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A.2.1.b. Barbara Berry

 

     Barbara Berry was born about 1739, probably in Pennsylvania, prior to when her parents moved to Virginia. By the mid 1740s they had made the move into the Virginia valley, and Barbara grew up on the family farm, tucked behind the Blue Ridge Mountains on the upper reaches of the north fork of the James River. Her future husband, David Dryden, grew up nearby, and around 1763 they got married in Augusta County, Virginia. They started a family not long afterwards, and bought some acreage of their own in the forks of the James River, where they grew hemp, among other crops, and slowly began increasing their family. Joining the mass movement of English pioneer settlers southwestward, along the trend of the Appalachian Mountains, in 1771 they moved to what would eventually become Washington County, Virginia, where they remained for the rest of their lives. Their oldest child, David Dryden III, was most likely named after the baby’s grandfather. A son, Jonathon, and three daughters, Rebecca, Elizabeth and Mary, followed over the next few years as the family became settled in their new home along the South Fork of the Holston River. During this time the Revolutionary War was raging, and a brother of David Dryden, Nathaniel, was killed at the Battle of King’s Mountain in the fall of 1780. A year later, their next son was born and apparently named after his uncle – the war hero. Their third son, William was followed by their last child, Thomas, who was probably named after Barbara’s father. Barbara Berry Dryden appears to have passed away sometime between 1811 and 1818, and David joined her in 1818. While their burial sites are not known, it seems quite likely that they were buried in the local Presbyterian Cemetery in Washington County, Virginia.

 

Timeline of Barbara Berry and David Dryden, Jr.

 

~1736125

The Dryden Family and Descendants Book II
Birth of David Dryden, Jr.

~173912,256

Esther (Berry) McCord Family Record

Augusta County, Virginia Deed Book 11, page 242
Estimated Birth Date of Barbara Berry

~1763125,541

Estimate Based on Birth Date of First Child
Estimated Marriage Date of Barbara Berry and David Dryden, Jr. in Augusta County, Virginia

17 Aug. 1764125,541

The Dryden Family and Descendants Book II, 1850 Federal Census
Sullivan County, Tennessee
Birth of David Dryden III in Augusta County, Virginia
(1850 federal census in Sullivan County, Tennessee shows David being 85 years old)

15 Oct. 176521

Augusta County, Virginia County Deed Book 12, page 351
James Dryden to David Dryden, Jr., 50, 144 acres in Forks of James below fork of Buffelo Creek. Delivered: D. Dryden, Jr., October, 1775.

23 June 1770125,542

The Dryden Family and Descendants Book II

Bible Record of Jonathon Dryden and Hannah Duff

Birth of Jonathan Dryden in Augusta County, Virginia

1771197

Hemp Certificates granted by the Court of Botetourt County, 1770 – 1771
As shown by this report hemp was extensively cultivated. Joseph Cloyd had 491 lbs., made on his plantation; William McClure, 530 lbs, made on his plantation; John McClure, 2807 lbs., made on his plantation; Andrew Lewis, 3097 lbs. made on his plantation; Patrick Denny, 1078 lbs. made on his plantation; Thomas McAlister, 1790 lbs. on James McAlister’s plantation, Charles Kirkpatrick, 1910 lbs., John Mills, 2319 lbs., John Armstrong, 419 lbs., Samuel McClenachan, 407 lbs., on David McClenachan ‘s Plantation, Andrew Woods 1164 lbs.; Francis Smith, 3462 lbs.; John Murray, 905 lbs.; Joseph Walker, 1452 lbs.; Mathias Yoakum, 586 lbs.; James Campbell, 3692 lbs.; Caleb Worley 3460 lbs.; Patrick McCollum 2076 lbs.; Thomas Paxton 3935 lbs.; Adam Wallace 510 lbs.; Robert Whitley 1268 lbs.; William Matthews 617 lbs.; John Paxton 8895 lbs.; George Salling 1714 lbs.; Peter Wallace 1716 lbs.; Samuel McCorkle 2750 lbs.; Henry Larkin 2099 lbs.; William McKee 557 lbs.; David Wallace 818 lbs.; James Gilmore 1715 lbs.; Nathaniel Evans 4500 lbs.; George Campbell 619 lbs.; John McClure 2311 lbs.; Andrew Smiley 1304 lbs.; William Hall 675 lbs.; Thomas Reed 1358 lbs.; Henry Coleman 26-25-26 lbs.; Edward Kenny 1279 lbs.; James Montgomery 1353 lbs.; David McGee 660 lbs.; John Young 710 lbs.; James Davis 900 lbs.; Samuel Wilson 108 lbs.; James Lawrence 3649 lbs.; David Robinson 1285 lbs.; John Greenlee 3456 lbs.; William Robinson 1274 lbs.; John Buchanan, Estate 1306 lbs.; Philip Love 3940 lbs.; Thomas Tosh 575 lbs.; Richard Woods, Junr. 1498 lbs.; Samuel Moore 929 lbs.; Arthur McClure 2329 lbs.; John Willey 1335 lbs.; John Kilpatrick 1891 lbs.; Archibald McCurdy 1701 lbs.; Thomas Wilson 2279 lbs.; Hugh Allen 554 lbs.; James Scott 937 lbs.; Samuel Wilson 998 lbs.; Mathias Yoakum 660 lbs.; William Lawrence 2000 lbs.; Robert Breckenridge 751 lbs.; William Christian 2514 lbs.; Benjamin Estill 1529 lbs.; Joseph McDonald 890 lbs.; James Hind 580 lbs.; Samuel Garwood 631 lbs.; William Beats 600 lbs.; William Ritchey 728 lbs.; Arthur McClure 1680 lbs.; Robert Erwin 1792 lbs.; William Moore 1010 lbs.; Robert Moore 2340 lbs.; James Simpson 540 lbs.; James Gilmore 5915 lbs.; James Trimble 1490 lbs.; William McKee 897 lbs.; John Wiley 1762 lbs.; Thomas Kitpatrick 1736 lbs.; John Howard 338 lbs.; John Gilmore 1403 lbs.; James Hale 1007 lbs.; James Templeton 1420 lbs.; John McClure 2280 lbs.; Thomas Reed 1700 lbs.; James McMahon 938 lbs.; John Taylor 274 lbs.; John Hanley 1200 lbs.; Francis Smith 11909 lbs.; Thomas Arnett 508 lbs.; Nathaniel Evans 14000 lbs.; Andrew Smithers 670 lbs.; John Poage Junr 449 lbs.; William Logan 776 lbs.; James Montgomery 3490 lbs.; Caleb Worley 4613 lbs.; Robert Kirkham 1137 lbs.; Conrad Wall 475 lbs.; Peter Wallace 1400 lbs.; Samuel Walker 800 lbs.; John Buchanan Estate 2320 lbs.; Joseph Walker 2056 lbs.; James Campbell 2613 lbs.; David Scott 972 lbs.; Solomon Whitley 1006 lbs.; Benjamin Estill 1995 lbs.; William Bowen 200 lbs.; Rachel Bowen 1566 lbs.; Capt. David Robinson 1600 lbs.; Patrick Lowry 2121 lbs.; William McBride 1121 lbs.; Thomas Stockton 1513 lbs.; Samuel McCorkle 1105 lbs.; Robert Breckenridge 1118 lbs.; Benjamin Hawkins 2007 lbs.; Francis Fulton 665 lbs.; Henry McCurdy 1554 lbs.; John Thompson 127 lbs.; James Snodgrass 522 lbs.; John Madison 1055 lbs.; Joseph Lapsley 2287 lbs.; John Paxton 5108 lbs.; Thomas McFerran 552 lbs.; Malcolm Allen 555 lbs.; James Dryden 963 lbs.; Hugh Mars 867 lbs.; Thomas Ratliff 575 lbs.; Martin Kizer 562 lbs.; Moses Cunningham 672 lbs.; George Salling 2935 lbs.; Andrew Calbreath 1402 lbs.; Audley Paul 1095 lbs.; Samuel Lawrence 728 lbs.; John Greenlee 1935 lbs.; Robert Caldwell 3000 lbs.; Adam Wallace 505 lbs.; William McEllaney 295 lbs.; Andrew Boyd 6050 lbs.; James Bainbridge 459 lbs.; James Robinson 636 lbs.; Christian Vineyard 522 lbs.; Robert McEllany 2569 lbs.; John Madison 1642 lbs.; Benjamin Hawkins 5155 lbs.; Jonathon Whitley 2029 lbs.; Frederick Francisco 977 lbs.; Michael Francisco 241 lbs.; David Dryden 365 lbs.; Patrick Campbell 2035 lbs.; Andrew Woods 1044 lbs.; Richard Woods 1896 lbs.; John Moore 2792 lbs.; John Cowardin 1615 lbs.; Arthur McClure 1990 lbs.; William Greenlee 451 lbs.; David Hume 3448 lbs.; William Maze, Jr. 1186 lbs.; Charles Ellison 370 lbs.; Thomas Willson 3379 lbs.; George Givens 1297 lbs.; Mathias Yocum 1200 lbs.; Hugh Crockett 1010 lbs.; John Poage 1700 lbs.; John Henderson 986 lbs.; John Tillery 2609 lbs.; William Lapsley 557 lbs.; William Skillern 3138 lbs.; Edward Gill 898 lbs.; John Thompson 2200 lbs.; Henry Cartmill 479 lbs.; John McClung 760 lbs.; John Madison 975 lbs.; John Bowyer 312 lbs.; William Kyle 878 lbs.; William Robinson 1360 lbs.; William Graham 219 lbs.

1771241,242

Botetourt County Tithables, A list of tithables taken from the north side of Buffalo Creek to the county line and from mountain to mountain for the year 1771 - James Trimble’s List
Francis Alison 2, James Bailey 2, Scalps 5, Constable, Samuel Bailey 1, James Bainbridge, 1, James Beates, 2, Benjamin Bennet, 1, John Berryhill, 1, Scalps 5, Henry Black 1, Timothy Blen 1, John Boles 1, John Bowyer 8, Luke Bowyer 1, Barnabas Boyles 1, Abraham Brown 3, John Brown 1, William Brown 1, James Buchanan 1, John Bush 1, James Campbell 1, James Campbell 2, Scalps 6, James Campbell 2, James Campbell 4, Robert Campbell 2, Aaron Collier 1, Alexr. Collier 2, John Collier 1, Scalps 1, Moses Collier 1, William Connor 1, William Crawford 1, Edmund Crump 1, Scalps 5, Hugh Cuningham 3, James Cunningham 1, Moses Cunningham 1, John Dailey 5, Scalps 2 5, James Davies 1, John Davis 1, John Dever 1, Scalps 5, David Dryden, 1, James Dryden ,1, Thomas Dryden 1, Scalps 5, Josiah East 1, Scalps 5, James Edmunson 5, scalps 25, Andrew Elder 2, Edward Erwin 1, Nathaniel Evans 3, Wm. Foster 2, Francis Fuller 1, Andrew Galbreath 1, Hugh Galbreath 1, John Gashaday 1, George Gibson 2, Saml. Gibson 3, Edward Gills 1, Abraham Gooding 1, John Greet 1, Thomas Haden 1, Jas. Hall 1, William Hall 2, Scalps 7, John Hanah Senr. 1, John Hannah Junr 1, William Holman 1, scalps 5, John Huton, Arthur Jameson 1, Robert Jameson 1, Edward Javis 1, William Johnston 1, Danel Keith 2, John Kelsy 1, John Kelsy 1, Moses Kelsy 1, Samuel Kelsy 1, Thomas Kilpatrick 3, Charles Kirkpatrick 2, Scalps 6, Henry Laken 3, Reuben Lanter 1, Joseph Lapesley 6, William Lapesly 1, Cornelius Lemon 1, James Logan 1, Scalps 5, William Logan 3, Patrick Lowry 2, Hugh Lusk 2, Nathaniel Mann 1, Hugh Mares 3, Samuel Matiere 1, James McCallister 4, James McClung 1, Arthur McClure 1, Arthur McClure 2, Nathaniel McClure 1, Samuel McClure 2, William McClure 1, John McCollam 1, Scalps 5, John McCollam 1, Patrick McCollam 3, Scalps 18, John McCollom 1, Neil McConnel 1, Patrick McConnel 1, Scalps 5, David McCord 1, James McCord 1, Alexr. McCorkle 3, Andrew McCorkle 1, Archibald McCurdie 1, Henry McCurdy 1, Richard McGee 1, John Mcintosh 1, John McKee 1, Patrick Mckorkle 1, James McMath 6, John Miliken 1, Christian Miliron 1, John Mitchel 1, Scalps 5, John Mitchel 3, Robert Moanies 1, James Moore 1, John Moore 4, Robert Moore 2, Samuel Moore 2, Scalps 10, William Moore 1, Scalps 5, John Nance 1, William Napier 1, John Neely 3, William Pacton 2, John Paxton 5, Scalps 25, Thomas Paxton 5, John Poage 1, David Pogram 1, alias David Robertson, John Porter 2, Scalps 10, David Robertson, John Robinson 1, James Rollin 1, James Scot 1, John Scot 1, Patrick Shannon 1, Henry Skeen 1, Joseph Skeen 1, Robert Skeen 1, Alexr. Smiley 1, Scalps 5, John Smiley Junr. 1, Scalps 5, Benjamin Smith 1, Hance Smith 1, Hance Smith 1, James Snodgrass 1, Joseph Snodgrass 1, John Sommers 1, John Sommers 1, James Templeton 5, Scalps 5, James Todd 1, Samuel Todd 1, James Trimble 5, Scalps 25, Joseph Walker 3, Joseph Walker 2, Adam Wallace 1, David Wallace 1, Peter Wallace 3, Samuel Wallace 1, Isaac Ward 2, Scalps 10, William White 1, Paul Whitley 4, Solomon Whitley 3, Hugh Wier 2, John Wiley 2, Smith Williams 2, Samuel Wilson 1, Thomas Wilson 2, James Welch 3, Scalps 6, Richard Wood, 3, John Conrode Wright, 1, John Younge 1

177169

Washington County, Virginia Survey Book 1, page 36
Joel Dryden...200 ac...commissioners certificate...on both sides of Holstein River...Beginning with James Doran & David Drydens land...corner to Thomas Berry, Sr...June 16, 1782 - Joel Dryden, heir of Nathaniel Dryden, decd, assignee of Benjamin Grag, assignee of William McNab, assignee of Thomas Stubbs...200 ac on Holstein River adjoining Thomas Berry, includes the place whereon Dryden now lives, actual settlement made in 1771...

9 Oct 177169

Botetourt County, Virginia Court Minutes
David Dryden prvd. certif. for 365 lbs of hemp.

