Hall, Broyles, McChesney, Sandlin


James Hervey McChesney [Parents] 1, 2 was born 3 on Sep 27 1814 in Caldwell Co., Tn.. He died 4 on Dec 28 1885 in Ky. He was buried in Dollar Cemetery, Caldwell Co., Ky. He married 5, 6 Eleanor Jane Millikan on Sep 27 1849 in Kentucky.

James McChesney, was a native of Caldwell County, Kentucky and lived on a farm near Fredonia.

Eleanor Jane Millikan [Parents] 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Feb 20 1826 in Jefferson Co, Tennessee. She died on Nov 30 1915 in Farmersville, Caldwell Co., Ky. She was buried in Dollar Cemetery, Caldwell Co., Ky. She married 5, 6 James Hervey McChesney on Sep 27 1849 in Kentucky.

The dates and names of the children are from SwanLake8@aol.com. Was a school teacher in Willspoint, TX.

They had the following children:

  M i Jefferson Worth McChesney
  F ii Virginia Caldwell McChesney
  M iii Robert Hise McChesney
  M iv Vernon Twiggs McChesney
  M v Persifer Bennett McChesney 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Aug 22 1855. He died 5, 6 on Feb 18 1866. He was buried in Dollar Cemetery, Caldwell Co., Ky.
  M vi Montgomery Douglas McChesney 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Dec 14 1856. He died 5, 6 on Aug 15 1857. He was buried in Dollar Cemetery, Caldwell Co., Ky.
  F vii Sarah Eleanor McChesney
  M viii Andrew Sevier McChesney
  F ix Lady May Davis McChesney
  F x Rebel Dixie McChesney
  M xi Kirby Smith McChesney 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Dec 25 1864.

School teacher in Willspoint , TX.

Kirby McChesney, moved to Willspoint, Texas in October 1887 and taught in the public schools as she had done in Kentucky.
  F xii Nancy Emeline McChesney 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Oct 12 1867 in Jefferson Co., Tn..

Nancy McChesney, was a teacher in the public schools of Kentucky until October 1887, when she joined her sister in Texas; and taught there until her health failed. After a year in Los Angeles, California, she returned to Texas and became publisher of the Plano Courier. She was editing the Commerce Journal in Commerce, Texas at the writing of G.T. Ridlon's book, published 1907.

School teacher in KY.
  F xiii Dollie Grace McChesney 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Apr 4 1871 in Jefferson Co., Tn.. She died 5 on Jun 17 1899 in Texas.

Dollie McChesney, moved to Texas with her sisters and engaged in teaching and millinery business.

William Millikan , Sr. [Parents] 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Apr 6 1720 in Dromore, County Down, Ireland. He died 5, 6 in Dec 1793 in Randolph Co, Nc. He was buried 7 in South of Greensboro, Randolph Co., Nc. (Centre Quaker Cemetery). He married Jane White in 1740 in Chester Co, Pa..

Other marriages:
Rowan, Hannah
Rowan, Jane

From the book "Jefferson Co., TN Family & History 1792-1996:

The great majority of Milligans/Millikans in Jefferson and the surrounding counties descend from William Millikan Sr., a zealous Quaker who was born in Northern Ireland about 1720. Ireland was being ravaged by a great famine in 1740. The year before, in 1739, William Millikan appears in Chester County, Pennsylvania. By 1741, he had married Hannah Rowan and started a family. In 1758 they migrated south to Rowan County, North Carolina.

Hannah had died sometime after 1768. In 1772, William Millikan was residing in Guilford County with his new wife, Jane White. The children of William Millikan by his first wife were: Samuel, William Jr, who moved to Jefferson County, Tennessee, Alexander, Benjamin, Sarah, Mary and Hannah. Being a Quaker, William Millikan was a non-combatant during the American Revolution, but his sympathies were pro-patriot which placed him on a death list. In 1782, William Millikan was living on Back Creek in Randolph County, near the Guilford county line. On March 10, a band of Tories came to his farm.

Finding William absent, they burned his house to the ground. Still, William Millikan was never caught. He served Randolph County, North Carolina as a Justice, Register of Deeds, and Clerk of Courts during the Revolution. William Millikan died in 1804. In the 1920's, Mrs. J. S. Welborn, a D.A.R. Regent, found William Millikan's grave and original tombstone at Centre Quaker Cemetery south of Greensboro. She reported that his tombstone disappeared several years later.

From the book "Saco Valley Settlements & Families" by Rev. G. T. Ridlon published 1895/ Page 1069:

Millikans of Randolph County, N.C.

This was a Quaker family early settled in Pennsylvania, and the ancestors of the North Carolina branch were among the earliest patentees of land grants in Randolph county, as the records show; their settlement there was long before the Revolution. Their homesteads are among the oldest in the state. Few members of this family have attained prominence in the state, being of the retiring disposition characteristic of the Quaker faith. They were patriots during the Revolutionary War, but non-combatant. William Millikan, who was the first clerk of the court after the organization of Randolph county, was the man whose house was burned by the Tories under Col. David Fanning in 1778.

Although the Millikan connection has been numerous in the county, there is not a case in all the records there entitled State vs. Millikan. Benjamin Millikan was a bold and fearless leader of the anti-slavery movement in his state, and many were the acts of heroism in defense of the principles he advocated. The whole race to a man were loyal to the Federal cause during the Rebellion, and not one fought under the Confederate flag, while a number escaped and enlisted in the Union army.

