who is widely known in Marshall County. Upon the old homestead farm he was reared, remaining with his father until he reached the age of seventeen years, when he started out in business life on his Own account, following boating on the Wabash and Erie canal. Twelve years passed in that way and when the canal business ceased to be profitable, owing to the more rapid transportation brought about by means of the railroads, he returned to Marshall County and settled upon a farm in Walnut Township. His time and energies were then given to general agricultural pursuits and to stock raising until 1899, when he retired to Argos and has since enjoyed a well-earned rest.

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     577

 

While upon the farm he successfully tilled the fields and also gained a good profit in the raising and sale of cattle, hogs and sheep. His business affairs were carefully and systematically managed and he was never known to take advantage of the necessities of another in a business transaction.

 

On the 11th of November 1877, Mr. Dawson was united in marriage to Miss Judith Fox, who was born in Wayne county, Indiana, July 3, 1852, a daughter of William and Judith A. (Brooks) Fox. Her father, who was born near Richmond, Wayne county, Indiana, March 23, 1823, died in Walnut township, near Argos, May 16, 1891. The mother was born in North Carolina January 17, 1819, and died in Argos August 7, 1905. When a little maiden of six years she accompanied her parents on their removal to Wayne County, Indiana, and it was there she gave her hand in marriage to William Fox. In 1861 they came to Marshall County, settling in Walnut Township, east of Argos, and later they established their home a half-mile south, where the father spent his remaining days. At one time he was quite an extensive landholder and was a well-known and prominent citizen of this community. He held membership in the Christian church and gave his political allegiance to the Whig party until its dissolution, after which he became a stalwart Republican. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Fox were born eight children, of whom six are now living: Lorenzo, Jesse B., Charity L., Mrs. Dawson, William L. and John H.

 

Mr. Dawson exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the Republican Party, but has never sought office. He belongs to Argos lodge No. 212, K.P., and is interested in all the progressive measures which have bearing upon the welfare and upbuilding of this part of the state. His life has been one of untiring industry and perseverance, and to these qualities he owes the success that he is now enjoying, making him a substantial agriculturist of the community.

 

WILLIAM STAFFORD. Marshall county, Indiana, has been the home of William Stafford since the early year of 1847, and from that time until the year of 1905 he was prominently identified with its business interests, but he is now living retired. He was first identified with its saw-milling interests, and in 1891 embarked in the lumber business in Argos, thus continuing until in April 1905, when he laid aside the active cares of a business life to enjoy the reward of former labor.

 

Mr. Stafford was born in Rush county, Indiana, April 11, 1841, a son of Enoch and Catherine (Mullen) Stafford, natives, respectively, of Virginia and Kentucky, the father born on the 13th of July 1816, and the mother in 1817. They were married on the 11th of April, 1837, and shortly afterward the young couple took up their abode in Rush county, Indiana, living there until the fall of 1859, when they came to Marshall county and established their home in Walnut township. The father was long numbered among the county's leading farmers and stockmen, and .his death occurred on the 23d of June 1895. He was a member of the Christian church and affiliated with the Whig party; Mrs. Stafford preceded her husband in death, dying on the 4th of August, 1893, and

 


578                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

of their nine children four are now living: William, the subject of this review; Julia, Who is married and living in Kansas; Augusta, the wife of Albert Chapman; and Priscilla, living in Kansas, the wife of John Barr.

 

During his boyhood days William Stafford worked on the farm. In 1847 he came to Marshall county, Indiana, and secured work in the saw mill of Mr. Railsback, and in 1851 he took charge of the business and continued its supervision until his enlistment for service in the Civil war entering on the 16th of August, 1862, Company D, Seventy-third Indiana Volunteer Regiment, enlisting at Argos, and he received his discharge at Nashville, Tennessee, July 1, 1865. During that time he participated in the battles of Perryville and Stone River, was also a member of the command of Colonel Straight in its raid into Georgia, and was captured near Rome, that state, and held as a prisoner of war for sixteen days. He was then paroled, and, returning to Indianapolis, remained there about five months, after which, in the fall of 1864, he was ordered to Nashville, Tennessee, and spent the winter there. Going thence to Stevenson, Alabama, he was detailed as guard of the Memphis & Charleston Railroad, remaining in the parole-guard service until the close of the war. When his Country no longer needed his service Mr. Stafford returned to Argos and resumed his milling operations as the head sawyer for David Railsback, and after eighteen months he took charge of the mill. In 1874 he suffered the loss of his hand while working in the mill. His career in the saw-milling business of Marshall covered a period of twenty-six years, and in 1891, as above stated, he embarked in the lumber business in Argos.

 

The marriage of Mr. Stafford was celebrated on the 5th of February 1868, Lorinda Hoover becoming his wife. She was born in Carroll county, Indiana, July 25, 1849, a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Brockus) Hoover. The father was born in Ohio, and during his boyhood days moved with his parents to Carroll County, Indiana, and in 1853 established his home in Marshall County. He purchased and cleared a farm in Walnut Township and erected a primitive little cabin home, to which he later built an addition, and his name is enrolled among the early pioneers of Marshall County. At the time of his arrival here game of all kinds, including deer and turkey, was plentiful, and for a number of years in the early days he was the incumbent of the office of road supervisor. His political affiliations were with the Whig party. The death of this honored pioneer occurred at the age of fifty years, in 1875, and his wife survived him but a few years, dying in 1879 at the age of fifty. They were married in Carroll County, Indiana, and their union was blessed by the birth of ten children, and the four now living are: Lorinda, the wife of Mr. Stafford; Elmer E.; Lydia B., the widow of George Stephens; and Lulu, the wife of B. L. Nichols, living in Chicago. To Mr. and Mrs. Stafford have been born four children: Lettie M., the wife of Claude Main; Rose Elizabeth, wife of Dr. E. E. Willsey; Emory E., Who died at the age of nine years; and William R. C. Mr. Stafford has membership relations with Argos Lodge No.263, I. 0.0. F., and is a charter member of Lafayette Gordon Post No.132, G. A. R., while his wife is a charter member of its auxiliary, the Relief Corps No. 250.

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     579

 

SAMUEL W. GOULD. M. D., a resident physician and surgeon of Argos, Indiana, began the preparation for his chosen profession at a very early age, graduating when but nineteen years of age, in 1858, from the Medical College of Ohio at Cincinnati, and in the same year he opened an office in Allen county of this state and began the work in which he has achieved such eminent success. He practiced in Allen County until 1865, and in that year came to Indiana, and to Argos in 1867. Realizing the need of further instruction in his work, he entered Rush Medical College of Chicago and graduated therein in 1870, and then returned to Argos. Dr. Gould is considered one of the best-read physicians and surgeons in the state. He is a regular and able contributor to the leading medical journals, and is a terse and ready writer, possessed of excellent descriptive powers and a rare faculty for holding and advocating decided opinions. He also possesses marked oratorical power, and is an entertaining, instructive and persuasive speaker.

 

Dr. Gould was born in York township, Union county, Ohio, June 11, 1839, a son of Daniel and Adeline (Wilkins) Gould, natives of Sara- toga county, New York, born, respectively, on January 1, 1808, and the 3d of May, 1808. They established their home in Union county, Ohio, in 1836, being among the first to take up their abode in the then wilderness of that community. The father purchased land at two dollars an acre and built a little log cabin home; not a nail having been used in the construction of this primitive dwelling, and this later became the birthplace of their son Samuel. In 1867 the family removed to Argos, Indiana, where the father lived retired during the remainder of his life, and died on the 25th of October 1888. He served for many years as a justice of the peace in Ohio and was a Whig politically. Mr. and Mrs. Gould were born in the same year and died in the same year, she on the 31st of January, and in their family were three children: Albert J., a well known attorney of Knox, Indiana; John H., living at Delphi, Indiana, where he served as a circuit judge for twelve years; and Samuel W. Dr. Samuel W. Gould began teaching school when but fourteen years of age, having previously received his education in a private school, and he taught a winter term of three months in a country school. During this time he was also a student, attending all academy until sixteen years, and he then began the study of the profession to which he has dedicated his life. His practice in Marshall County is large and remunerative, and he is also serving as the surgeon for the Nickel Plate Railroad Company, and is at present president of the pension board of examiners of Marshall County. He is a member of the Marshall County Medical Association, of the Indiana State and the American Medical Associations, and has several times been president of the county association.

 

Dr. Gould married Elizabeth C. Shaffer January 25, 1860. She was born February 9, 1840, in Logan County, Ohio, and died on the 7th of June 1864, after becoming the mother of two daughters, but both died in infancy. On the 30th of December 1867, Dr. Gould married Miss Sarah A. Smith, of St. Joseph, Michigan, born April 19, 1840, and their union was blessed by the birth of one son, Daniel W. Gould, who is living at Mishawaka, Indiana. The wife and mother died on the 29th June 1895,

 

580                                                            HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

An active member of the Episcopal Church and a lady of culture and attainments. Dr. Gould’s parents were strict Presbyterians, but he is more liberal in his religious views. In 1896 he was made the presidential elector for the Thirteenth Indiana District and voted for William McKinley for the presidency. He is a member of Argos Lodge No. 399, A.F. and A. M., of which he is the present master, and has served in that office many times previously. He is also a member of Plymouth Chapter No, 49, R.A. M.: of Plymouth Council No. 16, and of Plymouth Commandery No. 26, K.T.

 

PERRY N. SCHLOSSER, deceased was born in Osnaburg, Ohio February 9, 1934. He was a son of one of Indiana’s pioneer ministers, the Rev. Jesse Schlosser, and his wife, Elizabeth Moon, both of whom were also natives of the Buckeye state. They were married and became the parents of eight children, of whom those now living are: Lucinda, the widow of Christ Messerly, who served as a soldier in the Mexican War; Bell, Nannie, Sarah, Jesse, and Lavina. Nannie is the widow of Lewis La Brach, a soldier in the Mexican War. Reverend Schlosser was a minister in a Reformed Church in Ohio for many years. He came to Indiana in an early date in its history, where he presided over a large territory in the interests of his church, and for a number of years preceding his death, which occurred at the age of sixty-two years, he had charge of the church at Three Rivers, Michigan. His political affiliations were with the Whig Party. Mrs. Schlosser, who was born on the 22nd of February 1812 passed away in death March 29, 1887.

 

During his early life Perry N. Schlosser learned the blacksmith’s trade, and when quite young he enlisted in the Civil War, in Company H, Forty-fourth Regiment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry, entering the ranks on the 18th of September 1861, at Springfield, Ohio for three years or during the war, and he received his discharge at Camp Clark of that state with the rank of sergeant. On the 5th of January 1864, he re-enlisted as a veteran in Company H, Eighth Regiment of Ohio Calvary, in which he served until the close of the conflict, and was discharged at Clarksburg, West Virginia July 13, 1865. During his military career he participated in many of the historic battles of the war, including Knoxville, Charleston, Beverly Ford, Louisburg, Laurel Hill, Dutton’s Hill, and was also in the charge on Fort Saunders and the Piedmont and Hunters Raids. While at home on a furlough he with others wrecked the rebel newspaper office of the Dayton Empire.

 

After his return from the army, Mr. Schlosser located in Kewanna, Indiana, from whence after a time he removed to Plymouth, Indiana, and served as the foreman in a planing mill for sixteen years or more. His life’s labors were ended in death on the 18th of October 1895, when he had reached the sixty-first milestone on life’s journey. He was a member of the Reformed Church all his life, and he also held membership relations with Miles H. Tibbit’s Post No. 260 G.A.R.

 

Mr. Schlosser was first married on the 4th of December 1866, to Anna Yockey, but she died two years after her marriage, December 1 1868. Miss Anna Behmer became his wife on the 5th of July 1883, in Logansport, Cass County, Indiana. She was born in Germany March 22, 1855, the daughter of Conrad and Margaret Behmer,

 

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     581

 

who were born and married in the fatherland. In their family were twelve children, and the ten now living are: Margaret, the widow of Anthony Schultz; Anna, the widow of Mr. Schlosser; Mary, the wife of James Kaough; Ella, wife of Richard Herriatt; George, who married Maggie Ryon; Albert, who married Elizabeth Seltenright; John, who married Mary Friend; Joseph, who married Dora Cleany; Jacob and Frank. Mr. Behmer, the father, followed the weaver’s trade in Germany and after coming to America he located in Cass County, Indiana, where he died when his daughter, Mrs. Schlosser was but a child. The three children born to Mr. and Mrs. Schlosser are: Ralph, Ella V., and Jessie. The eldest son, Ralph Schlosser is the popular proprietor of a well-stocked livery, feed and sale stable, where vehicles of all kinds are always on hand and where special attention is given to the commercial trade. Ella V., the second child died in infancy.

 

JONATHAN PICKERL, an honored early resident of Marshall County, was born in Holmes County, Ohio July 31,1836, a son of Chasteen and Sarah (Hughes) Pickerl. The father, born in Virginia October 7 1808, came to Marshall County, Indiana, in the fall of 1847, and located in Walnut Township, four miles west of the present site of Argos, while later he established his home on one hundred and sixty acres of wild and unimproved land. In 1870 his little cabin home gave place to a more commodious frame residence, and there he spent the remainder of his life and died on the 29th of January 1871. He was a life-long member of the Methodist Episcopal Church a good and pious man, and his political affiliations were with the Whig Party. Mrs. Pickerl, who was of Scotch decent and a native of Virginia, born June 14, 1814, died on the 15th of April 1887, surviving her husband for a number of years. They were married in Holmes County, Ohio and of their eight children four are still living: Jonathan, the subject of this review; Sarah, the wife of Isaac Ball; John, a resident of St. Paul, Minnesota; and Chasteen.

 

When a lad of eleven years Jonathan Pickerl came with his parents to Marshall County, Indiana, attaining to years of maturity here, and in Green Township January 8, 1862 he enlisted for service in the Civil War, becoming a member of Company C, Forty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Regiment, and after a long and arduous military career he was mustered out of the service at Goshen, Indiana. With the rank of corporal of United States colored troops, Company K, he was discharged from the Forty-eighth Regiment after about fifteen months of service, but in April 1863, re-enlisted in Company K, Eleventh Regiment of United States colored troops. In the following year, on the 22nd of December he was discharged from the service on account of disability. In the meantime he had participated in many hard-fought battles of the conflict, including those of first Bull Run, Corinth, Pittsburgh landing, Jackson and Williams Bend, and it was after this battle that he received his rank as first lieutenant.

 

582                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

He was also in the battle of Haines’ Bluff, from whence he went to Vicksburg, thence to Jackson as a recruiting officer, where he also had charge of four other recruiting officers, and then on to Vicksburg. His service was an arduous one in his country’s cause, and his health thereby became so undermined that he was obliged to tender his resignation from the service. Mr. Pickerl also had three brothers in the war, one of whom, Hugh, served as a member of the Eighty-seventh Regiment. Aaron enlisted March 12, 1862, in Company C, Twentieth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, and among the several battles in which he participated was that of Bull Run, where he lost his life. The third brother, James B., enlisted July 22 1861, in company C, Twentieth Regiment and was wounded in the second battle of Bull Run. He was with his regiment in all its engagements, and was discharged on the 29th of July 1864.

 

After the close of his military career Mr. Pickerl of this review resumed his agricultural labors, but in 1867 he left the farm and purchased a boot and shoe business in Argos, to which he later added general merchandise, and he continued as one of the active businessmen of this city until his retirement in 1891.

 

He married, March 17, 1864, Emeline Thompson, born in Clark County, Ohio, August 12, 1842, a daughter of Lemuel and Mary (Fuller) Thompson. The father was born in Virginia April 16 1816, and died on the 19th of April 1896, long surviving his wife, who passed away on the 17th of August 1879. She was born August 133, 1822. Of their four children, two sons and two daughters, two are now living. Three children blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Pickerl James Wilbur, who died November 18 1868; Zua, the wife of W.C. Morse, of Detroit; and Harriett, the wife of E.S. Tuaner, of Argos. Just before her marriage, and during Mr. Pickerl’s absence in the army, Mrs. Pickerl had a sever attack of the spotted fever, which was followed by rheumatism, and this held her as a victim during almost the remainder of her life. She passed away in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which she joined about twenty years before her death, and thereafter remained on of its faithful members. Her last severe illness extended for a period of about three months, and the desire to recover and once more resume her place in the activities of home were strong, yet with all she expressed her abiding confidence in God and a hope for immortal life. She passed away on the 24th of December 1902. Mr. Pickerl is a member of Lafayette Gordon Post No. 132 G.A. R. of Argos Lodge No. 300, I.O.O.F., and of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he is serving a trustee, His political affiliations are with the Republican Party, and he is now the president of the school board of Argos.

 

JAMES M. SCHROEDER. The name of Schroeder has been a familiar one to the residents of Marshall County from the period of its earliest development to the present time. In 1833, a young couple just starting out in life for themselves sought a home amid the wilds of Marshall County, bravely facing the dangers and hardships which beset them on every hand, but finally carving in the dense wilderness a home for themselves and family, and here they spent the remainder of their lives and lived for many decades.

 

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     583

 

Jesse and Emily (Newsom) Schroeder were married in. 1833, in Iowa, and in the same year started on their journey to Marshall County. He was a native son of Dearborn County, Indiana, born January 4, 1819, and was reared in Dearborn and Rush counties. The wife was a native daughter of Iowa. They began their married life without means, the husband working at his trade of carpentering until he was able to purchase a small farm of forty acres, which he later sold and became the owner of a tract of one hundred and sixty acres in the woods. He moved a mill to this place, known as the Mattingly & Oglesbee mill, and began the arduous task of clearing new land, and at the same time added to the boundaries of his farm until he was the owner of nearly three hundred acres. But he subsequently sold his farm and spent the two following years in the West, and on his return to Marshall County bought one hundred and sixty acres on the Michigan road, where he was for a number of years quite extensively engaged in the buying and selling of cattle. Of Joe Trobridge he later purchased one hundred and twenty acres, but after residing there for a number of years he became the owner of a farm in Polk Township. He did much trading in land during his active business career and became well and prominently known throughout Marshall County. Eleven children, nine sons and two daughters, were born to Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder. The wife and mother died and the father afterward married Fidelia Ditto. He was a Republican in his political affiliations, an active worker for his party. The death of this honored old pioneer of Marshall County occurred when he had reached the seventy-fourth milestone on the journey of life.

 

James M. Schroeder, his sixth child in order of birth, was born in North township of Marshall county, October 15, 1860, and in the schools of that neighborhood he received his educational training. When but fifteen years of age he left home and began the battle of life for himself, and coming to Polk Township he made his home with Bryan McDaniel during the following four years. On the 19th of October 1880, he married Elizabeth C. Williams, whose parents, Hardy and Louisa (McDaniel) Williams, were prominent early residents of Polk township, the birthplace of their daughter Elizabeth, who was born November 17, 1856. She was one of a family of ten children, all born in the township of Polk, and to Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder have been born nine children - Remus J., Francis M., Louisa E., Orlo A., Edith E., Hazel A., Grace U., Julia M. and Florence I.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder have given their children the advantages of good common school educations. Remus J. completed the Public school course and one year in High School. He is of a mechanical turn of mind. Francis M. received his diplomas from the common school and Tyner High School and also spent forty weeks as a student at the Valparaiso University and is now one of the Successful teachers of Polk Township, having taught for seven years. He wedded Miss Mabel I. Norris, a native of Whitley County, Indiana, and one little son was born to this marriage Russell A., Louisa E. is deceased, Orlo A. is at home, received common school education and is a machinist. Edith E. is also a teacher in Polk Township, receiving her diplomas from the common and High schools. She has taught for two years. Hazel A. is the wife of Allen Davenport, a resident of North Township.


 

584                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

Grace U. graduates in the class of 1908. Myrtle and Florence are members of the seventh rade. Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder reared a nephew, Orval Schroeder, from the age of ten to seventeen, educating him in the common schools.

 

Mr. Schroeder’s homestead farm contains eighty acres in Polk Township, forty of which he has cleared and improved, and on this estate he is engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock-raising. During twenty-four years of his early business career he taught school in Marshall County, and in all this time he has also been a prominent factor in the public life of his community, upholding the principles of the Republican Party.

 

Mr. Schroeder began teaching school at $1 per day and during the evenings and mornings he took a gob of grubbing out new land, adding a few dollars to his slim purse. He is a successful man in life and his business affairs and is held high in esteem and respect of all who know him.

 

In 1904 he was elected the trustee of Polk Township, receiving the largest majority of votes ever accorded a candidate in this township, and this, too, in a Democratic community. His fraternal relations connect him with the Maccabees, Tent No. 142, the Odd Fellows, No. 821, at Tyner, Indiana, and the grange orders, also member of the state Grange, and is a member of the United Brethren Church and was superintendent of Sunday School for six years. Mr. Schroeder has met many reverses on his road to prosperity, his home, having twice been burned, and he has met with other losses, but steadily and persistently he has persevered, wining success in the business world and at the same time gaining for himself the respect and honor of his fellow men.

 

WILLIAM RAILSBACK is a member of one of the first families to establish their home amid the wilds of Marshall County, and all honor is due the brave and hardy pioneer, Caleb Railsback, who cast his lot with the earliest settlers of Marshall County and assisted in paving the way for its future development and prosperity. He was born in Roan County, North Carolina July 7 1805, but when he was a little lad of two years his parents David and Sarah (Stevens) Railsback, with their family, left their southern home and journeyed to Indiana, this being in the year 1807, and they established their home on the Whitewater River in Wayne County, near where Richmond now stands, There Caleb Railsback attained to years of maturity and maintained his residence until the 10th of November 1846. It was then that he came to Marshall County, and purchasing timberland he built him a little log cabin home in the wilderness and began the arduous task of clearing and cultivating his farm. He at one time was the owner of about seven hundred acres, but he divided his estate among his children as they attained to mature years and started out in life for themselves. For many years he served his community as its road commissioner. His political affiliations were with the Whig Party and he was a member of the Church of God. The death of this brave and honored pioneer of Marshall County occurred on the 9th of July 1895, long surviving his wife, Nancy (Barnhill) Railsback, who passed away on the 27th of April 1874. She was born

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     585

 

in Butler county, Ohio, May 29, 1811, and both she and her husband died in Argos. They were married in Marion county, Indiana, January 17, 1828, and of the eleven children which blessed their union, six are now living: William, David, Nathan, U. B., R. C. and B. F.

 

William Railsback was born in Marion County, Indiana, December 3, 1830, and accompanying his parents to Marshall County during his early manhood he began farming for himself in Walnut Township soon after his marriage. His farm consisted of Michigan road land in section 21, where the young couple resided for three years in a hewed log house which he had built, removing then two miles south of Argos, and in the winter of 1854-5 he erected the first saw mill in this locality. But after running this mill continuously until 1873 he sold it and moved to Argos, while later he purchased it and continued its conduct until 1885. On the 21st of April of that year, and in company with T. 0. Taber, Mr. Railsback organized the Exchange Bank of Argos, and in 1890 with others he organized the State Exchange Bank of Argos, of which he was made the president and continued in the office until 1896, while in January 1907, he was re-elected to the presidency. He has served as the trustee of his township for one year, and his vote was cast for the first presidential nominee of the Republican Party, John C. Fremont. He is a member of the Church of God.