2 June 1772543

Augusta County, Virginia, Will Book 4, pages 521-524
In the name of God Amen, I, David Dryden of the County of Augusta and the Colony of Virginia being sick and weak of body but of Perfect Mind & memory thanks be given to Almighty God Calling to mind the Mortallity of my body, knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die do make my last will and testament in the manner and form following, that is to say, Principally and first of all I recommend my soul to God who gave and my body to the dust from whence it came to be buried in a Christian-like decent manner & at the discretion of my Executor, nothing doubting but at the General Resurection I shall receive the same again by the Mighty Power of God and as touching such worldly estate wherewith all it hath pleased God to bless one with, I give & bequeath as follows, Impris:
I give and bequeath to my beloved Wife Dorothy her maintenance of the land I now live during her life, one milch cow & ewe & a lamb & my large bible to be left to Nathaniel at her decease and both Bostons Works, and her chest.
Item I give and bequeathed to my son Thomas Dryden one dollar and likewise my blue coat and jacket.
Item I give and bequeathed to my son James one dollar.
Item I give and bequeath to my son David one dollar.
Item, I give and bequeath to my daughter Eliner eight pounds of the Estate.
Item, I give and bequeath to my daugher Jane one dollar & two pewter dishes & three plates & one large Pot.
Item, I give an bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth one dollar.
Item I give and bequeath to my two sons Nathaniel and William the land whereon I now live to be equally divided bewixt them according to quantity and quality at the discretion of my Executors, also each of them a horse and saddle and likewise I give and bequeath to my son William one young bay filley, likewise I give and bequeath to each plow and taklings.
I give and bequeath to my son Nathaniel one black mare, likewise the two old plow horses to be divided between them also I allow all my Just dedts and demands to be paid out of the remainder of my moveable Estate, likewise if any thing is remaining I give and bequeath it to Dorothy my wife and sons Nathaniel and William
LASTLY I appoint Samuel Lyle and my son James sole executors of this my last will and testament and I do hereby Revoke and Disannual all other or former wills or testament by me made, Ratifying & confirming this and no other to be my last will and Testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 2nd day of June 1772, David Dryden.
Signed, published and
declared by the said David Dryden (SS)
David Dryden as his last will and
testament in the presence of us:
John Thompson
William Thompson
John Moor (his mark)

9 Sept 177256

Botetourt County, Virginia Court Minutes
Ordered that the Sheriff take David Dryden into custody until he shall find good security in the sum of forty pounds to appear here at the next court to answer the complaint of the Sheriff against him for a Rescue and for otherwise interrupting him in the execution of his office.

5 Jan. 177356,544

Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769 - 1800

The 1771 Cummings Petition, Location of the Homes of the Signers

Call to Reverend Cummings
A call from the united congregations of Ebbing and Sinking Springs, on Holston's River, Fincastle County, to be presented to the Rev. Charles Cummings, minister of the Gospel, at the Rev'd Presbytery, of Hanover, when sitting at the Tinkling Spring: Worthey and Dear Sir: We being in very destitute circumstances for want of the ordinances of Christ's house statedly administered amongst us under distressing spiritual languishment, and multitudes perishing in our sins for want of the bread of life broken among us; our Sabbaths too much profaned, or at least wasted in melancholy silence at home; our hearts and hands discouraged; our spirits broken with our mournful condition, so that human language cannot sufficiently paint. Having had the happiness, by the good Providence of God, of enjoying part of your labors, to our abundant satisfaction, and being universally well satisfied by an experience of your ministerial abilities, piety, literature, prudence, and peculiar agreeableness of your qualifications to us in particular as a gospel minister. We do, worthey and dear sir, from our very hearts, and with the most cordial affection and unanimity, agree to call, invite and entreat you to undertake the office of a pastor among us, and the care and charge of our precious souls. And upon your accepting of this, our call, we do promise that we will receive the word of God from your mouth, attend on your ministry, instructions and reproofs, in public and private, and submit to the discipline which Christ has appointed in his church administered by you while regulated by the word of God, agreeably to our confession of faith and directory. And that you may give yourself up wholly to the important work of the ministry, we do hereby promise to pay unto you annually the sum of ninety pounds from the time of your accepting this, our call; and that we shall behave ourselves toward you with all that dutiful respect and affection that becomes a people towards their minister, using all means within our power to render your life comfortable and happy. We entreat you, worthey and dear sir, to have compassion upon us in this remote part of the world, and accept this our call and invitation to the pastoral charge of our precious and immortal souls, and we shall hold ourselves bound to pray. In witness whereof, we hereunto set our hands, this 5th day of January, 1773. George Blackburn, Halbert McClure, Robert Craig, Augustas Webb, William Blackburn, Arthur Blackburn, Joseph Black, Samuel Briggs, John Vance, Nathaniel Davis, Jonathan Douglas, Westley White, John Casey, Samuel Evans, Wm. Berry, James Dorchester, Benjamin Logan, Wm. Kennerdy, John Cuzeck, James Fulkerson, Robert Edminston, Andrew McFerrin, James Piper, Stephen Jordan, Thomas Berry, Samuel Hendrey, James Harrold, Alexander McLaughlin, Robert Trimble, John Patterson, Samuel Newell, James English, Wm. Maguaghy, James Gilmore, David Wilson, Richard More, David Dryden, John Lowery, David Craig, Thomas Ramsey, Wm. McNabb, Wm. Christian, Robert Gamble, Samuel Wilson, John Davis, Andrew Colville, Andrew Martin, Joseph Vance, Wm. Laster, Wm. Poagee, Samuel Buchanan, Joseph Laster, Wm. Young, John Berry, John Boyd, Robert Buchanan, Wm. Davison, Robert Kirkman, Thomas Evans, James Young, Samuel Huston, Martin Prewitt, Wm. Marlor, John Sharp, Henry Cardwell, Nicholas Brodeston, Wm. Edmiston, John Long, George Adams, Andrew Miller, Thomas Edmiston, Robert Topp, George Buchanan, Alexander McNutt, John Beaty, John Hunt, James Dysart, Wm. Prewitt, David Beaty, Thomas Bayley, Wm. Miller, John McCutcher, George Teetor, David Gatewood, Andrew Leiper, James Berry, Michael Halfacre, Alexander Breckinridge, David Snodgrass, James Trimble, Stephen Cawood, George Clark, Daniel McCarmack, William Berry, James Gower, James Moulden, Frances Kincannon, Moses Buchanan, Robert Buchanan, Jr., Wm. Blanton, Joseph Snodgrass, David Carjon, Edward Jamison, Christopher Acklin, James Thompson, Samuel Buchanan, Richard Heggons, James Craig, Robert Denniston, Wm. Beats, John Laster, Josiah Gamble, Wm. Edmiston, Wm. McMillan, Hugh Johnson, John McNabb, Andrew Kincannon, John Kennerdy, Edward Pharis, Christopher Funkhouser, John Kelley, Robert Lamb, Samuel White, John Frankhouser, Sr., John Robinson, Thomas Rafferty, Thomas Montgomery, John Frankhouser, Jr., James Kincannon, Thomas Baker, Samuel Bell, Thomas Sharp, Margaret Edmiston, John Groce, John Campbell. We request the Rev. P. B., of Hanover, to present this, our call, to the Reverend Charles Cummings, minister of the gospel, and to concur in his acceptance of it, and we shall account ourselves happy in being your very obliged servants.

1 Feb 1773125

The Dryden Family and Descendants Book II
Birth of Rebecca Dryden in Fincastle County, Virginia

1 Feb 177456

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
David Dryden, 160 acres on north side of Holston
160 acre Loyal Land Company survey

~1774125

The Dryden Family and Descendants Book II
Birth of Elizabeth Dryden in Fincastle County, Virginia

15 Mar 1775125,545

The Dryden Family and Descendants Book II, High on a Windy Hill
Birth of Mary Dryden in Fincastle County, Virginia
Green Spring Cemetery, Abingdon, Washington County, Virginia
(Mary Duff, Consort of John Duff, d. 27 Dec 1847, age 72y) be Recorded. Teste

Oct. 177521

Augusta County, Virginia Deed Book 12, page 351
James Dryden to David Dryden, Jr., 50, 144 acres in Forks of James below fork of Buffelo Creek.
Delivered: D. Dryden, Jr., October, 1775.

10 June 17761127

Fincastle County Petition
To the Honorable the President and Gentlemen of the [Virginia] Convention
The Petition of the Western parts of Fincastle County Humbly Sheweth,
That the great extent of our County and the difficulty of attending Courts induced your Petitioners some time ago to solicit the Genral Assembly for a Division of the said County. But the subsisting disorders in the State then commencing prevented an Answer, Whereby your Petitioners have been Obliged to labour under the hardship of attending (many of them) near one Hundred and fifty Miles, upon all Publick business, which grievance induces your Petitioners now to address your Honourable House for relief either by a Division, if practicable, or a seperate district, so that we may attend Committees &c. without so much Expense and trouble as at present we are exposed to.
[From]
And your Petitioners shall pray &c.
Charles Cummings [a], Andrew Colvill, Saml. Newell, George Blackburn, John Logan, David Getgood, Joseph Black, William Montgomery, John Finley, John Blackburn, John Berry, Lante Armstrong, Alixander Brackinridge, Owen Owens, James Douglass, Robert Gamell, Waytley White, Jos. Martin, John Fain, Andrew Willoughby, Robert Edmiston, David Dryden, James Crage, Jame Elen, David Crage, Robt. Craig, John Vance, Wm. Casey, James Burton, George Finley, James Montgomery, Jas. Doun, Olfer Alexander, William Berry, John Cusack, John Casey, James Piper, James Mack [torn], David [torn] , B [torn] , [ ] ngles, Jas. Doun, Christopher Acklen, John Petterson, Thos. Sharpe, Wm. Blackburn, Arthur Blackburn, Samuel Evans, Samuel Evans, Andrew Mcferren, Henry Cresswell [b] , Isaac Russell, James McClung, John McClung, Thos. Tearray, Adam Kerr, Wm. McGaughy, Francis Dove, James Milliken, Thomas Berry, Alexr. Montgomery, Jno. Laughlin, Wm. Davison, David Looney [c] , Robert Williams [d], Jno. Johnson, Mathew Hair, David Maxwell, Senior, Jos. Adames, Jas. Campbell, Wm. Cocke [e], Wm. Anderson, Jno Kearnes, Robert Snodgrass, Wm. Mcbroom [f] , Thomas King, Jno. Diver, Robert Gilleland, Ephraim Grimes, David Grimes, David Maxwell, Junior, Alexr. Campbell, Wm Memillin, Robert Gray, Daniel Erwin, Jas. Brigham, Daniel Hogan, Jno. Whitcraft, Humphrey Hogan [g] , Samuel Kerr, Peter Looney, Wm. Michels, Jas. Patterson, David Erwin, Jno. Irwin, Jas. Mcnare, Jas Christian, Jon Anderson [torn], Gilbert Christian [torn] [h] , Robert [ ]ng [torn] , Jas. Mckean, Jno. Carr, George Maxwell, Jno. Adair, Jno. Doughlas, Jno. Donahoe, Jesse Adams, Alexander Diver, Wm. Elliott, Hugh Crawford, Mosses Looney, Thomas G [torn] , James [torn] , Jas. Young, Wm. Young, Andw. Cowan, George Berry, David Gilmore, Saml. Vance, James Rutledge, Joseph Vance Senior, Joseph Vance Junior, Fred. Wm Shurcke, Robert Buchanan, Wm. Blackburn, Allixander Breckenridge, Arthuer Galbreith, John Hayes, Waytley White, John Barnes, Frederick Sterns, John Barnes, Jacob Stern, James Bryan, George Blackburn, Arthur Neil, Samuel Adams, Ths. Bird, Barnabus Kelley, Edmund ONeel, Andrew Colvill, Robert Gillsepy, Robert Bowen, Archibald Buchanan, Willm. Wilson, John Buchanan, Willm. Hays, Andrw Lamy, John Hays, Willm. Hays Junior, William Richison, Willm. Thompson, John Brian, William Kennedy, John Harrise, David Snodgrass, Samuel Edmiston, Richard Higgins, Kellens Dungin, Corl. Adames, James Kincanon, Francis Kincannon [i] , Thomas Backer, George Backer, Jones Smith, John Douglas, John Edmiston, Andw. Hays, James Jarvis, Adam Kimberlin, Gor. Clark, Henry Willis, Wm. Cohran, Jester Cox, Daniell McCormick, Jno McCormick, Nathaniel Brown, John McCutchan, Benj. Grey, Robt. Edmondson, David Lowrey, James Carr, David Carson, John Lowrey, John Foreman, Alexdr. McNutt, John Crilley, Robert Huston, Moses Buchanan, William Lourey, Thos. Boilstone, Thomas McSpedden, Robert Buchanan, James Trimble, Robert Lamme, Samuel Buchanan, Jacob Wright, Francis Wright, James Wright, Andrew Buchanan, Charles Carter, Moses Forester, James Coller, John Jones, Andrew Edmiston, John Edmiston, Thomas Montgomery, Nicholas Brolstone, Gorg Breil, Saml. Scott, John Scott, Joseph Snodgrass, John Kandy, John Wormick, William McCutchan, Robert Spead, Collin Crilly [j], William Ferris, John Robison, Saml. McChesney, John Halley, John Buchanan, Samuel McCutchan, James Keys, John Summers, James Roberts, Fras. Kincannon, Andw. Kincannon