Quite a number have held places of honor and trust, being elected to offices either as Whigs or Republicans, and in 1894 T. C. Millikan was the Republican nominee for Congress in his district against a heavy Populist element. Benjamin Millikan, of Asheboro, N.C., is ex-sheriff, and his son, J. M. Millikan, clerk of the Superior court of Randolph county. A brother of the latter, H. F. Millikan, of Santa Fe, KS. is register of deeds for Haskell county. The family hold the tradition of a Scottish ancestry.

From geneology research by Sandy Taylor: "After his settlement in Rowan Co., NC, William Millikan was called to fill positions of trust commensurate with his abilities. We know he was justly held in high esteem for his estimable character. Through his friend, James Marshall of Chester Co., PA, he had purchased instruments and expected to have renumerative employment under Earl Granville who claimed to own one-eighth of the Province, as surveyor. At the organization of Randolph Co, which was composed of parts of Rowan and Guilford Counties, March 8, 1779, William Millikan was chosen as one of the Just---? Courts and at the same time was elected Register of Deeds. He also served as Clerk of Courts for his county. The tradition in the family calls him "a lawyer" and has some foundation in the fact of his doing considerable business as acting agent or attorney.

The land upon which William Millikan lived as a "Squatter" for many years was part of the territory claimed by Earl Granville, but his right was disputed, a controversy respecting the validity of his title arose, there was a resort to arms, the war of the Revolution ensued, the case was determined and all issues turned in favor of the Colonists; then all lands remaining unsold became a part of the public domain and was subject to entry. After the Revolution, Nov 2, 1784, William Millikan secured a land grant comprising four hundred acres on Back Creek. This became his farm. Two years previously his house was burned by ___? and the following abstract from a character sketch of Col. David Fanning written by Rev. E. W. Caruthers, will be of interest to the Millikan family.

On Sunday, March 10, 1782, Fanning went to the house of William Millikan Esq., who lived on Back Creek, about two miles from Johnsonville, on the old cross road. As Millikan was away (it is said he was driving his cows home and discovered Fanning in time to hide) from home they burned his buildings and destroyed everything they could. While the house was on fire, Mrs. Jane Millikan carried out a favorite feather bed, but they carried it back and threw it on the fire. When the bed began to burn, they twisted a stick into the feathers and scattered them over the house. When the blazing feathers, as they flew in every direction through the room, caught in a bundle of yarn which was hanging on the wall, they taunted Mrs. Millikan and said: "Look at your yarn old woman". When leaving Millikan's, they compelled his son, Benjamin to go along and pilot them to the house of Col. John Collier. Young Millikan was used to tell the sentinel at Collier's that they were friends.

There is a tradition that Col. Fanning took Benjamin Millikan and another young man out to hang them, and that while they were stringing the other up to the branch of a tree, Benjamin managed to escape. During the Revolution William Millikan was living on the west side of the "Plank Road", south of New Market, but after the burning of his house, he took up his abode with his son Samuel. He was a zealous Quaker, an advocate of liberty, and took an active part in civil affairs of the county. He enjoyed in an eminent degree the esteem and confidence of the public. William Millikan m: Jane White who was probably a daughter of Alexander White of Chester Co., PA.

Transcribed from Randolph County, NC. court records:
Randolph County, NC - Court - William Millikan Estate Sale - 1793
December Term 1793
Samuel Millikan, Administrator of the Estate of William Millikan, deceased. Returns the inventory found with the account of sales of said estate:
Amount of the sales of personal estate 39.10.7 (pounds)
Account of sundry notes of hand 60......5
Cash on hand 106.11.8
Book debts 14.00.0
--------------------------
220..7.3
5 notes on James Robbins for indian corn amounting in the whole to two hundred bushels.

Jane White [Parents] was born 1 in 1724 in Chester Co, Pa.. She died on Jul 7 1759 in Chester Co, Pa.. She married William Millikan , Sr. in 1740 in Chester Co, Pa..

They had the following children:

  F i Abigail Millikan 1 was born 2 in 1741 in Chester Co, Pa.. She was christened in New Garden, Mm, Nc. She died 3 on Feb 6 1806 in Randolph Co, Nc. She was buried 4 in Randolph Co, Nc.
  M ii Samuel Millikan 1, 2, 3 was born 4, 5, 6 on Dec 11 1742 in Chester Co, Pa.. He was christened in New Garden, Mm, Nc. He died 7 on Nov 3 1817 in Springfield, Guilford Co, Nc. He was buried 8 in Randolph Co, Nc.

From "The Posterity of William Millikan" by G. T. Ridlon: Samuel Millikan, eldest son of William was born in Chester Co., PA., Dec 11, 1742, was carried by his parents "when a small boy" to Rowan, now Randolph Co., NC. He was married according to the Quaker forms, 6th mo. 10, 1767, to Ann Baldwin, daughter of William and Elizabeth Baldwin; so say the records of the New Garden (NC) montly meeting.

From a certificate given by the monthly meeting held at New Garden, Rowan Co., Province of North Carolina, 29th day of 9th month, 1764, we learn that this Samuel Millikan returned to Pennsylvania that year and was "clear of any marriage engagement." He received a certificate from the monthly meeting at Bradford, Chester Co., PA, 12th day of the 4th month 1765, addressed to "Friends of New Garden monthly meeting, North Carolina,' and at that time returned to his southern home. This also stated that so far as known "after needful inquiry made" he was free from any "marriage Ingaigements." In a letter by his father dated New Marlborough, North Carolina, June 10, 1765, and addressed Humphrey Marshall of Bradford, Pennsylvania, he says, "My son came home the 22d of May. He desires to be remembered to you as also to your father and mother. I am highly pleased with your kind and friendly reception of the boy whilst among you all, and shall be glad to have it in my power to make a grateful return according to my station."