 

On the 3d of February, 1853, Mr. Railsback married Miss Melissa Brown, who was born in Henderson township, Jefferson county, New York, February 8, 1832, a daughter of Charles and Lucy (Conner) Brown, the former of whom was also a native of the Empire state, born on the 5th of April, 1805, and the latter was born near Dublin, Ireland. May 14, 1808. The father was called to the home beyond at the age of sixty-seven years, in 1872, and the mother died on the 16th of March 1900. They were married in Madison county, New York, January 27, 1829, and became the parents of ten children, the five now living being: Melissa, Sallie, Kaziah, Sylvanus and Lucy. The family left their New York home in 1837, and with horse teams started on the overland journey to Indiana, but in Michigan they traded their horses for oxen, and thus preceded on their way to Marshall County, where Mr. Brown entered eighty acres of government land. The first home of the family was a little log cabin, which he had built in the wilderness, their most frequent visitors in those early days being the Indians and wild animals. He owned at one time two hundred and forty acres of land and was prominent in the public life of his community, serving as a justice of the peace and as a school director for many years, and was a member of the Church of God. He was a Whig politically. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Railsback, namely: Simon B., who married Alice Hoover; Diantha, the wife of William M. Bryan; Melissa J., the wife of Thomas 0. Taber; Nancy M., who became the wife of William Cuffle and died at the age of twenty-two years; John- W ., and Lucy E. Mr. and Mrs. Railsback also have fifteen grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

 

JOHN W. LELAND one of the most highly esteemed of Marshall County’s early pioneers, was born in what was then the territory of Michigan, October 27, 1835, a son of Moses and Bretanna (Wells)

 


586                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

Leland, the former of whom was born in: Chester, Windsor county, Vermont, May 2, 1795, and the latter in Oneida county, New York, April 12, 1803. They came to Marshall County, Indiana, during an early epoch in its history and spent the remainder of their lives here, the father dying on the i7th of January 1860, and the mother May 12, 1879. They were married in Otto, Cattaraugus county, New York, May 2,1823, and nine children were born to them, four sons and five daughters, and the five now living are: Margaret E., the widow of Francis G. Davis and a resident of Jackson County, Wisconsin; Miriam, the widow of George W. Marsh and living in Argos, Indiana; John W., the subject of this review; Moses R., who married Emma Unger and is living in Fitzgerald, Georgia; and Asa M., who married Wealthy E. Martin and is residing in California. Three of the sons were soldiers in the Civil war, Moses serving in the Seventeenth Regiment of Indiana Mounted Infantry; Aaron as a member of Company C, Forty-eighth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, and he was promoted to the rank of field major and Asa as a member of Company K, Twentieth Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Cavalry. He was sergeant of his company.

 

Moses Leland, the father, was a highly educated man of his day, having first studied under the preceptorship of his uncle, Aaron Leland, who later became a judge and the lieutenant governor of Vermont, and he was also a Baptist minister. Moses Leland later attended Chester Academy at Chester, Massachusetts, and was also a student in a school in Boston. He was the son of a farmer, and his boyhood days were spent among the Green: mountains of Vermont, but in 1822 he left his native state and located in Cattaraugus county, New York, where he became a licensed minister of the Baptist church and also taught school and a singing school. Leaving the Empire state in 1834 with his wife and children he started for Indiana with ox teams, and on reaching what is now Monroe county, Michigan, they spent two years there, arid while there their son John was born to them. At the close of that period the westward march was resumed, and they reached Laporte county, Indiana, in 1836, driving three yoke of oxen, and after tarrying there a short time they continued on to Marshall county and established their home in what is now known as Green township. Mr. Leland became a very prominent factor in the early history of the county and was a member and the clerk of the board, which organized Green Township, They were charter members of the Jordan Baptist church, and to Mr. Leland belonged the honor of being the first ordained minister of this the first Baptist church in Marshall county. In political matters he first affiliated with the Whig party and later became a prominent Abolitionist.

 

John W. Leland, a son of one of Marshall County’s most honored pioneers, accompanied his parents on their journey hither when a babe of one year, his first summer being spent in Laporte county, and with them he then journeyed to Marshall county. Their first home here was a little log cabin, which the father had erected on his wooded farm of one hundred and twenty acres, and there the little son attained to manhood's estate and later on with his sisters became the owner of the old homestead. After a time Mr. Leland purchased one hundred acres of land, and he continued to farm in Green township until 1906, when

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     587

 

failing health caused him to lay aside the active duties of life, and he removed to Argos, his son assuming charge of the farm. For eight years he was a justice of the peace, and during that time he married over forty couples. During Mr. Leland's journey down the pathway of life he has passed many yearly milestones, and each birthday has been filled with sunshine until on the 27th of October 1907, he witnessed his first stormy anniversary of his birth. For many years he has been a prominent and worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and politically is a Republican, having cast his first presidential vote for John C. Fremont.

 

On the 2d of September 1860, Mr. Leland was united in marriage with Marietta Lawson. She was born in Union township, Marshall County, Indiana, May 3, 1843, a daughter of Noah and Nancy (Thompson) Lawson, natives, respectively, of Kentucky and Rush County, Indiana. Both died in early life, when Marietta was about two years of age, and they left two children, a son and daughter, the former being Charles A. The father followed the carpenter's trade, and his political. Affiliations were with the Whigs. Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Leland: Mark, Eva, Charles, Noah, Alice, Elsie, John, Jessie, Lawson and George. The first born, Mark, died at the age of six years, Charles died when twenty years of age, and Elsie and Alice are also deceased.

 

LEONARD BOCK, one of the leading business men of Argos, identified with its milling interests, was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, November 14, 1835, a son of John and Elizabeth (Flath) Bock, both natives of that community in the fatherland. The father, who was a wagon maker, also owned a farm and did milling. He was a member of the Lutheran church. Mr. and Mrs. Bock were the parents of five children: Frederick, deceased; Adam, a resident of Murphysboro, Louisiana; Leonard, whose name introduce, this review; George, who yet main- tains his home in Germany; and Jacob, living in Mishawaka, Indiana.

 

Leonard Bock was reared in the town of his nativity, Oberkincig, where he also received a fair German education, and between the age of fourteen and fifteen years he was placed out to learn the trade of a baker, and after the completion of his apprenticeship he continued the trade for about three years, in the meantime learning the milling bus ness. In order to evade the military law of Germany he immigrated to America in the year of 1853, leaving his native land in the month of June, and thirty-three days were spent on the ocean in a sailing ship. Arriving on American shores he proceeded at once to Dunkirk, New York, but after following his, trade there for a short time he went to Buffalo, that state, and during his residence there of five years he learned carriage trimming. In 1856 he trimmed the coach, which received the second premium at the New York State Fair. From Buffalo Mr. Bock went to Niagara Falls, Canada, but in the fall of 1858 returned to Buffalo to become the proprietor of a market; from the spring of 1859 until the spring of 1860 was employed as a carriage trimmer in Holly Springs, Mississippi, and in February of 1860 he removed to South Bend and became an employee of the Studebaker Brothers, with whom he remained

 


588                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

for eight years and four months. It was at the close of this period, in 1868, that he came to Argos, Indiana, and on the 4th of May of the same year he purchased a half interest in the Huff &. Hensel mill, purchasing Mr. Huff s interest, and in 1882 he came into possession of the remaining half of the business and continued as its sole proprietor until his son became interested in the business. In 1907 Mr. Bock spent about two months in travel through the west, visiting his son, Dr. Charles Bock, who is located in Los Angeles, California. Throughout the period of his residence III Argos Mr. Bock has taken an active interest in its welfare and improvement, and for seven years he served as a member of the town board, while for nine years he was a member of its school board.

 

On the 3d of November 1863, he was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Hensel, who was born in Marshall County, Indiana, in 1838, and her death occurred here on the 19th of September 1904. She was a daughter of Adam and Elizabeth (Lauderman) Hensel, both of whom were born in the Rhine province of Bavaria, Germany, and of their six children, three sons and three daughters, all are now deceased. The parents came to Indiana in the early '30s and established their home near Bremen in Marshall county, where the father first entered forty acres of wild timber land and erected him a little log cabin home. In time he succeeded in clearing his land, and on this homestead he spent the remainder of his life and died in the faith of the Lutheran church. Of the six children born to Mr. and Mrs. Bock four are now living: John A., Dr. Charles, Fred and Erdine. The daughter is the wife of M. H. Ormsby. Mr. Bock is a member of the Christian church, and also has membership relations with Argos Lodge No.399, A. F. and A. M., of which he is a past master. His political affiliations are with the Republican Party.

 

R. C. O'BLENIS, a well known lawyer of Marshall county, public spirited and thoroughly interested in whatever tends to promote the material welfare of his community, is numbered among the native soils of the county, born in Green township on the 22d of April, 1861. His parents, Abel and Mrs. Eliza (Shakes) (Worrell) O’Blenis, were born in Indiana and were the parents of four children: Jacob M., R. C., Eva, the wife of Charles Tilden and Emma May, .the wife of George G. Mill. . The father followed the tilling of the soil as a life occupation and at the outbreak of the Civil war he offered his services to his country's cause, entering the Twentieth Regular Indiana Volunteers. He was captured by the rebel ship Fanny off Cape Hatteras and incarcerated in Andersonville prison, there remaining until his exchange and his re-enlistment in the Eighty-seventh Regulars with the rank of a lieutenant. His re-enlistment occurred soon after the battle of Chickamauga, and he served as a brave and valiant soldier until the close of the war.

 

When R. C. O'Blenis was fifteen years of age his father he then began work on a farm for ten dollars a month. After three months or more here he walked two hundred miles into where he resumed his former occupation of farming by the month, after a time returned to Marshall county on foot arid began working

 


589                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

the farmers during the summer months, while in the winter months he attended school and worked for his board. He later became numbered among the educators of Green and Walnut townships, also teaching in. the schools of Argos, and here he was later appointed the deputy prosecuting attorney by the Hon. Charles P. Drummond. After remaining the incumbent of this office for four years, Mr. O'BIenis resumed his educational work and taught for two years. In 1891 he began the practice of law, and is now numbered among the leading representatives of the calling in Marshall county.

 

Mr. O'Blenis married Addie Robey on the 26th of December 1886. She was born in Howard County, Indiana, May 17, 1865, a daughter of James and Jane (Davis) Robey, both of whom also claimed Indiana as the commonwealth of their nativity. Two children were born to them, Laura and Addie, but the elder is deceased. Mr. O'Blenis holds membership relations with many of the fraternal orders, including Lodge No. 399, A. F. & A. M.; Warsaw Lodge No.802, B. P. 0. E.; Argos Lodge No.212, K. of F., and .in this order he has held all of the offices and has served as a delegate to the Grand Lodge. His political affiliations are with the Republican Party.

 

THOMAS 0. TABER. The specific and distinctive office of biography is not to give voice to a man's modest estimate of himself and his accomplishments, but rather to leave the perpetual record establishing his character by the consensus of opinion on the part of his fellowmen. Throughout Marshall County and this part of the state Mr. Taber is spoken of in terms of admiration and respect. His life was varied in its activity, honorable in its purposes and far reaching and beneficial in its effects, and when he was called to the home beyond his fellow-townsmen mourned the loss of one whom they had come to esteem and honor by reason of his sterling manhood.

 

Mr. Taber was a native of Center township, Marsha]] county, born November 25, 1856. His life span covered a half-century, his death occurring December 26, 1906; His paternal grandfather was Samuel D. Taber, one of the first settlers of Marshall County. He came here from New York when this was a wilderness and he died at Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1826. He was of English parentage and was a man of many excellent traits of character. By occupation he was a farmer and was recognized as one of the leading pioneers of the early days, leaving the impress of his individuality upon the development and upbuilding of the county. He belonged to the Church of God and his political views were in harmony with the principles of the Whig party. The parents of Thomas 0. Taber were Cyrus and Rachel (Flake) Taber, the former born in Center Township, this county, June 26, 1833, and the latter near Connersville, Indiana, February 10, 1837. They were married November 15, 1853, the wedding ceremony being performed by Mack Smith at Smith's Tavern, where the town of Argos now stands. The death of Cyrus Taber occurred December 26, 1877, and his widow, who is yet living, afterward married Jonas Miller. She was the daughter of John and Nancy Flake, early settlers and highly respected citizens of Marshall County. Cyrus Taber was the first white male child born in this county

 


590                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

and was widely known throughout this part of the state as Judge Taber. He contributed in large and substantial measure to the early development and progress of the locality in which he lived and furthered many progressive measures for the public good. He opened up the Michigan road and at one time was an extensive landowner here. He held membership in the Church of God and gave his political allegiance to the Whig party. Unto him and his wife were born six children, five sons and a daughter, but only one is now living, John H.

 

Thomas 0. Taber acquired his education in the Jordan school in the Plymouth high school and in the schools of Valparaiso, Indiana. When sixteen years of age he became teacher of the Shoemaker school and taught in all for about two and a half years. It was subsequent to this time that he attended the Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso and later he went to Plymouth, where he worked for Barnhill & Taber, merchants, m whose employ he remained for some time. He afterward engaged in farming for about two and a half years and in 1883 again went to Plymouth, where he purchased a half interest in E. K. Barnhill's mercantile store. Some time later he bought out his partner and continued the business alone until 1884, when he sold his store. He then spent six years upon the road in the cigar business and during that time he and his father-in-law, William Railsback, established a banking house at Argos, in 1885, under the firm name of Railsback & Taber, bankers. In 1890 they organized the State Exchange Bank of Argos, of which Mr. Taber was the cashier until 1902. In 1888 they also opened a banking business at Mentone under the firm name of Railsback & Taber, which institution became known later as the Citizens Bank, and was conducted by J. H. and T. 0. Taber under the style of Taber Brothers. T. 0. Taber also organized a bank at Silver Lake called the Commercial Bank, which was owned by Taber Brothers & Cavender, John C. Cavender being in charge of the business. T. 0. Taber likewise organized a bank at Markle, Huntington county, Indiana, in connection with C. D. Chapman, who was in active charge, this institution being conducted under the style of the Farmers' & Traders' Bank, with Mr. Taber as president. In May 1893, the Columbian National Bank of Chicago failed. It was the exchange house for the four banks which Mr. Taber had organized, and its failure brought on trying times for Mr. Taber, but his characteristic good management and conservative methods enabled him to continue his banking interests in all of these four institutions undisturbed. In 19o2 he organized at Marion, Indiana, the Grant Trust & Savings Company, with Harry A. Ford, his son-in-Iaw, as treasurer, while Mr. Taber became secretary. They began business on the 26th of May 1902, the company being capitalized for one hundred thousand dollars, and the phenomenal success of the business is indicated by the fact that there is today a capital of seven hundred and fifty thou- sand dollars. In 1904 Mr. Taber returned to Argos on account of poor health. At the time of his demise he was president of the State Exchange Bank and had extensive financial interests. He was one of the most successful men of this part of the state, owing not to any fortunate or adventitious circumstances, but to his keen insight, his ready discern ment concerning business conditions and his recognition of possibilities for successful accomplishment.

 


591                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

On the 18th of October, 1877, Mr. Taber was married to Miss Melissa Jane Railsback, who was born in Walnut township, this county, March 7, 1858, a daughter of William and Melissa (Brown) Railsback, who are mentioned elsewhere m this volume. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Taber were born ten children, of whom seven are yet living: Stella, the wife of Harry A. Ford; Earl R., who attended the Oberlin (Ohio) College and was graduated from the Indiana State University in the class of 1905 and is at present cashier of the State Exchange Bank at Argos; Charles C.; Gladys; Jessie; Glenna, and William P .

 

Mr. Taber was a member of the Knights of Pythias and was treasurer of the lodge. From his boyhood days he was a member of the Church of God and loyal to its teachings and precepts. In politics he was a stanch Republican and in matters of citizenship was ever progressive, alert and enterprising. In no sense a man in public life, he nevertheless exerted an immeasurable influence on the communities in which he lived: In business life as a financier, in social circles by reason of a charming personality, in matters of citizenship by reason of his loyalty to the public welfare. In all of his business life he displayed an aptitude for successful management and maintained a reputation for probity and commercial integrity that was above question.

 

ANDREW J. THOMAS. One of the well-improved farms of Walnut Township is the property of Andrew J. Thomas, whose labors have wrought a marked transformation in its appearance. In all of his work he is practical, methodical and progressive, and his labors are bringing to him a gratifying and well-merited success. He was born in Elkhart county, Indiana, November 27, 1850, his parents being E, P. and Margaret Ann (McConnell) Thomas. The father was born in South Carolina, September 23, 1823, and died in 1905 at the age of eighty-two years, while. the mother, whose birth occurred in Elkhart county, Indiana, died in 1864 at the age of thirty-four years. The father carried on farming in Elkhart County until 1854, after which he spent two, years in Iowa. He then returned to Elkhart County. Ind in the midst of the green woods built a log cabin and cleared his land, continuing its cultivation until his removal to Kosciusko County, Indiana. He was one of the worthy and valued pioneer settlers of this state, aiding in reclaiming the district for the purposes of civilization and in laying broad and deep the foundation for the present development and progress of the localities in which he made his home. He was a consistent member of the Christian church and in politics was a Jacksonian Democrat. He was married in Elkhart county, Indiana, to Miss Margaret Ann McConnell and they became the parents of seven children, namely; Andrew J.; Sarah J. the wife of Henry Roberts; James F., who married Mary Busby; John S., who married Matilda Hepler; William, who died at the age of eleven years; Catherine, the wife of E, Anglin; and. Albert P., who wedded Etta Boggs. After the death of his first wife Mr. Thomas, married Zilpha Ramsey, and unto them were born nine children, of whom seven

 


592                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

are yet living: Elizabeth, Henry, EIlen, Luretta, LiIlie, Ernest.

 

In taking up the personal history of Andrew J. Thomas we present to our readers the life record of one who is widely known in Walnut Township. He lived with his parents until fourteen years of age, when he came to Marshall County to make his home with his uncle, Solomon

Pearman, with whom he resided until he attained his majority. He then started out upon an independent business career, renting a farm from his uncle for three years, during which time his unremitting industry and careful expenditure brought him the capital that enabled him to purchase land in Green township, where he carried on farming for six years. On the expiration of that period he sold his property and bought the farm upon which he now lives in Walnut Township. It has since been his place of residence, and in 1897 he rebuilt the house, making it a modern and attractive home. In 1902 he rebuilt the barn and now has substantial improvements upon the place. His fields are well tilled and in addition to the cultivation of the cereals best adapted to soil and climate he breeds fine horses and graded cattle and hogs, his live stock interests proving to him a profitable source of income.

 

Mr. Thomas was married on the 1st of May 1873, to Miss Emily Jordan, who was born in Wayne county, Indiana, April 15, 1849, a daughter of Benoni and Julia Ann ( Boggs ) Jordan, both of whom were natives of Wayne county, the former born November 28, 1815, and the latter November 12, 1818. The father spent his boyhood days with his parents in the county of his nativity and was there married. Five children were born in Wayne County ere the removal of Mr. and Mrs. Jordan to Marshall County in 1849. They drove across the country with teams and settled in Center Township, Mr. Jordan purchasing timberland. There was a log cabin on his farm, which the Indians had built, and this the family occupied for about two years, when he erected a more commodious frame residence. He was one of the pioneers of the locality and did his share in clearing away the timber and preparing the soil for the plow. Only one acre had been cleared when he purchased his farm and as the years passed he prospered and added to his original holdings until he was the owner of three hundred and fifty acres of land. He was one of the prominent men here, being recognized as an influential citizen of the community. He greatly enjoyed hunting wild game, which was very plentiful at that time, including deer, turkeys and prairie chickens, and his skill with the rifle enabled him to keep a plentiful supply of game for the table. Both he and his wife were earnest and persistent Christian people, holding membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, and his political allegiance was given to the Whig party. The death of Mr. Jordan occurred August 9,1891, and the mother who is stiII living, now makes her home with her children. Unto them were born thirteen children, of whom nine are yet living: John, who married Elizabeth Roberts; Jane the wife of Franklin Mohn; Susan, the wife of Jefferson Worthington; Mrs. Thomas; Minerva, the wife of F. Worthington; Wiley, who married Lydia Yerick; Samuel, who married Alice Gunder; Rufus; and Olive, the wife of Sherman Orr.

 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas has been blessed with four


                                               

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                                      593                 

 

children: Cora E., Herman J., Charles A, and Julia A. The parents hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church and are much interested in its work and growth. His political views are in harmony with the principles of Democracy, and his fellow-townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability, kept him in the office of township assessor for five years through the exercise of their franchise. Mr. Thomas is a member of Tent No.263 of the Knights of the Maccabees. From the age of fourteen years he has lived in this county, covering a period of more than four decades, and has witnessed much of its growth and development. He can well remember a time when its prairies were largely covered with the native forest growth and, the county gave little evidence of the Improvement and progress, which It today enjoys. As the years have gone by he has shared in the agricultural development of the county and through his enterprising labors has attained success.

 

WILLIAM T. YOUNG has for twenty years owned the farm upon which he now resides, but the tract that came into his possession bore little resemblance to the splendidly developed place which today returns to him a very gratifying income in reward for his care and labor. The farm is now equipped with excellent modern improvements and everything about the place indicates his careful and progressive spirit.

 

Mr. Young is one of Marshall county's native sons, his birth having occurred in Tippecanoe township ApriI6, 1853, his parents being John W, and Mary (Stonner) Young, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Ohio. They were married, however, in Marion county, Indiana, and became the parents of nine children, of whom six are now living, namely: William T.; John; Alice, the wife of George W. Beltz, living in Walnut township; Benjamin N.; Anna; and James R. It was in the year 1851 that John W. Young came to Marshall county, settling in Tippecanoe township, where he made his home until called to his final rest. He first built a log cabin and in that primitive dwelling all of his children were born except two. His farm comprised one hundred and forty acres of land, which he cleared and developed, and later he built a fine home, where he spent his remaining days. He was one of the prominent men of Tippecanoe Township, active and reliable in business and progressive in citizenship. His life, ever upright and honorable, was in consistent harmony with his professions as a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and he also exemplified the beneficent spirit of the craft, for he affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the lodge at Bourbon. In politics he was a Democrat. In his boyhood days William T. Young experienced all the hardships and privations that fall to the lot of the pioneer settler, being reared amid the wild scenes and environments of frontier life. As a boy he assisted his father in cutting away the wilderness and as opportunity offered he attended school, walking two and a half miles to the nearest schoolhouse. His father gave him his time when he was eighteen years of age and he then worked out by the month at clearing land. When he had saved some capital from his earnings he bought a team of horses and began the cultivation of rented land, thus carrying on general farming until the fall of 1888, when he purchased the farm upon which he now

 


594                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

resides. There was a log house upon the land and it remained his residence until 1899, when he built the modern farmhouse that he now occupies. In 1896 he put up a fine bank barn and all of the improvements upon the place are monuments to his enterprise and thrift, for the farm was largely undeveloped when it came into his possession and nearly the entire tract was covered with timber. His fields are now well tilled and he also raises graded stock.

 

On the 14th of February 1875, Mr. Young was married to Miss Elizabeth Jane Borton, who was born in Walnut Township, this county, June 5, 1856, a daughter of Albert and Minerva (Johnson) Borton. Her father, who was born in Stark County, Ohio, April 9, 1824, died April 14, 1886. He was first married in Ohio to Miss Levina Wood and by that union has one son, Alonzo. He afterward came to Indiana, making the journey with a horse team in 1853, and settled in Tippecanoe Township, Marshall County. A schoolteacher by profession, he followed that work throughout the greater part of his life and taught three generations. He owned a farm in Bourbon Township, upon which he spent his last days, and in the community where he lived he was one of the prominent and influential men. It was after his removal to Marshall County that he was married a second time, the lady of his choice being Miss Minerva Johnson, who was born in Hancock County, Ohio, June 30, 1834. The wedding was celebrated in Walnut Township and Mrs. Borton died August 14, 1876. In their family were five children: Mrs. Young, Luther H., Lillie M., Lura E. and Edith B. The parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Borton was a Republican in his political views following the organization of the party, prior to which time he had voted with the Whig party.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Young have become the parents of six children: Franklin T., who is living in Montana; Charles L., who married Flora Trump; Willie E... who died in infancy; Anna May; Wilma Alice; and Lura E. The parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Young is a Democrat in his political views. He has always lived a life of activity and of uprightness and has been just and true in his relations to his fellowmen, never having a Jaw suit in his life, nor was he ever sued by anyone. He has displayed tireless energy and reliability in business and in many respects his life record is well worthy of emulation.