12 Aug. 1777124,706

Rockbridge County, Virginia Deed Book A, page 12,13

Abstracts of Rockbridge County, Virginia, Vol. 1, Deed Book A, 1778 - 1788

This Indenture made the twelfth day of August in the year of our Lord one hundred Seven Hundred and Seventy Seven between David Dryden and Barbara Dryden, his wife of Washington County and State of Virginia of the one part and David Steel of Augusta County and State aforesaid of the other part. Witnesseth that the said David and Barbara Dryden for and in Consideration of the Sum of one Hundred pounds Current Money of Virginia to them in hand paid by the said David Steel the receipt of which they do hereby acknowledge and thereof do Retain -----?--- Discharge the said David Steel his Heirs and Executors and Administrators them the said David Dryden and Barbara have Granted bargained Sold Aliened and Confirmed and by these Presents do Grant Bargain Sell Alien and Conform to the Said David Steel and to his Heirs and Assigns, one certain Tract or parcel of Land Containing one Hundred and Forty four Acres, lying and being in the County of Botetourt, in the Forks of the James River, below the fork of Buffelow Creek and bounded as followeth. Beginning at a walnut on the bank of the said Creek and Runneth thus South Seventy five Degrees West Two Hundred and forty poles to two Black Oak Saplins, North thirty one Degrees West fifty poles to a Poplar on the bank of a hill, North forty Seven Degrees East Two Hundred and four poles to a Black Oak, South forty three Degrees East Ninety Six poles to a lynn and white walnut on the bank of the --?-- Stan---?-- Creek thence Down the f---?--- Courses of the James to the Beginning. Together with all the Houses ----?-- and Under---?-- Water and Water Courses, Rights, ---?--- and Apurtenances whatsoever to the said Premises belonging or in anywise Apertaining and the Reversion and Reversions, Remainder and Remainders Rents & fines and ----?--- thereof and also all the Estate property Claim and Demand whatsoever of them the said David Dryden and Barbara of in and to the said Premises and all Deeds or Writings touching or in any wise Concerning the Same. To have and to hold the Lands hereby conveyed with their apurtenances unto the Said David Steel his Heirs and Assigns forever to the only proper use and behoof of him the Said David Steel and of his Heirs and Assigns forever. And the Said David and Barbara Dryden for them and their Heirs, Executors and administrators doth Covenant promise and Grant to and with the Said David Steel and his Heirs and Assigns by these presents that the Said David Dryden and Barbara now at the time of Sealing and Delivering these presents are Seized of a good, sure and Indefiasible Estate of Inheritance in Fee Simple of and in the premises hereby granted and that they have power and authority to grant and Convey the fame to the said David Steel, in manner and form afforsaid. And that the said Premises now are and forever hereafter Shall Remain and be free and clear of all former Gifts, Sales, Dowers Right and Title of Dower, Judgments, Executors Titles troubles, charges and Encumbrances Whatsoever made non committed or Suffered by the Said David and Barbara Dryden or any other person whatsoever. The Quitrents to grow due and payable to the State of Virginia, And Lastly that the Said David Dryden and Barbara Dryden, for them and their Heirs all and singular the Premises hereby Granted with the Apurtenances unto the Said David Steel and his Heirs and Assigns Against the Said person and persons whatsoever shall and will warrant and forever Defend by these presents In Witness whereof the said David and Barbara Dryden have hereunto Set their hands and Seals the Day and Year first above Written.
David Dryden (Seal)
Barbara Dryden (Seal)
Sealed and Delivered in the Presence of
William Preston
John McCormic
David McCluer
At a Court helf for Rockbridge County the Fifth Day of May 1776.
David Dryden and Barbara his Wife’s Bargain and Sale for Land to David Steel was fully proven by the witnesses thereto and is ordered to be Recorded.
Test. Andrew Reed

19 Aug. 1777203

Augusta County, Virginia Will Book 5, pages 527 – 530
The Estate of David Dryden deceased

1772

   

 

To Samuel Lyle

 
 

July 7th To balance due at his decease

3.11.11

 

To 8 gallons Rum (a) 4/is 32/ Alspice 1/3 used at Funeral

1.13.3

 

To 1 yard Stock Tape sugar

.4.9

 

To 1 Black Walnut Coffin

.12.6

Sept 10

To 8 Galls Rum

1.18.--

 

To 2th Sugar

.1.4

 

To Cash pd John Mackey for2 galls Whiskey at vendue

.6.--

 

To ditto pd John Smiley Sen on Acct

.10.--

Oct 23

To ditto pd Adam Reid

.2.--

Nov 26

To ditto pd Hugh Price

.9.--

 

To ditto pd Dan. McEarly

.6.--

Nov 30

To ditto pd Andrew Hays

.11.6

1773

To ditto pd John Moor

1.4.8

March 2

To ditto pd John McCollam Jun

.3.9

July 13

To ditto pd John Brown

.18.--

Aug 14

To ditto pd Benjamin G--?—y

.5.--

 

to ditto pd Jas Wheeney

1.16.6

25

To ditto pd John Mackey

2.12.7

   

17.7.5

 

Brought Over

17.7.5

Sept 17

To ditto pd Joseph Walker Jun

.11.9

30

To ditto pd Capt. Saml McDowell

.4.2

Oct 1

To ditto pd Wm Clark

.7.--

 

To ditto pd Niel Mcaltister

.15.--

26

To ditto pd. Tho Reed

1.5.3

 

To ditto pd John Mclung

.10.3

17

To ditto pd John Madison Probat of Will

.3.4

1774

To ditto pd Benj. Waller Recording Certificate

.3.4

Jan 20

To ditto pd John Lyle for repaving grave yard

.6.--

Feb 9

To ditto pd Wm Ramsey

1.4.2

10

To ditto pd Jo Mclung Sen

.12.6

11

To ditto pd David Graw for Crying Venue of s.d Estate

.10.--

19

To ditto pd Wm. Alexander

1.11.6

20

To ditto pd John Thompson

.9.6

 

To ditto pd Hugh Marino(?) Acct.

.3.--

May 2

To ditto pd James Steard

1.16.4

June 17

To ditto pd Col John Bowyer

2.11.1

1775

To ditto pd Wm Sproul

.3.--

Jan 24

To ditto pd Wm McClennahan a – note

.7.11

25

To ditto pd Ja Mclung Sen a note

2.14.10

Apr 7

To paid Ja Cowdon Acct

.4.02

May 5

To paid Andew Taylor d.

.5.--

August 16

To paid John Madison for Recording Inventory

1.--.10

1776

   

March 22

To paid Joy Scott Acct

1.2.--

Aug 27

To paid Jas Dryden Acct

4.8.9

 

To a legacy paid ditto

.6.--

 

To paid Thos Dryden Acct

2.1.2 1/2

 

To a legacy paid Ellenor Dryden

8.--.--

 

To Allowance for Eston Sverice(?)

 5.--.--

Sept 6

To Thomas Dryden for Legacy

.6.--

 

To paid Nath. Dryden his 1/3 of s.d. Estate

18.11.4

 

To paid Wm. Dryden his 1/3 ditto

18.11.4

 

To paid Dorothy Dryden her 1/3 ditto

18.11.4

 

To legacy paid David Dryden

.6.--

 

To ditto pd Wm. McNabb

.6.--

   

118.15.11

 

Balance

.1.5

   

118.17.5

C.r.

   

1772

   

Sept 10

By Capt Sam McDowell

.3.1

 

By Thomas Leekey

.4.1

 

By Robert Fairies

 3.3

11

By Alexander McClure

.11.2

 

By Daniel McEarly

.2.--

Oct 31

By Matthew

.3.1

1773

   

May 1

By Adam Reed

.1.11

Nov 8

By John Carruthers

3.11.6

 

By ditto for Joshua Coah

1.--.--

Nov 17

By Ja Willson Jun

3.--.1

Dec 11

By Dan Lyle

.14.7

1774

   

Jan 20

By John Lyle Sen

17.--

Feb 9

By Wm Ramsey

2.5.--

19

By Wm Alexander

7.--.--

1775

   
 

Jan 24 By M Cunningham

3.4.--

 

May 15 By Andw. Taylor

.--.3

1776

   
 

Aug 27 By Dominic Moran

1.3.8

 

By David McNeeley Sen

1.--.--

 

By John Sheep

1.5.--

 

By John Campbell

.5.--

 

By Benj Gray

.15.--

 

By Wm McClung Jun

.2.--

 

By Ja Dryden

1.1.--

 

By Walker Smiley

.11.--

 

By David Gray for Rye 3 by book D 26/1

4.6.1

 

By John Kirk

--?--

 

By John Smiley

.11.1

 

By Wm Carruthers

.10.3

 

By Thos Cooper

3.4.--

 

By Thos Dryden

100 .8.--

 

By Joseph

.10.--

 

By Mary Boyle

1.5.--

 

By Nath Dryden

64.12.7

 

By Wm Dryden

.2.6

 

By Dorothy Dryden

6.17.3

   

118.17.3

Pursuant to an Order of Court to us directed we have Examined the within Account and find it to be Just and stands stated August 19th 1777.
James Tate Charles Campbell
At a Court held for Augusta County by Authority of the Commonwealth of Virginia August the 19th 1777. This Account of the Administration of the Estate David Dryden decd. being returned and Examined is Ordered to be Recorded. Test.

30 Sept. 177756

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a Court continued and held for Washington County
Ordered that Joseph Vance, Samuel Willson, Benjamin Gray, John Willson, David Dryden and Jonathan Douglass or any three of them being first sworn appraise the Estate of James Young deceased and make return to next Court.

25 Nov. 177756

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At Washington Court House ... in the first year of the Commonwealth of Virginia
A Grand Jury of Inquist for the Body of this County, Viz. Aaron Lewis Foreman, Andrew Willoughby, Samuel Newell, James Piper, John Vance, Samuel Evans, John Willson, Andrew Cowan, David Catgood, Tobias Smith, John Loveless, James Dulany, John Sharp, James Fulkison, Joseph Gray, Samuel Willson, Thomas McCullough, Henry Smith, George Finley, David Dryden, William Robinson, Joseph Martin, John Berry & James Leeper, were sworn and having got their charge went from the Bar to consult of their presentments.

15 June 177956

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a court held for Washington County
A Jury sworn to try the suit now depending between John Ickis Plantiff and Joseph Bates defendant Viz. James Fulkison, Robert Edmondson, Robert Reaugh, John Blackburn, Samuel Buchanan, James Berry, David Dryden, David Craig, James Herris, Wm. Lowry, Samuel Evans, & William Montgomery returned verdict for defendant which is ordered to be recorded.

20 Aug. 177956

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a Court continued and held for Washington County
Daniel McKinney four days attendance for Henry at the suit of Ackland. David Dryden four days for Acklin against Henry.

21 Nov. 178084,525

Washington County, Virginia Will Book 1, page 170
Entry of Vandue (value) of the Estate of Nathaniel Dryden on 21 November 1780
Account of sales to: Mary Dryden, David Dryden, William Dryden, John Berry, James Ashmore, Goseph Gray, Elizabeth McKrabb, John McCauley, William Willock, Elijah Smith, Alexander Doren, Alexander Montgomery, Patrick Sheilds, David Taylor, Has Stout, James Montgomery, John Fare & William Lowry by David Dryden, Admr. Recorded March Court 1791

24 Nov. 178056

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a court continued and held for Washington County
On the motion of Meary Phillips and John Berry Administration is granted them on the Estate of James Phillips Deceas’d whereupon they together with David Dryden and Oliver Alexander ackowledged their Bond in the sum of 8000 for the faithful fulfillment of said decadants Estate

24 Aug 178169

Washington County, Virginia Survey Book 1, page 36
Joel Dryden...200 ac...commissioners certificate...on both sides of Holstein River...Beginning with James Doran & David Drydens land...corner to Thomas Berry, Sr...June 16, 1782 - Joel Dryden, heir of Nathaniel Dryden, decd, assignee of Benjamin Grag, assignee of William McNab, assignee of Thomas Stubbs...200 ac on Holstein River adjoining Thomas Berry, includes the place whereon Dryden now lives, actual settlement made in 1771...

178169

Washington County, Virginia Survey Book 1, page 294
James Doren - 400 ac - Commissioners Certificate - on both sides of Woolf Creek, a north branch of Holstein River - beginning on a path at the foot of a knob corner to James Montgomery's land - on the bank of a branch corner to David Lowrey - crossing Wolf Creek - by a cabbon - corner to Thomas Berry - corner to Joel Dryden - corner to David Dryden - crossing the creek to the side of the first mentioned knobb - August 26, 1785...James Doren, assignee of Westley White, assignee of James Dorchester - 400 ac - by settlement made in 1769 - on Wolf Creek adjoining William Lowrey, Thomas Berry, David Dryden, Alexander Doren - 268 ac surveyed for James Doren on January 29, 1774

25 Aug. 178169

Washington County, Virginia Survey Book 1, page 328 Beginning on a large black oak & Elm on the river S.10 E 78 poles to a bunch of Linns;

S.83 W.40 poles

to a white oak, Walnut & Honey Locust on the bank of the river;

N.12 W. 63 poles

to old hiccory on a knob;

North 132 poles

to two walnuts in a rocky gap;

S.81 W.130 poles

to a poplar on Joel Dryden & James Doren;

N.34 E.80 poles

to a white oak;

N.14 E.56 poles

to a white oak corner on Oliver Alexanders land;

N.88 E.140 poles

to a ceder & white oak sapling on the west side of fifteen mile creek;

S.15 E 110 poles

to a white oak at the mouth of fifteen mile creek on the N.E. side of the creek;

S.11E.80 poles

to a white oak on the S.W. side of the river;

East 36 poles

to a white oak on the N.E. side of the river;

S.13 W.60 poles

to a black oak under a high ridge;

S. 15 W.100 poles

to the Beginning.

1782 June 15th David Carson, D.S.
Robt. Preston, S.W.C.
We the Commissioners for the district of Washington and Montgomery Counties do certify that David Dryden assignee of John Row is entitled to four hundred acres of land lying in Washington county on both sides of Holstein River one hundred & sixty acres of which was surveyed for David Dryden the 1st of Feby. 1774 by virtue of an order of council dated the 16th Decr. 1773 he having proved to the Court that he was entitled to the same by actual settlement made in the year 1771. As witness our hands this 30th of August 1781.
Teste, James Reid, C.C.C
Jas. Cabell, Harry Innes, N. Cabell, Comr.s

18 Oct. 1781125,546

The Dryden Family and Descendants Book II, 1850 Federal Census
Montgomery County, Missouri
Birth of Nathaniel Dryden in Washington County, Virginia (1850 census shows him to be 68 years old)

1782491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Capt. James Montgomery’s Precinct
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (46)
12 Horses
18 Cattle

16 June 178269

Washington County, Virginia Survey Book 1, page 36
Surveyed for Joel Dryden 200 acres by certificate from the Commissioners for the District of Washington and Montgomery Counties by Act passed in May 1779 lying on both sides of the Holston River. Beginning at the corner with James Doran & David Dryden’s land ... on the bank of the river with Thomas Berry Senior’s line. 16 June 1782

18 June 178256

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a Court continued and held for Washington County
David Dryden Administrator of Nathaniel Dryden against John McCauley, James McCauley and Edward Smith comes into Court and Enters themselves Special Bail.

18 June 1782251

Washington County, Virginia Guardian & Administrators Bonds
Eliza Hill named guardian of Rebecca, Marian, James, Sarah, Elizabeth and Thomas Hill, orphans of Thomas Hill, deceased. Bond: 200 pounds. Sureties: George Findley and David Dryden.

20 Aug. 178256

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a Court continued and held for Washington County
A Jury Sworn to try the Cause now Depending between Robert Crow Administation of the Estate of William Fowler Plantiff & Arthur Niel Junior, Defendant (Viz) James Logan, John Kenedy, James Bradley, David Drydon, Robert Tate, Thomas Lee, Andrew Bunting, Samuel Evans, John Kirk, Thomas Montgomery, Richard Prior, William johnston, Thomas Byrd two Days attendance Returned Verdict for Defendant which is Ordered to be Recorded.

2 May 178356

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a court held and continued for Washington County
David Dryden Plaintiff against Wm. & Robert Ramsey defendants ) In Case
THIS day came the parties by their Attornies and thereupon came also a Jury To wit Joseph Gray, Alexander Breckenridge, James Piper, Abraham Fulkason, Thomas Caldwell, Evan Baker, Alexander Doran, William McMillin, Robert Trimble, Edward Bond and Samuel Duff who being elected tried and sworn the truth to speak upon the issue joined upon their Oaths do say that the defendants are guilty in manner and form as the Plaintiff against them hath declared and that they do assess the Plaintiffs damages by occasion thereof to five pounds besides his Costs, therefore it is considered by the Court that the Plaintiff recover against the said Defendants his damages aforesaid in form aforesaid assessed and his Costs by him in this behalf expended and the defendants in Mercy & c. Costs four hundred and thirty pounds of Neat Tobacco and fifteen shillings Attornies fee.