On Nov. 2, 1784, Samuel Millikan received a grant of land consisting of 554 acres on the waters of Little Uwarrie river in Randolph county, North Carolina, and record of the same may be found in the Book of Claims No. 18, page 229, at Raleigh, NC. He seems to have first settled near the Marlborough meeting house, a short distance from the present town of Ashborough. By his will he devised to his son William 200 acres of land known by the name of the "Old Place whereon I once lived near the Marlborough Meeting House." At a later date he had moved to a farm near the Springfield Meeting House, then in Randolph, now in Guilford county, close to the line and not far from High Point. His name frequently occurs in the Quaker records (now stored in the vaults of Guilford College) in connection with the Springfield monthly meeting, and as a business man. Some of his descendants assume to say his business was the manufacture of wagons, agricultural implements and edged tools, his shop being at Guilford Court House village. No mention of a plant of this kind is made in his will, but it does indicate that he was quite extensively engaged in farming. He must have been a man of considerable means as evidenced by letters from his sons in Ohio, and his will made the 18th day, the 2d month, 1817, and now on file at Ashborough, NC. Besides the bequest to his son William already mentioned, he made disposition of his estate as follows: "To the heirs of my son John (deceased) 100 acres of land in the state of Ohio on Whetstone Creek, the waters of the Sciota; also one hundred dollars in money to be equally divided among them when the youngest should reach the age of 21." "To my son Benjamin 60 acres of land known as the Pine Tract adjoining the lands of Joshua Holliday, he having already received a title to 200 acres as part of his share." "To my son Jesse the notes held on Eleazer Beals (testators son-in-law) for a tract of land I purchased of John Roddock amounting to $425; also $100 in money." "To my son Samuel, the tract of land whereon I now live for the support of my loving wife during her widowhood." He also gave Samuel all his live stock and farming tools and half of the household furniture. The other half of the furniture was given to his wife and at the end of her widowhood to be equally divided between his five daughters. All of his other lands were to be sold by his executors and the money arising therefrom and all notes and money on hand to be equally divided between his wife and nine children.

He further bequeths to his boy, Absolom Griffin, (probably a "bound" boy) the tract of land purchased of William Frazier, called the Frazier place, provided that in the event of Absolom's death without heirs, it should be sold with the residue of the estate. He also gave to Rosanna Leech (probably a "bound" girl) one cow and calf.

That Samuel Millikan was actively engaged in the cause of emancipating the slaves was shown by the veneration in which his name was held by some negroes he had helped to free in North Carolina, and who had settled in Ohio. When they met John Millikan (the old editor) and learned that he was Samuel's grandson they could not prostrate themselves low enough to adequately express their delight and gratitude.

He appointed his brother Benjamin, and sons Benjamin and Samuel, his executors, and we know that they faithfully performed their duties, even making a journey to Ohio and Indiana to pay the money due to the children of his son John.

Samuel Millikan died in 1818, and his widow removed to Indiana with her daughter Ann, the wife of Rev. Eleazer Bales, with whom she lived until her death near Mooresville, Morgan Co., IN. There were five sons and five daughters of whom more with 3d generation.
  F iii Sarah Millikan 1, 2 was born 3 in 1743 in Chester Co, Pa.. She died 4 on Apr 9 1826 in Lost Creek, Jefferson Co, Tennessee. She was buried 5 in Tennessee.

From "The Posterity of William Millikan" by G. T. Ridlon: Sarah Millikan, first daughter of William was born in Chester Co., PA as early as 1748-50, but the order of her birth as compared with the other children has not been ascertained. She was married according to the Quaker formula at New Garden Monthly Meeting, Guilford Co., NC., Jan. 28, 1761, to John Mills, son of John and Rachel (Bates) Mills, and resided in her state until 1784, when, with her husband and children, she removed to Lost Creek, now Jefferson County, TN. John Mills was a weaver by trade, and had a mill on his farm for fulling his cloth. He left part of his family at a Quaker settlement in then Greene Co., and with his oldest sons built a cabin about one and a half miles east of the place where Lost Creek sinks under Mahoney Hill. They cleared 10 acres and planted for a crop. William, a son, was hunter and housekeeper. Soon Mrs. Mills and her younger children followed. Their nearest post office was Greenville, 60 miles away. The first meetings of the Quakers in the Lost Creek settlement were held at the cabin of John Mills. He died at Lost Creek and was buried in the graveyard by the Quaker meeting house. Mr. Mills was a pioneer and one of the most useful persons in the settlement. One tradition makes Sarah Millikan Mills death at Lost Creek; another in Indiana. I find in an old letter of date" Lost Creek, Jefferson Co., TN, 19th-10th-1817," the following statement: "Aunt Sarah Mills is in a common state of health; we saw her at meeting today." She had eleven children.
  F iv Martha Millikan 1 was born 2 in 1744 in Edenton, Chowan Co, Nc.
  M v David Millikan 1 was born 2 in 1745 in Chester Co, Pa..
  F vi Mary Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 5 on Jun 24 1747 in Chester Co, Pa.. She died 6 on Sep 12 1814 in Wayne Co, in.
  M vii William Millikan , Jr.
  M viii Benjamin Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 5, 6, 7 on Jan 21 1755 in Chester Co, Pa.. He died 8 on Jan 1 1842 in Back Creek, Nc. He was buried 9 in Randolph Co, Nc. (Marlborough Quaker churchyard).