 

ISIAH HESS. The name of Isaiah Hess is recorded among those who bravely fought for their country during the Civil war. He enlisted for service on the 19th of July 1862, entering Company E, Seventy-fourth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, at Goshen, Indiana. He was mustered into the service at Indianapolis, from whence he went to Louisville, Kentucky, then to Bowling Green and back to Louisville, on to Sheppardsville, from whence he was ordered to Perrysville and was held in reserve during the battle at that place. He was also in the Atlanta campaign, in the battles of Crab Orchard, Gallatin, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, and at Jonesboro he was wounded and was subsequently given a furlough. Rejoining his regiment at Goldsboro, North Carolina, he went with his command, under the leadership of General

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     595

 

Sherman, to Rolla, North Carolina, thence to Richmond, Virginia, and on to Washington, D, C., to participate in the Grand Review. From there he went to Indianapolis, Indiana, and received his final discharge June 15, 1865, for the war had closed and his country no longer needed the services of her brave boys in blue. After his return from the front Mr. Hess followed agricultural pursuits until 1899 in Walnut Township, Marshall County, and since then has had charge of a rural free delivery mail route.

 

Mr. Hess was born in Elkhart county, Indiana, October 30, 1842, a son of Elias and Lucinda (Wright) Hess, the former of whom was born in Franklin county, Ohio, March 12, 1812, and died October 19, 1894, aged eighty-two years seven months and nine days; the latter was born in Stark county of that state, and died July 4, 1880, aged sixty-three years five months and twenty-four days. The father came to Walnut Township, Marshall County, Indiana, in I86S, and purchased three hundred and twenty acres of timberland, of which he cleared about one hundred and ten acres and made many improvements thereon. He later sold that farm and bought two hundred and ninety-six acres in Greene township, the year of the purchase being 1888, and in the following year he removed to near Springfield, Missouri there spending the remainder of his life and dying in his eighty-third year. Mrs. Hess died in Marshall County. They were married in this county, and of their fourteen children nine are now living: Belinda, Levi, Isaiah, Jasper N., Enoch W., Susannah (the wife of Dr. Sutton), Erastus, Lewis J. and Henry. The brother, Ezra, was also a soldier during the Civil war, serving in the Twenty-first Indiana Battery, and he lost his life near Winchester, on Sand Mountain, Tennessee, being but twenty-eight years of age at the time of his death. The son Levi served four years as a member of Company B, Twenty-ninth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, and was made the captain of his company. Mr. Hess; the father, was a second time married, wedding in 1889 Mrs. Delia Tatem, nee Beckmer, and it was in the year following his second marriage that he removed to Missouri. He was a member of the Baptist church in an early day, but died as a member of the Christian church, and his political affiliations were first with the Democratic Party, later with the Whigs, and at the time of his death he was identified with the Republican Party.

 

The early life of Isaiah Hess was spent with his father on the farm, remaining under the parental roof until his departure for the seat of war. On the 16th of August 1867, he wedded Sarah A. Beckner, who was born in Elkhart county, Indiana, a daughter of Isaac and Mary (Studebaker) Beckner, both of whom were born in the state of Ohio. The following children were born of this union: Lorena M., the wile of James Herrin; Loresta L., who died at the age of two and a half years; Evaline, the wife of Frank Pickerl, the postmaster of Argos; Albert F.; who married Lue Stevenson; Elias B., who was in the war with Cuba in the Forty-ninth Iowa Regiment, and who married Ida Anglan; Lura L., the wife of Ora McClure; one who died in infancy; and Frank P. The first wife, Sarah A., died August 1; 1897, and Mr. Hess has been a second time married, wedding Mrs. Esther Callon, a native of Wayne county, Indiana, and a daughter of William and Margaret Cox.

 


596                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

Mr. Hess is a member of the Christian church and also has membership relations with Lafayette Gordon Post, No.132. His political affiliations are with the Republican Party, and he is a stanch advocate of its principles.

 

FRANK P. BOGGS, one of the prominent and well known business men of Marshall county, and also a representative of one of its earliest pioneer families, was born in its township of Center September 26, 1851, a son of Lewis and Sarah (Devault) Boggs, both natives of Ohio, the father born on the 16th of July, 1816, and the mother on the 29th of May, 1820. They were married in Kosciusko county, Indiana, and later cast their lot with the early pioneers of Marshall county, Indiana, coming here as early as 1838 and purchasing a farm in the then wilderness of Center township. Mr. Boggs owned one of the largest farms in the county and was one of the first in his community to breed Poland China hogs. He was a member of the Church of God and was a Jefferson Democrat in his political affiliations. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Boggs were born eight children: James T., Thomas J., Sarah Jane, Francis M. (who died when sixteen years of age, December 3, 1861), Frank P., Lewis B., Joseph W. and Axie L.

 

When twenty-one years of age Frank P. Boggs engaged in farming for himself on the old homestead, but in 1891 he left the farm 'and came to Argos to embark in the grain business, but three or four years later he returned to his agricultural pursuits, still maintaining his home in Argos. He is a progressive and energetic fanner, keeping pace with all the modern methods and improvements in farming, and on his farm of two hundred and twenty acres he is extensively engaged in the breeding of hogs, cattle and sheep. His political affiliations are with the Democracy, which he has represented in many of the town offices, and he is a member of the Church of God.

 

On the 6th of March 1879, Mr. Boggs married Martha E. Busby, who was born in Center township, Marshall County, Indiana, December 14, 1859, the daughter of Benjamin and Rachel E. (Wood) Busby, both of whom claimed Ohio as the commonwealth of their nativity. The father, who was born June 3, 1835, is yet a resident of Walnut township, but the wife and mother has long since passed away, dying September 29, 1887. She was born on the 26th of August 1821. From their native state of Ohio they journeyed to Wisconsin in 1854, spending one year there, and then came to Marshall County, Indiana. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Boggs has been blessed by the birth of one daughter, Ella, the wife of Eugene DeMont.

 

JAMES H. KIZER, M. D. During many years Dr. James H. Kizer has been a member of the medical profession in Marshall County, and his residence here dates from the year of 1860. His alma mater is the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Keokuk, Iowa, where he graduated with the class of 1887, and in his practice he has made a specialty of the curing of cancers. In this special branch he has achieved a commendable success.

 

Dr. Kizer was born in Wayne County, Ohio, near Wooster, March 2,

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                         597   

 

1844, and is of German descent, for his paternal grandfather, Peter Kizer, Sr., was born in the fatherland, but coming to this country he was married in Pennsylvania, and his death occurred in Wayne county, Ohio, where he had taken up his abode in a very early day. His life's activities were devoted to the tilling of the soil. His son also bore the name of Peter and was born in Pennsylvania, but was reared in Wayne County, Ohio, and was there married to Cassie Anders, who was born in Virginia. Her father, John Anders, was also a native of the Old Dominion state, but was a member of a German family, In 1852, when his son James was a little lad of eight years, Peter Kizer, Jr., journeyed to St. Joseph county, Indiana, establishing his home on the north side of the river near South Bend, where he followed agricultural pursuits, although he was by trade a carpenter. In November, 1860, he left St. Joseph county and sought a home in Center township of Marshall county, his death here occurring when he had reached the advanced age of eighty-one years, long surviving his wife who had passed away at the age of fifty. She was a member of the German Baptist church, and both were loved and honored in the community where they so long lived and labored. Mr. Kizer was a Methodist in his religious belief, and politically was a Democrat. In their family were the following children: John, who served in the Civil war as a member of the Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry, Company K; David, who served in Company I, One Hundred and Fifty-first Indiana Volunteers; James H., the subject of this review; Delilah; Ethan Allen, a resident of Texas; Milton, who served his country as a member of the Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry, Company K; and Jacob, who was drafted as a soldier but was rejected. Dr. Kizer was also numbered among the boys in blue of the Civil war, joining in February 1865, Company I, One Hundred and Fifty-first Regiment, his lieutenant being D. A. White and his colonel Joshua Healy. From Indianapolis, Indiana, they were ordered to Tennessee, and in September 1865, at Nashville, Dr. Kizer was discharged from the service and returned home. He later began the study of medicine under the preceptorship of Dr. Bowers, of Plymouth, and subsequently removing to Fulton County, Indiana, he practiced his profession there from 1881 to 1884. In 1887, as above stated, he graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Keokuk, Iowa, and then returning to Indiana he located in Walnut, Marshall county, from whence he removed to Inwood, and since 1907 he has been numbered among the medical practitioners of Tippecanoe.

 

The marriage of Dr. Kizer was celebrated in Berrien County, Michigan, September 7, 1862, Filinda Harris becoming his wife. She was born in Holmes county, Ohio, to Barton and Lydia Harris, both now deceased, the father dying in Ohio and the mother in Marshall county, whither she had removed in 1852. Dr. and Mrs. Kizer have two sons Jasper N., a lumber salesman of Menomonee, Wisconsin, and Martin R., a farmer near Talma, Indiana. Their only daughter, Nora L. Holmes, died in Inwood at the age of twenty years. The grandson of Dr. and Mrs. Kizer, Dean Kizer, is principal of the Center high school of Fulton county, Indiana, and is a young man of ability as an educator and orator. He is now a student at Bloomington, Indiana in the State University.

 

598                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

Dr. Kizer affiliates with the Democratic party and during his residence in Bigfoot, Indiana, he served as its postmaster during Garfield’s administration, was also for four years the postmaster of Inwood under Cleveland, has been three times elected the coroner of Marshall County, and has served as a delegate to many of the conventions of his party. He is a self-made man in the truest sense of the word, for when but a small boy in his teens he ran away from home and has ever since depended upon his own resources. He has achieved success in his chosen calling, but the high position he now enjoys is the result of painstaking and persistent labor. Mrs. Kizer is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

JAMES B. SEVERNS. On the roster of the public officials of Marshall County is recorded the name of James B. Severns, who in 1906 was the choice of the Democratic Party for the office of County Commissioner. He assumed the duties of the position in January 1907, and his career has been marked by signal usefulness to his constituents. For forty-five years he has been identified with the interests of Marshall County, but he is a native son of Wabash County, Indiana, born April 3, 1857. His father, Isaac Severns, was of Scotch decent but a native of Coshocton County, Ohio. He was twice married, and by his first wife, a Miss Butler, he had three children, of whom two of the sons served as soldiers in the Civil War. Mary Ellen Woods, whose parents were numbered among the early pioneers of Wabash County, Indiana, but were formerly of Coshocton County, Ohio, subsequently became his wife, and in 1863 they journeyed to Tippecanoe Township, Marshall County, where the father spent the remainder of his life and died at the age of fifty years. His political affiliations were with the Democratic Party.

 

Mrs. Severns has reached the age of seventy-seven years, and is loved and revered in the community in which she has so long made her home. The five children of Mr. and Mrs. Severns are: James B., the subject of this review; Nancy, wife of Benjamin Bowman of Fulton County; Amos, a resident of Fulton County, Indiana; Vina Martin; and Walter, a resident of Omaha Nebraska.

 

When a little lad of six years James B. Severns accompanied his parents on their removal to Marshall County, Indiana, and thus throughout nearly his entire life he has been identified with its interests, prominent in both its business and political relations. The early years of his life were spent with his father on the farm, and when he had reached the age of twenty-two he married Rosetta Blue, born in Kosciusko County, Indiana to Simeon and Priscilla (Vories) Blue, prominent early residents of Kosciusko County. The mother’s death occurred at the age of thirty-eight years, but the father reached the age of seventy-eight ere he was called to the home beyond, his death occurring in Harrison Township, Kosciusko County. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Severns – Howard I., Bertha and Stewart. Howard I. Received his diploma from the common schools and then took a course in the Tippecanoe high school. He married Miss Eva Van Tries, and they have one little son, Kenneth. The family resides in the township of Tippecanoe,


                                                HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                                      599

 

where he is an agriculturist. Bertha also received her diploma from the common schools and is the wife of Clyde Morarity, an agriculturist of Tippecanoe Township. They have three sons-Wendell, Floyd and Orlando. Stewart received a common school diploma and also took two terms in high school. He married Miss Grace Sellers and resides in the township of Tippecanoe. Mrs. Rosetta Blue Severns died at the age of forty-one years, and on the 19th of December, 1901, Mr. Severns wedded Mrs. Eva (Zehner) Clevenger, the widow of Nelson Clevenger, by whom she had two children-Lawrence E. and Pearl. Lawrence is a graduate of the common schools and the township high school and resides in Plymouth, Indiana, where he is engaged with a real estate firm. Pear) graduated in the common schools and began high school training at the Tippecanoe high school. By her second marriage Mrs. Severns has become the mother of a little son, Raymond, now three years of age.

 

The homestead farm of Mr. and Mrs. Severns, known as "Sunny Banks," consists of two hundred and sixteen acres in Tippecanoe Township, adjoining the village of Tippecanoe. This pretty estate was brought from almost a wilderness and much credit is due Mr. and Mrs. Severns for what they have done and are doing to make their beautiful home an ornament as well as a rich and productive estate. Mr. Severns is an active worker in the ranks of the Democratic party, which he has represented as a delegate in many of its conventions, and when elected to his present position he received a majority of five hundred and one votes.

 

CHARLES F. COOPER. For twenty years Charles F. Cooper was identified with the educational interests of Marshall County, and he is also a representative of the county's earliest and best known families. His paternal grandfather, Jeremiah Cooper, was of Irish descent, and his death Occurred when his son Solomon was but four years of age, leaving his widow, nee Bridget Rafferty, of Irish parentage, with five children. Solomon Cooper, one of their sons, was born near Doylestown, a suburb of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1826, and in 1846 he served his country as a soldier in the Mexican war. In 1849, during the ever memorable emigration to the gold fields of California, he came to Marshall county, Indiana, in company with Joseph Hall, the pioneer miller of Tippecanoe river and the best known of the old pioneers of the Tippecanoe valley. When he had reached the age of twenty-six Solomon Cooper married, in Tippecanoe township, Elizabeth McWhorter, who was born in Franklin county, Indiana, near Metamora, and she is now living in the village of Tippecanoe, aged seventy-six years. During his life in Marshall County Solomon Cooper farmed five different farms and achieved success in his chosen calling of agriculture. His death occurred when he had reached the age of seventy-one years. He was both a Whig and a Republican in his political affiliations, a strong Lincoln man, and although not a church member he was a fine Bible student. At his death he left seven children: John H., a farmer and formerly a teacher of Tippecanoe township; Charles F., of this review; Hugh M., in the telephone business in Argos; Cora B., the wife of Orville Smith, agent for the Nickel Plate railroad in Argos; William L., who resides with his mother in Tippecanoe;

 


600                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

 

Pleasant, a railroad agent in Hammond, Indiana. and Winnie, wife of William Crane, of Tippecanoe township. Three children are also deceased, two having died in infancy, and one, Ulysses G., at the age of fifteen years. Charles F. Cooper was born in one of the old-time log cabins of Marshall county, about one hundred rods east of where he now lives, September 25, 1856, and his educational training was received in the district schools of the neighborhood, by study at home and by attendance at the old Methodist college of Ft. Wayne. At the age of twenty we find him teaching a country school, and he continued his educational labors in Marshall county for twenty years, and to his credit let it be said that many of his pupils have in the meantime gone forth to battle for themselves and have achieved success in the business world. On leaving the school room Mr. Cooper turned his attention to farming pursuits, and he is now the owner of The old homestead of his father, a beautiful estate of sixty-four acres and known as Fairview.

 

On the 4th of September, 1881, Mr. Cooper married Marian Ellen Tea, who was born in Stark county, Ohio, near Canton, to Samuel B. and Rebecca (Hoppes) Tea, prominent early settlers of Marshall county, Indiana, but now residents of Wisconsin. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Cooper, namely: Loreva, formerly identified with the educational interests of this county, but now the business manager and bookkeeper for a large business house in Indianapolis, Indiana; Opal E., Mabel E., Charles N. and Arthur S. As a Republican Mr. Cooper has been an active worker in the public affairs of his community, and many times has served as a delegate to his party's conventions, while at one time he served as a justice of the peace, this having been when the office was similar to that of a judge of the present time. He is a member of the Methodist church, and is now serving as one of his church officers.

 

C. A. REEVE. The name of C. A. Reeve is known throughout May- shall and adjoining counties from his long connection with the telephone interests of that section. He has been a lifelong resident of Marshall County, having been born in Plymouth December 25, 1855. He is a son of C. H. Reeve, who was born in New York and came in an early day to Laporte County, Indiana, with his parents.

 

Mr. Reeve was reared in Plymouth and there received his education. In 1882 he began his business career, as manager for tl1e local Bell Telephone Company and in 1885 became a half-owner in the newly organized Home Telephone Company, which began with a very small list of subscribers and one operator. In ten years after its organization Mr. Reeve became sole proprietor of the exchange, with a subscription list of five hundred and requiring seven operators to serve the interests of the rapidly growing concern. The service covered all of Marshall County, with trunk lines to adjoining counties. On August 1, 1907, Mr. Reeve sold out his entire interests and became president of the Marshall County Trust & Savings Company, of which he was one of the promoters and which opened for business December 16, 1907.

 

He was, on November 16, 1887, united in marriage to Miss Mary F.,

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                         601

 

Burroughs, of Indiana, and one child was born to them, a son, Charles Burroughs. Mr. Reeve spent his early days on the farm and has throughout his business career exemplified the principles of thrift and honesty in all his dealings.

 

ALFRED A. HUFF, a representative businessman of Marshall County, has contributed in substantial measure to the commercial prosperity of Argos by the establishment and successful conduct of several enterprises. He readily recognizes and utilizes opportunities which others pass by heedlessly and to this characteristic is largely attributable the prosperity that he now enjoys. A native of Indiana, he was born in St. Joseph county August 29, 1866, his parents being Charles and Barbara (Friend) Huff. The father, who was one of the most progressive agriculturists of the county and a man whom to know was to respect and honor, was born in Germany April 3, 1829, and died on the 5th of October, 1900, at the age of seventy-one years. In his youth he came to America with his parents. Phillip and Catherine Huff, being then only about six years of age. The voyage across the Atlantic was made in a sailing vessel, which eventually dropped anchor in the harbor of New York. The family home was established in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, where they remained until 1845, when they came to Marshall County, Indiana, settling in German township. There were fourteen children in the family, all of whom are now deceased.

 

Charles Huff was a youth of sixteen years at the time of the removal of the family to Marshall County. His educational advantages in youth were very limited, but he possessed an observing eye and retentive memory and he acquired by experience a knowledge of the world and of business that served him well in lieu of an education. After his marriage he spent two years in South Bend, Indiana. For a time he operated a sawmill near Bremen and subsequently removed to Missouri, where he entered government land, making his home in that state for some time. Later he returned to Marshall County and settled in Walnut Township, where he was engaged in the operation of a sawmill for a number of years. He next purchased land, securing a tract upon which the old home stands today, and in 1885 he built the fine brick residence, which continued to be his home until he was called to his final rest. He lived a life of untiring energy and what he undertook he carried forward to successful completion. In public enterprises he was regarded as a leader and cooperated largely in advancing measures for the public good. He and his brother were largely instrumental in building the I. P. & C. railroad, now the Lake Erie & Western, and owned at that time an extensive sawmill plant located just north of the present Lake Erie & Western Railroad depot. When the Nickel Plate Railroad was built he gave liberally of his time and means toward furthering the project and spent much money and energy in securing this trunk line for Argos.

 

On the 25th of September 1850, Charles Huff was united in marriage, in St. Joseph County, Indiana, to Miss Barbara Friend and soon afterward settled in Bremen. She was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, January 28, 1832, and still survives her husband, living on the

 


602                                          HISTORY 0F MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

old homestead near Argos. Unto this worthy couple were born eight children, four of whom died in infancy, while four reached adult age, namely: Mrs. Sarah E. Finney, who has departed this life since the father's death; Ida C., the wife of James Bolin; Alford A., of this review; and Zua A., now the wife of Chris. Kreiger, of Argos. The death of Charles Huff occasioned deep and widespread regret, for he was a man of many friends, held in the highest esteem throughout the community. Such was the friendly regard for him that he was uniformly called Uncle Charley in Argos and this part of the county. He ever had a warm handclasp and a hearty, smiling greeting for all with whom he came in contact. He ever appreciated the good qualities of others and those who knew him valued his friendship and were anxious to win it. Ever honorable and upright, he lived in harmony with his professions as a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His political allegiance was given to the Democracy.

 

In his boyhood days Alfred A. Huff worked upon the home farm and attended school until he reached the age of seventeen. He then became his father's partner in farming operations and later in other business ventures. In 1896, having made a lake by the damming of certain waters, they built an icehouse on the bank and began dealing in ice, carrying on this business in connection with general agricultural pursuits. The relation between father and son was continued up to the former's death in 1900, since which time Alfred A. Huff has carried on his farming interests alone. In 1902 he built a cold storage plant, which he operates in connection with the icehouse and which has a capacity of forty cars. He is a wholesale dealer in beer and has built up a good business in the sale of Rochester, Mentone, Bremen, Inwood, Argos and Bourbon. He is farming two hundred and sixty-eight acres of rich and valuable land and upon the place are as fine improvements as can be found in the state of Indiana. In 1903 he built a modern bank barn, seventy-two by ninety-two feet, with cement basement, and in 1906-7 erected a most attractive residence of stone and brick, constructed in modern style of architecture and richly and tastefully furnished. He has his lake well stocked with game fish and upon his farm he raises good grades of cattle and hogs. In addition to his other business interests he was one of the organizers of the Argos Furniture Manufacturing Company and is one of its board of directors. Thus his varied interests have been an element in the commercial activity and consequent prosperity of the town and he belongs to that class of representative American men who promote the public welfare in advancing individual success.

 

On the 24th of December, 1889, was celebrated the marriage of Alfred A. Huff and Miss Louise Swank, who was born in Kosciusko county, Indiana, and is a daughter of Adam and Mary (Heckaman) Swank, who lost her parents in girlhood. Her foster parents were Jacob and Elizabeth Yockey. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Huff have been born two children, Zola Joyce and Charles Dale.

 

In his political views Mr. Huff is a Democrat, but the honors and emoluments of office have had no attraction for him, as he has always preferred to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, and in his

 

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     603

 

work he has displayed untiring energy, quick perception and readiness in forming and executing his plans. In all things he has manifested an aptitude for successful management and is numbered among the representative agriculturists and businessmen of Argos and Marshall county.

 

JOHN GEORGE SCHROETER. In the early year of 1855, when this section of the country was but a vast wilderness, with its forests uncut and its lands uncultivated, there came to dwell within its borders a sturdy German couple, Jacob and Margaret Schroeter, who had left their native land of Germany in their early youth and were married in New York. From the Empire state they journeyed to Ohio, and in 1855 to Marshall County, Indiana establishing their home one-mile west of Bourbon, where they became the owners of forty acres of virgin land. In 1863 they transferred their residence to a farm four miles north of this city, where they purchased eighty acres of land and continued the cultivation arid improvement of their estate until their busy and useful lives were ended in death. Mr. Schroeter answered to the call of death on the 23d of December 1883, and he now sleeps beside the brave pioneers who blazed the way for future development in Marshall County.