2 May 178356

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a Court continued and held for Washington County
Mary Dryden and David Dryden Executors of Nathaniel Dryden Plt) against John McCauley, Defendant) In Debt
THIS day came the parties by their Attornies and thereupon came also a Jury To wit Ambrose Yancey, David Fulton, Jacob Young, Archelaus Dickenson, George Clark, John Bradley, Hugh Berry, Robert Craig, David Beatie, Richard Brindlee, Alexander Caldwell and William Kennedy who being elected tried and sworn the truth to speak upon the issue joined upon their Oaths do say that the defendant doth owe to the Plaintiffs twenty pounds ten shillings and three pence besides his Costs; therefore, it is considered by the Court that the Plaintiffs recover against the said defendant their Debt aforesaid in form afore-said assessed and the Costs and the defendant in Mercy & c.Costs three hundred and twenty five pounds of Neat Tobacco and fifteen shillings Attornies fee.

20 May 178356

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a court held for Washington County
THIS day came the parties by Their Attornies and thereupon came also a Jury To wit Alexander Breckenridgc, Andrew Kincannon, Gilbert Watson, James Douglas, James Piper, George Finley, David Dryden, Isaac Anderson, Alexander Reid, Thomas Smith, Jacob Anderson and George Clark who being elected tried & sworn the truth to speak upon the Issue joined upon their Oaths do say that the defendant is guilty in manner and form as the Plaintiff against him hath declared and that they do assess the Plaintiff's damages by occasion thereof to thirty pounds beside his Costs; therefore, it is considered by the Court that the Plaintiff recovered against the said defend-ant his Damages aforesaid in manner and form aforesaid assessed & his Costs by him in this behalf expert deal and the defendant in Mercy & c.

20 Aug. 178356

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a court continued and held for Washington County
This day came the parties and thereupon came also a Jury to-wit Jn. Sharp Wm. Long, Frederick Friley, W. Greer, Saml. Scott, David Dryden, Alex. Breckenridge, Jn. Walker, Robert Tate, Hance Hamilton, Isaac Baker and Wm. Huston.

21 Aug. 178356

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a Court continued and held for Washington County
Christopher Acklin Plaintiff against In Debt, David Getgood Defendant)
THIS day came the parties by their Attornies and thereupon came also To wit David Beatie, John Berry, William Edmondson, James Herrald, James Berry, Samuel Hamilton, William Greer, David Dryden, Andrew Willoughby, William Davison, Patrick Savage and James Crow who being elected tried and the truth to speak upon the issue joined upon their Oaths do say that the defendant is guilty in manner and form as the Plaintiff agaunst him hath declared and that they do assess the plaintiff’s damages by the occassion thereof to twelve pounds Eight shillings and ten pence with Interest thereon from the fourth day of August 1783 besides his Costs, Therefore it is considered by the Court that the Plaintiff recover against the said defendant his Debt aforesaid in form aforesaid assessed and his Costs by him in this behalf Expended and the defendant in Mercy.

1784491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Alexander Montgomery’s Return
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (48)
11 Horses
14 Cattle
Tax Paid: 1.15.9

17 Mar. 178456

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a court continued and held for Washington County
In Case. Hugh Berry Plaintiff against Joseph Lock Defendant Patrick Kendrick Common Bail
THIS day came the parties by their Attornies and thereupon came also a Jury To wit, James Herraid, Thomas Meek, Drury Pucker, James Snodgrass, John Hoult, John Berry, Robert Craig, James Bates, James Campbell, David Dryden, John Vance, Robert Trimble who being elected tried and sworn the truth to speak upon the issue joined upon their Oaths do say that the defendant is guilty in manner and form as the Plaintiff against him hath declared and that they do assess the Plaintiffs damages by occasion thereof to thirteen pounds Eleven shillings and Eight pence besides his Costs, Therefore it is considered by the Court that the Plaintiff recover against the said defendant his damages aforesaid in form aforesaid assessed and his Costs in this behalf Expended and the defendant in Mercy & c.

19 May 178456

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a court continued and held for Washington County
This day came the parties by their attornies and thereupon came also a Jury to-wit; Jas. Gilliland, Jas. Berry, Saml. McChesney, George Clark, Richard Moore, Abraham Fulkinson, Jas. Bates, Wm. Barker, Ezekial Kelley, Jacob Anderson, Alex. Breckenridge and David Dryden.

18 Aug. 178456

Annals of South West Virginia 1769-1800
At a court continued and held for Washington County
In Case. John Reid for James Dysart and Robert Craig Plaintiff against Samuel Machesney--Defendant
THIS day came the parties by their Attornies and thereupon came also a Jury To wit Robert Craig, Robert Faires, James Douglas, Archclaus Brumley, David Dryden, David Gatgood, Samuel Magee, Thomas Montgomery, Jacob Anderson, John Beatie, Robert Allison and James Williamson who being elected tried and sworn the truth to speak upon the issue joined upon their Oaths do say that the defendant is not guilty in manner and form as the Plaintiff against him hath declared. Therefore it is considered by the Court that the Plaintiff take nothing by his Bill but for his false clamour be in Mercy and that the defendant go hence without day and recover against the Plaintiff his Costs by him in his defence Expended. Costs Four hundred pounds of neat Tobacco and fifteen shillings Attornies fee.

18 Oct. 1784125,547

The Dryden Family and Descendants Book II, Nathaniel Julian Dryden Family Bible
Birth of William Dryden in Washington County, Virginia

20 Mar. 1785548

Land Office Records, Virginia Land Office
Patrick Henry Esquire Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia. To all to whom these presents shall come Greeting: Know ye, that by Virtue of part of a Certificate in right of Settlement given by the Commissioners for adjusting the Titles to unpatented lands in the District of Washington and Montgomery and in Consideration of the Ancient Composition of one Pound fifteen Shillings Sterling paid David Dryden into the Treasury of this Commonwealth there is granted by the said Commonwealth unto the said David Dryden a certain Tract or Parcel of Land Containing three hundred and thirty acres by Survey Bearing date the fiteenth day of June one Thousand seven hundred and Eighty two Lying and being in the County of Wasington on Holston on the fifteen mile Creek and Bounded as followeth To wit, Beginning at a Large Black oak and Elm on the River thence south ten degrees East Seventy eight poles to a Bunch of Lynn, South Eighty three degrees West forty poles to a white oak and Walnut and Honey Locust on the Bank of the River North ----?--- Degrees West Sixty three poles to an old Hickory on a Knob North one hundred and thirty two poles to two Walnuts in a rocky Gap North Eight one degrees West one hundred and thirty poles to a poplar on Joel Drydens line and with Drydens Line North thirty one degrees West one hundred and forty poles to two Black oaks Corner with Joel Dryden and James Dorin North thirty four degrees East Eighty poles to a white oak North fourteen degrees East forty poles to a White Oak Corner on a Line Alexanders Land North Eighty eight degrees East one hundred and forty poles to a Ceder and white oak Sapling on the West side of fifteen mile Creek South fifteen degrees east one hundred and ten poles to a white oak at the mouth of fifteen mile Creek on the North East side of the Creek South Eleven degrees East Eighty poles to a white oak on the South West side of the river East thirty six poles to a white oak on the North East Side of the river South thirteen degrees West sixty poles to a Black oak under a high ridge thence South fifteen Degrees West one hundred poles to the Beginning With its Appurtenances; To have and to hold the said Tract or parcel of Land with its appurtenances, to the said David Dryden and his Heirs forever. In Witness Whereof, the said Patrick Henry Esquire Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, hath hereunto set his Hand and Caused the ---?-- seal of the said Commonwealth to be affixed at Richmond, on the Twentieth day of March in the year of our Lord, one thousand and seven hundred and Eight five and of the Commonwealth the Ninth.
Patrick Henry

28 Feb 1786125,546

The Dryden Family and Descendants Book II, 1850 Federal Census
Montgomery County, Missouri
Birth of Thomas Dryden in Washington County, Virginia (1850 federal census records show to be 63 years old.)

1786491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Alexander Montgomery’s Company
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (50)
10 Horses
14 Cattle

1787491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
John Lathim, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable                David (51)
1 White Tithable 16-21      Jonathon (16)
9 Horses
17 Cattle

4 Apr 1788491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
John Lathim, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable                David (52)
1 White Tithable 16-21      Jonathon (17)
10 Horses

5 June 1789491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Walter Preston, Commissioner
David Dryden Sr.
1 White Tithable                David (53)
1 White Tithable 16-21      Jonathon (18)
10 Horses

12 May 1789251

Washington County, Virginia Guardian & Administrators Bonds
David Dryden named guardian of Phebe Dryden, orphan child of Nathaniel Dryden, deceased.

Bond: 150 pounds, current money of Virginia. Surety: David Carson.

21 Aug 1790491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Walter Preston, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable                David (54)
1 White Tithable 16-21      Jonathon (19)
7 Horses

1 Sept 1791491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Walter Preston, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable                David (55)
1 White Tithable 16-21      Jonathon (20)
6 Horses

1792491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Walter Preston, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable                David (56)
1 White Tithable 16-21      Jonathon (21)
10 Horses

19 Sept 1793491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Walter Preston, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (57)
9 Horses

2 Apr 1795491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
David Dryden
1 White Tithable                David (59)
1 White Tithable 16-21      Nathaniel ? (15)
6 Horses

1797491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
David Dryden
1 White Tithable                David (61)
1 White Tithable 16-21      Nathaniel (16)
2 Horses

16 Dec. 1798120

Washington County, Virginia, Will Book 2, pages 209-210
In the name of god amen, the sixteenth of December one thousand seven hundred and ninety eight. I, Thomas Berry, of the County of Washington and State of Virginia, being weak in body but sound in mind and knowing that all flesh must yield to death when it shall please god to call, I do hereby make constitute and ordain and declare this to be my last Will and Testament in manner and form following revolking and anuling by these present all and every testement or testaments will or wills heretofore by me made and declare either by word or writing and this to be taken only for my last will and testament and none other and now for the settling my temperate estate and such goods and chattals and debts as it pleased god for above my deserts to bestow on me. I do order, give and dispose the same in manner and form following, And first I do will that all my just debts be paid within convenient time after my decease by my executors hereafter named and seconded, I do give and bequeath to my well beloved wife Esther the third part of all the moveable Estate except the negros as I have left her the third part of the price of my land already. I do leave to my son George a negro named Adam and all my wearing apparel and George is to give to my daughter Rebeckah fifty dollars. I do also leave to my daughter Esther a negro girl named Phili to her and her heirs and if the girl has any children they are to go to Esther and her heirs, also my negro woman named Tawney I do allow her to be free and I leave her a milch cow. I also leave to my son John, four dollars. I also leave the rest of my estate to my children hereafter named, son James, son Thomas, my daughter in law Mary Berry, wife to son William deceased, my daughter Mary, my daughter Barbara, daughter Rebeckah, my daughter Elizabeth, my daughter Susannah, my son Francis to be equally divided among them. I also leave to my grandson Thomas Dryden my best saddle. I also will that David Dryden and Samuel McChesney and David Lowry shall be my Executors given under my hand and seal this sixteenth of December 1798.
Witnesses present
Thomas Berry LS (?)

Jonathan Dryden
William Palmer

20 Aug. 1799120

Washington County, Virginia, Will Book 2, pages 239 - 240
At a court held for Washington County by the 20th day of August 1799. The last will and Testament of Thomas Berry deceased was exhibited into court and proved by the oaths of Jonathan Dryden and William Palmer the witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded. And on the motion of David Dryden, David Lowry and Samuel McChesney the Executors thereon named who took the oath of Executors presented by law and together with David Craig, David McCord and James Maxwell their securities entered into and acknowledged their bonds in the sum of four thousand dollars with conditions as the law directs. A certificate for the probate of the said will is therefore granted them in dueform excud. Teste Andrew Russell

1799491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (63)
6 Horses
Total Tax Paid: .12

27 Oct. 180021

Augusta County, Virginia Circuit Court Records, Section “I”, Judgements, page 76
O. S. 36; N. S. 12-- Simon Ely vs. James Thompson
David Dryden deposes that in 1771 he removed to the country now called Washington, and came to the house of Thomas Berry.

1800491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Matthew Willoughby
David Dryden
2 White Tithables      David (64), Nathaniel (19)
7 Horses
Total Tax Paid: .24

1801491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Matthew Willoughby
David Dryden
2 White Tithables      David (65), Nathaniel (20)
7 Horses
Total Tax Paid: 3.84

1802491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Matthew Willoughby
David Dryden
2 White Tithables      David (66), Thomas (16)
5 Horses

21 Mar 1804491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Frederich Hamilton, Commissioner
David Dryden
2 White Tithables       David (68), Thomas (17)
4 Horses

13 June 1805491

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Frederich Hamilton, Commissioner
David Dryden
2 White Tithables      David (69), Thomas (18)
6 Horses

1806147, 530

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Mathew Willoughby, Commissioner
David Dryden
2 White Tithables      David (70), Thomas (19)
6 Horses

1807530

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Mathew Willoughby, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (71)
2 Horses

27 June 180821,514,707

Augusta County, Virginia, Will Book 10, pages 197,198
27 June 1808707 Augusta County, Virginia, Will Book 10, Page 197, 198
In the Name of God, Amen, I William Johnston of the Parish and County of Augusta & State of Virginia, being stricken in years and being at this time in a weak and sickly state of being and considering the certainity of Death and the Uncertainty of life have thought proper (I being of sound mind and disposing memory) to dispose of such worldly goods as God hath been pleased to bless me with, by making this my last will and Testament, in the manner and form following to wit. In the first place, I give and bequeath my soul into the hand of almighty God who gave it and my body to the earth to be buried in a decent christian manner at the discretion of my Executors. Item, to my wife Jane Johnston, I give and bequeath the sum of ten shillings. Item, as to my plantation I will and request my Executors shall sell it so soon as they can do in their opinion to the best advantage after the present tenant (Mr. Halmans time is out) and the products of such sale, I will and request to be disposed of in the manner following, to wit, To my Brother in Law William McKnob, living on Wataga State of North Carolina, I give and bequeath the sum of one hundred pounds in Cash to him, his Heirs and Assigns forever. Item, I give and bequeath to Katherine Kerns, wife to Alexander Kerns my negro girl named Sally, until she arrives at the age of twenty five years, or the value of said Sally in Cash, the said Sally to be free at the age of twenty five years. Item I give and bequeath unto my half sister Jane Shields, wife to Patrick Shields, living near the mouth of the Missouri River the sum of one hundred pounds, to her, her Heirs or assigns forever. Item, I give and bequeath unto Hugh Dreddan, Ruery Dreddan and Lilah Dredden, Son and Daughters of Wm. Dredden of Madison County, Kentucky the sum of fifty pounds Each, to them, their heirs and assigns forever. Item, I give and bequeath the remainder of my estate, both real and personal to the Sons & Daugher of David Dreddon Living on the South fork of Holsten River to be equally divided amongst them, their Heirs and assigns forever, after my debts and funeral Expenses are paid, as to my personal Estate, which I may die possessed of, desire and request my Executors do dispose of in the best manner they can after my decease in Order to pay the above legacies, and further as my present tenant Henry Hartman has the care of my in my Illness, if I am called off by the present dispensation of providence I will and desire that my Executors shall discharge the said Henry Hartman the sum of ten pounds of his rent in consideration of his care of me. And lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my friends James Rankin and Robert Rankin Executors of this my last will and Testament, hereby revoking all other or former wills being heretofore made. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and official seal this tenth day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eight.
---?--- ----?--- -----?--
William Johnston (Seal)
as for the last Will and Testament of the above named William Johnston
Michael Cline, Henry Hartman Jr and Henry Hartman Senr.