From "The Posterity of William Millikan" by G. T. Ridlon: Benjamin Millikan, third son of William was born in Chester Co, PA. Jan 21, 1755, was but three years of age when the family migrated to North Carolina in 1758. He married Rebecca Rush, May 4, 1776. She was born Oct 21, 1760. By this union there were eleven children. Benjamin inherited his father's homestead farm on Back Creek which was part of the original grant of 1784 to William Millikan, his father. He made his will March 25, 1834, but I have no record of his death. His widow, when 83 years of age, was carried by her daughter, Mrs. Abigail Commons, to Indiana, where she died. They were devoted members of the Quaker Society, used their language and dressed in their garb. He was buried in the Marlborough Quaker churchyard.

"Will of Benjamin Millikan": I Benjamin Millikan of the State of North Carolina, Randolph County; considering the uncertainty of this mortal life, and being of sound mind and memory, (blessed be Almighty God for the same) do make and publish this my last will and testament, in manner and form following, (that is to say.) First I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife Rebecca Millikan, one mare, a cow and calf and all the Household furniture; and the plantation whereon I now live, containing 283 acres on Back Creek, 3 hogs, 2 ewes and lambs, the above mentioned tract of Land to remain hers her lifetime, and at her death to belong to my son Benjamin Millikan. I also give my wife one pair of gears and the Barshear plow, one ax, one hoe, also I give and bequeath to my youngest daughter Rebecca Winningham one red hided Heifer. I also allow one table with all the rest of my personal property to be sold and one tract of land lying south of where I now live adjoining. Also I give and bequeath to my Daughter Tamar Owen one dollar. Also I give and bequeath to my son Absalom Millikan one dollar. Also I give and bequeath to my son Jonathan Millikan one dollar. Also I give and bequeath to my granddaughter Tamar Hutchens one dollar. Also I give and bequeath to my grandson Benjamin Ellebe one dollar. Also I give and bequeath to my Granddaughter Polly Ellebe one dollar. Also I give and bequeath to my youngest Daughter Rebecca Winningham one dollar. Also I give and bequeath to my other 3 children all the rest, residue, and remainder of my personal estate, goods, and chattels, of what kind and nature soever, namely Mary Wade, Samuel Millikan and Benjamin Millikan to be equally divided betwixt those three. I hereby appoint James Davidson and my son Benjamin Millikan Executors of this my last will and testament hereby revoking all former wills by me made. In witness where of I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 25th day of March in the year of our Lord 1834.
  F ix Hannah Millikan 1, 2, 3 was born 4 in 1756 in Chester Co, Pa.. She died 5 on Jan 14 1852 in Guilford Co, Nc.. She was buried 6 in (Springfield, Cemetary) Guilford, Nc.
  M x Alexander Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 5, 6, 7 in 1757 in Chester Co, Pa..

From "The Posterity of William Millikan" by G. T. Ridlon: Alexander Millikan, fourth son of William was born in Chester Co., PA, in 1757; was an infant in arms when his parents removed to North Carolina. He went to Lost Creek, Jefferson Co., TN' with the family of his brother William and other relatives in 1792, and removed thence into Georgia where he became a wealthy planter and the owner of many slaves. He was married but died childless. His Quaker kindred in North Carolina and Tennessee did not hold him in fellowship because of his slave-holding, and his name would have been lost to the family but for an old lady, now in her 94th year, his grandniece, who relates that this Alexander wished to make her father, who had been named for him, the present of slaves as a tangeable expression of his regard, but Alexander Millikan, the namesake, refused to become a slaveholder, and the offer was rejected. The compiler has made diligent inquiry in many counties in Georgia, but has failed to find any descendants or the name of his wife.

Elihu Millikan , Sr. Rev. [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 was born 7, 8, 9, 10 on Dec 6 1785 in Guilford Co, Nc.. He died 11, 12, 13 on Dec 21 1864 in Blaines Roads, Jefferson Co, Tn.. He was buried 14, 15 in Rutledge, Grainger Co., Tn. (Lea Springs Baptist Church). He married 16, 17 Cynthia Ann Lea on Feb 20 1838 in Lea's Springs, Grainger Co, Tn.

Other marriages:
Hurst, Nancy

Elihu Millikan, was a Captain of the Infantry commanded by Colonel William Johnson in the war of 1812 for six months. In the Battle of New Orleans 1814 he fought under Andrew Jackson. Elihu received 80 acres in a land grant.

Elihu's father was a Quaker and his mother a Calvinist.

Elihu Millikan, became a Baptist minister in the First Baptist Church of Knoxville, Tennessee, January 22, 1843, his name appears there, and he preached in many other churches in that area. He was listed in the Tennessee's Pioneer Baptist Preachers.

From the book "Jefferson Co., TN. Family & History:

William and Eleanor's son Elihu Millikan would become one of Jefferson County's early leaders. He was born 06 Dec 1785, in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he crossed the Smoky Mountains with his parents at age seven to settle in Tennessee. In 1808, he married Miss Nancy Hurst who became the mother of fifteen children. War with Britain broke out in 1812. Elihu Millikan was drafted in Jefferson County in Sep 1814 and served as a captain in the Third Tennessee Militia.

Elihu Millikan participated in the battle of New Orleans, fighting under Andrew Jackson. He was honorably discharged in Knoxville, Tennessee in May 1815. Elihu then returned home to Jefferson County.

After the war he became seriously interested in spiritual matters. Elihu had to decide between his father's faith, which was Quaker, and his mother's faith, which was Baptist denomination. Elihu Millikan was ordained a Baptist minister on 18 Sep 1825. Sadly, his wife Nancy died in 1831. He remained alone until 1838 when he re-married a younger woman named Cynthia Lea. Old Jesse Hill, a friend of Elihu Millikan, said of him, "He was the principal preacher in this region of country, was a missionary and an able man." Elihu Millikan died in 1864 and was buried in the cemetery near Lea Springs Baptist Church not far from Rutledge. His original tombstone, now destroyed, had this inscription: "Rev. Elihu Millikan died Dec 21, 1864, aged 79 years and 15 days. Them that sleep in Christ will God bring with him."