 

During the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Schroeter in Stark County, Ohio, their son John G. was born March 28, 1852, and accompanying the family on their removal to Marshall county he received his educational training in its public schools. After attaining to mature years he worked out by the day for a time, or until he was able to purchase a team and engage in the hauling of logs. For two years thereafter he operated a sawmill in German township, then worked for a year as a carpenter, and from 1884 until 1892 he operated a threshing machine, in which' he owned a half interest. At the close of that period he purchased one hundred and five acres of land where he now lives, but at that time the farm was unimproved, without fences or buildings; and the pleasant and commodious residence which now stands thereon, as well as many other valuable improvements, are monuments to his industry and business ability.

 

On the 6th of December 1888, Mr. Schroeter was united in marriage to Lizzie Foltz, a daughter of Nicholas Foltz, of Kosciusko County, Indiana. Mr. Schroeter is a member of the Lutheran Evangelical church. He is a Democrat in political sentiment.

 

WILLIAM F. BATES. In the death of William F. Bates Marshall County lost one of its most valued citizens. Many years of his life were spent within its borders, and during an extended period he was prominently identified with the agricultural interests of Tippecanoe Township, his fine estate consisting of two hundred and eighty acres only a mile and a half from the village of Tippecanoe, but eighty acres of the place has been sold to his son Frank. William F. Bates was an excellent businessman, progressive in his views, and he commanded the respect of his fellowmen by his uprightness and his many admirable traits of character.

 

He was born in Portage county, Ohio, in 1866, a son of Frederick and Anna (Hickman) Bates, both also natives of that commonwealth,

 


604                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

the mother born in Greene county, and the father was of English descent. Their son William grew to years of maturity on a farm in Ohio, and from his native state he came to Marshall county, Indiana, and enrolled his name among the leading business men and citizens of Tippecanoe township, prominently identified with its farming and milling interests.

 

Mr. Bates married Miss Jennie Hoffman, a daughter of Henry and Lucinda (Bailor) Hoffman, both of whom were born in Pennsylvania, and the mother was a member of a Pennsylvania Dutch family. They came to Marshall County, Indiana, in 1840, an early epoch in its history, and for many years the father conducted a sawmill near the home farm of William F. Bates. He became prominent in the early life of his community, and his death occurred at the age of fifty-four, his wife being but fifty-two at the time of her death. In their family were eight children, five sons and three daughters, and the five now living are: Charles W., Frank, Alexander, Elizabeth and Jennie Bates. The three deceased are Rhoda, Vina and James F., all of whom attained mature years. The parents were members of the United Brethren church. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bates: Alice Bailey, of South Bend; Anna, the wife of Herbert Laird, and they reside with her mother on the homestead; Frank, who lives south of the home farm, where he is a successful farmer and stock buyer; Nellie Ellinger, of South Bend; and Stella Plummer, of Tippecanoe township. The political affiliations of Mr. Bates were with the Republican Party. He met a sad death in the streets of Bourbon on the 12th of May 1906, leaving a grief-stricken wife and children to mourn his loss, while the community in which he had so long lived and labored mourned the loss of one of its truest and best citizens.

 

JACOB FIFER. The name of Jacob Fifer is closely associated with the early history of Tippecanoe Township and Marshall County and he is a representative of one of its oldest al1d most prominent families. It was in a very early day in the county’s history that Joseph Fifer, the father of Jacob, journeyed from his old home in Elkhart county, Indiana, to establish his home in the wilds of Tippecanoe township, this being in 1844, and on the present site of the home of his children, William and his sisters, he built his little log cabin and began the work of clearing and cultivating his land. The Indians were then numerous in this section of the state and Tippecanoe Township was also the home of many wild animals and wild game. The son Jacob was quite a hunter in those early days, and many a deer and wild turkey have fallen before his trusty rifle. Joseph Fifer was a native of Pennsylvania, a member of a Holland Dutch family, and in his early life he went from his native state to Kentucky and thence to Ohio, where he was reared and later married to one of the commonwealth's native daughters, Nancy Myers, also of German descent. Her father served his country in the Indian wars and the War of 1812, and the father of Joseph Fifer served in the Revolutionary war under General Washington. After his marriage Joseph Fifer went to Elkhart County, Indiana, this being in about 1838, and a few years later, in 1844, he continued his journey to Marshall County. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Fifer, of whom four

 


605                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

are now living: Jacob, William, Angeline and Susan, and those deceased are Joseph, Catherine, Ellen and Isaac. After a life devoted to agricultural pursuits Joseph Fifer was called to the home beyond at the age of fifty years, a Whig in his political affiliations and a member of the Evangelical church, as was also his wife, who long survived him and reached the age of seventy-three years. They were loved and honored by all who knew them, and their names are recorded high on the roll of the brave pioneers of Marshall County.

 

Jacob Fifer was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, near Dayton, March 18, 1833, and he was a little lad of eleven years at the time of the removal of the family to Marshall County, and he remained at home until his marriage. In 1864 he volunteered for service in the Civil war and was made a member of Company B, Eighty-third Infantry, General John A. Logan's command of the Fifteenth Corps, and participated in many of the hard-fought battles of the war, including the engagement of Kinston, North Carolina, and he was also at Rolla, that state, when General Johnston surrendered. Going to Washington, D. C., he participated in the Grand Review, and was mustered out of service at Louisville, Kentucky, receiving his discharge at Indianapolis, Indiana. Returning to his old home in Tippecanoe Township, he resumed his agricultural labors and is now the owner of a fine estate of one hundred and five acres, well improved and under an excellent state of cultivation.

 

When he had reached the age of twenty-nine years Mr. Fifer married Nancy Jane Copeland, a native of Ohio. She was a daughter of Robert and Lucinda Copeland, prominent early residents of Marshall county, and at her death, in the fall of 1906, she left five children: Schuyler Colfax, a resident of Chicago, Illinois; Mahala Hetzner, who is with her father; Pleasant Mikesell, of Talma, Indiana; William, connected with a wholesale house in Indianapolis, Indiana; and Lucinda Pomeroy, a resident of Plymouth, Indiana. Four children are also deceased, Matilda Finley, two who died in infancy, and one in later years. Mrs. Fifer was a member of the Baptist church, and she proved to her family a true and loving counselor until her life's work was ended in death.

 

JOHN F. BECK, deceased, was identified with the business interests of Marshall county for forty years, but his birth occurred in Elkhart county, Indiana, March 14, 1833. His father, Simeon Beck, was born in Kentucky, as was also the maternal grandfather, but his daughter, Mary Williams, who became the wife of Simeon Beck, was born in southern Indiana, and her death occurred on the 27th of June 1872. In their family were the following children: Celena, Ann Caroline, William Monroe (a resident of Milford, Indiana), John F., David, George G., Elias and Sarah Ann. David died in California just two days after the death of his brother, John F., in Marshall county. The family is adherents of the Methodist Episcopal church, and politically they have allied their interests with the Republican Party.

 

John F. Beck was born and grew to years of maturity on the old homestead in Elkhart county, near Goshen, attending the old-time log schoolhouses of the neighborhood. In 1867, with his mother and

 


606                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

brothers, he left his childhood's home and journeyed to Marshall county, Indiana, where he became the owner of a fine estate of two hundred and forty acres in Tippecanoe township,

 

On the 18th of October 1866, Mr. Beck was united in marriage to Annetta Watson, who was a successful and popular teacher before her marriage. She was born in Delaware County, Ohio, August 24, 1846, a daughter of Cyrus C. Watson, also a native of Delaware County and a son of William Watson, who claimed Connecticut as the commonwealth of his nativity, and the family was originally from England. In Morrow County, Ohio, Cyrus Watson married Sally Poorman, who was born in Pennsylvania and was a member of a Pennsylvania German family. In i854 they established their home on a farm in Center township, near Inwood, and afterwards at Bourbon, where the wife and mother died in 1897, and Mr. Watson died at the home of Mrs. Beck when eighty-five years of age. During the Civil war he served as a soldier in Company B, One Hundred and Fifty-filth Regiment. In their family were three daughters: Sarah Frances Stockman, of Texas; Mrs. Elnora Jackson, of Talequah, Indian Territory, and Mrs. Annetta Beck. The only son, Martin Watson, died in Wisconsin. Mr. Watson, the father, was a stanch Republican in his political affiliations, and both he and his wife were members of the United Brethren church. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Beck, namely: Melvin, who resides on the old home- stead farm and is one of the best known business men of the community; Mary Kesler, who resides in Texas; Sarah E., the, wife of H. H. Herald, a harness maker and postmaster of Patricksburg, Indiana; Chloe A. Wood, of Tippecanoe township; and Celena, who married Ora E. Reed and resides in Center township. The political affiliations of Mr. Beck were with the Republican Party, and he held membership relations with the United Brethren church. He was loved and honored for his many noble traits of character, and in his death, which occurred on the 25th of September, 1901, Marshall county lost one of its prominent business men, one who had been long identified with its agricultural interests. Mrs. Beck is also a member of the United Brethren church.

 

WILLIAM L. YANTISS, one of the three commissioners of Marshall County, is a representative of one of the county's earliest and most prominent families. The founder of the name here was the grandfather of W. L. Yantiss, John Yantiss, who with his wife, Mary Iden, cast his lot with its pioneer residents of 1858. He was born in the Old Dominion state of Virginia, and in 1846 the family became residents of Huntington County, Indiana, from whence they journeyed to Marshall County. In their family were four Sons: J. J.; Jonah L., who lost his life in the service of his country during the Civil war, serving in the Seventy-third Indiana Infantry, and he was but seventeen years old at the time of his death; Damerio, deceased; and David, a resident of Fulton county. J. J. Yantiss was born in Ohio in 1842 and was but a lad when he came with his parents to Marshall County, Indiana. At the inauguration of the Civil war he offered his services to his country's cause and became a member of the Seventy-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Company F, serving for three years as a brave and loyal soldier. For his wife he

 


                                                HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                          607

 

 

Chose Elizabeth Riley, who was to him a true and loving helpmate in the journey of life. She was born and reared in Indiana, her parents having been numbered among the early pioneers of Wayne County, and her father was of Scotch ancestry. Two of her brothers, George and James Riley, served their country during its Civil War, and one is now living in Kansas and the other in Oklahoma. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Yantiss; Malvin P, who resides near Hillsdale in Wisconsin; W.L., the subject of this review; and Manferd E., employed in railroad service. The wife and mother was called to the home beyond on the 10th of March 1893, when forty-four years of age. She was a member of the Wesleyan Methodist Church. Her husband still survives her and resides in the county, which he helped to transform from a wilderness to its present high state of perfection. He is liberal in his religious views and is a Republican in his political affiliations.

 

W.L. Yantiss was born on the old home farm of his grandfather in Tippecanoe Township, Marshall County, January 1, 1870, and the educational training which he received in its districts schools was supplemented by attendance at the high school. He assisted his father in the work of the farm until the age of twenty-one, when on the 28th of July 1891, he was married to Catherine Grace, a daughter of Jacob and Louisa (Cupp) Grace, prominent and well known residents of Tippecanoe township. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Yantiss – Gracie, Chloe, Joseph Glenn and Jacob Cleo. Mr. Yantiss actively and efficiently upholds the principles of the Republican Party, and in the fall of 1904 was its choice for the office of county commissioner. He is a good businessman and is the owner of one hundred and forty acres in Tippecanoe Township. He is a scion of one of the pioneer families of Indiana, and is inscribing his own name on the pages of its political and industrial history.

 

JAMES A. WORSHAM. One of the most prominent of Marshall County’s businessmen

Is James A. Worsham, the proprietor of a sawmill in Tippecanoe Township and also interested in the S.J. Peabody Lumber Company. His mill was erected in 1899, and has a capacity of five thousand feet daily, while during the past five months he has cut for the Peabody Company four hundred thousand feet of natural lumber. Mr. Worsham thoroughly understands the milling business in all its details and he has made his mill one of the leading industries of Marshall County.

 

He was born in Fayette County, Indiana July 10, 1861; a son of Jeremiah Worsham Jr., and a grandson of Jeremiah Sr. Charles Worsham was killed in battle during the Civil War. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Maria Shores, was born in southern Indiana, and her father, Thomas Shores, was also a native of the southland. Jeremiah Worsham Jr., died when his son James was but six years of age, leaving his widow with five children. His business career was devoted to the tilling of the soil, his political affiliations were with the Democracy, and his entire life was characterized by the utmost fidelity to the duties of life. Mrs. Worsham was a member of the Christian Church.

 

James A. Worsham was taught the value of industry in his early life,

 


608                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

and his first employment was a mill on the Tippecanoe river, while later he spent one year at Hoffman's lake, and for six years he conducted a profitable business in Kosciusko county. In 1899 he became a resident of Tippecanoe Township and in the same year erected his mill. In Plymouth, in 1881, by the Rev. Parker, he was married to Ida Hubler, a daughter of M. and Catherine Hubler, the former of whom is an ex-soldier of the Civil war. The six children of Mr. and Mrs. Worsham are Bessie Spencer, Alfred, Mabel, Ethel, Emanuel and Thomas S. The eldest daughter is married and resides on her father's farm of forty- forty acres three and a half miles east of the village of Tippecanoe. Alfred, the eldest son, married Miss Nellie HaIl and resides in Tippecanoe, Indiana. The third child in order of birth, Walter, died in infancy. Mr. Worsham exercises his right of franchise in support of the principles of the Democratic Party. He began life for himself empty handed at the early age of twelve years and all he has accumulated he has earnestly toiled for. He is known by all as a gentleman of the strictest integrity and great credit is due him.

 

BENJAMIN F. MEREDITH. Among the officials of Tippecanoe Township is recorded the name of Benjamin F. Meredith, the present incumbent of the office of trustee, to which he was elected in 1904 as a representative of the Democratic party. At the election he received a majority of seventy-six votes. He is also numbered among the leading agriculturists and stockmen of Tippecanoe Township, where he owns an estate of eighty-seven acres, where he follows general farming and is also well known as a buyer and shipper of stock.

 

Tippecanoe township also claims Mr. Meredith among its native sons, his natal day being the 5th of July, 1864, having thus been born amid the stirring times of the Civil war. His father, J ob Lewis Meredith, now deceased, was long numbered among the prominent business men of Marshall county, having established his home within its borders in an early day in its history, but he was born in Ohio, During the Civil war he served his country with credit and honor as a member of an Indiana regiment. In Fulton county of this state he married Margaret Drudge, who proved to him a faithful and loving companion until his life's labors were ended in death in 1881, when forty-two years of age. They became the parents of three children - B. F., the subject of this review; John, a businessman in New York city; and Orlando, a stock- man of Mentone, Indiana. The mother now. resides in Kosciusko county, Indiana. Mr. Meredith devoted his life's activities to the tilling of the soil. He voted with the Democratic Party and was a Baptist in his religious belief.

 

Benjamin F. Meredith was born on the homestead farm in Tippecanoe Township, and after his father's death he remained at home and assisted his mother with the work of the farm, in the meantime receiving his educational training in the district schools. When he had reached the age of twenty years he married Rosa Emmons, who was born in Fulton county, Indiana, a daughter of William Emmond. Five children have been born to bless their union, namely: Loughly, Lieu, Margaret, Willie and Reatha. Mr. Meredith supports the principles of the Democratic Party

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     609

 

and has many times served as a representative to its conventions, and in 1904, as above stated, was its choice for the office of trustee of Tippecanoe township. He is a member of the Odd Fellows fraternity, Lodge No.715, of Tippecanoe, Indiana.

 

CHARLES H. NEU has the honor of being one of the pioneer merchants of Bourbon. It was in 1878 that he became a resident of Marshall County, attending school for one year thereafter, and during the following five years he filled a clerical position in the hardware store of Acker & Sons. In partnership with Isaac B. Arnold he then became the proprietor of a hardware store, they having purchased the business of 0. F. Ketchum, and one and a half years later Mr. Arnold sold his interest to J. W. Davis, the firm name then becoming Neu & Davis. After a period of ten years Mr. Neu purchased the interest of Mr. Davis and continued as the sole proprietor of the business until 1907, when he sold the store and retired from active business relations. He has been connected with the First State Bank since its organization, and since 1903 has served as its vice-president, and he is also the owner of a farm of two hundred and forty acres of land in Bourbon Township. In his business relations he has met with a well-merited success.

 

Although long numbered among the prominent and influential residents of Marshall County, Mr. Neu is a native son of the Empire state of New York, born in Steuben County on the 30th of March 1854. His father, John N. Neu, was born in Germany, but came to the United States when a young man and became identified with the tanner's trade n New York, from whence he removed to Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 1868, and there conducted a hotel for a number of years. In 1878 he followed the tide of emigration to California, but after a residence of a few years in the Golden state returned to the east, and his death later occurred in 1900. Mrs. Neu, who bore the maiden name of Charlotte Bill, also claims Germany as the land of her nativity and she now makes her home with her son in Bourbon.

 

On the 24th of October 1884, Charles H. Neu was united in marriage to Olive Arnold, a daughter of one of Marshall County’s well-known residents, Isaac B. Arnold. They have two children, John and Helen, the son being a partner in the hardware firm of Neu & Keller, of Bourbon, and the daughter is a teacher in the schools of North Dakota. Mr. Neu has fraternal relations with the Masonic order affiliating with Bourbon Lodge No.227, and also with the Independent Order of Red Men.

 

J. W. EIDSON. One of the eminent physicians of northern Indiana and also one of the most conspicuous figures in its political circles is Dr. J. W. Eidson, who is devoting his time to his extensive practice, and at the present time is president of the County Medical Society. A deep interest in the science of medicine and a close study of its principles have gained him prominence among the best representatives of the profession in this section of the state, but at the same time his abilities have won him high political honors. In 1889, as a representative of the Democracy, he was made a member of the state legislature, and in that

 


610                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

session the school book law, as well as the "Lacey bribery"' law were passed. He introduced an act requiring beef to be inspected a certain distance from where slaughtered, which act was passed and signed, but was afterward declared unconstitutional. The doctor has also served his county as its coroner, and is at the present time a member of the town council.

 

Although so prominently identified with the interests of Marshall County, Dr. Eidson is a native son of Fulton County, Indiana, born on the 12th of March 1854. His father, B. A. Eidson, claimed Ohio as the commonwealth of his nativity, born in 1817, but in early life he went with his parents to Miami County, and he afterwards went to Fulton county and farmed there during the remainder of his life, which was brought to a close in 1893. His father was William Eidson, a native of the Old Dominion state of Virginia. B. A. Eidson was also quite a politician as well as a farmer, and at one time he held the office of county commissioner, in which he represented the Democracy. His wife bore the maiden name of Sarah A. Deckard and was a native daughter of Indiana.

 

To their son J. W. they gave a common school education in the Fulton county schools, this being later supplemented by study in the Valparaiso University, while for eight years thereafter he was a member of the teacher's profession. Deciding upon the practice of medicine, however, as his life work, he entered as a student the Indiana Medical College and graduated therein in 1884. He entered upon the practice of his chosen profession in Bourbon, and from that time forward has ministered to suffering humanity in this city, his skill and ability winning him a most desirable reputation. He is a close student of the science and is a member of the County, State and American Medical Associations, thus keeping well informed on the progress that is constantly being made along medical lines.

 

On the 14th of February 1906, Dr. Eidson married Miss Bertha Staley, a daughter of David Staley, a prominent early resident and farmer of Marshall County. One child, David Arthur, was born to them on the 8th of December 1906. Mrs. Eldson is a member of the Methodist church.

 

C. C. VINK, the cashier of the First State Bank of Bourbon is well and favorably known to the residents of Marshall county, for he has been prominently identified with the business interests of this city for many years, and in 1902 he assisted in the organization of one of its leading financial institutions, the First State Bank. On both the paternal and maternal sides his family have been identified with the making of the history of the country and have been represented in its early war, both his grandfathers participating in the Mexican war, and his mother's five brothers served throughout the period of the Civil war. They entered the ranks of the boys in blue at the commencement of the conflict, and at the expiration of their term of enlistment returned to the front, and two of the five suffered the horrors of Libby prison. The parents of Mr. Vink, William and Minerva (Foulks) Vink, were born in Columbiana County, Ohio, which was also the birthplace of the son on the 22d

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     611

 

of June, 1856, and there the father was engaged in farming until his retirement from the business world. His death occurred at the home of C. C. Vink, July 5, 1892, when he had reached the sixtieth milestone on the journey of life. His widow survived until the 22d of February 1905, dying at the age of seventy-three years. In their family were four children: Angelina, the wife of Frank Carl, of Wisconsin; Milton E., a resident of Cuyahoga county, New York; William L., who also makes his home in Wisconsin and C. C.

 

Mrs. C. C. Vink received his educational training in the public schools, and in December, 1876, he came to Bourbon, where he first secured employment with Isaac Arnold on his farm west of town, there remaining for three years. From that time until 1891 he filled a clerkship in this city, and in that year was appointed the deputy county treasurer under Arthur D. Senior, but three and a half years later Mr. Senior died and Mr. Vink was appointed to fill out his unexpired term. At the succeeding election he was defeated by one hundred votes to that office, although in 1896 he won the election by a handsome majority of six hundred votes, while two years later he was re-elected to the office. In 1902, with Hiram F. Bowman, he organized the First State Bank of Bourbon, and has ever since served in the important position of its cashier. Mr. Vink has raised the standard grade of fine stock in his county, being a breeder of the Red Polled cattle, registered, and also the pure bred Barred Plymouth Rock chickens.

 

Op the 2ist of December 1882, Mr. Vink was united in marriage to Frances Steinbach, a daughter of Henry Steinbach, whose name is enrolled among the honored pioneers of Marshall county. Three daughters have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Vink, Bessie, Honora and Katherine, and the eldest is now the wife of John Kester, of Bourbon. Mrs. Kester is now and has been for several years connected with the State Bank of Bourbon as bookkeeper. She received her business training in the South Bend Business College.

 

Mr. Vink has fraternal relations with the Odd Fellows Lodge No. 207, with the Maccabees Tent NO.162, and with the Knights of Pythias order, Castle Hall Hercules Lodge N 0. 233. His political relations are with the Democracy, which he represented in the office of town council and as a member of the school board. His great-grandfather Vink was a soldier in the Revolutionary war under Washington and this entitles Mr. Vink and his children to become members of the Sons and Daughters of the Revolutionary war. His grandmother Vink, whose maiden name was Margaret Fisher, was born in Maryland. She was supposed to have been a descendant of Baron Fisher of Germany, who was a wealthy nobleman in the fatherland, and she was in line of inheritance. The battle of Fisher's Hill in Pennsylvania during the Revolutionary war was upon the land owned by one of the descendants of the baron.

 

Mr. Vink is popular in the city in which he has so long made his home, and is numbered among its most valued businessmen.

 

GEORGE D. ETTINGER is prominently connected with the financial interests of Bourbon, which has been his home for a number of years;  but his birth occurred in southern Michigan on the 17th of November,

 


612                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

1857, his parents being F. J. and Lydia (Patrick) Ettinger, the father a native of Pennsylvania and the mother of Ohio. She is of Scotch-Irish descent. During the early '50s the father established his home in Michigan and. became connected with the harness and saddlery business but in 1860 he removed to Warsaw and has ever since remained a resident of that city.

 

After completing his education in the public schools of Warsaw, George D. Ettinger worked in the J. D. Thayer flourmill from 1876 until 1883. In that year he came to Bourbon to take charge of the elevator which H. G. and J. D. Thayer had purchased in this city, and when the business was organized into a stock company, the Bourbon Elevator & Milling Company, William Erwin became the president, J. C. Erwin treasurer, and George D. Ettinger the secretary. This is one of the leading industrial institutions of Marshall County.

 

Mr. Ettinger married Effie A. Brindley, of Kosciusko county, Indiana, and they have one daughter, Hope, and two sons, John D. and Mac. Mr. Ettinger holds fraternal relations with the Masonic and the Knights of Pythias orders.

