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Bath, Bathe, de Bathe

Coats of Arms

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The Arms of:

*Walter De Bathe /Baa/ Bathon/Bathond: High Sheriff of Devon 1217 – 1219.

We are informed that Risdon, Izacke and all other sources are incorrect in stating that Walter de Bathon was sheriff of Devon at this time!  Please see Sheriffs of Devon page.

Arms: Azure, a Saltire Engrailed Or.

          *The authority according to John Prince in his "Worthies of Devon", is Issac ; This is Richard Izacke author of "Remarkable Antiquities of the City of Exeter", Pub. 1677, in the "List of Sheriffs of Devon" contained in the same work.

*Sir Walter de Bathe / Baa / Bathonia: Lord of Colebrooke, Devonshire.

** Also amongst the quarterings of Holland, Duke of Exeter.  

Arms: Ermine, a bend gules.

        *According to "Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica", 1868, vol. 1, pg. 285. Entry submitted by Charles Bath of Ffynone. Tristram Risdon in his "General Armory" from his "Survey of the County of Devon" gives simply "Baa, of-------- .** From the "Visitations of Devon", 1620.

 

* Augustine de Baa / Bathe / Bathonia : His seal.

* Sir Andrew de Metstead (Medstede) : Augustine’s son-in-law.

Arms: Quarterly or and gules, four escallops

counterchanged.     

      *According to Joseph Holland’s "Collection of Arms", 1579, "The Visitation of the County of Devon 1564", Colby, under the quarterings for Andrew Holland of Weare, Devon.

* Baa

Arms: Sable, three bendlets argent.

       *These arms are found among the quarterings for Andrew Holland, the 1588 holder of Weare, Devon in the "Visitation of the County of Devon of 1564" pg. 132, compiled by Frederic Thomas Colby, D.D.. Andrew Holland’s ancestral grandmother was Eleanor Metstead, daughter & heir of Andrew de Metstead (above) and granddaughter of Augustine de Baa, whose arms these are claimed to be.

*Sir Walter de Bathonia / Bathe / Baa / Ba: A Lord of Roxton , Bedfordshire, 1316.

**Thomas Baa / Bathon / Bathe Lord of Shepwash manor and land, Devonshire, 1316.

Arms: Gules, a chevron argent between three roundels (plates).

       *From the Parlimentary Rolls , Circa. 1312 , "Anglo-Norman Armory Two", Cecil Humphrey-Smith, pg. 253, Edward Henry Bath MS. gives Issac’s (Izacke’s) Catalogue , as above. "The Knights of Edward I", Rev’d C. Moor, pg. 59,  College of Arms MS, Circa 1520 (HDB)        **From Tristram Risdon’s "General Armory" in his "Survey of the County of Devon".

*Sir Walter de Bathonia / Bathe / Baa / Ba: of Bedfordshire (as above)

Arms: Gules, a chevron between three mullets argent.

also

Arms: Gules, a chevron between three pierced mullets argent.

Which is also given for

**Robert Baa : of Huntingdonshire, 1391

        *From the Parlimentary Rolls , Circa. 1312 , College of Arms MS, Circa 1520 (HDB): according to "The Dictionary of British Arms, Medieval Ordinary" Vol II, Chesshyre and Woodcock. ** "British Museum Shields", W. Birch, London 1887.: according to "The Dictionary of British Arms" (as above). * "The Bradfer-Lawrence Roll": 1445 - 1446.: according to "The Dictionary of British Arms" (as above).

 

* Sir Osbert de Bathonia / Bathon / Bathe: Lord of Loxton & Spekford, Somerset, 1296.

Arms: Gules, a chevron between three annulets argent.

        *According to "A Survey of the County of Devon" in his "Knights of Somerset", Tristram Risdon, "The Knights of Edward I", Rev’d C. Moor.

 

* Baa or Baker

Arms: Gules a chevron ermine between three roundels argent.

        * According to Tristram Risdon in his "Survey of the County of Devon 1608 – 1628" under "General Armory", Risdon also gives "__________ a chevron ________ between three annulets______" for the same names.

 

** Walter de Bathon / Bada: Sheriff of Devon April 25 1236 to Easter 1251.

Arms: Azure, three chevrons argent.