Craig Stewart installed a new grave marker for Rev. Elihu Millikan in May 1995. The original stone was missing and the footstone has the initials "E.M.". This information was noted on document from Jefferson County, Tennessee Library provided by Betty Reneau to me via fax.

From "The Posterity of William Millikan" by G. T. Ridlon: Rev. Elihu Millikan, fifth son of William, was born in Guilford Co., NC, Dec 6, 1785; married Sept. 29, 1808, Miss Nancy Hurst, who became the mother of 14 children. He was carried from North Carolina to Tennessee by his parents in 1795, when but ten years of age. Was in the War of 1812. He was drafted militia under Col. William Johnson. Honorably discharged May 3, 1815. His wife died in Nov. 1830, and he married 2nd wife, Feb 20, 1838, Cynthia Lea, daughter of Rev. Major Lea and his wife Lavinia, born near Lea's Springs, Grainger Co., TN, Aug 31, 1803, and died July 31, 1890. As his widow, she applied May 11, 1878, for pension. Elihu Millikan grew to manhood on his father's farm near Morristown and fought under Jackson at New Orleans. Of his religious experience little is known until he appears as a Baptist minister. His father was a Quaker and his mother a Calvinist. By searching the Scriptures soon after his conversion he embraced his mother's creed and united with the Baptist denomination. He was supposed to have been baptised by Elder Isaac Burton, then pastor of the "Bethel South" Baptist Church, now know as the "Morristown First." This church licensed him to "excercise a public gift," and by authority of the same body he was ordained Sept. 18, 1825. He was pastor of Mossy Creek church for seven years and of the Buffalo Church in Grainger Co., TN., nearly a quarter of a century, resigning Oct 3, 1859, on account of the infirmities of old age. At one meeting during this pastorate the church had an accession, "by experience and baptism" of ninety-nine members out of ninety-nine who professed conversion. This was known as the "Routh Jones Meeting." He was frequently called into councils for the ordination of ministers, the settlement of discords and recognition of new churches; as well as to attend, everywhere, "sacremental," "protracted" and "camp meetings." In the records of the organization and recognition of the First Baptist church of Knoxville, TN, Jan. 22, 1843, the name of Elihu Millikan appears.

Jesse Hill, aged 93, living near Mossy Creek, knew Elder Millikan as far back as 1828, and said: " he was the principal preacher in this region of country; was a missionary and an able man." William Haynes said: "Brother Millikan was a strong doctrinal preacher and was successful in revival meetings. he had a good influence in the community. people had confidence in him and he built up the Baptist cause." Uncle Sammie West said, speaking of Elder Millikan's wonderful voice: "I heard him preaching one night from the Buffalo church to my house, a distance of two miles air course."

He was fervent and effective in prayer and devoted to the old songs of Zion. It was his uniform practise to sing before the final benediction: "Dismiss us with thy blessing, Lord, Help us to feast upon thy word; All tha has been amiss forgive, And let thy truth within us live."

Old uncle Jerry (colored), living at the Millikan place near Lea's Springs in Grainger Co., who was waiting boy to the Elder, catching his horse for him to ride to his meetings, was a Baptist and bore this testimony to his former master: "He always fed and clothed well, and had reasons about him."

A little while before he died some friends were singing the old familar hymn: "How firm a foundation ye saints of the Lord," and coming to the words: "I'll never, no never foresake," he clapped his hands and exclaimed: "No, he never will! He never will!" He was buried by the side of his wife near Lea's Springs, Grainger Co., TN. On his tombstone is this inscription: "Rev Elihu Millikan died Dec 21, 1864, aged 79 years and 15days. Them that sleep in Christ will God bring with him."

Cynthia Ann Lea 1, 2, 3 was born 4, 5, 6, 7 on Aug 31 1803 in Grainger Co., Tn.. She died 8, 9, 10 on Jul 31 1890 in Grainger Co., Tn.. She was buried 11 in Rutledge, Grainger Co., Tn. (Lea Springs Baptist Church). She married 12, 13 Elihu Millikan , Sr. Rev. on Feb 20 1838 in Lea's Springs, Grainger Co, Tn.

Tombstone inscription reads: "Perfect through suffering blessed are the dead which die in the Lord".

They had the following children:

  F i Lavinia Lea Millikan 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Feb 12 1840.

No children.
  M ii Albert Jamagin Millikan 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Jun 22 1843. He died 5 on Aug 21 1843.

Elihu Millikan , Sr. Rev. [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 was born 7, 8, 9, 10 on Dec 6 1785 in Guilford Co, Nc.. He died 11, 12, 13 on Dec 21 1864 in Blaines Roads, Jefferson Co, Tn.. He was buried 14, 15 in Rutledge, Grainger Co., Tn. (Lea Springs Baptist Church). He married 16, 17, 18, 19 Nancy Hurst on Sep 29 1808 in Morristown, Jefferson Co, Tn..

Other marriages:
Lea, Cynthia Ann

Elihu Millikan, was a Captain of the Infantry commanded by Colonel William Johnson in the war of 1812 for six months. In the Battle of New Orleans 1814 he fought under Andrew Jackson. Elihu received 80 acres in a land grant.

Elihu's father was a Quaker and his mother a Calvinist.

Elihu Millikan, became a Baptist minister in the First Baptist Church of Knoxville, Tennessee, January 22, 1843, his name appears there, and he preached in many other churches in that area. He was listed in the Tennessee's Pioneer Baptist Preachers.