 

JESSE L. SEE, who is living on section 27, Green township, is widely known as one of the extensive and successful livestock dealers of this part of the state. He was born in Miami County, Indiana, August 5, 1871, his parents being Lewis and Mary L. (Culp) See. The father, a native of Miami county, is now living and his entire life was devoted to general agricultural pursuits up to the time of his retirement. He now makes his home in Peru, Indiana, and is a member of the Baptist church there. His wife died in September 1903, and of their family of eleven children three have also passed away. Those still living are: Alonzo J., Noah, Jesse L., Dora, Peter, Sanford, Plenny and Evelyn.

 

When only eleven years of age Jesse L. See started out to make his own way in the world and has since been dependent upon his labors for the success, which he has achieved. He worked in a restaurant at Logansport, Indiana, and was afterward employed as a farm hand. Before he was twenty-one years of age he had visited nine different states of the Union and soon after his marriage, in the fall of 1897, he and his wife went on a, visit to New York. Upon their return from the east they located in Walnut Township, where they lived until March 1898, when they took up their abode upon the old family homestead on section 27, Green Township. They own one hundred and ninety-five acres of land, all in Green Township. In 1904 Mr. See remodeled the house, making it a modern farm residence, and there are also good outbuildings and other substantial equipments on the place. Since 1897 he has dealt extensively and successfully in stock, handling many sheep. In one year he sold sheep to the amount of thirteen hundred dollars and he has also bought and shipped cattle and hogs to the Chicago market. In his business affairs he is energetic and determined and is meeting with a gratifying measure of prosperity. He is now the superintendent of Green Township.

 

On the 5th of August 1897, Mr. See was married to Miss Lucy Bartholomew, who was born in Green Township, Marshall County, Indiana, December 14, 1868, her parents being Noah and Amanda M. (Douglas)

 

HISTORY OFMARSHALL COUNTY.                          613

 

Bartholomew. The father was born in New Haven, Connecticut, January 27, 1815, and died February 9, 1890. With his parents he removed to Chautauqua county, New York, and in 1836 came to Indiana, settling in Green township. He was then twenty-one years of age. He joined Barney Corey in the purchase of a quarter section of timberland on section 27 and they held this land jointly until the death of Mr. Corey.

 

Mr. Bartholomew lived upon that place for fifty years and it was his home at the time of his demise. He held a number of township offices and was prominent and influential in the community, while in matters of public progress he took an active and helpful part. He gave the ground on which the schoolhouse of district No. 9 now stands, this being the place where he first had his home. The Jordan Baptist church stands on land now owned by Mr. Jesse L. See. Mr. Bartholomew cast his first presidential vote for William Henry Harrison and his last vote for Benjamin Harrison, the grandson of the Tippecanoe hero. His wife, who was born in Macedonra County, New York, October 1, 1825, died September 24, 1890. She was the daughter of Stephen and Aurilla Douglas and was the widow of Ransom Wiser. She married Mr. Bartholomew on the 26th of January 1865. Unto them were born two children, the younger being Mrs. See. The elder, Reuben, who was named for his grandfather, Reuben Bartholomew, died at the age of seventeen years, eleven months and twenty-four days. Mr. and Mrs. See were married by the Rev. Andrew E. Babcock, who had also performed the wedding ceremony for her parents. Three children have been born of this union: George B., Ombra M., and Lloyd A.

 

Mr. See is a member of Argos Lodge, No.263, I. 0. 0. F., and of Lodge No.399, A. F. & A. M. at Argos, Indiana. He gives his political allegiance to the Republican Party. His wife belongs to the Jordan Baptist church and he contributes to its support. His life has been characterized by all that is honorable and upright in his relations with his fellowmen and his industry and diligence in business constitute an example well worthy of emulation.

 

JAMES BIGGS. One of the best-known citizens and business men of Marshall county is James Biggs, who was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, September 15, 1840, a son of John and Lucinda (Branem) Biggs, both of whom also claimed the Buckeye state as the commonwealth of their nativity, but on the paternal side the family is an old Virginia one. James Biggs was thrown upon his own resources at an early age owing to the death of his father, and during his boyhood days he came with his brother-in-law, Arthur Bland, to Miami county, Indiana, and in 1850 they continued their journey to Marshall county, locating three miles south of Bourbon in Tippecanoe township, where Mr. Biggs purchased two hundred and sixty acres of wild and unimproved land. At that time Indians were still numerous in this section of the state, and all was new and wild. Mr. Bland died on his old homestead here, having accumulated during his residence here a large estate, which Mr. Biggs was called upon to settle. In 1857 he bought forty acres of land three miles west of Bourbon, from which he cut and sold the timber, and in time transformed the tract from an unbroken wilderness to a well-cultivated farm,

 


614                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

at the same time adding to his possessions until he is now the owner of three hundred and fifteen acres and also property in Bourbon. As a representative of the Democracy, Mr. Biggs served eight years as the trustee of Bourbon Township, having been elected to the office in 1883.

 

He married, in 1861, Emma Bell, whose father, Henry Bell, came to Marshall County during its pioneer days, and her birth occurred in Ohio. They have become the parents of three children: William, who resides on one of his father's farms; Charles, also an agriculturist in Bourbon township; and Hester, who has become Mrs. Rackett and is a resident of Tippecanoe township, Marshall county. Mr. Biggs is a member of the fraternal order of Odd Fellows and of the Methodist church.

 

ISAAC NEWTON ELLIS, deceased, was born in Clinton county, Ohio, July 25, 1836, a son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Oglesby) Ellis. After completing his educational training in the schools of his native county he came with his sister, Mrs. Trickel, to Laporte county, Indiana, with whom he lived and worked until his marriage. In the meantime his father had located in Marshall County, having purchased a farm between Bourbon and Plymouth in 1850, and Isaac Newton joined him here and worked on the farm until the early part of the '60s. He then purchased a farm and continued its cultivation and improvement until his life's labors were ended in death. The estate is now owned by his widow and consists of ope hundred and sixty acres. At the time of the purchase the land was wild and unimproved, and to his energetic efforts and excellent business ability is due its present state of productiveness. The death of this honored early business man of Marshall county occurred in 1884, while in the prime of life, for he was but forty-eight years of age when death claimed its own.

 

Mr. Ellis was first married to Mary Payne, who died in 1870, leaving one daughter, Orvilla, now Mrs. Parker, and a resident of Marshall County in 1872 he married Eda L. Hindle, whose grandfather, Christian Hindle, was one of the first residents of Marshall County, he having established his home here when there was no town nearer than South Bend or Logansport. The old Hindle home was located one mile from Inwood. The father of Mrs. Ellis was Adam Hindle. The second marriage was blessed by the birth of three children: Arvada, the wife of Elza Hite, of Center township; Armetta, the deceased wife of Lester Rite; and one who died in infancy. Mrs. Ellis is a worthy member of the Methodist church, as was also her husband. Re was a good man, a kind husband and father, and was loved and honored by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance.

 

GEORGE W. RATFIELD. Numbered among the businessmen of Marshall county is George W. Ratfield, whose entire life since he was a child has been spent within its borders. Re was born in Marion County, Ohio, July 24, 1843, but in 1850 his father, William Ratfield, removed with his family to Bourbon Township, Marshall County, where he entered one hundred and sixty acres of land five miles northeast of Bourbon. This was during a very early period of its development, and this early

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     615

 

pioneer had to cut his way through the woods to his farm and clear a space sufficient to erect his little log cabin. His nearest neighbor was a mile and a half distant, and all was new and wild, but with the passing years he brought his farm under an excellent state of cultivation and there he spent the remainder of his long and active life, dying in 1859 at the age of fifty years. He was a native son of England, coming with his parents to the United States during his boyhood days, and the family home was first established in Marion County, Ohio, where they became farming people. Mrs. Hatfield bore the maiden name of Mary Tharp, and was born in Pennsylvania.

In the old-time log cabin schools of Bourbon Township George W. Hatfield received his educational training, and during his early manhood, in August 1862, he enlisted for service in the Civil war, entering the Twenty-first Indiana Battery and continuing as a soldier until the close of the conflict. His services were in Kentucky, Tennessee and Georgia, and he participated in all of the engagements in which his regiment took part, while in the battle of Chickamauga he was wounded in the left knee. Receiving his honorable discharge in June, 1865, Mr. Hatfield returned to the work of the farm in Bourbon township, and in 1884 he took up his abode on his present estate of eighty acres, located a few miles from Bourbon, the old home of his wife. He also; has property interests in the city, and in 1904 Mr. and Mrs. Hatfield laid aside the active work of the farm and removed to Bourbon to enjoy the rest, which their former years of labor had brought them.

 

They were married in January 1866, Mrs. Hatfield bearing; the maiden name of Susan Hanes, and she is a daughter of Henry Hanes, of Marshall county. Of their children, three daughters and one son are living, namely: Adella, now Mrs. Price, of Illinois; Mary Agnes, now Mrs. Bates, and a resident of Bourbon township; William A.; and Myrtle, now Mrs. Snell, of Bourbon. One daughter, Cora May Pritch, died in 1900, and three children also died in infancy. Mr. Hatfield is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and for thirty-five years he has been an active and valued member of the Methodist church, having served in all of its offices from steward to class leader. He sustains his relations with his old army comrades by his membership in Warsaw Post, G. A. R. True to his duties of citizenship, he is an active public worker, and in 1904 was elected the trustee of Bourbon township, while against his wish he was also nominated and elected as the township assessor. As a citizen he is highly respected and esteemed and the family is one of prominence in the community where they have so long resided.

 

THOMAS B. LEE. To Thomas B. Lee belongs the honor of being one of the earliest residents of Marshall County, and for many years he has been prominently identified with the business interests of Bourbon. He was born in Philadelphia February 14, 1832, a son of Nathan and Urie (Wilson) Lee, natives respectively of Lancaster and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania. The father, who was a cabinet-maker, moved to Marion County, Ohio, during the boyhood days of his son Thomas, and he spent the remainder of his life there. The son received his educational training in the schools of Marion County, and one year after his

 

 


616                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

father's death he moved to Morrow county, Ohio, and in 1863 he came with his oldest brother, Isaac, to Panama, Marshall county, Indiana, and engaged in the milling business. At one time he was the proprietor of three sawmills, and he continued in that business with his brother until 1879, when the latter sold his interest to Dwight L. Dickinson, who remained in partnership with Mr. Lee, of this review, until 1892. During a few years thereafter Mr. Lee lived retired, and again entering business activities he was identified for four years with the carriage business in Bourbon. He subsequently turned his attention to the sale of agricultural implements in partnership with John Plant, and this line of trade has ever since claimed his time and attention.

In 1855 Mr. Lee was united in marriage to Ruth Platt, whose death occurred in 1893, and in the following year he married Alice Beatty. To the first union were born two daughters, Viola, now Mrs. Listenfelt, and Rosamond, Mrs. Fouts. Mr. Lee is a Democrat in his political affiliations, and fraternally is a member of the Masonic order, joining the Blue Lodge in Bourbon in 1869, and he is a member of the Chapter and Commandery in Plymouth and the Consistory in Ft. Wayne. Marshall County numbers Thomas B. Lee among her earliest and most honored pioneers. He established his home within her borders in a very early day, when the county was but thinly settled, and in those early days the residents of Panama secured their supplies from Bourbon, six miles distant, ox teams being used for the purpose, and it often took the greater part of two day; to make the return trip. Mr. Lee is thus familiar with the early days of Marshall County, and he has inscribed his name on the pages of its business history.

 

BRODIE W. PARKS, M. D. From the formative period in the history of northern Indiana the Parks family have been prominently associated with its business, professional and political life. James Parks, the grandfather of Brodie, is recorded as the first white settler in Bourbon town- ship, whence he came from Bourbon county, Kentucky, and in memory of his old home county there he bestowed the name of Bourbon upon his township and town here. Prior to his removal from Kentucky, a son, Dr. John F. Parks, was born in Bourbon county, and he married Malinda Hall, they becoming the parents of Brodie W. Parks November 27, 1,851, in Bourbon, Indiana. . Brodie W. Parks, physician and banker, received his literary training in the Bourbon public schools and the University of Michigan, and his medical training in Rush Medical College of Chicago, wherein he graduated in 1876. He thereafter practiced medicine and sold drugs and hardware, and finally, in 1907, with others he organized the Bourbon Banking Company, a state bank, and was elected the president of the institution. Mr. Parks was born and has always lived in or near Bourbon, has risen step by step to a place of influence and honor among public- spirited and high-minded men, and as a professional and business man fills an important position in the business life of the city and community. He is independent in politics, and although a member of no particular religious denomination he favors the Christian church and is a believer in the Bible and its teachings.

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     617

 

He married, December 25, 1876, in Marsha1l county, Mary Alice, the daughter of David L. Gibson, and their children are: Lizzie G., Nellie M., Mary E., John J., Howard D. and Carlanthia A., all of whom have attained to mature years with the exception of the youngest, who is but thirteen. During his life Mr. Parks has spent considerable time in travel, spending two years on the Pacific coast when young, and with the exception of that of South Dakota he has at different times visited every western state of the Union.

 

LUTHER JOHNSON, M. D. Throughout the entire period of his professional career Dr. Luther Johnson has been numbered among the medical practitioners of Bourbon, coming to this city in the year following his attendance at Rush Medical College, in June, 1867, and his long identification with this place and his prominence here entitles him to more than a passing notice in a work of this character, devoted as it is to the portrayal of the lives of the representative men of Marshall county. He was born in Findlay, Ohio, April 24, 1836 a son of Miller and

Hanna (Caton) Johnson, natives respectively of West Virginia and Ohio. During his early manhood the father became a resident of Ohio, locating near Columbus, where he fo1lowed agricultural pursuits for a time. Removing in 1853 to Marshall County, he established his home on a farm in Walnut Township, near Bethel, where he followed the tilling of the soil during the remainder of his active and useful life, dying at the age of seventy-eight years in 1884. His wife survived him until 1889, dying also at the age of seventy-eight years. Mr. Johnson was of the Quaker faith and was of English descent.

 

In the public schools of Marshall county Dr. Luther Johnson received his literary training, and on leaving the schoolroom as a student he returned as a teacher, following the profession for a number of years. In 1861 he offered his services to his country's cause as a soldier in Company D, Ninth Indiana Infantry, but on account of a wound, which he received at the battle of Shiloh, he was discharged on a surgeon's certificate for disability in June 1862. Returning to his home, Dr. Johnson became actively interested in the political affairs of the community, and made the race for the office of sheriff, but was unsuccessful at the polls. It was then that he determined upon the practice of medicine as his life occupation, and for four years he was a student of medicine, returning in 1866 from Rush Medical College. As before stated, he came to Bourbon in June of the following year, and his name has since been a household word in the homes of this community, and his long professional career has been attended with marked success. For forty years he has been a member of the Masonic order, affiliating with Bourbon Lodge No. 227, in which he has held all of the offices several times, and he is also a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Red Men and the Miles H. Tibbetts G. A. R. Post No.260, at Plymouth.

 

Dr. Johnson married, in 1867, Rhoda A. Borton, a daughter of Samuel Borton, of Stark County, Ohio. Their three children are Charley M., Arthur L. and Willa W.

 


618                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

F. E. RADCLIFFE, M. D. Occupying a high place in the medical fraternity of Marshall County, Dr. F, E. Radcliffe has been successfully engaged in practice in Bourbon since 1893. His birth occurred in Whitley county, Indiana, July 8, 1872, his parents being E. M. and Mary (Norris) Radcliffe, natives respectively of southwestern Ohio and Indiana. In the early '50s the father came to Indiana and located at Pierceton, where he has ever since maintained his residence and is prominently identified with its business interests. He is a Republican politically, and is a member of the Baptist church.

 

After completing his literary education in the schools of Kosciusko county, F. E. Radcliffe began the study of medicine in the Purdue Medical School, then the medical department of Butler University, in which he graduated in 1898; He then entered the ranks of the medical practitioners at Burket, being at that time twenty-one years of age and the youngest physician in the state. After a residence there of five years he came to Bourbon, where he has been in continuous practice since 1893. He has gone steadily forward in the profession, studying, working and striving to keep abreast of modern thought and the discoveries in medical science, and he caters to a general practice.

 

Dr. Radcliffe married, in 1899, Miss Lela, a daughter of George Knox, one of the prominent early residents of Kosciusko county, Indiana, and a veteran of the Civil war. The doctor is a member of the State and American Medical Associations, and has fraternal relations with the Masonic Lodge N0. 229, of Bourbon. His father is a Knights Templar Mason, and all of the doctor's male relatives are members of that helpful and beneficent order.

 

A. C. MATCHETTE, M. D. Many years of self-denying labor in the service of suffering humanity is the summing-up of the life of A. C. Matchette, one of the most honored citizens and venerable physicians of Bourbon. He is a representative of an old Virginia family of French extraction, and in the Old Dominion state his parents, William J. and Eliza (Wasson) Matchette, had their nativity. The father came to Indiana in the early year of 1829 and established his home in Wayne County, where he was a leading member of the medical-profession for several years, and previous to his removal he had practiced medicine in his native state of Virginia. In 1842 he removed from Wayne county to Goshen, where he had large real estate interests, and he remained in that city until his life's labors were ended in death, in 1861, aged sixty-six years. He was a leading Abolitionist in the early days; in fact the honor of being its first advocate in Indiana belongs to him. He was also very enthusiastic in the cause of temperance, and was honored and revered wherever known. His wife died during the infancy of their son A. C.

 

.A. C. Matchette was born in Wayne County, Indiana, August 24, 1837, but received his literary educational training in the public schools of Goshen. Inheriting a love for the medical profession from his father, he became a student in the Northwestern University, from which he received his diploma in 1862, and during the three following years he practiced his chosen profession in Chicago. In the meantime he had enlisted for service in the Civil war, entering the Twenty-ninth Indiana

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                         619

 

Infantry, and his military service, which covered a period of three years, was wholly connected with the medical department, and a part of his army career was also with the navy. He took part in several memorable engagements, including Arkansas Post and many others in eastern and western Tennessee, and he also participated in the siege of Corinth. At the close of his military career in 1865 Dr. Matchette came to Bourbon to join his brother, W. C. Matchette, who had been a medical practitioner here for some time, and thus the doctor is numbered among the city's pioneer physicians. The county at that time was an almost unbroken wilderness, with no roads or drainage, and the early settlers were often obliged to make their journeys on foot, it requiring from two to five days to cover fifteen miles. On account of the lack of drainage there was much malaria here, and the doctor has often been called upon to prescribe to from seventy-five to one hundred and twenty patients in one day, One can hardly realize what it meant to be a pioneer physician, riding here and there, far and near, in all kinds of weather over the little pathways that served the pioneers as highways, courageously bearing cheer and comfort to the distant patient. In those early days the county was richly wooded, and walnut trees, which would now sell for a thousand dollars were cut down and burned in order to clear the land. The site of Dr. Matchette's drug store, now in the business center of Bourbon, was at the time of his arrival here a pond, and from the door of the log cabin drug store, which stood upon its edge, he has often shot ducks. Bourbon was quite a lumber center in those days, and many saw mills were located within its borders and in the surrounding country.

 

In 1866 Dr. Matchette was united in marriage to Marie Louise Curran, a daughter of Rev. Dr. Curran, a Presbyterian divine of Huntington, Indiana. Their only son, Richard, is now the manager of his father's drug business. Dr. Matchette also had one brother and six sisters, but only one of the number, Benjamin, is now living, she being the widow of the late Dr. France, an old and prominent medical practitioner of Bourbon. The doctor is independent in his political affiliations, although in the early days he was a firm Abolitionist and cast his first vote for Lincoln. He has never cared for the honors of public office, and at one time was nominated on the Greenback ticket for congress, but declined to accept the honor, He is a member of the Masonic order, the Red Men and the Knights of Pythias, and to him belongs the distinction of being a charter member of Masonic Lodge NO.227, of Bourbon. The doctor has been very successful in the line of his profession, and especially so in the treatment of the liquor and drug habit, in which he has attained national fame owing to a formula which he invented and which has been adopted by several successful institutions, they discarding their own methods and adopting his. The record of a noble life is a man's best monument, and no words of eulogy can add luster to the name of Dr. A. C. Matchette.

 

S. E. HARRIS. Among those whose business activity has contributed to the welfare and prosperity of the city of Bourbon is S, E. Harris, who for many years has been a prominent figure in journalistic circles. As the editor of the Bourbon New's he is well known to the general public

 

620                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

of this section of Indiana. Throughout nearly his entire business career he has been connected with journalistic work, entering the field in 1880, in Ellettsville, when he established the Ellettsville News and continued as its editor for four years. During the following four years he was the editor and proprietor of the Orleans Examiner in Orange County, Indiana, and, returning thence to Ellettsville, he was engaged in newspaper work in that city for two years. During several years thereafter he was a resident of Bloomington, this state, and in 1896 he came to I Bourbon and purchased the Bourbon News having ever since continued the publication of that sheet with the exception of one year. At that time he sold the paper, but was induced by the general public at the close of one year to resume its editorship. During his connection with this journal he has increased its subscription list from four hundred to over two thousand. His power as an editor is widely acknowledged among contemporaneous journalists.

 

Mr. Harris is a native son of Indiana, born in Monroe County on the 23d of September 1850. His father, James Harris, was a well-known physician there for many years, but was born in Kentucky. During his boyhood days he came with his parents to Monroe County, and for fifty years he followed the practice of medicine there, becoming one of its most prominent citizens and leading physicians, His death occurred in 1902, when he had reached the eighty-fourth milestone on the journey of life. His wife, Sarah A. Fletcher, was a native of Pennsylvania, and died in 1901. They gave to their son, S. E, Harris, a common school education, and after its completion he engaged in the drug business with his father, who conducted a drug store in connection with his medical practice. The son later turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, and in 1880, as before stated, entered the journalistic field.

 

Mr. Harris married, in 1870, Laura B. Munson, a daughter of William B. Munson, of Monroe county, Indiana" and they have four children: Gerard B., a graduated optician, and who is associated with his father in business; C. M., a practicing physician of Bourbon; Edna M., now Mrs. Yenaway, of Casey, Illinois; and Eloise, at home. Mr. Harris is a member of the Methodist church. Bourbon numbers him among her most public-spirited citizens, and among the people with whom he is laboring he is popular and highly esteemed.

 

SINCLAIR PARKS. The late Sinclair Parks, who died February 5, 1892, after a brief illness, was the oldest son of the pioneer James 0. Parks, whose family was the first settlers of Bourbon Township and gave the township its name. The history of this pioneer family will be found on other pages of this work.

 

It was one of the prominent and very active citizens of Bourbon Township whom death took away in the person of Sinclair Parks. Born here in Marshall County, November 9, 1837, a son of James 0. and Susan ( Dinwiddie ) Parks, he passed from the schools of this county to Bryant's Commercial College in Indianapolis, and then studied law, graduating with his degree from the University of Michigan in 1865. He was a student at Ann Arbor during the progress of the war, and finally could endure no longer to remain engaged in the quiet vocations of peace, so

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                         621

 

he enlisted in 1864, in Company E, One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Indiana Infantry, as first sergeant. On being mustered out at the end of the war he returned to college and was at once graduated, having nearly completed his course before going off to the army. He began practicing in Plymouth and in Bourbon, at first with his father and brother, and on the retirement of his father he continued in partnership with the latter. He deserves a permanent place in the history of the bench and bar of Marshall county, for he was a well-qualified lawyer, both in education and practice, and acquired a good clientele. He was long prominent in Republican politics in the county; having served as chairman of the county committee, but never sought office for himself. At his death he was owner of two farms in Bourbon Township and one in Tippecanoe, the former being still in the possession of his widow.