1809530

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Mathew Willoughby, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (73)
2 Horse

1810530

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Mathew Willoughby, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable       David (74)
2 Horses

1810538

Federal Census, Washington County, Virginia
David Dryden
1 male < 10
1 male 16 - 26      Nathaniel ? (29)
1 male > 45          David (74)
1 female > 45       Barbara (68)

15 May 1811552

Augusta County, Virginia Sheffet's Administrator vs. Rankin's Administrator--O. S. 357; N. S. 129
Letter from David Dryden, Sr., to his sister, Jane Shields
{First Page}
“May the 15th 1811
Dear sister, I gladly embrase this opertunity to let you Know that we are as well as we can expect at present. hopeing These may find you well. the Bearer of these a few Days agoe informed me where you live and that your husband was Deceased that your son in law monson was dead and that you were well and {insert: he} had been at your house. I will inform you that the last account we had from son Wm he was well and has a wife and three or four children and it is said his wife is industrous and the children are sensible[?] smart children. he wrote that he would be at our house about harvest he lives two mile in the side of new river at a place calld new Dublin. Your brother James Dryden is dead and your brother Wm. Johnson is Dead also and he has left you one hundred pound. Betty one hundred pounds. Wm. Drydens Children one hundred and fifty pounds and the rest he has left to our Children. he left a man of the name of Rankin his Execut. and his wife is yet alive and has Brought suit against Rankin and intends to break the will if she can and when your money will be got is uncertain. Do you write me the first opertunity and let me know at to Diret my letter when I write to you again as I may not have any opertunity to send only by the post.”
{Second Page}
“and let me know how you all are and how you like the country and what sort of water and land is there and how it is to be got money or trade and what sort of time is best and if you have any religions or not. your sister Betty is. and Wm was up a few Days ago. your friends here are well as for as I Know. our Children is left us but Nat. Jonathan is moved to Duck River and Wm and Thomas live closeby us and David lives where he Did and is married again and has got a fine Daughter. Wm has got three sons and Tomas has got two Daughters. pray Do not forget that you are in your sixty ninth yer of your age and cant Expect to live long hire. Be busy with god that you may be prepared for Death. farewell.
David Dryden sen.
Mrs. Jane Shields

1811530

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Mathew Willoughby, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (75)
2 Horses

1812530

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Mathew Willoughby, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (76)
3 Horses

1813530

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Mathew Willoughby, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (77)
3 Horses

1814530

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Mathew Willoughby, Commissioner
David Dridon
1 White Tithable      David (78)
2 Horses
5 Cattle

1815530

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Mathew Willoughby, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (79)
2 Horses

1816530

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Mathew Willoughby, Commissioner
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (80)
2 Horses

1817530

Washington County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
David Dryden
1 White Tithable      David (81)
2 Horses

2 Mar. 1818215

Washington County, Virginia, Will Book 4, page 247
In the Name of God Amen. I David Dryden Jr. of Washington County in the State of Virginia being sick & weak in body but of sound mind & disposing memory for which I thank God & calling to mind the uncertainty of human life and being desirous to dispose of such worldly estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with. I give & bequeath the same in the manner following to wit, I desire that my Executor sell so much of my perishable property as will be sufficient to pay all my just debts and funeral expenses. I give and bequeath to my children David Dryden, Rebecca Duff, Mary Duff, Elizabeth Palmer and William Dryden, each the sum of five dollars. I give & bequeath to my son Jonathan Dryden my young gray horse and also five dollars. I give to my children Rebecca Duff, Mary Duff, Elizabeth Palmer, and Nathaniel Dryden all my bed clothing to be equally divided among them, I give to Barbara Dryden* five dollars. I give to Polly Palmer five dollars & my Bureau, I give & bequeath to my sons Nathaniel Dryden and Thomas Dryden all the balance of my estate both real & personal the perishable property to be equally divided between them. The land to be divided according to an agreement between myself an each of them -- I do hereby Constitute and appoint Thomas McChesney, Nathaniel Dryden and Thomas Dryden Executors of my last Will & Testament hereby revoking all other or former Wills or Testaments. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & affixed my seal this 2 d. day of March 1818.
David Dryden (SS)

Mosby Davison
John H. Henderson

19 May 1818215

Washington County, Virginia, Will Book 4
At a Court held for Washington County
The last Will & Testament of David Dryden Jr deceased was exhibited in court and proved by the oath of Mosby Davison and John H. Henderson the subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded. And on the motion of Thomas McChesney, Nathaniel Dryden & Thomas Dryden the Executors therein named who took the oath of an Executor prescribed by law & entered into & acknowledged their bond in the sum of one thousand dollars with Andrew Russell & Edward Campbell their securities conditioned as the law directs. A Certificate is therefore granted them for the probat of the said Will in due form. Jacob Lynch, D.

27 June 1818215

Washington County, Virginia, Will Book 4, pages 265 - 266
Appraisement of estate of David Dryden (Jr), Washington County, Virginia, 27 June 1818
An Inventory and Appraisement of the estate of David Dryden, dec.d. made the 27th June 1818

l Clock

$15

 

1 Cupboard & furniture 

$5

 

1 Cupboard 

$11

 

1 Bureau

$11

 42.--

1 Rifle & Pouch

$10

 

8 Books

$5

 

1 Pr Dog Irons

$2

 

1 Pr Shovel & Tongs

$1

18.--

1 Washing Tub

.75 ct

 

1 Churn

50 cts

 

1 Iron Pott

$4

 

2 D..D. & 1 pr Hooks

 $3

8.25

2 Ovens 1 Skillet & 1 pr Hooks

@ 2.50

 

4 Planes

$3

 

1 Kettle

$3.50

9.--

1 Saw 1 Auger & Foot addz

$1.16

 

2 Plates & 2 Crocks 

.66 2/3 cents

1.83.2/3

1 Wooden bowl 1 Quart 1 Saddle & Coffee pot

.75 cts

 

1 Grubbing Hoe

.75 cts

1.50

1 Sorrel Cott

$35

 

1 Gray Cott

$21.25

 

1 Sorrel Mart

$45

 

1 Cow

$12

113.25

Amt. Carried Over:

 

$ 193.82.2/3

Amt. Brought Over:

 

$ 193.82.2/3

(missing) Cow & Calf

$15

 

1 Ditto & Ditto

$9

 

1 Table 1 Tumbler & Bottle

$1.37.2/3

25.37.2/3

1 Table

 

 

6 Chairs

$$1.752

 

11 Sheep

$14.66.2/3

 

1 Grind Stone

.50 cts

18.91.2/3

Cloth

$9.75

 

4 Blankets & 1 Sheet

$11

 

1 Bedsted Bed & Furniture

$10

30.75

1 Bedsted Bed & Furniture

$20

 

1 Bedsted & Cord

$2

 

1 Ditto & Jointer

.75 cts

22.75

1 Bolt

37.1/3 cts.

 

1 Book

 $0.50

 

1 Saddle

$7

7.87.1/3

 

 

$299.48.1/3

Thomas McChesney David Parks
N. Dryden Executors Hugh Berry
Thomas Dryden David Lowrey
David Lowrey Jr.

18 Aug. 1818215

Washington County, Virginia, Will Book 4
At a Court held for Washington County
This Inventory and appraisement of the estate of David Dryden deceased was returned to Court and ordered to be recorded.
Test Jacob Lynch, D.

18761181

A history of the pioneer families of Missouri, by Wm. S. Bryan and Robert Rose, published by Bryan, Brand & Co., St. Louis, MO, 1876, Mo. Histories of Families, Montgomery County, p. 253

Dryden – David Dryden, of Pennsylvania, married Barbara Berry, and settled in Washington county, Va., where he and his wife both died. Their children were – Jonathon, David, Nathaniel, William, Thomas, Rebecca, Elizabeth and Mary.