From the book "Jefferson Co., TN. Family & History:

William and Eleanor's son Elihu Millikan would become one of Jefferson County's early leaders. He was born 06 Dec 1785, in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he crossed the Smoky Mountains with his parents at age seven to settle in Tennessee. In 1808, he married Miss Nancy Hurst who became the mother of fifteen children. War with Britain broke out in 1812. Elihu Millikan was drafted in Jefferson County in Sep 1814 and served as a captain in the Third Tennessee Militia.

Elihu Millikan participated in the battle of New Orleans, fighting under Andrew Jackson. He was honorably discharged in Knoxville, Tennessee in May 1815. Elihu then returned home to Jefferson County.

After the war he became seriously interested in spiritual matters. Elihu had to decide between his father's faith, which was Quaker, and his mother's faith, which was Baptist denomination. Elihu Millikan was ordained a Baptist minister on 18 Sep 1825. Sadly, his wife Nancy died in 1831. He remained alone until 1838 when he re-married a younger woman named Cynthia Lea. Old Jesse Hill, a friend of Elihu Millikan, said of him, "He was the principal preacher in this region of country, was a missionary and an able man." Elihu Millikan died in 1864 and was buried in the cemetery near Lea Springs Baptist Church not far from Rutledge. His original tombstone, now destroyed, had this inscription: "Rev. Elihu Millikan died Dec 21, 1864, aged 79 years and 15 days. Them that sleep in Christ will God bring with him."

Craig Stewart installed a new grave marker for Rev. Elihu Millikan in May 1995. The original stone was missing and the footstone has the initials "E.M.". This information was noted on document from Jefferson County, Tennessee Library provided by Betty Reneau to me via fax.

From "The Posterity of William Millikan" by G. T. Ridlon: Rev. Elihu Millikan, fifth son of William, was born in Guilford Co., NC, Dec 6, 1785; married Sept. 29, 1808, Miss Nancy Hurst, who became the mother of 14 children. He was carried from North Carolina to Tennessee by his parents in 1795, when but ten years of age. Was in the War of 1812. He was drafted militia under Col. William Johnson. Honorably discharged May 3, 1815. His wife died in Nov. 1830, and he married 2nd wife, Feb 20, 1838, Cynthia Lea, daughter of Rev. Major Lea and his wife Lavinia, born near Lea's Springs, Grainger Co., TN, Aug 31, 1803, and died July 31, 1890. As his widow, she applied May 11, 1878, for pension. Elihu Millikan grew to manhood on his father's farm near Morristown and fought under Jackson at New Orleans. Of his religious experience little is known until he appears as a Baptist minister. His father was a Quaker and his mother a Calvinist. By searching the Scriptures soon after his conversion he embraced his mother's creed and united with the Baptist denomination. He was supposed to have been baptised by Elder Isaac Burton, then pastor of the "Bethel South" Baptist Church, now know as the "Morristown First." This church licensed him to "excercise a public gift," and by authority of the same body he was ordained Sept. 18, 1825. He was pastor of Mossy Creek church for seven years and of the Buffalo Church in Grainger Co., TN., nearly a quarter of a century, resigning Oct 3, 1859, on account of the infirmities of old age. At one meeting during this pastorate the church had an accession, "by experience and baptism" of ninety-nine members out of ninety-nine who professed conversion. This was known as the "Routh Jones Meeting." He was frequently called into councils for the ordination of ministers, the settlement of discords and recognition of new churches; as well as to attend, everywhere, "sacremental," "protracted" and "camp meetings." In the records of the organization and recognition of the First Baptist church of Knoxville, TN, Jan. 22, 1843, the name of Elihu Millikan appears.

Jesse Hill, aged 93, living near Mossy Creek, knew Elder Millikan as far back as 1828, and said: " he was the principal preacher in this region of country; was a missionary and an able man." William Haynes said: "Brother Millikan was a strong doctrinal preacher and was successful in revival meetings. he had a good influence in the community. people had confidence in him and he built up the Baptist cause." Uncle Sammie West said, speaking of Elder Millikan's wonderful voice: "I heard him preaching one night from the Buffalo church to my house, a distance of two miles air course."

He was fervent and effective in prayer and devoted to the old songs of Zion. It was his uniform practise to sing before the final benediction: "Dismiss us with thy blessing, Lord, Help us to feast upon thy word; All tha has been amiss forgive, And let thy truth within us live."

Old uncle Jerry (colored), living at the Millikan place near Lea's Springs in Grainger Co., who was waiting boy to the Elder, catching his horse for him to ride to his meetings, was a Baptist and bore this testimony to his former master: "He always fed and clothed well, and had reasons about him."

A little while before he died some friends were singing the old familar hymn: "How firm a foundation ye saints of the Lord," and coming to the words: "I'll never, no never foresake," he clapped his hands and exclaimed: "No, he never will! He never will!" He was buried by the side of his wife near Lea's Springs, Grainger Co., TN. On his tombstone is this inscription: "Rev Elihu Millikan died Dec 21, 1864, aged 79 years and 15days. Them that sleep in Christ will God bring with him."

Nancy Hurst 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 5, 6, 7 in 1783 in Jefferson Co, Tn. She died 8, 9 in Nov 1830. She married 10, 11, 12, 13 Elihu Millikan , Sr. Rev. on Sep 29 1808 in Morristown, Jefferson Co, Tn..