 

Mr. Parks married, in October, 1865, Miss Ada M. Mowlan, daughter of Charles and Charlotte (Rambo) Mowlan, the father a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the mother of La Porte county, Indiana.

 

The Mowlan family belongs among the older settlers of Marshall County, having located here in 1845. Mr. Mowlan is well remembered in Plymouth, having been a merchant here for years, and was also elder of the First Presbyterian church of this city. Of his seven children, two died in infancy, and all are now deceased except Alfred Mowlan and Mrs. Parks, who live together in Bourbon. Mrs. Parks was the mother of three children, but none of them are living. Claude Vernon lived to be eight years old, while Orrison Wilmot died when three months old, and Early died aged two years. Mrs. Parks is a member of the Presbyterian Church, in which her late husband was an elder.

 

NOAH BERKEY. One of the prominent and honored early residents of Marshall county is Noah Berkey, who for many years has been extensively engaged in the tilling of its soil. He was born twenty miles north of Toronto, Canada, January 26, 1837, a son of Isaac and Gertrude (Blough) Berkey, both of whom were born in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania. After their marriage they went to Canada, where they farmed for ten years, and then returned to the states and took up their abode in Elkhart County, Indiana. This was in the year of 1840, and they entered land and became the owners of one hundred and ninety acres. On this estate they spent the remainder of their lives, the father dying in 1874, and the mother five years later, in 1879.

In the family of these honored Indiana pioneers were seven sons and four daughters, and as the family were in limited circumstances the children were obliged to begin the battle of life for themselves at an early age. The educational training of their son Noah was thus very meager in his early youth, and he worked on the farm until 1869. It was in that year that he came to Marshall County, and here he became identified with the saw-milling business in company with his brother James in Center Township. This section of the state was at that time thickly covered with timber, and the sawmill was one of its most valuable institutions, a boon to the early pioneers who had to clear their land and prepare their own building materials. Mr. Berkey continued in the business for three and a half years. He also purchased one hundred and fifty-five acres of land in section 14,

 


622                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

which he cleared and improved and placed it under its present high state of cultivation. Here he has been engaged in general farming and stock-raising for many years, and for nine years he also represented his townsmen in the office of township assessor. He affiliates with the Democratic Party.

 

Mr. Berkey married, in 1861, Eliza Anglemyers, who died in 1862, and in 1867 he married Elizabeth Whitehead. She died on the 16th of November, 1885, leaving five children: Chauncey, an agriculturist of Bourbon township; William, who is with his father; Bessie, now Mrs. Hatfield; and two deceased, a son aged twenty-one years, and a daughter aged nineteen. As a citizen Mr. Berkey is held in high esteem in his community, and Marshall county is proud to claim him among her honored pioneers.

 

LUTHER BANKS, deceased, was born in Connorsville, Fayette County, Indiana, June 15, 1832, a son of Thomas and Jane (Moffett) Banks, natives respectively of Kentucky and Tennessee and of English and Irish descent. During his young manhood Thomas Banks came to Indiana and located in Marion County, where he acquired possession/ of forty acres of land where Indianapolis now stands, receiving it in lieu of wages for a year's work. He sold that tract in 1836 and moved to Delaware County, where he resumed his agricultural labors on land he had there purchased, and also dealt quite largely in stock. In 1864 he came to Bourbon and purchased the Bates farm, continuing its cultivation and improvement until he put aside the active work of the farm and removed to the city. Both he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives there, both dying at the age of seventy-five years.

 

Luther Banks received his educational training in the schools of Delaware county and in the college at Newcastle, Henry county, and thus well equipped he entered the teacher's profession and taught for twelve years in Delaware county. It was in 1864 that he came to Marshall County, establishing his home one-mile west of Bourbon, and in 1867 he purchased the farm of forty acres on which he ever afterward lived.

 

When he obtained possession of this land it was in its virgin state and by his own efforts brought it to its present high state of development, and in addition he owned eighty acres west of the homestead, on which his son is residing. He made a specialty of the raising of Oxford Down sheep, in which he was very successful, and to him belonged the credit of having raised and shipped to market the first strawberries ever raised in this section. Marshall County was proud to claim Luther Banks among her honored pioneer residents and businessmen, and in addition to being one of her prominent agriculturists he also taught school for one year after coming here.

 

On the 18th of J tine, J858, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Sanders, of Delaware County, who died December 12, 1876, and on the 11th of July 1878, he wedded Miss Maggie E. Senior. Their only son, Morris, now operates his father's farm in Bourbon township. During the long period of over forty years Mr. Banks was a valued member of the Christian church, and during many years served as its elder. He died very suddenly, March 7, 1908. He was out to his barn looking after

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     623

 

his stock, and was stricken in death from .heart failure. His funeral sermon was preached by Rev. N. H. Sheppard, of South Bend, formerly of Plymouth, Indiana. He left a wife, one son, Morris; thirteen grandchildren, one sister, Mrs. Jacob Sunderland, of Muncie, Indiana, and many friends who honored him for his integrity. He was an upright, honorable citizen, and all who knew him esteemed him for his many .noble characteristics.

 

AARON ARMANTROUT. The name of Aaron Armantrout is closely associated with the early history of Marshall County, and he now sleeps beside the sturdy pioneers who helped to build an empire and whose memory will ever remain green among those who lived among them and appreciated their efforts. He was born in Ohio on the 23d of January 1835, a son of Valentine and Nancy (Hoover) Armantrout, and when a boy he moved with his family from Dayton to Peru, Indiana, where he attended school and later farmed. His father died during his youth, and on attaining to years of maturity he married, February 26, 1857 Lucinda Ptomey, and moved east of Peru to farm with his brother John. It was in 1864 that he came to Marshall county, purchasing eighty acres of land one mile northeast of Bourbon, but after one year he sold that tract and in 1877 moved to the present homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, while later he became the owner of eighty acres three miles west. He made the most of the improvements on this valuable homestead, and he farmed there until his life's labors were ended in death, in 1893, September 5, having then reached the fifty-eighth milestone on life's journey. He was a member of the Methodist church.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Armantrout became the parents of the following children: George W., of Aberdeen, South Dakota; Franklin, who died in infancy; Albert, whose death occurred at the age of twenty-six years, two months and twenty-six days; Elmer E., who resides on the farm southwest of the homestead; Ella, now Mrs. Seavolt, and a resident of Bourbon township; Oliver, who resides on the homestead; and one who died in infancy. Mr. Armantrout came to Marshall County when it was but sparsely settled, and to the privations, hardships and earnest labors of such as he have resulted the establishment of one of the foremost sections of this commonwealth. He was an earnest, honest citizen, a loving husband and father, and his memory is cherished and revered by all who knew him.

 

JOHN D. THOMAS. The name of John D. Thomas is inscribed on the pages of Marshall county's history in connection with the record o~ her jurisprudence. It was many years ago, in l877, that he sought a home in Bourbon, and during the long period, which has intervened his ability, has won him marked success. His birth occurred in Rush County Indiana, November 20, 1842, his parents being Edwin and Nancy (Dinwiddy) Thomas, natives respectively of New York and Kentucky. During his boyhood days the father came with his parents to Indiana, and after his marriage he removed to Madison county; this state, but in 1860 he transferred his residence from the Hoosier state to Illinois. His

 


624                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

death occurred in 1885, in California, where he was visiting his sister. After attending the district schools near his boyhood's home, John D. Thomas became a student in the Grand Prairie Seminary, of Onarga, Illinois, entering that well known institution at the age of twenty-one and remaining for two and a half years. He then matriculated in the University of Michigan, where he graduated in law in 1870, and in the year of 1877 he established his home in Bourbon. This city has ever since continued as the scene of his operations, and he is accorded a prominent position at the Marshall county bar. He is an independent voter and a strong supporter of W. J. Bryan.

 

In 1877 Mr. Thomas married Mary J. Irvine, whose birth occurred in Illinois, and their daughters are: Isa, now Mrs. Brownell, of Nebraska; Helena, now Mrs. Smith, of Denver; and Amy, Mrs. Burnett, and a resident of Nevada.

 

HENRY STEINBACH. For many years Mr. Henry Steinbach was numbered among the most prominent businessmen of Bourbon, where he has made his home since the early year of 1863. He came to this city to obtain timber for the manufacture of his handles which he was making for railroads, and, deciding to establish his home here, brought his family, and has ever since continued the manufacture of handles, working on a railroad contract until 1871. The disastrous fires of that year so blackened the timber as to make it unfit for his handles, and he then resumed his old trade of wagon making in partnership with W. J. Acker. The firm of the Steinbach & Acker Manufacturing Company became well and prominently known, but after seven years the partnership was dissolved, and Mr. Steinbach continued the work alone until his retirement from the business world.

 

Although so long and prominently identified with the business interests of Indiana, Mr. Steinbach claims the fatherland as the place of his nativity, born in Prussia, Germany, in 1831, and a son of William and Maria (Dilthy) Steinbach. In 1846 the family came to the United States and located in Washington County, Wisconsin, the community at that time being the home of many Indians and all was new and wild. Henry was the eldest of their four sons, and he assisted in his early youth ill the work of clearing his father's farm from its heavy growth of timber, that farm continuing as the home of his parents until their deaths, the father dying at the advanced age of eighty-four years, and the mother was ninety when called to join him in the home beyond. In 1853 Mr. Henry Steinbach went to Chicago, and was there married to Mary Peters, a native also of Germany, and four years later they moved to Kansas, but as that community was in an unsettled condition they returned to western Missouri, where Mr. Steinbach followed his trade of wagon-making. Leaving that state in 1862, he returned to Chicago, and in 1863 came to Bourbon, which has ever since continued as the place of his residence and the scene of his operations.

 

Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Steinbach, namely: William, a resident of Warsaw; Frances, now Mrs. Vink; Emma, the wife of William Rhodes, of Plymouth, Indiana; Harry, who is engaged in business with C. C. Vink in Bourbon; Louis E., the incumbent of the

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     625

 

office of superintendent of schools; Fred, who is connected with the School of Correspondence of Scranton, Pennsylvania, and resides in Kansas; and Mamie, now Mrs. Philpot, of Warsaw .During the long period of forty years Mr. Steinbach has held membership relations with the Masonic order, and still longer, for forty-five years, he has affiliated with the Odd Fellows order. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Red Men and of other societies. His religious affiliations are with the Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Steinbach died January 3, 1893.

 

JAMES HOGATE. After a successful business career James Hogate is now living a retired life in the village of Tippecanoe. He is a representative of one of the county's earliest pioneer families, and he is a grandson of Phillip Hogate, who was a Revolutionary soldier of English descent, and his wife, nee Priscilla Center, was of Irish parentage. Their son, John C. Hogate, whose name is recorded among the first settlers of Marshall county, was born in New Jersey, from whence he removed to Wayne county, Ohio, locating on the present site of Salem, and, after his marriage to Sarah Summers, also a native of New Jersey and a daughter of Dave and Harriet Summers, he made the journey across Lake Erie and by canal to Logansport, and thence by team to Tippecanoe township, Marshall county, Indiana, in 1844. This was during a very early epoch in the county's history, and during the journey hither their team ran away and the entire family were nearly killed. The first home of the family here was a little log cabin, but Mr. Hogate sold his first farm and bought land one mile south. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hogate: Hannah, who died on the 2d of January, 1904; James, the subject of this review; Catherine Emmons, who died in, Kosciusko county, near Warsaw; Ann Jane Fry, who died near Alliance, Ohio; Susan, a twin of Sarah, died near Spokane Falls in Washington; Kesiah resides with her brother James; and Permelia Hill died in Plymouth on the 29th of December, 1879. James, the first-born child, died when one year old, and David died at the age of six years. John C. Hogate, the father, was called from this life when sixty-four years of age. During the early part of his business career he served as captain of a steamboat, and for fourteen years he was engaged in boating on the Delaware river from Carpenter's landing, New Jersey, to Philadelphia. He later became identified with agricultural pursuits, and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Hogate died at the age of sixty-four years, surviving her husband but three years.

 

James Hogate grew to years of maturity on the homestead farm in Tippecanoe township, and in 1865, during the period of the Civil war, he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Fifty-first Indiana Infantry, and served until the close of the conflict. He was made captain of Company D, and for a time was in General Dudley's command. With his regiment he went to Gloucester, Tennessee, where he remained for a time, and at the close of the war he received an honorable discharge as a brave and loyal soldier. With his sister Kesiah he is now living retired from business cares in the little village of Tippecanoe. He has reached the seventy-ninth milestone on the journey of life, and is one of the best-known and most honored residents of Marshall County.

 


626                              HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

GEORGE D. HARTMAN, who for some years has been identified with educational and with agricultural interests in Marshall county and now cultivates a farm of one hundred and twenty acres, was born in St. Joseph county, Indiana, April 1877. His father, Francis M. Hartman, was the second son of Thomas W. and Malinda Hartman, and having arrived at years of maturity he was married, January 14, 1869, to Miss Nancy J. Alward, who died January 15, 1873. There were two children of that union, but Carrie J. died in infancy and Addie M. is also deceased. Having lost his first wife, Mr. Hartman wedded Mrs. Elizabeth Bondurant, nee Huff, on the 17th of October 1875. They became the parents of four children: George D., Lydia G., Grover C. and Millard. In the year 1862 Francis M. Hartman made the overland trip to California with a mule team to Nevada City, and thence to San Francisco, spending about five years upon the Pacific coast, after which he returned to the middle west by way of the Isthmus of Panama, crossing the lake on that isthmus on a steamboat, after walking for eleven miles over the mountain range to take the boat. There were many: Mexican bandits in the mountains at that time who waylaid the travelers returning from California and robbed them of their gold. On the eastern side of the isthmus Mr. Hartman embarked on a steamer for New York City, and thence proceeded up the Hudson River and By way of the Erie Canal to Buffalo. He arrived in Marshall County, Indiana, in 1877, settling in North Township, where he spent his remaining days as a farmer. In 1884 he united with the Wesleyan Methodist church and remained one of its faithful adherents until his death. In politics he was a Democrat and as a citizen was loyal to the best interests of his community. Many sterling traits of character gained for him the confidence and respect of his fellowmen and wherever he was known he was held in high esteem. His birth occurred in St. Joseph County, Indiana, April 26, 1842, and he died February 5, 1902, when almost sixty years of age. His widow, who was born January 19, 1850, is now living in North Township, this county. She was first married to Allen S, Bondurant and unto them were born two sons, Phillip and Clinton A.

 

George D. Hartman, spending his boyhood days under the parental roof, supplemented his early educational advantages, afforded by the public schools, by study in the Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso. When twenty-one years of age he taught his first school... at Buffalo, in North Township, Marshall County, and had fifty-two students under his supervision. He afterward engaged in teaching in German, Center and Walnut townships, following the profession of teaching during the winter months, while in the summer seasons he carried on farming.

 

On the 31st of March 1901, Mr. Hartman was married to Miss Lizzie Fogel, who was born in Center Township, Marshall County, Indiana, January 17, 1878, her parents being Henry and Barbara (Flosenzier) Fogel. Her father was born in Delaware county, Ohio, August 24, 1850, and the mother in Germany, November 29, 1853. They were married in Center township, Marshall county, Indiana, July 19, 1877, and became the parents of three children: Mrs., Hartman, Lee W., who died at the age of nine years, and Volline, who is at home.  Mr. Fogel

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     627

 

came to Indiana in the early '60s and settled in Center township, Mar- shall county, where he now resides. He has since lived the life of an active, enterprising farmer, and is well known in the community. Politically he is a Democrat, and both he and his wife are consistent members of the Lutheran church.

 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Hartman has been blessed with two children, H. Earl and Russell. The parents are earnest and consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. Hartman gives his political allegiance to the Democracy, Fraternally he is connected with Castle Hall Lodge No.212, the Walnut Arbor of Gleaners and Tribe of Ben Hur at Plymouth. One of Indiana's native sons, he possesses the alert, enterprising spirit of the middle west, and as the years pass by is meeting with the success that ever crowns earnest, persistent effort.

 

GEORGE W. SCHAFER, for many years prominently connected with the business interests of Marshall county, was born in Canton, Ohio, December 5, 1829, a son of John and Rosanna Schafer, both of whom were born in Wurtemberg, Germany. They were married in their native land, and in 1816 set sail for the United States and landed in the harbor of New York, from whence they journeyed to Stark County, Ohio, in the same year and located where the city of Canton now stands. Mr. Schafer was perhaps the first wagon-maker in that city, and he plied his vocation there for many years, also owning a farm near Canton on which he and his wife spent their remaining days. He was a member of the German Lutheran church, and politically was a Jefferson and Jackson Democrat. Of the eleven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Schafer a daughter only is now living.

 

The boyhood days of George W. Schafer, the youngest born of the eleven children, were spent at Canton, Ohio, until he arrived at the age of nineteen years, when, as it were, the spirit of ambition which so often kindles in the bosom of youth a desire to push out and see the world and make a mark for himself, took possession of this young man, and with this aim in view he started west and landed in Plymouth, Marshall county, Indiana, For a time he contented himself working at his trade, assisting in the building of what is known as the old Parker House, where now stands the brick hardware building, and the Coffee House and many other old-time buildings were left as monuments of his early industry.

 

Again that pent-up spirit of ambition could not be restrained any longer in Plymouth, and while yet a mere boy he started for California, landing, after six months and five days of sojourning by stage and other ways of travel in vogue at that time, at the Golden Gate city. There he engaged in milling, and it is fitting at this time to relate an incident which took place at the mine, and in fact shows that mark of character which characterized his whole life and caused him to ever lead that even tenor of his way. It was the day before Buchanan's election, and the mine in which he was working caved and completely buried himself and comrade, and while in that condition and seeing no way of escaping death he ventured to ask his friend for whom he elected to vote on

 


628                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

the following day. As those who were working for their release came close enough he coolly and calmly directed from below their work of rescue.

 

After five years of frontier life he determined to visit his old home at Canton, from whence he returned to Plymouth, Indiana, but business called him to Valparaiso soon after his return here, and there he met for the first time the girl, Paulina Miller, whom fate had designed was to be his future life partner. In July, 1859, with the newly wedded wife, he again started for the west, settling for a time in St. Joseph, Missouri, from whence in the year of 1862 his guiding star directed him to Colorado, where he at once engaged in farming, cattle raising and selling goods. After four years of successful business operations, "homeward his footsteps he did turn," and in the autumn of 1856, with his family, he landed at Inwood, Indiana, where, with his usual spirit of thrift and industry, he immediately engaged in the saw-milling business with Charles Croup, and this partnership continued until the death of Mr. Croup, after which he conducted the business for about two years alone or until he formed a partnership with C. L. Morris. In 1890, however, the business relationship of Schafer & Morris was dissolved, Mr. Morris taking the mill and business at Plymouth and Mr. Schafer the business at Inwood. In 1894 Mr. Schafer purchased the sawmill at Argos, where he moved his family and continued the business until that ambition for financial success was satisfied when he retired leaving his son Louis the sole proprietor. After retiring from this long life of active business he built a new home in Argos where he and his wife might live the remainder of their lives in that quiet contentment that all, sooner or later, must seek.

 

Mr. Schafer was married on the 5th of July 1859, in Valparaiso, Indiana, to Miss Paulina Miller, a native daughter of Wurtemberg, Germany. She came with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Miller, when seven years of age, to the United States, the family being first established in Lancaster, New York, and later in Michigan City, Indiana, where Mr. Miller followed his trade of a confectioner for many years. He was in his political affiliations a Jefferson and Jackson Democrat, and was a member of the German Lutheran church. Mrs. Schafer is the youngest born of their four children, and by her marriage she has become the mother of six children, but only three of whom, with their mother, survive the husband and father: William and Louis N., and a daughter Jennie, all of Argos. Three sons, George, Jr.; Charles and John preceded him to the home beyond. After an illness of only short duration Mr. Schafer passed away on Thursday, November 7, 1907, respected by all, and whose comradeship, intellectual and in the close relationship in the affairs of life all enjoyed because of sturdy and sterling qualities recognized and appreciated. His was a Christian life refined and consistent. He united in infancy with the German Reformed church, and always remained steadfast to its teachings.

 

CHARLES C. DURR, D. D. S., dentist and manufacturer of dental supplies, Plymouth, has attained high rank in his profession. His alma mater is the old Philadelphia Dental College, where he graduated with its class of 1873,

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     629

 

and in the same year of his graduation he located for practice in Plymouth. During the past seven years he has served as the dentist for the Culver Military Academy, having offices both there and in Plymouth.

 

Dr. Durr was born in Pulaski County, Indiana, in what is now Monterey, September 24, 1852, a son of Dr. Gustavus A. and Eliza (Lopp) Durr. The father was a native of Baden Baden, Germany, but the mother was born in this country, in Indiana, Coming to America, Dr. G. A. Durr located at Monterey and moved to Lake Maxinkuckee in 1856, and he remained in practice there until his death at the age of sixty-one years. His wife was forty-four when called from this life, and in their family were two children who grew to mature years.

 

Dr. Charles C. Durr, the elder, was four years old when his parents located at Lake Maxinkuckee, and his education was received in the public schools of Plymouth and in the Fort Wayne Methodist Episcopal College, where he was a student for two years. Following his graduation in 1873 from the Philadelphia Dental College, he entered at once the dental fraternity of Plymouth, his residence here covering a period of thirty-three years, and as he was only four years old when he came to Marshall county he may be said to have spent his life thus far within its borders. He is a member of the State Dental Society, the Knights of Pythias and Ben Hur fraternities, and votes with the Republican Party.

 

The doctor married, first, Ida Southworth, who at her death left one daughter, Grace, now the wife of E. W. Burris, Tulsa, Oklahoma. His present wife was before marriage Josephine Redd.

HIRAM F. BOWMAN) president of the First State Bank of Bourbon, was one of the organizers of this well known financial institution in 1902, and has the honor of being its first and continual president. The bank from its beginning has enjoyed a very prosperous career, paying 8 per cent dividends, and has a capital of forty thousand dollars, with a surplus of thirty-five thousand, and its deposits are increasing year by year, evidencing the high confidence this bank enjoys in the community.

 

Mr. Bowman was born on the 5th of February 1860, in Kosciusko County, Indiana, a son of Daniel and Lucinda (Hall) Bowman. The father, a prominent and well known physician of northern Indiana, was born in Dayton, Ohio, in 1821, but when a boy moved with his parents to South Bend, Indiana, and in 1847 to Kosciusko county, where he practiced medicine for twenty years. He was there married to Lucinda Hall, a daughter of Judge Hall, of that county, and in 1867 they came to Marshall County, where for five years Dr. Bowman continued in the practice of his profession. But at the close of that period he laid aside its duties and was thereafter identified with the drug business until his death in 1887. His widow died in Bourbon in 1907. In their family were three children, Mr. Bowman, of this review, being their only son, and the two daughters are Flora, who became the wife of C. W. Shakes and died in 1889, and Alice, the wife of James H. Matchett, at Winona Lake. Dr. Bowman was well known for his skill and ability in the practice of medicine and, was a highly respected man, retiring in his manner and not a seeker after public honors, although he was a member of the school board and was an alderman.

 


630                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

 

He voted with the Republican Party.