1893146,590

An Account of Our Ancestors on Trip to Canada as War Prisoners
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1st Letter
Sept.11, 1893
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dear George:
Your papa's [Dixson Duncan] grandfather and grandmother, John and Nellie Duncan, and grandfather and grandmother, Frank and Sally Berry [Adelaide’s grandparents] moved from Virginia during the Revolutionary War to Kentucky. I don't know just where, but it was somewhere in the best part of the state. There was quite a little colony of them but I do not know the names of any except these families. They took up claims of land and complied with what was necessary to secure their claims. I don't know what it was nor how long they had been there til they were compelled to move for safety to a fort or blockhouse where they were taken by British officers and soldiers who had Indians with them to whom the British gave all their household goods except two suits of clothes and two blankets to each man and the same to each woman.
I remember hearing my grandmother [Sarah ‘Sally’ (Sharp) Berry] tell how the Indians would toss the pillows in the air after they had ripped the ticking to make the feathers fly in the wind and how they would laugh. They wanted the cloth but not the feathers. They then started on their march to Detroit, where they stayed awhile and then on to Montreal where they stayed until peace was declared. They were liberated to get back as best they could.
There was one family along who had a young woman - a daughter who complained of a toothache for some weeks , when someone examined her mouth and found a cancer had eaten through her cheek, all but the skin. She died soon after and the officers only allowed them to stop long
enough to pile up a few rocks on her body. Charles Gatliff was her father's name. He came back to Kentucky and I saw him after he was eighty years of age. I also saw his sons: Moses, Aaron, Riece, Jim and Cornelious. I also saw two of his daughters: Betsey Martin and Sally Faris. I suppose Joe remembers having seen one of his grandsons, Charles Gatliff, who moved to Missouri a short time before we left Iowa for Princeton. His wife was papa's cousin, Polly Early, and your uncle, Harvey Green Duncan, married their daughter Lillian.
I heard grandmother [Sarah (Sharp) Berry] say she saw the Indians kill two children. It was very cold for part of their journey and once when a great fire of logs was burning where they camped, an Indian picked up a child that was standing near and threw it in the fire. No one dared to try to get it out. On another occasion, a woman was carrying a little babe, and she was almost exhausted, when an Indian jerked it from her arms and thrust his tomahawk in its head, threw the child to one side of the road, and drove her on.
While they were in Montreal, the men were made to repair the Englishships and the women cooked and washed for the English officers. On one occasion, the men found a case of wine on the ship and drank the wine. The officers put them in prison or the guard house and my grandmother Berry [Sarah (Sharp) Berry] went to the guard house and begged for their release until they were released.
I don't know what their punishment would have been. I don't know if any of the young men were put on the English ships to make them fight against their own country or not, but your grandfather Duncan [John Duncan Jr] and four other young men were going to be put on a man-of-war in the morning and your grandfather's oldest sister [Elizabeth Duncan. b. 1762] baked bread and fixed up some provisions. They stole a canoe and crossed the St. Lawrence to the American side and got away. They traveled through the hostile Indian country till they reached the settlement in Pennsylvania. In the outskirts of the settlement, they found a deserted place, an iron pot and a potato patch. I heard your grandfather [John Duncan Jr] tell how they boiled potatoes and ate with such appetite. Your grandmother Duncan [Mary ‘Polly’ Laughlin] told me that their friends did not know till after peace and they returned from Montreal, whether these young men were drowned in the St. Lawrence, whether they were killed by Indians, whether they were lost in the wilderness and perished, or whether they were safe. She did not know the name of a single one of her husband's companions, and I never heard her say who they were. I am very sorry that I did not ask your Uncle Harve Duncan for he may have known. I do not know whether there was any fighting at the fort or not, in Kentucky, or whether they surrendered to the greater number without fighting
All the way, I can approximate the time they moved from Virginia to Kentucky. My Grandfather Berry fought in the battle at King's Mountain and he was also a scout before they moved to Kentucky [This could NOT mean Francis Berry/Sarah Sharp as they were in captivity in 1781 when King’s Mountain occurred. Adelaide is writing this letter to her son and Francis Berry/Sarah Sharp would have been the son’s grandparents, but Francis Berry, d. 1800, would have been Adelaide’s grandfather, so that is a possibility, although he was probably too old.] After my papa [Lafayette Berry] got to practicing law. He got a pension for a Duncan McFarlain, who was a scout with my grandfather [Francis Berry, Jr.] I remember how the hair seemed to stand on my head as I lay in my trundle-bed and listened to McFarlain tell papa of their exploits. At one time he and Charles Miller ran, with the Indians after them, thirty miles to a blockhouse.
As the prisoners were leaving Canada, they crossed some lake in a ship which was very crowded and manned by French-Canadian sailors. A storm arose and the sailors got frightened, and quit work. They started to pray, and cross themselves, when an Englishman, perhaps an officer, came on them and cursed and swore and ripped and tore around and kicked them, and made then get to work. Finally they got safely to land. I remember hearing my father tell of hearing his father laughing about it. Grandmother [Sarah (Sharp) Berry] said there were piles of feathers floating in the eddies on the lake shore that looked like houses - the shedding of many waterfowls on the lake.
My uncle Lewis Berry [son of Francis Berry/Sarah Sharp] was born in Montreal. He died in the American army in the War of 1812. As our ancestors were coming home they passed near Niagra Falls. All heard the roar and some of the men went to see it but the women and children were too weary to go. They went back to Kentucky to where they had been captured and found men on
their claims. Both your greatgrandfathers, John Duncan and Frank Berry, sued at law for their claims but lost their suit. Berry's long tongue made him say the judge was a perjured scoundrel. The judge sued him for slander and got judgment of eight hundred dollars. Then, the poor weary souls went back to Virginia where they had lived before they went to Kentucky and raised their families there. Quite a number of the children afterwards moved to Whitley County, KY where your papa and I were born and raised and married. My grandmother Berry [Sarah (Sharp) Berry], in her old age, came there and died in 1834.
I only remember of having seen your grandfather Duncan [John Duncan Jr] twice . Alec Laughlin, your papa's cousin, married in Whitely County, and moved to Tennessee where his daughter Eleanor Litton was born. He came back on a visit and stopped at his uncle's (your grandfather Duncan's) and they both came to Watt's Creek where my papa [Lafayette Berry] and your papa's uncle, Thanny Laughlin, lived. They stopped at our house, and it was a hot day, and your Aunt Candace and I had taken off our dresses and were running around in our Chemises, which were long and long-sleeved. They came on us unaware and we went to the back of the house and sat on a chest, while they laughed at us. I remember how your grandfather's [meaning John Duncan Jr] shoulders shook. He was very much the make and size of your papa but his hair was black and I think his eyes were blue. I afterwards saw him riding past our house on a white horse. He wore a high bell-crowned hat, and a blue jeans frock coat. (I have seen the hat and coat after I was married and have ridden the white mare, it was, whose name was Ginger). He was a dear nephew to my grandmother [Sarah Sharp Berry, whose sister Elinor "Nellie" Sharp was the mother of John Duncan, Jr.], and I know she loved him, and I know my papa loved him. He [John Duncan, Jr.] died from dry salivation by taking a dose of calomel measured out on a case knife blade by an old woman who had more confidence in herself than good sense. I remember when word came that Johnny Duncan was dying, my papa hurried off and took a handful of nails. Mama asked him what he did that for. He said to put in the coffin. Years afterwards I learned that was an old country superstition but its meaning I never heard. He got there in time to write his will before he died, and he moved him after his death. He had been dead six years when I and your papa were married - that would make his death to have occurred in 1832. Your papa [Dixon Green Duncan] and I lived with your grandmother [Mary "Polly"(Laughlin) Duncan] the first year after we were married and she loved to talk about him. She said he was a remarkably strong man for his size. When he was a young man, it was the custom for the neighbors to all unite and help each other cut the small grains with sickles and the young women would do the cooking, and sometimes they would go to the fields and use the sickles to good purpose. Then at night they would have a dance. Your grandmother said your grandfather worked all day, and danced all night, for two days and two nights, without any sleep. I don't believe his sons or grandsons, or great-grandsons could do that, even if they can ride a bicycle.
I don't know whether the Gatliff family moved from Virginia or Tennessee to Kentucky, or not. I only know that they were together in their captivity. I don't know whether the British gave them any money to get home or not. My grandfather Berry never paid that eight hundred dollars. He somehow got a farm in Sullivan County, Tennessee, where his family were raised, but it was always in the name of Billy King, grandmother's sister's husband. [Sarah (Sharp) Berry’s sister, Elizabeth Sharp who married William King.]
My papa [Lafayette Berry] said your grandfather Duncan [John Duncan Jr] was so near gone when he got there that he was in no condition to make a will, but your uncles Harvey and Joe Duncan said for your grandmother's sake, to have it done, to not add to her distress by breaking up her home, by taking two-thirds of everything and dividing it amongst the children, as they knew your uncle Joe Sullivan [the husband of Narcissa Duncan] would insist on doing if there was no will. So the will was written, giving your grandmother everything - the farm, the Negroes, and everything else, as long as she lived, and at her death all to be divided equally amongst the children. I guess it was pretty hard for Sullivan to not to try to break the will, for after I was married I heard your Aunt Narcissa say: "The children ought to have had the little that was coming to them a long time ago." But he knew that your Uncle Harve and Uncle Joe would not give him any child's play if he undertook the law with them. They were the executors.
If I were back to ten or twelve years of age, and knew more than I did then, how I would ply my grandmother and parents with questions. I guess I will close my pioneer stories. Nellie Duncan and Sally Berry were sisters. Sharp was their name before they were married.
Much love to all.
Mother
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2nd letter
Sunday P.M. Sept.17, 1893
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dear George,
In looking over your letter, I find I did not answer all your questions. I don't know whether your grandfather Duncan [John Duncan Jr] was much of a woodsman, or not, nor whether he was much of a hunter or not, but I don't believe he was much of a hunter for I think I would have heard talk of it, if he had been. Your grandmother [Mary (Laughlin) Duncan] Duncan's oldest brother, Johnny Laughlin, was a great hunter. His children used to sit on the woodpile when he went out with his gun, and listen to hear a shot, then each would claim separate parts of the deer, such as the milt, the heart, or the ribs. Isaac King, his son-in-law, told this and said he neglected his cornfield to hunt, like my papa did. I don't believe your grandfather Duncan did that. (Note: Isaac King married Jane Laughlin and John Laughlin was her uncle, her father being Thomas Laughlin, who was the oldest brother of Mary "Polly," so there is some question as to which man was the hunter referred to. Violet M. Pilcher, typist of this copy of the letter.)
I don't know how long they were in the wilderness, nor whether the family got together in Kentucky or not till after the old folks went back to Virginia. Decatur Dryden's mother [Sarah Sharp Berry, b. 1788, d/o Francis Berry/Sarah Sharp, who married William Dryden. s/o Barbara Berry/David Dryden Jr] was the first child my grandmother Berry had after her return from captivity, [Adelaide must mean that Sarah Sharp Berry was the 1st child born when BERRY/SHARP returned to Washington Co, since a daughter Elizabeth was born 1786 which is after release from captivity] and it may be he has heard her tell things she certainly heard her mother talk of.
Before our ancestors moved to Kentucky [prior to 1780/81], they in Virginia had to seek safety in a blockhouse. Your grandmother Duncan [Mary "Polly" Laughlin] told me of this after I was married. She was a little girl and was drinking sweet sap that was dripping from a sugar tree near her father's house. She had left one shoe and stocking in the house. A runner came galloping by, calling out: "To the blockhouse. The Indians are coming!" Her father [John Laughlin Jr] picked her up, and poor lame man that he was, carried her in his arms. By the time they got pretty near the blockhouse, there was quite a crowd of neighbors, and they stopped to drink at a little stream, and your grandmother's little tin cup that she had in her hand was all they had to drink out of; only one woman pulled off her shoe and gave her children drinks out of it. I don't know whether your great-grandfather Duncan's family was in the blockhouse or not, but my grandfather and grandmother Berry [Francis Berry/Sarah Sharp] were, as also Billy King, whose wife was Betty Sharp [the sister of Sarah Sharp] before she married.
There were five men killed by the Indians while they were staying in the blockhouse. The men would go out to their fields to get food, and those inside would hear the shooting, and after awhile go out and bring in their slain friends. They tied their feet together, also the hands, and to a pole, then two men would carry them. Your grandmother told of one poor German woman whose son Fritz was all the family she had. He was brought in that way. Your old grandmother would choke and stop, and tears run down her cheeks when she told me of how this poor woman would wring her hands, and say: "Oh, my Fritz, my Fritz!"
This Billy King [William King married to Elizabeth Sharp, sister of Sarah (Sharp) Berry] was the one who afterwards held the deed to granfather Berry's farm. I heard mama say he was as faithful as if grandmother Berry's children had been his own - never took any advantage of them. Your grandmother told me that one Sunday morning in the blockhouse, he dressed in his clean white flax linen pants and hunting shirt, and laid the corner of his hunting shirt across his knee, and took Isaac, his baby on his knee. The baby had bowel complaint and stained his hunting shirt. He jumped up, and tore around as if the Indians had him, and my grandmother Berry and his wife flew at him and got the baby away and the hunting shirt off him, for he took out his knife and they had work to keep him from cutting off the corner of the shirt that was so badly spoiled. Did any of them think that any of their descendants would write this down more than a hundred years after it occurred? Your grandmother [Mary (Porterfield) Duncan] said to me: "Your grandmother [Sarah (Sharp) Berry] was a beautiful woman then."
Isaac King moved to Kentucky, Whitely County, before papa [Lafayette Berry] did, and he lived four miles from where I was raised. I remember when I was a little girl, of riding behind him to Williamsburg on a big white stable horse. We were going to a Presbyterian preacher, and I was going to ride behind mama, and Ellen Carr behind papa, when he said: "Put her behind me." I was so much afraid of him and of the horse too that it was anything but a pleasant ride to me. We crossed the Cumberland River which was pretty full too.
Decatur Dryden's grandmother Dryden was a Berry. I think my grandfather's sister, but perhaps a cousin. [Decatur Dryden was a son of Sarah Berry/William Dryden. William Dryden was a son of Barbara Berry/David Dryden Jr. Adelaide is saying her grandfather, Francis Berry/Sarah Sharp was related to the grandmother of Decatur Dryden, Barbara Berry Dryden. Barbara Berry and the Francis Berry who married Sarah Sharp were cousins, not siblings.] Your grandmother Duncan's mother was Polly Price before she was married to that lame weaver, Luke Laughlin. [John Laughlin Jr]. She is the only one of your ancestors whose nationality I do not know. When your grandmother [Mary (Laughlin) Duncan] was a little girl, this Polly rode a fine young mare that was a great favorite in the family some miles to a neighbor's, and as she was coming home, a bull was roaming in the woods and took after her. She ran the mare and got home safe and she wanted to keep the mare put up until the bull left, but no, her husband would turn her out, saying the mare could keep out of the bull's way; but the next day they found the mare dead, gored to death by the bull. I tell this so his great grandsons may know to heed their wives.
With much love to all.
Mother

 

Analysis of the Timeline

 

          Barbara Berry’s birth date is estimated to be about 1739, based on the birth of her first child in 1764, and calculations based on a family history record from one of her sisters and a 1763 Augusta County lands transfer record. A late 19th family history record that ultimately can be sourced to Barbara Berry’s youngest sister, Esther (Berry) McCord, provides the birth date of Barbara’s father (Thomas Berry, Sr.), the identity of both of his wives and all of the children from both marriages, as well as their birth order. This record identified James Berry as Thomas Berry’s oldest child, followed, in order, by Barbara Berry and Thomas Berry. Although no birth dates were given, an analysis of a 1763 Augusta County, Virginia deed record can be used to accurately approximate the birth dates of the first three children. In this land transfer, Thomas Berry Sr. sold a recently purchased parcel of land to his oldest son James on 21 June 1763, and the conveyance was legally witnessed by James’ younger brother Thomas Berry. The importance of this record lies in the fact that, in order to legally serve as a witness in a sanctioned county government proceeding such as this, the younger Thomas Berry must have been at least 21 years of age. Consequently, since Thomas was at least 21, his brother James Berry had to have been several years older, and the date of the land sale can be used to calculate a close approximation of not only their birth dates, but also that of their sister, Barbara Berry, who was born between them. Basic biology requires an absolute minimum time of nine months between the births of James and Barbara, as well as between Barbara and Thomas, so, at a bare minimum, the least amount of time between the birth of James Berry and his younger brother Thomas, was 18 months. From a practical point of view, however, new pregnancies probably did not commence immediately after a birth. Some time, perhaps a few months, most likely separated the birth of a child and the onset of pregnancy for the next child. Assuming a minimum interval between pregnancies of three months, which might be an underestimate, the time between the birth of James and Thomas Berry can be extended from 18 months to a bit more reasonable time span of 24 months. Given this assumption, the younger Thomas Berry, in order to have been at least 21 years old in 1763, could have been born no later than 1742, his older brother James could have been born no later than 1740, and, within this logical construct, Barbara Berry must have been born in 1741. If the interval between pregnancies was more than three months, then the birth dates of each of these children could be pushed back in time another year to 1739, 1740 and 1741, respectively. The totality of the indirect evidence, thus, provides a logical framework for concluding that James Berry was probably born about 1739, his next youngest sibling, Barbara Berry, in 1740 and his next oldest first brother, Thomas Berry, in 1741.12,256
 

          The location of her birthplace is somewhat undefined, since the location of her parents is not known with certainty until 1748. It seems quite likely, however, that this Berry family, along with the rest of this Berry clan, was living in Pennsylvania, probably in one of the Scotch-Irish settlements near the Susquehanna River (Figure 29). These Berry families moved from their probable temporary home in Pennsylvania to the valley of Virginia sometime between 1742, when the Augusta County, Virginia militia lists were drawn up, and 1748, when the first known legal footprint of her father, Thomas Berry, was made in Augusta County, Virginia. All able bodied males were required to join the militia at this time, particularly in the frontier areas of Virginia, and the absence of any Berry family members on any of the 1742 militia lists (Table V) clearly indicates that none of the Berrys were yet living in Virginia at that time. By 1748, however, her father’s property was processioned for church tax purposes in Augusta County, which clearly means that he was already established on some Augusta County property by that date. Both dates, 1742 and 1748, fall within the estimated time range for Barbara Berry’s birth. That combined with the probable location of the Berrys in Pennsylvania suggests a high probability for her birthplace being Pennsylvania.1151,1152
 

     Barbara Berry, at least from the time that she was several years old, grew up on her parent’s Augusta County farm in the southern part of the Beverly Grant and northern part of the Borden Grant. Figure 10 shows the locations of the Augusta County Virginia properties owned by the various members of this Berry clan during the 1740s, 50s and 60s, the time period covering Barbara’s childhood. Thomas Berry’s properties, which are not contiguous, are clustered on the drainage divide between the upper reaches of the South Fork of the Shenandoah River and several tributaries of the North Fork of the James River, now known as the Maury River. (Figures 3 and 8, Tables I and II) At the time, the latter stream was called the North River. Which of Thomas Berry’s three properties contained the main residence of this Berry family, and Barbara’s childhood home, is not known with certainty. It is also known that her father was a member of one of the two local Presbyterian churches – either the New Providence or the Timber Ridge churches, so, obviously, Barbara had a Presbyterian upbringing.369,402

 

     Barbara Berry married David Dryden, Jr., a son of David Dryden Sr. and Dorothy ? (unknown last name). As with her birth date, Barbara’s marriage date of 1763 is also estimated from the birth date of her first child, with the interpretation being that she must have gotten married about a year before the first child came along. Two Dryden families, David and William, either brothers or father and son, lived along the North River in the central part of the Borden Grant about nine miles south of the Thomas Berry properties. In Figure 8 and Table II, the Dryden properties, numbers 98 and 99, straddle the North River in the Borden Grant. Since both Barbara and David lived in Augusta County, it seems quite obvious that they must also have been married in that county. David Dryden, father of Barbara’s husband of the same name, appeared on the 1742 militia list in Capt. John McDowell’s company (Table V), which clearly shows that, unlike the Berrys, the Drydens were already living in Virginia by that date. In addition, David Dryden Sr. was also a member of the same Presbyterian church as the Thomas Berry family, so there was ample opportunity for Barbara and David to meet and get to know each other.