        *The authority according to John Prince is the "Cat. Sher."; possibly the Sherbourne Missal Shields, Circa. 1400.** According to Richard Izacke in his "Remarkable Antiquities of the City of Exeter", also the "Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries", Vol xiii, in the list of sheriffs; pgs 46-48. Note: Henry Summerson in his "Crown Pleas of Devon Eyre, 1238" states that this man later became Lord of Colebrooke and much else besides. (see above; Ermine, a bend gules)

*Sir Henry de Bathe / Bathonia?

 

Arms:  a chevron between three wolves rampant?            

        *From the monument base in Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, currently ascribed to Sir George Nowers., previously ascribed to Sir Henry de Bathe (see Tomb)

 

 

*Bath / Bathe: Origin undetermined.

 

Arms: Or, a chevron engrailed sable between three

wolves’ heads erased of the last.             

        *Listed in "Burke’s General Armory" as belonging to the Bath family, but date and holder unknown. Edward Henry Bath MS. gives these as the arms of Henry Bath of Longlands, prior to 1868 and of a period before 1799.

 

 

*Bathonia, de: of Radwell Manor (now Rodwell Farm) in South Petherton, Somerset.

 

Arms: Or, a chevron engrailed between three

Lions' heads erased sable.

        *From "The Particular Description of Somerset", Thomas Gerard of Trent, 1633, Somerset Record Society Vol. 15, 1900:  according to the "Dictionary of British Arms, Medieval Ordinary", Vol. II, Chesshyre and Woodcock."The Victoria County History of Somerset", Vol. 4, page 181 gives as holding Radwell: Reynold de Bathe (d. 1254) his minor son also Reynold and by 1283 Osbert de Bathe (see above Lord of Loxton & Spekeford).Radwell passed to the Weyland family through Osbert's daughter Elizabeth.

*Thomas de Baa: of Ickham , Kent. Knight of the Shire Circa. 1334 - 35 .

 

Arms: Or, a lion sable crowned argent.

        *From the "Dictionary of British Arms, Medieval Ordinary", Vol. I, Chesshyre and Woodcock. Their source being "Anstis Aspilogia I"  "Archaeologia Cantiana" Vol. 14 -1882 page 119 ICKHAM CHURCH, ITS MONUMENTS AND ITS RECORDS By the Rev Scott Robinson gives a lion rampant. In 1305, Walter de Ba, one of the same family, was admitted to the privileges of a layman "in fraternity" with the monks of Christ Church, Canterbury (Harleian MS. 2044, fol. 62a).

 

*John Bathe, or Matilda (his wife): of Wallington, Surrey, 1390 .

 

Arms: A lion Rampant.

*From the "Dictionary of British Arms, Medieval Ordinary", Vol. II, Chesshyre and Woodcock.

 

*Eleanor de Bathe: Circa. 1349 - 50 .

 

Arms: Ermine and bend.

 (see above for Walter, Lord of Colebrooke.)

 

 

 

 

 

Arms: bend and label of five.

 

 

 

 

Arms: Two bars, label of five.

 

 

 

 

 

Arms: Lion guardant and bend.

 

 

 

 

 

Arms: Bend between three lions.

(These are the arms of the HOLLAND family whose members were Dukes of Exeter.)

 

 

 

 

        *From the "Dictionary of British Arms, Medieval Ordinary", Vol. I, Chesshyre and Woodcock. Their source being "Anstis Aspilogia I" being the records of John Anstis ( 1669 - 1744 ), Garter King of Arms ( 1719 - 1744). There is a suggestion that this lady had other arms in addition to the ones above.

*Nicoll D’Bape (de Bathe) / Bassett. Latter part of the 13th C.

 

Arms: Barry undée (undy) of six argent and gules, a label or.

       These arms are included as the source’s editors have him indexed as both a Bathe and a

Bassett. The editors note that Bassett has been substituted for Bape, which has been cancelled.

This is illustrative of the fact that the name de Bathe can be found in many medieval

records and documents given as a "moniker" for persons without an established surname,         

but who were residents in or from the district of Bath(e), Somerset. Also, some academics and   

professionals, who were trained at the various ecclesiastic institutions of Bath, used "of Bathe"

as a means of advertising their credentials. Some of the individuals included in the Medieval     

Connections page may fall into this category.                                                                                       

         Whether or not these men passed on the surname "de Bathe" to their offspring is a crucial  

question when considering the origins of the surname of the current Bath, Bathe and de Bathe  

families.                                                                                                                                                       

* According to "Three Rolls of Arms", Weston Walford, 1864, item 448 ; from the St. George’s Roll.

 

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