 

Hiram F. Bowman received his educational training in the common schools, but when only a little lad of thirteen years he started out in the world to make his own living, after which time his parents had no further expense on his account. He lived at home and clerked in a store, worked in the harvest fields, taught school and in fact spurned no occupation that would yield him an honest dollar. In this way he saved enough to buy an interest in his father's drug business, his first business venture, and after continuing in that vocation for fifteen years he went on the road for a Chicago wholesale drug house. At the close of his three years as a traveling salesman he opened a drug store in South Bend, but in 1888 sold his interests there, and during the following year it was associated with the South Bend National Bank. In 1889 he came to Bourbon and conducted a private bank with J. H. Matchett. In 1902, as before stated, he assisted in the organization of the First State Bank, of which he was made the president with C. C. Vink as cashier and Jacob Pritch vice president. He is the heaviest stockholder in the bank, owns several pieces of real estate in this county, and in addition he also owns over seven hundred acres of valuable land in Wisconsin. Mr. Bowman married, in 1881, Mary Dale, a daughter of Elijah Dale, of Illinois, She was teaching in the schools of Bourbon before her marriage, and the union has been blessed by the birth of three sons. The eldest, Dane S., is a graduate of Purdue University. He occupies a very responsible position with the Westinghouse Electric Company, and, although only three years out of school, he has charge of all the government work coming to the company. Horace D., the second son, is pursuing' a course in civil engineering in the Illinois University. Neil H. is at home. Mr. Bowman, of this review, is a charter member of Lucullus Lodge No.233, K. of P. of Bourbon, and he is also a member of the Methodist church. A high standard of morality and elevated principles have always governed the actions of this prominent business man and citizen of Bourbon, and his well directed efforts have brought to him a valued success, and best of all he enjoys the esteem and confidence of all who know him.

 

CHARLES VAN BUSKIRK is the Tippecanoe superintendent of the Heinz Pickle Plant. In tracing the careers of those who have achieved success in the business world and of those who stand highest in public esteem it is found in almost every case that they are those who have risen gradually by their own efforts, their diligence and perseverance. These qualities are largely possessed by Charles Van Buskirk, and who by reason of his marked business ability has been appointed the manager in this place of one of the largest corporations of the kind in the world. The plant here was erected in 1899, fifty by one hundred feet, supplied with all modern machinery for carrying on the work of manufacturing the Heinz food products, and this is the banner plant of the state.

 

Mr. Van Buskirk was born in West Cairo, Ohio, in 1883, and being placed upon his own responsibilities when a boy he secured his education through his own exertions, first attending the graded schools, later the high school of Muncie, and subsequently became a student in the Eastern Indiana Normal school of that city.

 


                                                HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                          631

 

 

With this excellent training he re-entered the school room as a teacher, and for two years continued his educational labors at Muncie, from whence he came to Marshall County and spent three years in the schools of Bourbon Township and two years in the city schools there, where he had charge of the seventh grade. Leaving on the expiration of that period a professional for a business life he became associated with the Heinz Pickle industry in the capacity of manager of their Tippecanoe plant, and has ever since continued to discharge the duties of this important position.

 

On the 5th of November 1907, Mr. Van Buskirk married Mertie Ehle, of Canajoharie, New York, and she too, was for a time numbered among the successful and popular educators of Marshall County. Mr. Van Buskirk has membership relations with Bourbon Lodge No. 227, A.F & A.M., and with Lodge No. 2333, I.O.O.F. His political affiliations are with the Republican Party.

 

J.P. Leitch. Bremen’s well-known cigar manufacturer, J.P. Leitch, was born in Noble County, Indiana, March 10, 1867. His father Malcolm Leitch, had his nativity in Pennsylvania, but in an early day in its history he became a resident of Noble County, Indiana, and was identified with its agricultural interests from the year of his arrival, 1854, until the time of his death at age sixty-five years. He married Esther Harrison, who was born in Virginia but was reared in Pennsylvania, and she reached the advanced age of eighty-four years. In their family were nine children, five of whom grew to years of maturity and three are now living: Daniel A., a resident of Nobel County; James M., also of that county: and J.P., the subject of this review.

 

Noble County, Indiana continued as the home of J.P. Leitch throughout the period of his boyhood and youth, receiving his educational training in its public schools, and during an early period in his life he worked as a well driller, thus continuing until his removal to Bremen in 1897. Here he at once began the manufacture of cigars, and in addition to carrying on this business he is also interested in five thousand acres of land in Cuba and has made three visits to that country. In company with C.F. Wahl they formed a stock company and their land is rich in its various kinds of timber.

 

 

In 1886 Mr. Leitch was united in marriage to Margaret Hanlon, a daughter of Robert Hanlon, of Noble County, Indiana, and their four children are Laura, Robert, Myrtle and Minnie. Mr. Leitch is a Democrat politically and has taken an active interest in the work of his party. His fraternal relations are with the Masonic Order, affiliation with its Chapter and Blue Lodge at Plymouth, with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the Knights of Pythias, of which he is a past chancellor.

 

FATHER JOHN TREMMEL. There is particular propriety in directing the attention to those who have consecrated their lives to the cause of the Master and uplifting of man, and in the pastor of St. Michael’s Church of Plymouth, Father John Tremmel, we find a man of ripe scholarship and the deepest human sympathy.

 


632                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY

 

He came to this charge from St. Joseph's church in Covington, Indiana, September 18, 1905, and is now in charge of a congregation numbering one hundred and fifteen families.

As a preparation for his life's work Father Tremmel first studied in the public schools of Fort Wayne, his native city, where he was born August 29, 1866, and was later a classical student in Mt. Calvary College at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. After studying also at St. Francis Semi- nary of Milwaukee, that state, and Mt. St. Mary Seminary of Cincinnati, Ohio, he was ordained for the priesthood June 13, 1890, and his first work was as assistant to the pastor of St. Joseph's church of Hammond, Indiana. After four months there he took charge of St. Patrick's church at Lagro, this state; from whence on the 18th of January, 1891, he assumed the pastorate of St. Joseph's church in Covington, Indiana, and from there, as before mentioned, came to Plymouth September 18, 1905.

 

JOHN F. LANGENBAUGH. One of the oldest and best known citizens of Marshall county is John F. Langenbaugh who since an early epoch in its history has been identified with many of the interests that have contributed to its substantial development and improvement, and he is now serving as the county truant officer in Plymouth. His probity, fidelity and sterling worth have won him the unqualified confidence of his fellow citizens and his life has been filled with arduous and honorable toil for the good of others, while all who know him respect and reverence him.

 

Mr. Langenbaugh was born in Millheim, grand duchy of Baden, Germany, November 10. 1822. His father, John F. Langenbaugh, a native of Alsace, France, came to the United States on the 28th of February 1835. Previous to his emigration, however, he had served as major of the Second Dragoon Regiment under Bonaparte, continuing on the medical staff of that famous general for seven years, and he kept complete record of their retreat from Moscow, which his son John is still engaged in translating. Mr. Langenbaugh, Sr., served in the engagement of Austerlitz, also in the great battle of Waterloo, where he was one of twenty-five to escape death out of a regiment of one thousand soldiers. After his emigration to the United States he located in Stark County, Ohio, and was a practicing physician until his death in 1863, at the advanced age of ninety-three years, dying in Bourbon, Indiana. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Barbara M. Conrad, died and was buried in her native land of Germany in 1834. . John F. Langenbaugh, the only child of this marriage, obtained his educational training in the schools of the fatherland and in February 1835, he graduated in a high school of Germany. It was on the 28th of February of the same year that he came with his father to the United States, and making their way to Starke county, Ohio, they remained there about one year, going thence to Holmes county, Ohio, which continued as their home from 1835 to 1840. Mr. Langenbaugh received only four months English training, and he then began teaching in the

 


                                                HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                          633

 

old log schoolhouses of Holmes County, beginning his educational labors in 1840 and continuing for eight years in the Buckeye state. During that time he served as a soldier in the Mexican War. On the 25th of February 1850, he came to Indiana and established his home on Elkhart Prairie, Elkhart County, where he resumed his educational labors for two years, and at the close of the period purchased and moved to a small farm in Lagrange County, this state, where he was later made the trustee of his township and taught in its schools. It was on the 1st of November 1850, that he first arrived in Plymouth, and purchasing land of an old Indian Chief, Peter Comeway, he removed to his farm, teaching school and farming at the same time. On the 1st of October 1856, his family joined him in Marshall County. On the 28th of February 1861, Mr. Langenbaugh left the farm and obtained a clerkship with G. S. Cleveland of Plymouth, while later for four years he served in the same capacity for Rich & Smith, and at the close of that period he resumed his old profession of teaching, first in the Turner school for one year, was later made principal of the Inwood school, and was the first principal of the Bremen high school, entering on his duties in that institution in 1871. To Mr. Langenbaugh and his sister, Lizzie, belongs the honor of being the only living representatives of the first teachers’ institute held in Marshall County, Indiana.

 

Throughout the entire period of his residence in this community he has been deeply interested in its cause of education and has been one of its most influential citizens in all public affairs. During one year he served as the land appraiser in German Township, was an assistant civil engineer for the P.K. & P. Railroad Company, now known as the Three Road, in 1880, was appointed the census enumerator of German Township, for four years was the city assessor of Plymouth, and in 1861 he was elected a member of the Plymouth Hook and Ladder Company, and he still has membership relations with this the most beneficent and helpful of the city’s early organizations. He has now reached the eighty-fifth milestone on the journey of life, but he can yet mount a ladder with as much rapidity as many of the younger members of the company. During four years Mr. Langenbaugh served as the delinquent tax collector of Marshall County, for thirty years was its notary public, was the assistant county superintendent of schools under Thomas McDonald, the father of the editor of this history, and in the meantime he served as the president of the Indiana State Firemen’s Association for five years, and was the captain for eleven years and the secretary for six years of the Plymouth Fireman’s Association. He was subsequently appointed the county truant officer, and is now serving his second year in that office.

 

At Millersburg, Ohio November 3, 1849 Mr. Langenbaugh married Margaret Boone, a daughter of Daniel Boone and granddaughter of Daniel Boon of Kentucky fame. They have had four children: Daniel B., a resident of Traverse City, Michigan; Margaret A., the wife of J.L.W. Trickham, also of that city; Barbara A., the wife of D.C. Cole, of Plymouth, Indiana; and John F. Jr., deceased. In the beneficent and time honored order of Masonry Mr. Langenbaugh has achieved distinction, and has received his degrees as follows: E.A., December 19,

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                         634

 

1862; F. C., January 2, 1863; M, M January 16, 1863; Mark M., February 16, 1864; Past M., February 22, 1864; Most E. M., March 21 1864; R. A. M., March 29, 1864; K. R. L. and K. T., September 16' 1864; R. & R. M., August 16, L865. He served as worshipful master for one year, one year as high priest of the chapter, four years as grand master of the Council, and two years as generalissimo of Warsaw Commandery No.10, K. T. Mr. Langenbaugh is now the only living charter member of the commandery. In his political affiliations he votes with the Republican party where national issues are involved, but locally casts his ballot for the best man.

 

 

FRANK H. BOLL1NGER, proprietor of a meat market in Donaldson and identified with farming and stock raising interests in West township, is numbered among the energetic, far-sighted and successful business men of Marshall county. He was born in Ohio March 14, 1861, his deceased father, Andrew Bollinger, having been also a native of the Buckeye state, where he spent the days of his boyhood and youth. Arriving at years of maturity, he wedded Adaline Russher, who was likewise born in Ohio, where she passed her girlhood days. Coming to Marshall County in 1864, they settled on a farm in West Township, the father purchasing forty acres of land. It was covered with the native growth of forest, but in the midst of the green woods he began clearing his fields, which he brought under a high state of cultivation, adding many modern Improvements and accessories. In the course of years he sold that property and invested in 120 acres of land. He cleared the greater part of this tract, improving it and making it his homestead until his death at the age of sixty-eight years. His political views were in harmony with the principles of the Republican Party, and he voted for its candidates at state and national elections, but at local elections where no general issue was involved, cast an independent ballot. Fraternally he was a Mason, loyal to the teachings of the craft, and religiously he was connected with the United Brethren church. He had a wide acquaintance throughout the country and his many excellent traits of character won the esteem of all who knew him, so that his death was the occasion of deep, and widespread regret. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Bollinger, namely: Lila, Frank H., George, Mary, William, Rosie and Ida, but the last two are deceased. Five of the family was born in West Township, following the removal of the parents to Indiana. .

 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of life for Frank H. Bollinger in the days of his boyhood and youth. At the usual age he entered the public schools and. therein mastered the common branches of English learning, becoming well qualified for the transaction of business and the duties, which naturally come when one leaves the school room to commence practical life. To son1e extent, however, he attended school in Illinois. He was well trained in the work of the farm, early becoming familiar with the duties and labors, which fall to the lot of the agriculturist. In the year 1885 he established a butcher shop in Plymouth, where he remained for about one year, after which he spent a like period in that line at South Bend, Indiana. He has conducted butchering in Donaldson at intervals for about seventeen years, and is now conducting a meat market in the town.

 


                                                HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                          635

 

He is likewise a professional auctioneer and is frequently called upon to cry sales. He is also interested in farming and stock raising in West Township, and his varied business affairs are bringing him well-merited success.

 

Mr. Bollinger was married in West Township to Miss Sadie Leannan, who was born in Ohio but reared in Michigan. They have four children, two sons and two daughters, all natives of West Township – Edward, Daniel, Ora and Lila. The family home is a good farm of 100 acres in West Township, in the midst of which stands a comfortable residence. The fields are carefully tilled and the work is carried systematically forward in keeping with ideas of modern progressive agriculture. The family attends the United Brethren Church, of which the parents are members, and Mr. Bollinger politically is a Republican, and does not consider himself bound by party ties, but frequently casts an independent ballot. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons and with the Court of Honor, and is true to the beneficent teaching of these orders. His business interests have brought him into contact with a large number of Marshall county’s citizens, and a genial, social manner and cordial disposition have gained him the friendship and regard of many with whom he has come in contact.

 

S.A. LAIRD. For about twenty years the name of S.A. Laird has been inseparably interwoven, with the history of the educational interests of Marshall County, and during then years of that time he has served as the principal of the Tippecanoe schools. He has charge of two buildings, one of which is located in the western part of town, and the central building, which was erected in 1891 and contains three rooms, is a credit to the little town of Tippecanoe. The rooms can accommodate one hundred pupils, with about forty in the high school.

 

Professor Laird is a native son of Marshall County, born on the 22nd of September 1868, and is a representative of two of the oldest American families. The paternal ancestor was a Scotchman, and his descendants participated in the Revolutionary War, and in an early day became residents of Pennsylvania. On the maternal side the ancestors were Pilgrims on the Mayflower. The parents of the Professor were John W. and Mary (Alden) Laird, natives, respectively, of Comstock County, Ohio, and of Massachusetts, and of their family of ten children, seven sons and three daughters, eight are now living, five sons and three daughters. Four of the sons are successful and popular educators of Marshall County,


 

636                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

and she was born, reared and educated in Bourbon. Her father is a well-known citizen of Tippecanoe County and is a veteran of the Civil war. One daughter; Leonora, a little lady of three years, has blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Laird: Mrs. Laird is a member of the Methodist church. In his political affiliations Professor Laird is a Republican.

 

ANDREW R. GERARD was born in Switzerland county, Indiana, November 12, 1825, and died at his home in Marshall county January 16, 1901, aged seventy-five years, two months and four days. He became one of the earliest settlers of Marshall County, for he came here with his parents and their family in the fall of 1842 and located in Center Township, where the remainder of his life was spent. At that time Plymouth was a village of but two or three houses, and the homes of a few scattered pioneers were separated by miles of wilderness, in many parts unmarked by roads and unbroken by the settler's ax. Mr. Gerard possessed in an eminent degree the pioneer virtues of industry, economy, integrity and hospitality, and he thus acquired a comfortable home and a competence. In 1845 he entered from the government the farm where he ever afterward lived, and he partially cleared this farm, built and furnished a dwelling, and to this home he brought, in 1848, his first wife, Susanna Hindel. Nine children, four sons and five daughters, were born to this union, namely: Lydia E., Mary A., Eva M., John W., Sarah J., George N., Christian C., Susan and Andrew E. His first wife died in 1862, and in 1866 he married Sybilla Bright. Six children were born of the second marriage -Christina (deceased), Jennie, Cora, Emma, Nora and Charles. Thirteen children survive, and with the exception of a daughter in Marion, Indiana, and two sons who reside in Colorado, all were present when their honored father was laid to rest.

 

During the Civil war Mr. Gerard offered his services to his country as a volunteer to assist in the suppression of the rebellion, but he was unable to pass the medical examination and was not accepted. For over fifty years he was a member and an earnest worker in the Methodist Episcopal church, first worshiping with a class that met in a log school- house called Salem, a mile and a half south of Inwood. He was the class leader of this organization for many years, and a church, which was afterward built at that place, was destroyed by fire. During the pastorate of Rev. T. C. Neal he united with the church at Inwood. His religious life was even, calm and consistent. He was one of the last of a people who are rapidly passing away, the pioneer settlers who contended with the wilderness, wild beasts and savages, and in toil and poverty, in hardships, privations and disease built for the later generation who enjoy the fruits of their labors.

 

Charles C. Gerard, the youngest son of Andrew R., was born in Marshall County, Indiana, March 22, 1874, and he now resides on the old homestead farm where his father lived and labored for many years. He also follows in the political footsteps of his father and votes with the Republican Party, and his religious connection is with the Methodist church. In 1897 he married Pearl Deacon.

 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                         637

 

NOAH BERGER. The attractiveness of Marshall county as a place of residence is indicated by the fact that many of her native sons have remained within her borders after attaining adult years, finding here good opportunity for advancement in various lines of business. To this class belongs Noah Berger, now a successful agriculturist, and stock raiser of German township. He was born March 18, 1861, upon the farm which is yet his home. His father, Jacob Berger, is a retired farmer, living in Bremen, and is a native of Germany, but was only about a year old w hen he came to America with his parents. His father, Frederick Berger, now deceased, was a pioneer of German township. He, too, was born in Germany and was there reared and married. His family numbered four sons and three daughters, of whom Jacob Berger was the sixth in order of birth. Leaving the land of his nativity, Frederick Berger brought his wife and children to the new world and settled first in Ohio, where he remained for about six years. Attracted by the opportunities of the frontier, he then journeyed westward to l\1arshall county, Indiana, and was among the earliest settlers of German township. Here he entered from the government a claim to one hundred and sixty acres of land, constituting the farm upon which Noah Berger now resides. The grandfather cleared this place of the native forest and made a part of the improvements. He was a lifelong Republican, was a progressive citizen and faithful member of the Evangelical church. He died at the age of eighty-two years.

 

Jacob Berger, being but an infant at the time of the emigration of the father's family to the United States, pursued his education in the old-time log schoolhouses of this locality and was reared on the present place. The hardships and trials of pioneer life fell to his lot, but he bravely met these and learned to overcome difficulties by perseverance, determination and unwearied industry. He was married in German township to Miss Pauline Walner, a native of Elkhart county, Indiana, where she was reared. Her people were of Pennsylvania Dutch descent. Unto this marriage were born twelve children, the old family homestead in German township being the birthplace of all. Noah Berger was the third in order of birth in this family of eight sons and four daughters, of whom two died in infancy. As he reared his family Jacob Berger continued the work of the home farm and made most of the present improvements upon the place, his labors converting it into a productive tract of land. The Republican Party received his earnest endorsement, for he believed its principles were most conducive to good government. He was always loyal to his honest convictions and his life was in harmony with his professions as a member of the Evangelical church.

 

Noah Berger, reared under the parental roof upon the old homestead farm, acquired his education in the schools of the township, while from his father he received practical training in the work of field and meadow. He was married in 1887 to Miss Sarah Keppler, a native of Indiana, who died in 1888, leaving one child. In 1890 Mr. Berger wedded Miss Lucy Grimm, who was born in Wabash County, Indiana, and by whom he had four children. The second wife passed away in 1902 and Mr. Berger was again married on the 12th of March 1903, his present wife having been Emma E. Miller, a daughter of Frederick


 

638                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

and Catherine ( Manger) Miller. Her parents were farming people of German township, but both are now deceased. Mrs. Berger was born and reared in German township and is of German lineage, her father having been born in the land of the Teutons. He devoted his life to general agricultural pursuits and owned forty acres of land in German township. Unto the present marriage of Mr. Berger there have been born two children, a son and daughter.

 

In his political views Noah Berger is both a Republican and Prohibitionist. He endorses principles of both parties and at different times casts his ballot for the candidates of each. His vote is usually influenced, however, by his belief in the capability of the candidate. He belongs to the Evangelical church and his life record has been characterized by all that is just and honorable in man's relations with his fellowmen. There have been no startling chapters in his life history, but to the thoughtful student it will be manifest that his course has been shaped in accordance with upright principles and guided by an understanding of his duties and obligations toward his fellowmen.

 

ALBERT R. ZIMMERMAN. Throughout his entire business career Albert R. Zimmerman has been connected with journalistic work, and since 1903 he has been the editor and, proprietor of the Bourbon Advance, .one of the leading journals of northern Indiana. He is a native son of Newark, New Jersey, born on the 22d of May 1854, a son of Adam and Eliza NI. (Drake) Zimmerman, natives, respectively, of Hamburg, Germany, and of Plainfield, New Jersey. In their family were thirteen children, all of whom received the advantages of a common school training, and after the completion of his education Albert R. Zimmerman began his work as a printer in Mason City, Illinois, being then seventeen years of age, and he thoroughly mastered the business in all its details. In 1890 he began the publication of the Dwight Star and Herald in Dwight, Illinois, removing four years later to Lamont, Illinois, to become the publisher of the Observer, In 1894 he removed to Plymouth, Indiana, and established the Marshall County Independent, the first daily paper ever edited in Plymouth, and from that city he came to Bourbon in 1896 and began the publication of the Mirror. His residence here was not continuous, however, but in 1903 he returned and as above stated, began the publication of the Advance. The life of this journal has been prosperous and today it ranks among the ablest papers of this section of the state. It has ever been a true friend of Bourbon, and much of the prosperity of the city is due to its progressive spirit. Mr. Zimmerman is an independent Democrat in his political affiliations.

 

He has been twice married, first in 1880 and again in 1888, Grace Carr then becoming his wife, and their children are Clyde, George, Blanche, Hazel and Leon. Mr. Zimmerman has fraternal relations with the Knights of Pythias and the Maccabees.

 

SAMUEL C. BERGER has spent his entire life in Marshall county, his birth occurring in its township of German March 18, 1859. His father, Jesse J. Berger, was born across the ocean in Germany, but when a babe of one year was brought by his parents to the United States and

 


                                                HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY                                      639

 

was reared on a farm in Marshall county, Indiana, from his seventh ;p year. His parents were numbered among the early pioneers of German Township, and were prominently identified with its early history. After his marriage to Pauline Walmer, Jacob J. Berger established his home on a farm in German township, and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits until his retirement from the business world, and with his wife, he now resides in Bremen, Indiana. They became the parents of twelve children, ten of whom are now living, one residing in St. Joe, Indiana,, one in Kansas, one in Bourbon, two in North township, one in Terre  Haute, one, David, resides in Madison township, St. Joseph county, Indiana, and three are living in German township, Marshall county. Samuel C, Berger, the second in order of birth of the twelve children, spent the early years of his life in his native township of German, and when a small boy he began the active battle of life for himself. He is now one of the leading farmers of the township of North, where he now owns a fine estate of two hundred and forty acres in section 23, many of its improvements standing as monuments to his excellent business ability.

 

On the 13th of August, 1885, Mr. Berger married Mary Ann Balmer, a daughter of Peter and Margret (Abuhl) Balmer, both of whom were born in Switzerland, They were married in their native land, and in 1883 set sail for America, locating near Bremen, Indiana, where the husband and father became a prominent agriculturist, and he is still living. Mrs. Balmer died on the 29th of December 1905. They were the parents of seven children, three sons and four daughters, and five, three sons and two daughters, are yet living. Mrs. Berger, the fourth of their seven children, was born in Switzerland, December 27, 1866. She came to America one year before her parents, and in Bremen she continued her educational training in the English schools. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Berger - Elmer, Clement, Freda and Cleo.