 

     Barbara and David’s first child, David Dryden III, was born in mid August 1764 in Augusta County, Virginia, and their second child, Jonathan Dryden, was born in the early summer of 1770. The very noticeable six year gap between their first two children strongly suggests that additional children, who did not survive, may have been born in the interim time period. The next occurrence of interest in their lives was a land purchase. In the fall of 1765 David Dryden Jr. (Barbara’s husband) purchased a 144 acre tract along the mouth of Buffalo Creek at the north fork of the James River (the northern part of the area known as the forks of the James) from his older brother, James Dryden. It would seem quite logical to assume that Barbara and David moved there not long after the birth of their oldest child to initiate their own farming operations. In the meantime, legal moves were going on at the provincial level within the Virginia colony. Botetourt County was carved out from the southern half of Augusta County and Barbara and David’s farm on Buffalo Creek fell within the confines of the new county. When their second child was born in 1770, his birth place was, therefore, Botetourt County, Virginia rather than Augusta County like his older brother. Another interesting note here is that the dividing line between the two counties was close to the southern end of the Borden Grant boundary, which left all of Thomas Berry’s properties and the elder David Dryden’s property on the Maury River within the Augusta County. Because of this county change, any Botetourt County occurrence of a David Dryden represents David Dryden Jr., Barbara Berry’s husband, rather than David Dryden, Sr, who still lived within Augusta County. (Figures 15, 16 and Figure 110) Several of Barbara Berry cousins lived in this area (the forks of the James) at the time, as well. Two John Berrys, one a son of James Berry and the other a son of James’ brother William Berry, the latter two being first cousins of Barbara’s father Thomas Berry, had moved into the area by the mid 1760s with their own young families. Further supporting the interpretation that Barbara and David moved to their own home in the forks of the James are two pieces of evidence – a Botetourt County hemp certificate list and the 1771 Botetourt County tithable lists.21,56,196,241,242,543,557,568,750,836,838,841,843,853,861

 

     Hemp was grown by the American colonists to supply rope for the wooden sailing ships of the day, so, with a guaranteed market, it was a popular cash crop. For the 1770/1771 time period David Dryden’s name appears on a list issued by the Botetourt County court certifying that he had grown, harvested and sold a hemp crop that year. The document is further dated as being issued in the fall of 1771, so this data probably represents the 1771 growing season. When Botetourt County was formed in 1770 twelve tax districts were established by the county court to cover the rather small area of the county that was actually settled by American colonists. Those areas were defined geographically by the court and assigned to specific individuals to generate a list of people living within the district, and, ultimately, to collect the taxes on those individuals. The boundaries of the twelve tax districts and the assigned list owners are shown in Figure 111 Of the twelve 1770 districts, tithable records for only three survived to the 21st century, and none of those include the district in which David and Barbara lived. The first Botetourt County tithable list in which they appear was for 1771, the same year that David Dryden received his hemp certificate. In that year, for the most part, the same tax districts as those defined for 1771 were used, and, in several cases, different individuals were assigned to the lists (Figure 112). David Dryden appears in the 1771 Botetourt County tithables on James Trimble’s List. According to the Botetourt County Court Minutes from 11 June 1771, James Trimble’s tax district covered the same ground as that covered the previous year (1770) by William McKee, which was described as extending from the northern county border with Augusta County southward to Buffalo Creek and, from east to west, it encompassed the entire valley floor between the mountain ranges. The surveyor notes for David Dryden’s 144 acre tract notes that his property was located on the northern side of Buffalo Creek where it emptied into the north fork of the James River, definitively placing it within James Trimble’s 1771 tax district. (Figure 110)

 

     The 1770/1771 Botetourt County hemp certificate data, which has no inherent geographic reference other than the county designation, was cross referenced with the 1771 Botetourt County tithable data in order to establish more precise geographic control for the hemp data, the individuals living within tithable districts, as well as to come to a better understanding of agricultural practices of the time. The ground location and boundaries of the tithable districts can be mapped with reasonable accuracy based on their geographic descriptions and associated information included in Botetourt County court records. Since individuals who appeared on certain lists lived somewhere within the bounds of that tithable district and the ground location of those lists can be determined, the homestead locations of these individuals can thus be refined to a much more specific area within the county. The cross referencing process also permitted the development of a basic understanding of some dynamics of hemp production in Botetourt County during this time period as well as how Barbara Berry and David Dryden fit into this agricultural scenario. At its inception, Botetourt County covered a huge chunk of territory, including the entire southwestern quarter of the Virginia colony and all of the territory of the modern state of Kentucky. (See Figure 65) The location and extent of the tax districts highlights the fact that European settlement in the county, shown in Figures 111 and 112, was restricted to a rather narrow sliver of territory along the eastern edge of the county. It should also be noted that, while two thirds of the hemp certificate names could be directly correlated to names on the 1771 county tithable lists, one third of the hemp certificate names did not appear on any Botetourt County tithable list. There are a number of reasons for this. They could have moved into the area after the tithable lists were made, the individuals could have been living in the area at the time but were missed by the list owners, or the individuals could have been living in another county at the time, but owned land in Botetourt County that was leased and farmed by someone else where the crop was grown. Since the tithable data represents a head tax of people actually living within the tax districts and was not a property tax, absentee landowners would not appear on any Botetourt County tithable lists. Despite this obvious shortcoming, the conclusions are valid and accurate, since the correlatable data represents the overwhelming majority of settlers receiving hemp certificates.

 

     The hemp certificate data notes that David Dryden was credited for the production of 365 pounds of hemp in 1771. He most likely grew other crops too, but only the hemp was documented in these county records. In comparison to the other hemp producers in the county, David Dryden was something of a bit player. As shown in Table LIII, the average 1771 production for all of the listed hemp producers was 1700 pounds, so, with an output of a paltry 365 pounds, David Dryden ranked as one of the small scale operators, which certainly makes sense for a one man operation. His farming household consisted only of two adults and two young children with no evidence of slave ownership, so all of the farm work must have been accomplished by Barbara and David. Of particular importance is the fact that the hemp certificates when combined with the 1771 tithable lists clearly document the fact that David and Barbara Dryden were still living in the forks of the James River of Botetourt County in the early fall of 1771. Another element of the fusion of these two data sets is the insight it provides on the 1771 hemp production of Botetourt County. As shown in Figure 110, Barbara and David lived within the prime hemp production region of the county. Figure 113 also shows that hemp was not produced in either the extreme northwestern nor southwestern parts of the county, probably due, primarily to lack of easy access to the market areas in the more settled part of the region. In addition, production gradually tapered off southwestward along the primary line of movement for the majority of the settlers moving westward, the Great Wagon Road.

 

Table LIII

1771 Hemp Production in Botetourt County, Virginia

 

First Name Last Name Pounds   First Name Last Name Pounds   First Name Last Name Pounds
Samuel Wilson 108   Edward Gill 898   Peter Wallace 1716
John Thompson 127   James Davis 900   Thomas Kitpatrick 1736
William Bowen 200   John Murray 905   John Wiley 1762
William Graham 219   Samuel Moore 929   Thomas McAlister 1790
Michael Francisco 241   James Scott 937   Robert Erwin 1792
John Taylor 274   James McMahon 938   John Kilpatrick 1891
William McEllaney 295   James Dryden 963   Richard Woods 1896
John Bowyer 312   David Scott 972   Charles Kirkpatrick 1910
John Howard 338   John Madison 975   John Greenlee 1935
David Dryden 365   Frederick Francisco 977   Arthur McClure 1990
Charles Ellison 370   John Henderson 986   Benjamin Estill 1995
Samuel McClenachan 407   Samuel Wilson 998   William Lawrence 2000
John Armstrong 419   Solomon Whitley 1006   Benjamin Hawkins 2007
John Poage Junr 449   James Hale 1007   Jonathon Whitley 2029
William Greenlee 451   Hugh Crockett 1010   Patrick Campbell 2035
James Bainbridge 459   William Moore 1010   Joseph Walker 2056
Conrad Wall 475   Andrew Woods 1044   Patrick McCollum 2076
Henry Cartmill 479   John Madison 1055   Henry Larkin 2099
Joseph Cloyd 491   Patrick Denny 1078   Patrick Lowry 2121
Adam Wallace 505   Audley Paul 1095   John Thompson 2200
Thomas Arnett 508   Samuel McCorkle 1105   Thomas Wilson 2279
Adam Wallace 510   Robert Breckenridge 1118   John McClure 2280
James Snodgrass 522   William McBride 1121   Joseph Lapsley 2287
Christian Vineyard 522   Robert Kirkham 1137   John McClure 2311
William McClure 530   Andrew Woods 1164   John Mills 2319
James Simpson 540   William Maze Jr. 1186   John Buchanan Estate 2320
Thomas McFerran 552   John Hanley 1200   Arthur McClure 2329
Hugh Allen 554   Mathias Yocum 1200   Robert Moore 2340
Malcolm Allen 555   Robert Whitley 1268   William Christian 2514
William Lapsley 557   William Robinson 1274   Robert McEllany 2569
William McKee 557   Edward Kenny 1279   John Tillery 2609
Martin Kizer 562   David Robinson 1285   James Campbell 2613
Thomas Ratliff 575   George Givens 1297   Samuel McCorkle 2750
Thomas Tosh 575   Andrew Smiley 1304   John Moore 2792
James Hind 580   John Buchanan Estate 1306   John McClure 2807
Mathias Yoakum 586   John Willey 1335   George Salling 2935
William Beats 600   James Montgomery 1353   Robert Caldwell 3000
William Matthews 617   Thomas Reed 1358   Andrew Lewis 3097
George Campbell 619   William Robinson 1360   William Skillern 3138
Samuel Garwood 631   Peter Wallace 1400   Thomas Willson 3379
James Robinson 636   Andrew Calbreath 1402   David Hume 3448
David McGee 660   John Gilmore 1403   John Greenlee 3456
Mathias Yoakum 660   James Templeton 1420   Caleb Worley 3460
Francis Fulton 665   Joseph Walker 1452   Francis Smith 3462
Andrew Smithers 670   James Trimble 1490   James Montgomery 3490
Moses Cunningham 672   Richard Woods Junr. 1498   James Lawrence 3649
William Hall 675   Thomas Stockton 1513   James Campbell 3692
John Young 710   Benjamin Estill 1529   Thomas Paxton 3935
Samuel Lawrence 728   Henry McCurdy 1554   Philip Love 3940
William Ritchey 728   Rachel Bowen 1566   Nathaniel Evans 4500
Robert Breckenridge 751   Capt. David Robinson 1600   Caleb Worley 4613
John McClung 760   John Cowardin 1615   John Paxton 5108
William Logan 776   John Madison 1642   Benjamin Hawkins 5155
Samuel Walker 800   Arthur McClure 1680   James Gilmore 5915
David Wallace 818   John Poage 1700   Andrew Boyd 6050
Hugh Mars 867   Thomas Reed 1700   John Paxton 8895
William Kyle 878   Archibald McCurdy 1701   Francis Smith 11909
Joseph McDonald 890   George Salling 1714   Nathaniel Evans 14000
William McKee 897   James Gilmore 1715        

 

      The next major event in Barbara and David Dryden’s lives was their move from the forks of the James to the area in southwestern Virginia that would eventually become part of Washington County. The date of the move is not known with certainty, but from the available data it appears to have occurred as early as the fall of 1771. Washington County land survey notes documenting David Dryden’s Washington County property acquisition in the early 1780s indicate that he had fulfilled his settlement requirements in 1771, and in an 1800 Augusta County court deposition David Dryden noted that he had moved to the area in 1771, spending some time at the house of Thomas Berry. Presumably this Thomas Berry was his father in law, but it could also have been his sister’s brother. If he actually moved his family into the area that year, then it would have taken place after their crops had been harvested in the early fall, as indirectly documented by the hemp certification data which bears a date in early October of 1771. Although he should have been identified in one of the 1772 Botetourt County tithable lists, whether he was in southwestern Virginia or still back in the forks of the James, for some reason, David does not appear in any of them, so the 1772 tithable records are of no use in the determination of the timing of his move. It can be documented from several sources, however, that Barbara and David Dryden were already living in southwestern Virginia in the latter part of 1772. In early September of that year the Botetourt County sheriff took David Dryden into custody, and David Dryden’s name appears on the Cummings Petition, in which local Presbyterians settlers formally requested the presence of Rev. Cummings in early January of 1773, which very strongly suggests that he must have already been living in the area in the fall of 1772. The incident with the sheriff, although not particularly geographically or chronologically significant, is particularly intriguing and strange. The county sheriff filed a complaint against David, and was ordered by the court to take him into custody at least until a forty pound bond was paid. Apparently, David Dryden was participating in a rescue of some kind which interfered with the sheriff’s execution of the duties of his office. The nature of the rescue or the interference are not specified, but for someone’s actions to incur the wrath of the law in such a manner it seems to suggest that someone very close, perhaps a family member or very close friend, was involved. Beyond that general interpretation, the matter remains unclear and quite mysterious. David and Barbara’s presence in southwestern Virginia must have been detected by representatives of the Loyal Land Company either in late 1773 or early 1774. That land company still retained remnant claims to a huge chunk of southwestern Virginia by virtue of a 1749 patent from the Royal Governor of Virginia. Although their claims were ultimately extinguished, in 1774 they still exercised technical ownership of the area, so any squatters discovered living in the area by the company representatives were forced to have their lands surveyed and, ultimately, they were expected to purchase their property rights from the land company. David and Barbara were, at the very least, forced to pay for a survey of the land they were squatting on. While the data is not particularly voluminous or detailed, the convergence of the available evidence seems to point to late 1771 as Barbara and David Dryden’s migration date into southwestern Virginia. After making a long horse or oxen drawn journey in a wagon laden with all of their worldly possessions along the main route of the Great Wagon Road along the valleys between mountainous ridges of the Appalachian fold belt, they settled on 160 acres of what appeared to be unclaimed land along the north bank of the South Fork of the Holston River, not far from Barbara’s parents.

 

     In the late spring of the following year, 1772, David Dryden Sr., father of Barbara’s husband, who still lived back in Augusta County, must have reached the point where he realized that his days were numbered, because he wrote his last will and testament, identifying all of his children and his wife. David Dryden Jr., along with most of his brothers received only a $1, which suggests either that there was very little of value to hand down to his children or that they had already received their inheritance. It is of passing interest to note that one of the children, a daughter, received her inheritance in pounds rather than dollars for some reason. When the estate was finally settled in court several years later, David Dryden Jr. received a small monetary sum equivalent to less than a British pound.

 

     For the next few years in their log home at the mouth of 15 Mile Creek on the banks of the South Holston River, Barbara and David grew their family at a regular pace. Not long after the petition to Reverend Cummings had been sent in early 1773, Barbara Berry Dryden gave birth to their first daughter, Rebecca Dryden. By that time, though, Fincastle County had been carved out of a portion of Botetourt County, so Rebecca’s birth took place in Fincastle County, Virginia. Another daughter, Elizabeth Dryden, was born in Fincastle County sometime in 1774, and Mary Dryden, daughter number three, was born in the spring of 1775, also in Fincastle County. The year 1775 was also important to this Dryden/Berry family, since they received the title for the property that they had vacated back in the forks of the James in 1771. Just over two years later, in the summer of 1777, they sold the tract to David Steel of Augusta County. The sale was actually made in May of 1776 and merely finalized in 1777.