They had the following children:

  F i Hannah Millikan 1, 2, 3 was born 4, 5, 6 on Sep 5 1806 in Grainger Co, Tn. She died 7, 8, 9 on Mar 17 1885 in Sabina, Clinton Co., Oh.. She was buried 10 in Sabina, Clinton Co., Oh. (Grassy Run Friends Burial Ground).
  F ii Lavinia Millikan 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Oct 18 1809. She died 5, 6 in Died in Childhood.
  M iii Pleasant Miles Milligan 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 5, 6, 7, 8 on Feb 27 1811 in Jefferson Co, Tn.. He died 9 in Oct 1874 in Cog Hill, Tn. The cause of death was Paralysis/(Stroke). He was buried 10, 11 in Etowah, McMinn Co., Tn. (Carlock Cemetery).

Pleasant Millikan, like his father, was a strong Baptist. Before the Civil War he was a merchant and real estate dealer; afterwards a farmer. He died at Cog Hill, Tennessee October 1874. Pleasant died of paralysis at Cog Hill, Tennessee. Death by paralysis shows in many records of family members, a note here is it is believed that paralysis was actually a stroke as we know it today. Paralysis being one of the symptoms of a stroke.
  F iv Elizabeth Millikan 1, 2 was born 3, 4, 5 on Jul 2 1812 in Jefferson Co, Tennessee. She died in Kentucky.
  M v Samuel Millikan 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Nov 26 1812 in Jefferson Co, Tennessee.
  M vi Elihu Millikan , Jr. 1, 2, 3 was born 4, 5, 6 on Mar 13 1815 in Jefferson Co, Tennessee. He died in Missouri.
  M vii Louis R. Millikan Rev. 1, 2 was born 3, 4, 5, 6 on Dec 6 1816 in Jefferson Co, Tennessee. He died 7, 8 on Oct 8 1870.
  F viii Mary Millikan 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Aug 10 1818 in Jefferson Co, Tennessee.
  F ix Ellis R. Millikan 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Feb 22 1820 in Jefferson Co, Tennessee.
  M x Alfred Millikan 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Jun 5 1821 in Jefferson Co, Tennessee.
  M xi Chesley B. Millikan 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Nov 16 1822 in Morristown, Hamblen Co, Tn.

Chesley Millikan, his residence has been Madisonville, Hopkins County, Kentucky for 25 years. Has been in the marble business. Served in the Confederate Army during the Rebellion. No children. His father had a carpenter square made by his grandfather with his initials engraved on it.
  M xii William Millikan Rev. 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Apr 6 1824 in Morristown, Hamblen Co, Tn..

William Millikan, was a Baptist minister of the General Baptist Church. He had nine children.
  F xiii Eleanor Jane Millikan
  F xiv Nancy Emerline Millikan 1, 2, 3 was born 4, 5, 6 on Jan 21 1828 in Grainger Co, Tn. She died 7 on Oct 7 1863 in Knoxville, Tn. She was buried 8 in Knoxville, Knox Co, Tn (Macedonia Methodist Cemetary).
  M xv Perry Talbot Millikan 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Jul 20 1830 in Jefferson Co, Tennessee. He died 5 in Sep 1862 in Grainger Co, Tn.

Perry Millikan, died unmarried at the home of his sister in Grainger County, Tennessee.

William Millikan , Sr. [Parents] 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Apr 6 1720 in Dromore, County Down, Ireland. He died 5, 6 in Dec 1793 in Randolph Co, Nc. He was buried 7 in South of Greensboro, Randolph Co., Nc. (Centre Quaker Cemetery). He married 8 Hannah Rowan on Jun 19 1759.

Other marriages:
White, Jane
Rowan, Jane

From the book "Jefferson Co., TN Family & History 1792-1996:

The great majority of Milligans/Millikans in Jefferson and the surrounding counties descend from William Millikan Sr., a zealous Quaker who was born in Northern Ireland about 1720. Ireland was being ravaged by a great famine in 1740. The year before, in 1739, William Millikan appears in Chester County, Pennsylvania. By 1741, he had married Hannah Rowan and started a family. In 1758 they migrated south to Rowan County, North Carolina.

Hannah had died sometime after 1768. In 1772, William Millikan was residing in Guilford County with his new wife, Jane White. The children of William Millikan by his first wife were: Samuel, William Jr, who moved to Jefferson County, Tennessee, Alexander, Benjamin, Sarah, Mary and Hannah. Being a Quaker, William Millikan was a non-combatant during the American Revolution, but his sympathies were pro-patriot which placed him on a death list. In 1782, William Millikan was living on Back Creek in Randolph County, near the Guilford county line. On March 10, a band of Tories came to his farm.

Finding William absent, they burned his house to the ground. Still, William Millikan was never caught. He served Randolph County, North Carolina as a Justice, Register of Deeds, and Clerk of Courts during the Revolution. William Millikan died in 1804. In the 1920's, Mrs. J. S. Welborn, a D.A.R. Regent, found William Millikan's grave and original tombstone at Centre Quaker Cemetery south of Greensboro. She reported that his tombstone disappeared several years later.

From the book "Saco Valley Settlements & Families" by Rev. G. T. Ridlon published 1895/ Page 1069:

Millikans of Randolph County, N.C.

This was a Quaker family early settled in Pennsylvania, and the ancestors of the North Carolina branch were among the earliest patentees of land grants in Randolph county, as the records show; their settlement there was long before the Revolution. Their homesteads are among the oldest in the state. Few members of this family have attained prominence in the state, being of the retiring disposition characteristic of the Quaker faith. They were patriots during the Revolutionary War, but non-combatant. William Millikan, who was the first clerk of the court after the organization of Randolph county, was the man whose house was burned by the Tories under Col. David Fanning in 1778.