 

CHARLES F. HOLTZENDORFFJ M. D. Among the first families of Plymouth is, numbered the Holtzendorffs, prominently identified with its business and professional life. The city was in its infancy when A. C. Holtzendorff, the father of the Doctor, came here to reside, and he was born and reared in Germany. His wife was before marriage Christena Lang, and their two sons are both physicians, the younger being Dr. H. C. Holtzendorff, a well-known practitioner of Mishawaka.

 

Dr. Charles F. Holtzendorff, the elder, was born in Plymouth; August 28, 1878, and after completing his education in the city schools he entered and in 1895 graduated from the' Indiana Medical College. His first location for practice was La Paz, in Marshall County, remaining there for two years and six months. Returning thence to Plymouth he has practiced here since 1897, and he is a member of the Marshall County, the Indiana State and the American Medical Societies.

 

The Doctor married, March 4, 1907, Emma Gallather, a daughter of John Galtather, Dr. Holtzendorff is a Republican and active in the local work of his party. During five years he served as the captain of

 


640                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

the local National Guards, and he is a member of the Masonic order and the Knights of the Maccabees.

 

JOHN OSBORN was born in North Bend township, Stark county Indiana, five miles northwest of Culver, January 8, 1859, and throughout his entire business life he has been more or less prominently identified with the interests of Culver and its vicinity. His father, William Osborn is also a resident of this city, but he was born in Delaware county, Ohio: and from there moved to Stark county, Indiana, in 1840, and was identified with its agricultural pursuits until his removal to Culver. He survives his wife, Louisa. J, Owens, who died at the age of seventy-six years. She was born in Bartholomew County, Indiana, and by her marriage to William Osborn became the mother of six children, all yet living.

 

John Osborn, the third son and third child in the family, spent his early life on his father's farm in Stark County, but in 1879 he left his boyhood's home for Union township, Marshall county, and was engaged in farming and stock raising there until 1892. In that year he sold his farm and opened a bank at Culver, the Marmont Exchange Bank, which he conducted six years and then closed the business by paying his depositors in full. Leaving Culver he went to Logansport, Indiana, to engage in the restaurant business, but after a year and eight months there he returned to Culver and established and conducted a provision store here for four years. The business was then sold to the Stahl brothers, and Mr. Osborn turned his attention to contracting and building, a field in which he has met with eminent success. He continues his building operations during the summer months and conducts a real estate business in the winters. He owns at the present time five of the best business buildings in the town, besides other real estate and two farms, one in Wells county and the other in Marshall county, and at this writing he is erecting a post office arid bank building for Mr. Shilling in Culver and a fifty-room hotel furnished with all modern conveniences, a house in which the citizens of this community may well feel a just and commendable pride.

 

Mr. Osborn married, in 1884, Ora Morris, who at her death left two children - William 0. and Bessie. Mr. Osborn married, secondly, Jennie Shoemaker, of Wells County, Indiana. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the Blue Lodge of Culver, and is a Democrat

Politically and has served his fellow citizens as a member of the schoo1 board.

 

WILLIAM H. ENGLISH. In the archives of Marshall county is recorded the name of William H. English as a county surveyor, he having been elected to that office in 1896 and continued therein during the succeeding four years. At the close of his term of service he remained in the office as a deputy, serving first under H. E. Grube, and he is still the incumbent of the office of deputy county surveyor. Mr. English is a native son of Marshall County, born in its township of Center on The 25th of January 1869. His father, William Franklin English, was born in Stark county, Ohio, but when about fourteen years


 

641                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

of age he journeyed to the northwest, and at the age of twenty came to Marshall county, Indiana, and became identified with the farming interests of Center township. He was there married in 1861 to a native daughter of Ohio, Phoebe Clark, and the young couple began their married life in Center township, continuing actively identified with its interests until their busy and useful lives were closed in death, the mother dying in 1894 and the father in 19°5. William H. English, their only child, spent the early years of his life in his native township of Center, supplementing the educational training which he received in its public schools by attendance at the Valparaiso University, where he pursued the teachers' course and afterward taught in the public schools of Marshall county and the city schools of, Plymouth, After leaving the school room he entered upon his duties as a public official. He is an active worker in the ranks of the Democracy and is a member of the Masonic and the Knights of Pythias fraternities, also of the order of Ben Hur and the Eastern Star. Mr. English married, in 1893, Sarah Ada Seider, a daughter of Mrs. Henry Grossman, of Plymouth, and their two children are Opal M. and Roy W. H.

 

HENRY D. WEAVER was born in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, March 15, 1830. His father, H. G. Weaver, was born in the 0ld Dominion state of Virginia, but removed to Kentucky in early life. Being greatly opposed to the institution of slavery he left the southland in the antebellum days and journeyed to Pennsylvania, where he married Miss Anna M. Shirk, and shortly afterward they went to Ohio. There the husband and father followed agricultural pursuits until 1852, and in the interim became very prominent in public affairs. He served the commonwealth as a member of its legislature and his name became a familiar one in many high official positions and in other walks of life. He also served his country as a soldier in the war of 1812, under General Scott, the hero of Lundy's Lane, and when that gallant general was making the race for the presidency he held a rally at that historic spot, and while attending Mr. Weaver was taken ill and died shortly afterward.

 

Henry D. Weaver received his educational training in the schools of Ohio, and in 1863 he came to Bourbon, Indiana, and for seven years thereafter was engaged in the drug business in this city. At the close of that period he sold his store to Hiram Bowman, and in 1882 purchased his present farm of one hundred and seventy acres on the north edge of the town. On the homestead is a pleasant and commodious residence, and Mr. Weaver devotes his time to the cultivation and improvement of his estate, He married, in 1865, Miss Jennie Parks, a daughter of James 0. Parks. Mr. Weaver has fraternal relations with the Masonic order in Bourbon, and during one year he served as the postmaster of this city.

 

FRANK M. WICKIZER, who is the chief editor and proprietor of the Argos Reflector, at Argos, Indiana, is one of the strong, positive, liberal, self-trained and thoughtful citizens of Marshall County, with charity for all, seeing good in all religions and types of humanity, he is logically

 


642                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

a stern opponent of capital punishment, He believes that punishment of criminals should always tend toward reformation, and never toward brutal punishment or extermination; he believes that as it is never too late to turn about in the right direction the state should never weary in giving its weak and erring brother or sister a chance at redemption. By temperament, training, experience and compact character Mr. Wickizer is admirably fitted to honor journalism and American citizenship.

 

The Wickizer fan1ily traces its American founders to Pennsylvania, and is enriched and strengthened by the blood of both the Scotch and German nationalities. On the maternal side the strain comes from the Old Dominion. The course of migration on the part of the paternal ancestors was by way of Ohio to Indiana, and of the members of the maternal family it was direct to the Hoosier state. Mr. Wickizer himself was born at Argos, Indiana, March 12, 1870, being a son of James M. and Rebecca (Williams) Wickizer. The father's family represented the pioneer eleme1it of Marshall county, different members migrating from Fairfield county, Ohio, in the early 'fifties and locating near Poplar Grove, Union township. James M. Wickizer, the father, opened and operated the first store in Argos, continuing one of the leading merchants of the place until about 1885, when he retired to a farm adjoining the town. On this homestead were reared the following children of his family: Albert B., Corbin W., Frank M., Samantha and Elmer 0. The mother is a daughter of Merrill Williams; an early settler of Mar- shall county and at one time one of its wealthiest landowners and businessmen.

 

Frank M. Wickizer received a good education in the country schools, the public institutions of Argos and at the U. C. College, Merom, Indiana. His broad range of information, his working capital as a newspaper and public man, is chiefly the result of his ceaseless and intelligent reading of books and newspapers an inveterate habit since he was ten years of age. His earlier years were spent in farming and stock breeding., and later he became associated with his brother in the editorial management of the Argos Reflector. In September 1907, he purchased the newspaper and printing plant, and, with his son Donald J. as partner, is now operating it. The journal not only reflects the best interests of the home community, but the stanch opinions of its senior proprietor on all public policies from an independent standpoint and with a view of justice and fairness to all.

 

Mr. Wickizer has carefully studied the political economics of the country and became identified with the Republican Party at the age of twenty-one. Although strong advocates of temperance, the other members of the family were Democrats. At the age of twenty-four he made the race for state representative, but was defeated by M. W. Simons. Later he made the campaign of county and district, the entire Republican ticket being elected in Marshall county against a normal Democratic majority of over six hundred votes. In the field of state politics he has been most active in securing the repeal of capital punishment in Indiana, and in December 1907, with Governor Hanly, Gus S. Condo of Marion, Senator Charles M. Kimbrough of Muncie and others, he organized the Indiana Society for Abolition of Capital Punishment. Of this organization he was elected secretary-treasurer, issued several telling addresses on the subject of growth of public sentiment indicates an early repeal of the law.

 


643                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

Reared in the Methodist church, in his mature years Mr. Wickizer carefully investigated various teachings and theological beliefs and says that he found "a little good and some bad in all." In later years he became an investigator -of spiritualism, and, being convinced by personal experience that he had received a direct message from his deceased mother, became an earnest believer of the life beyond in spirit communication with the departed. While firm in faith, at the same time he finds many frauds practiced in the name of spiritualism, In his own words his religious belief is this: "Humanity is weak and all subject to err, though I believe a little good can be found in all, and my religion is to look for the good and overlook the weaknesses of frail humanity. Every man's religion and salvation are within himself in the God-power given to each. My belief is that no time, place, circumstance, color or sex can change or alter good or bad. I believe that we should look in, rather than out, up or elsewhere, and that this will find all power and manifestation of God. I am chiefly concerned in trying to do right and to satisfy the power within, and believe that each one should hold this religion uppermost, regardless of sect, cult, or orthodox obligations of any kind."

 

Mr. Wickizer was married at Argos, Indiana, in November, 1891, to Miss Nora A. Warner, daughter of Jacob Warner , and the three daughters and three sons born to their union are: Delfay R., Frances M. and Anita; Donald J ., Russell A. and Merrill W ., the eldest son being in partnership with his father in the conduct of the Argos Reflector.

 

DR. W. E. LAWHEAD, a prominent and well-known physician of Marshall County, has been a member of the medical staff of Inwood since his graduation from the Medical University of Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1906. He was born in Van Wert County, Ohio, where he received his literary training in its high school, and he is a son of Charles E. and Jessie F. (Allen) Lawhead. Charles E. Lawhead also had his nativity in the commonwealth of Ohio and he resides in Van Wert, where at one time he filled the mayor's chair and is now engaged ill merchandising. He is one of the most prominent men of that city.

 

.LUTHER R. CRESSNER, of the firm of Cressner Company, abstract titles, real estate, loans and insurance, Plymouth, was born in this city December 23, 1865, the youngest of the six children, Tour sons and two daughters, born to Theo. and Rebecca A. ( Monroe) Cressner. Theo. Cressner was born, reared and educated in Germany and is a banker. When Luther R. Cressner had attained the age of twenty years he began writing abstract titles and has ever since been identified with this particular line, and during the incumbency of his brother, Theo. Cressner, in the recorder's office, he served as his deputy. In. 1894 he married Nellie A. Morris, a daughter of C, L. and Mary E. (Nlckerson) Morris, of Plymouth. Their two children are Margaret L. and Morris L. Mr. Cressner has been a lifelong' resident of

 


644                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

Marshall County, although for a year and a half he was in the West, and he is one of Plymouth's leading businessmen and citizens. He votes with the Democratic Party.

 

F. J. BUSSARD, the agent of the Vandalia Railroad Company at Plymouth, has been the incumbent of this position and a resident of this city since the 2oth of June, 1904, but for twenty years he has been connected with the railroad work. He entered the service almost at the commencement of his business career, beginning as a telegraph operator in 1887 at Leesburg, Indiana, and his work has taken him to many places in northern Indiana. Remaining in Leesburg from June until the following November, he then went to Warsaw and entered the employ of what is now the Wabash division of the Big Four Railroad. After an eight years' connection with that company he went over to the Pennsylvania Railroad in the same city, from where in the fall of 1892 he was transferred to Valparaiso, Indiana, and remained as the company's cashier there for a period of seven years. From there he went to Terre Haute and entered upon a one year's contract as an electrical signal repair man for the Vandalia Company, and when his contract had expired, in October, 1900, he went to the Wabash Railroad at North Manchester, but after three years there took a position at clerical work with the Chicago & Erie, now the Erie Railroad, at Bolivar, this state. Closing his work there in October he returned to the Wabash at North Manchester as a telegraph operator and remained with the company there from December 1900, to January, 1901, when he was transferred to the Vandalia Road at the same place, the road having changed ownership in the meantime. Next he went to Auburn Junction, Indiana, as agent for the Vandalia Company, where he remained from the 19th of

January until the following May, for sixty days was then the agent at South Whitley, and returning to Auburn Junction remained there until November, when he again went to South Whitley, and from there, June 20, 1904, he came to Plymouth as the agent for the Vandalia Railroad Company.

 

In referring more particularly to the personal life of F. J. Bussard it may be said that he is the eldest of the ten children of Maurice and Artemesia Bussard, and was born in North Manchester, Indiana, August 20, 1867. Maurice Bussard was of a German family and his wife was of Canadian-French ancestry, and of their large family of ten children all are living at the present time save one.

 

On the 31st of March 1888, F. J. Bussard wedded Violeta Havens, a daughter of Samuel W. and Elizabeth Havens, of Jackson Township, Kosciusko County, Indiana. Two daughters and a son have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bussard-Margaret H., Grace I. and Robert M. Mr. Bussard is a prominent Mason, belonging to the blue lodge chapter, commandery and to the Royal Arch degree. He is also a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity Valparaiso.

.

OLIVER J. WARNER, who carries on general farming and is also conducting a profitable business in the purchase and sale of horses, in which connection he is well known, was born in Osceola, Elkhart county,

 


HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     645

 

Indiana, December 5, 1861, his parents being Jacob and Margaret (Wilhelm) Warner, the former of German and the latter of Irish lineage. The father, who was born in Franklin county, Indiana, March 5, 1828, died July 7, 1904, at the age of seventy-six years. Having arrived at adult age, he was married in Ohio, in 1852, to Miss Margaret Wilhelm, who was born in Pennsylvania, August 5, 1830, and is now living in Argos. The year 1861 witnessed their removal to Indiana, at which time they located in Elkhart county, and in 1863 they came to Marshall county, settling in Walnut township, where Mr. Warner spent his remaining days as a farmer, having purchased one hundred and sixty acres of timber land. He cleared away the timber and converted his fields into a productive tract that annually brought to him good harvests as a reward for the care and labor which he bestowed upon the farm. He was a prominent man in the community and in politics was a Democrat. The family numbered five children: Sarah E., Francis, Oliver J., and Cora and Nora, twins.

 

N o event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life for Oliver J. Warner in his boyhood and youth. He remained with his parents until twenty-five years of age and then started out upon an independent business career. On the 2oth of February 1887, he became proprietor of a livery barn in Argos in partnership with 0. P. Bear and at the end of six months he bought out Mr. Bear's interest and then sold a half interest to Mr. Kaiser. They built a brick barn in 1891 and in connection with the livery business they also engaged in the purchase and sale of horses and likewise dealt in carriages. This enterprise was conducted by the firm until February, 1905, when Mr. Warner sold his interest in the business and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land known as the William Yereck farm. He has since been conducting this farm, which is now a well cultivated and highly improved property, and he also buys and sells horses, cattle and sheep, this branch of his business contributing substantially to his income.

On the 25th of November, 1885, Mr. Warner was joined in wedlock to Miss Hattie Taylor, who was born in Walnut township, Marshall county, January 7, 1861, a daughter of Jared and Lucy ( Bailey) Taylor , both of whom were natives of New York. The father died when Mrs. Warner was but four years. of age, giving his life in defense of the Union as a soldier in the Civil war, his remains being interred at Savannah, Georgia. His wife, who was born December 26, 1835, departed this life November 1, 1897. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor came to Indiana and settled first in Laporte, after which they removed to Twin Lakes, Mar- shall county. Mrs. Taylor was a member of the Wesleyan Methodist church and a lady of many excellent traits of heart and mind. By her marriage she became the mother of three daughters: Josephine, Hattie and Mary.

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Warner have been born four children: Claude, Glenn, Vern and Lucy. Mr. Warner is a member of Argos Lodge No. 212, K. P., and gives his political support to the Democracy. He is a wide-awake and energetic businessman, who finds in the conditions that surround him opportunities for business advancement and success, realizing

 


646                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

that diligence and industry constitute the basis promotion in the business world.

 

J. B. BOWELL, a prominent dealer in real estate, loans and insurance in Plymouth, has been identified with this line of work since 19o4, A son of a prominent and well known farmer of Walnut township, Bazel N. Bowell, he was born there November 24, 1855, and is of English descent. Bazel N. Bowell, the father, was born in Clark county, Indiana, but came to Marshall county as one of its early residents, purchasing and improving a farm in Walnut township, but is now living retired in the town of Argos, Hannah ( Kennett) Bowell, his wife, was born in Carroll county, Indiana, and died in her fiftieth year, after becoming the mother of eight children, six of whom, with the husband and father, survive her at this writing.

 

J. B. Bowell, the fourth child and third son, grew to manhood's estate on the old homestead farm in Walnut township, receiving his education in the schools of Argos and at the age of fifteen he became a clerk in a store there. For fifteen years he continued in a clerical capacity in a dry goods store, ten years of the time having been spent in Plymouth, and for twelve years after leaving that line of work he was the proprietor of the Ross Hotel, the leading hotel of the town at that time. In 1904, as before mentioned, he began dealing in real estate and insurance, and is meeting with success in this vocation.

 

On the 18th of March, 1876, Mr. Bowell married Ellen Kershaw, who died and left two children, Bert D. and Daisy B, On the 26th of June, 1898, Mr. Bowell wedded Elizabeth J. Cox, and their four children are Floyd F., Ralph, Walter and Martha, Mr. Bowell has been a life- long resident of Marshall County and for thirty years a resident of Plymouth, is a Republican and a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity.

 

OTICE M, WELBORN. The agricultural interests of West township found a worthy representative in Otice M. Welborn, who formerly lived on section 4, As the years passed he carefully tilled his fields and raised stock and his well-directed business interests are bringing him a substantial income, gaining him a place with the representative members of the community. He was born in Green township, Marshall County, April 15, 1862, his father, David Welborn, who has now departed this life, was also a farmer and became one of the early settlers of Marshall County, taking up his abode in West township, Where the work of development and progress had scarcely been begun. He was a native of Ohio, his birth having occurred in Stark county, that state, in 1829, There he was reared and at about the age of twenty years he left home in company with Ike Barlow, well known in Marshall County. Their joint capital consisted of but two Cents, but they were resolute, energetic young men who believed that they could earn a living and meant to do so. They traveled on foot to Indianapolis, carrying their tools with them and making wooden pumps on the way, thus providing for their own support. They not only made their expenses, but also managed to save twenty- five dollars. After reaching their destination they engaged in making


 

HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.                                     647

 

pumps in Indianapolis for a number of years, and thus Mr. Welborn gained a start in business life. He was married to Miss Eliza Moore, a native of Green Township, Marshall County, Indiana, in which locality she spent her girlhood days. She was a daughter of James Moore, one of Marshall County’s active farmers and representative citizens, who settled in Green Township when the work of civilization and improvement had scarcely been begun. The great part of the land was still in possession of the government and he entered a claim, which was covered with the native forest trees. There in the midst of the green woods he began clearing and developing a farm, and as the years passed he brought a large tract of wild land under cultivation. It was upon the old Moore homestead amid the scenes arid environments of pioneer life that Eliza Moore was reared, remaining with her parents until she gave her hand in marriage to David Welborn. The young couple began their domestic life upon a farm and as the years passed the family circle was increased to include three sons and a daughter, namely: Henry, who is now de- ceased; William; Ellen, who died in infancy; and Otice M., of this review. The mother passed away in Green township and, the father afterward married again, his second union being with Mrs. Barbara (Miller) Runner, the widow of Jake Runner, who laid his life upon the altar of his country, while serving as a soldier of the Civil war. He left one son. By the second marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Welborn there were born two daughters, Nora Dean and May, both natives of West township. After his second marriage David Welborn removed from Green to West Township and purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in the midst of the forest. There he built a log cabin and cleared his tract of land of one hundred and twenty acres with the assistance of his sons. As time passed the trees were cut down, the stumps grubbed up and the brush burned, and then followed the task of plowing and planting, so that in the course of years rich harvests were gathered as the soil became fallow and productive. As his financial resources increased he added to his original farm, purchasing one hundred and twenty acres, which had already been cleared. He then improved that place and continued a resident and valued farmer of West Township until his death, which occurred when he was seventy-four years of age. He was unfaltering in his political allegiance, which was given to the Democracy, and he was equally loyal and faithful as a member of the German Baptist church. He well earned the proud American title of a self-made man, for he started out in the business world empty-handed. He soon learned, however, that "there is no excellence without labor," and as the years passed he worked persistently and energetically. Honorable in all his dealings, he was never known to take advantage of the necessities of another in a business transaction, but followed methods which would bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. At his death he left to his family the priceless heritage of an untarnished name as well as an excellent farm property.

 

In early boyhood Otice M. Welborn became a district school student in West township and as the years passed mastered the branches of English learning which qualify one for life's practice and responsible duties. He was eleven years of age when his father removed to the present 

 


648                                          HISTORY OF MARSHALL COUNTY.

 

family homestead of one hundred and twenty acres, and it was upon this farm that 0. M. Welborn was reared and still makes his home. Lessons of integrity and industry were early impressed upon his mind and have been guideposts of life for him in his later years. He was married on the 26th of December 1883, to Miss Mary Alice Seiders, who was born and reared in West Township, and is a daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Nisely) Seiders, who were early settlers of Green Township, but were natives of Germany. The father was brought to America when but three years of age and was reared in Marshall County. He became in the course of years a representative farmer of this county and for a long period carried on general agricultural pursuits in West Township, where Mrs. Welborn spent the clays of her girlhood. Following his marriage Mr. Welborh rented land, living on different places for a number of years. Eventually he purchased a farm of one hundred and twelve acres. He cleared a part of this, while a portion had already been placed under cultivation. Most of the improvements stand as monuments to his thrift and labor and to his progressive spirit. In 1900 he sold this farm and in 1901 purchased his present place after having spent a year in the west. He has added many modern and substantial improvements to the farm, which he now owns, and has thus made it a valuable property. The fields are well tilled, the buildings are kept in a good state of repair and everything about the place indicates his careful supervision. Other business interests than agriculture, however, have claimed the time and energies of Mr. Welborn, who for two years, from 1904 until 1906, was engaged in the butchering business on Michigan Street in Plymouth. He was also in the grocery business in Donaldson for about six months in 1887. He has made three trips to the west and has invested in land in South Dakota. He also owns forty acres in Walnut Township and has at different times owned considerable property in Plymouth, Argos and also in Chicago. His investments have been judiciously made and have contributed in substantial measure to his income.

 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Welborn have been born two sons and two daughters, Alyin R., Forest S., Margaret Deloras and Bertha M., all of whom are natives of West Township. Mr. Welborn proudly cast his first presidential vote for the candidate of the Democratic Party and has since been one of its loyal adherents. He is now serving on the advisory board, but whether in office or out of it is always loyal to the best interests of the community. He is a member of the German Baptist church and his religious faith is a guide in his relations with his fellowmen, promoting his consideration for the right of others and his loyalty to truth and justice. He belongs to one of the old and prominent families of the county and merits the respect, which is so uniformly given him. Mr. and Mrs. Welborn are now residents of Plymouth, Indiana, having retired from the agricultural life.