 

     By now, the Revolutionary War had been initiated, and people were finding it increasingly difficult to handle their state affairs with the capitol being so far away. Consequently, David Dryden, along with many of his neighbors, signed a petition to the Virginia convention in the spring of 1776, asking them to further subdivide the county. In that year, the newly independent Virginia legislature completely dissolved Fincastle County, replacing it with three new counties, one of them being Washington County, named after the heroic but as yet win-less commander of American military forces. (Figure 65) Beginning in the fall of 1777 David Dryden began appearing in Washington County court records. From 1777 through 1784 he served on several juries, including a grand jury, was bonded in an estate administration and in an orphan case, participated in an estate appraisal, and was involved in several lawsuits. In addition, he was compensated, monetarily, for appearing in court, probably as a witness in a trial. The Revolutionary War had been going on for several years, and in the fall of 1780 the pivotal Battle of Kings Mountain was fought. Many of the Washington County militia men participated, and Nathaniel Dryden, one of David’s brothers, was killed in the engagement. David served as the administrator of his brother’s estate, and in the estate sale for his deceased brother’s property, David, along with a number of other Dryden family members, purchased many of Nathaniel’s household items, which was not an uncommon occurrence in this pioneer society. Several of the lawsuits he was involved with dealt with the disposition of his deceased brother’s estate, and in 1789 he became the legal guardian for his brother’s daughter. About a year after the King’s Mountain battle was fought, another son, Nathaniel Dryden, was born to David and Barbara, and was most likely named for David’s brother, Nathaniel.

 

     When the Revolutionary War began in 1776, the royal provincial land office of Virginia ceased to exist, and it wasn’t until 1779 that a new American version was created. One of the first orders of business was to develop a policy for dealing with the rights of squatters versus the need of the state to issue military service land grants on state-owned land. A process was established to legitimize many of the land claims made by the early settlers, and David’s original 160 acre settlement, no doubt assisted by the Loyal Land Company survey documentation, allowed him to qualify for 400 acres of land at a state-defined purchase price. Probably due to the long-time presence of other settlers in the immediate area, only 330 contiguous acres were open (which included the original 160 acre tract), so that amount was surveyed in the summer of 1781, ten years after Barbara and David had originally settled on the ground. It was on this Washington County property that David and Barbara Dryden lived for the rest of their lives.

 

     Another outgrowth of the development and expansion of American legal authority in Virginia after the successful conclusion of the war was the establishment of taxation authority. Rather than assessing tithables, which was, essentially, a head tax on any male of at least 21 years of age who was living in a particular area, regardless of whether they owned land or not, a new taxation system was established based on property ownership within a specified area. Taxable property included horses, cattle and slaves, and, presumably, land. Oddly enough, however, no references to land ownership appear in any of David Dryden’s tax records even though he definitely owned land in the area during the entire period. Taxes applied only to white males, women only if they were widows and free blacks. While the tithable system was eliminated, some of the terminology remained, so a taxable male was still referred to as a tithable male, and males in the 16 to 21 year age bracket who lived in the household were also listed as tithables. In 1782 David Dryden was listed in the first Personal Property Tax assessed by the newly minted United States of America in the Commonwealth of Virginia. At the age of 46 he was still listed as a taxable male, with two items of taxable property – horses and cattle. The commissioner listed in the tax entries shown in Table LIV refer to the person responsible for identifying taxable people and property within prescribed areas. David Dryden appeared consistently in the same district year after year although the tax commissioner changed every now and then. From 1782 through 1817, just prior to his death, David Dryden was consistently included in the Washington County tax rolls. For a few years several of his sons were of the right age to appear in the 16 to 21 year old bracket. What conspicuously stands out is what is not listed in these records. Apparently, the Drydens were not slave owners. Other than David’s appearance in the records, the most consistent feature is the record of his horse ownership. For years he seems to have owned a herd of horses ranging from 6 to 10 horses, but in 1807 the number noticeably was reduced to two and remained mostly at that level until David’s death. It’s not too surprising though, because, by that year he was 71 years old and probably slowing down quite a bit. From the family structure, as defined in the results of the 1810 census, it can be seen that Barbara was still alive one of their sons, possibly Nathaniel, was still living in the household.
 

 

Table LIV

David Dryden in Washington County Tax Records 1782 - 1817

 

Year White Tithables White Tithables 16 - 21 Horses Cattle Commissioner Tax Paid
1782 1   12 18 James Montgomery  
1784 1   11 14 Alexander Montgomery  
1786 1   10 14 Alexander Montgomery  
1787 1   1 9 17 John Lathim  
4 Apr 1788 1 1 10   John Lathim  
05 Jun 1789 1 1 10   Walter Preston  
21 Aug 1790 1   1 7   Walter Preston  
01 Sept 1791 1 1 20  6 Walter Preston  
1792 1 21 10 Walter Preston  
19 Sept 1793   9   Walter Preston  
02 Apr 1795 1 1 15  6    
1797 1 16 2    
1799 1   6     $0.12
1800 2   7   Matthew Willoughby $0.24
1801   7   Matthew Willoughby $3.84
1802 2   5   Matthew Willoughby  
21 Mar 1804   4   Frederich Hamilton  
13 June 1805   6   Frederich Hamilton  
1806 2     6   Matthew Willoughby  
1807   2   Matthew Willoughby  
1809 1   2   Matthew Willoughby  
1810   2   Matthew Willoughby  
1811   2   Matthew Willoughby  
1812 1   3   Matthew Willoughby  
1813   3   Matthew Willoughby  
1814 1   5 Matthew Willoughby  
1815   2   Matthew Willoughby  
1816   2   Matthew Willoughby  
1817   2      

 

     Another son, William Dryden, was born in the fall of 1784, and two years later, Thomas Dryden was born, both in Washington County. Barbara’s father, Thomas Berry, wrote his will in late 1798 and passed away about eight months later in Washington County. He had identified Barbara as his daughter in the will and named her husband, David Dryden, as one of the executors of his estate. Two data entries from 1808 and 1811, a will from a man in Augusta County and a letter from David Dryden to his sister, reveal some complicated and intricate family stories that require some exploration. In the early summer of 1808 William Johnston of Augusta County wrote his will in which he identified some family members and how he intended to have is property divided up after his death. Several Drydens were mentioned by name, while others have been identified through research as also being Drydens. For example he assigned cash awards to two of his half sisters – Jane (Dryden) Shields (who married Patrick Shields) and Elizabeth (Dryden) McNabb (who had married William McNabb), as well as to the children of William Dryden, and gave a significant amount of his estate to David Dryden, specifically mentioning that David lived on the South Fork of the Holston River. Another woman is mentioned, Katherine Kerns, who doesn’t fit into the Dryden family structure. From the 1811 letter from David Dryden to the same Jane Shields it was determined that David and Jane were siblings. If David Dryden and Jane Shields were brother and sister, then both must be half siblings of William Johnston. Apparently, David Dryden Sr was married to a widow who had at least one child from a previous marriage, possibly two. The one known with certainty is William Johnston. In his will William Johnston appears to be providing monetary and property to his half siblings and possibly to a full sister.

 

     Another element that can be discerned from this data is that David Dryden’s wife, Barbara Berry Dryden, must still have been alive in 1811 since he referred several times to her indirectly, using the personal pronouns “we” and “our” rather than just referring to himself. David Dryden wrote his will in the late winter of 1818, and it was proved in court in mid May of the same year, so he passed away sometime during the intervening two and a half months. In his will there is no mention of Barbara, which must mean that she has already passed away. The date of her death, as a result, can only be bracketed as occurring sometime between mid May of 1811, when David’s letter to his sister was written, and early March 1818 when he wrote his will.

 

     After his death, David Dryden’s estate was appraised. Table LV shows the results of that appraisal with the items and their associated values organized into three categories: Household Items, Tools and Livestock. The first thing that comes to mind when evaluating this data is the rather small amount of personal property in his estate and its relatively low value. David and Barbara Dryden do not appear to have been people of abundant means by any stretch of the imagination. Another noticeable element is the absence of any slaves in the household, which probably has much to do with the value being so low. The items, themselves flesh out some more details of their lives. It should be noted that the actual monetary value for the total estate value expressed in Table LV is just under a dollar short of the actual total amount expressed in the appraisal record due to uncertainty in calculating the partial cent values. The difference is less than one percent, and so was considered to be negligible in the analysis. The most valuable category in the estate was the livestock, which constituted 51% of the value of the estate, and comprised 11 sheep, 3 horses, three cows and two calves. When it is considered that David Dryden was in his early eighties when he passed away, this was probably all he could handle. His tax records for the preceding years consistently revealed the presence of only two or three horses, so the appraisal is consistent with the documented trend of his horse ownership. Although no cattle were recorded in the previous several years of taxes, he owned five cows in 1814 and close to that number when he passed away a few years later. The sheep were never mentioned in any tax or court records. Entries classified as Household Items constituted 45% of the estate total value, consisting of bedroom furniture with blankets and sheets, a bureau, presumably for clothing items, tables and chairs, simple food preparation and cooking items, eating utensils, a washing tub (probably for laundry) and a butter churn, which means the cows he owned were most likely milk cows rather than cattle for slaughter. There are also nine books, which were quite possibly reference books with tips for survival when living a pioneer life. More importantly, though, the books strongly suggest that David Dryden was able to read and write. Finally, there was a rifle and a pouch, so, at least at one time, he hunted for food and possibly used the rifle for defense in the earlier years. The last category, Tools, comprised only four percent of his estate value, but are quite illuminating. Some of the items, for example, the joiner, the plane, the auger and a foot adze (a tool for smoothing or carving rough cut wood) clearly indicate that David Dryden did a lot of wood working, possibly making the table and chairs and other items in his house. The tongs, shovel, hoe and the grindstone attest to his farming life and, at least with the grindstone, the need to keep his tools sharp. The iron dogs are iron bars used to hold wood up in an open fire so the air can circulate, which definitively demonstrate that David Dryden was living in the era of wood burning fires for heat and cooking.

 

     After his death, David Dryden’s estate was appraised. Table LV shows the results of that appraisal with the items and their associated values organized into three categories: Household Items, Tools and Livestock. The first thing that comes to mind when evaluating this data is the rather small amount of personal property in his estate and its relatively low value. David and Barbara Dryden do not appear to have been people of abundant means by any stretch of the imagination. Another noticeable element is the absence of any slaves in the household, which probably has much to do with the value being so low. The items, themselves flesh out some more details of their lives. It should be noted that the actual monetary value for the total estate value expressed in Table LV is just under a dollar short of the actual total amount expressed in the appraisal record due to uncertainty in calculating the partial cent values. The difference is less than one percent, and so was considered to be negligible in the analysis. The most valuable category in the estate was the livestock, which constituted 51% of the value of the estate, and comprised 11 sheep, 3 horses, three cows and two calves. When it is considered that David Dryden was in his early eighties when he passed away, this was probably all he could handle. His tax records for the preceding years consistently revealed the presence of only two or three horses, so the appraisal is consistent with the documented trend of his horse ownership. Although no cattle were recorded in the previous several years of taxes, he owned five cows in 1814 and close to that number when he passed away a few years later. The sheep were never mentioned in any tax or court records. Entries classified as Household Items constituted 45% of the estate total value, consisting of bedroom furniture with blankets and sheets, a bureau, presumably for clothing items, tables and chairs, simple food preparation and cooking items, eating utensils, a washing tub (probably for laundry) and a butter churn, which means the cows he owned were most likely milk cows rather than cattle for slaughter. There are also nine books, which were quite possibly reference books with tips for survival when living a pioneer life. More importantly, though, the books strongly suggest that David Dryden was able to read and write. Finally, there was a rifle and a pouch, so, at least at one time, he hunted for food and possibly used the rifle for defense in the earlier years. The last category, Tools, comprised only four percent of his estate value, but are quite illuminating. Some of the items, for example, the joiner, the plane, the auger and a foot adze (a tool for smoothing or carving rough cut wood) clearly indicate that David Dryden did a lot of wood working, possibly making the table and chairs and other items in his house. The tongs, shovel, hoe and the grindstone attest to his farming life and, at least with the grindstone, the need to keep his tools sharp. The iron dogs are iron bars used to hold wood up in an open fire so the air can circulate, which definitively demonstrate that David Dryden was living in the era of wood burning fires for heat and cooking.

 

     When considered as a whole, the items that were enumerated and appraised in David Dryden’s personal estate attest to the fact that he and his wife Barbara Berry Dryden led what we would consider to be the hard lives of pioneers. They were quite clearly rugged individuals that met the basic needs of their lives by making their own furniture and growing, raising and preparing their own food without the modern conveniences of the modern era that we take for granted like air conditioning and central heating.

 


Table LV

David Dryden's Estate Appraisal

 

Household Items $134.42   Tools $12.55
4 Blankets & 1 Sheet $11.00   1 Ditto & Jointer $0.75
1 Bedsted Bed & Furniture $10.00   1 Bolt $0.37
1 Bedsted Bed & Furniture $20.00   1 Grubbing Hoe $0.75
1 Bedsted & Cord $2.00   1 Grind Stone $0.50
Cloth $9.75   1 Pr Dog Irons $2.00
1 Table 1 Tumbler & Bottle $1.37   1 Pr Shovel & Tongs $1.18
1 Table $1.75   2 D. D. & 1 pr Hooks $3.00
6 Chairs $2.00   4 Planes $3.00
coffee pot $0.36   1 Saw 1 Auger & Foot addz $1.00
2 Plates & 2 Crocks $0.66      
l Clock $15.00      
1 Cupboard & furniture $5.00      
1 Cupboard $11.00      
1 Bureau $11.42      
1 Kettle $3.00      
2 Ovens 1 Skillet & 1 pr Hooks $2.00      
1 Iron Pott $4.00   Livestock $151.66
1 Churn $0.50   11 Sheep $14.66
1 Washing Tub $0.75   (missing) Cow & Calf  $15.00
1 Saddle $0.36   1 Ditto & Ditto $9.00
1 Book $0.50   1 Sorrel Cott (colt) $35.00
8 Books $5.00   1 Gray Cott (colt) $21.00
1 Saddle $7.00   1 Sorrel Mart (mare) $45.00
1 Rifle & Pouch $10.00   1 Cow $12.00

 

     In 1893 Adelaide Berry Duncan, a granddaughter of Francis Berry and Sarah (Sharp) Berry, wrote two letters to her son George, which relate a great deal of family history, most likely relayed to her by her mother and other family members. In the letters she reviewed the lives of both her paternal and maternal grandparents, and included varying degrees of detail on a number of other relatives. Much of the content of the letters deals with the life story of her Berry grandparents, Francis and Sarah Sharp Berry, but there is one reference to Barbara (Berry) Dryden. Adelaide wasn’t quite sure of the relationship between Francis and Barbara Berry and guessed that they were either siblings or cousins. As we now know, the latter guess was correct.
 

 Decatur Dryden's grandmother Dryden was a Berry [Barbara (Berry) Dryden]. I think my grandfather's sister, but perhaps a cousin

 

 

In-Laws of Barbara Berry

Timeline of David Dryden, Sr. and Dorothy ? (Unknown Last Name)

 

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