Although the Millikan connection has been numerous in the county, there is not a case in all the records there entitled State vs. Millikan. Benjamin Millikan was a bold and fearless leader of the anti-slavery movement in his state, and many were the acts of heroism in defense of the principles he advocated. The whole race to a man were loyal to the Federal cause during the Rebellion, and not one fought under the Confederate flag, while a number escaped and enlisted in the Union army.

Quite a number have held places of honor and trust, being elected to offices either as Whigs or Republicans, and in 1894 T. C. Millikan was the Republican nominee for Congress in his district against a heavy Populist element. Benjamin Millikan, of Asheboro, N.C., is ex-sheriff, and his son, J. M. Millikan, clerk of the Superior court of Randolph county. A brother of the latter, H. F. Millikan, of Santa Fe, KS. is register of deeds for Haskell county. The family hold the tradition of a Scottish ancestry.

From geneology research by Sandy Taylor: "After his settlement in Rowan Co., NC, William Millikan was called to fill positions of trust commensurate with his abilities. We know he was justly held in high esteem for his estimable character. Through his friend, James Marshall of Chester Co., PA, he had purchased instruments and expected to have renumerative employment under Earl Granville who claimed to own one-eighth of the Province, as surveyor. At the organization of Randolph Co, which was composed of parts of Rowan and Guilford Counties, March 8, 1779, William Millikan was chosen as one of the Just---? Courts and at the same time was elected Register of Deeds. He also served as Clerk of Courts for his county. The tradition in the family calls him "a lawyer" and has some foundation in the fact of his doing considerable business as acting agent or attorney.

The land upon which William Millikan lived as a "Squatter" for many years was part of the territory claimed by Earl Granville, but his right was disputed, a controversy respecting the validity of his title arose, there was a resort to arms, the war of the Revolution ensued, the case was determined and all issues turned in favor of the Colonists; then all lands remaining unsold became a part of the public domain and was subject to entry. After the Revolution, Nov 2, 1784, William Millikan secured a land grant comprising four hundred acres on Back Creek. This became his farm. Two years previously his house was burned by ___? and the following abstract from a character sketch of Col. David Fanning written by Rev. E. W. Caruthers, will be of interest to the Millikan family.

On Sunday, March 10, 1782, Fanning went to the house of William Millikan Esq., who lived on Back Creek, about two miles from Johnsonville, on the old cross road. As Millikan was away (it is said he was driving his cows home and discovered Fanning in time to hide) from home they burned his buildings and destroyed everything they could. While the house was on fire, Mrs. Jane Millikan carried out a favorite feather bed, but they carried it back and threw it on the fire. When the bed began to burn, they twisted a stick into the feathers and scattered them over the house. When the blazing feathers, as they flew in every direction through the room, caught in a bundle of yarn which was hanging on the wall, they taunted Mrs. Millikan and said: "Look at your yarn old woman". When leaving Millikan's, they compelled his son, Benjamin to go along and pilot them to the house of Col. John Collier. Young Millikan was used to tell the sentinel at Collier's that they were friends.

There is a tradition that Col. Fanning took Benjamin Millikan and another young man out to hang them, and that while they were stringing the other up to the branch of a tree, Benjamin managed to escape. During the Revolution William Millikan was living on the west side of the "Plank Road", south of New Market, but after the burning of his house, he took up his abode with his son Samuel. He was a zealous Quaker, an advocate of liberty, and took an active part in civil affairs of the county. He enjoyed in an eminent degree the esteem and confidence of the public. William Millikan m: Jane White who was probably a daughter of Alexander White of Chester Co., PA.

Transcribed from Randolph County, NC. court records:
Randolph County, NC - Court - William Millikan Estate Sale - 1793
December Term 1793
Samuel Millikan, Administrator of the Estate of William Millikan, deceased. Returns the inventory found with the account of sales of said estate:
Amount of the sales of personal estate 39.10.7 (pounds)
Account of sundry notes of hand 60......5
Cash on hand 106.11.8
Book debts 14.00.0
--------------------------
220..7.3
5 notes on James Robbins for indian corn amounting in the whole to two hundred bushels.

Hannah Rowan [Parents] 1 died 2 in 1768. She married 3 William Millikan , Sr. on Jun 19 1759.


William Millikan , Sr. [Parents] 1, 2 was born 3, 4 on Apr 6 1720 in Dromore, County Down, Ireland. He died 5, 6 in Dec 1793 in Randolph Co, Nc. He was buried 7 in South of Greensboro, Randolph Co., Nc. (Centre Quaker Cemetery). He married Jane Rowan in 1775.

Other marriages:
White, Jane
Rowan, Hannah

From the book "Jefferson Co., TN Family & History 1792-1996:

The great majority of Milligans/Millikans in Jefferson and the surrounding counties descend from William Millikan Sr., a zealous Quaker who was born in Northern Ireland about 1720. Ireland was being ravaged by a great famine in 1740. The year before, in 1739, William Millikan appears in Chester County, Pennsylvania. By 1741, he had married Hannah Rowan and started a family. In 1758 they migrated south to Rowan County, North Carolina.

Hannah had died sometime after 1768. In 1772, William Millikan was residing in Guilford County with his new wife, Jane White. The children of William Millikan by his first wife were: Samuel, William Jr, who moved to Jefferson County, Tennessee, Alexander, Benjamin, Sarah, Mary and Hannah. Being a Quaker, William Millikan was a non-combatant during the American Revolution, but his sympathies were pro-patriot which placed him on a death list. In 1782, William Millikan was living on Back Creek in Randolph County, near the Guilford county line. On March 10, a band of Tories came to his farm.

Finding William absent, they burned his house to the ground. Still, William Millikan was never caught. He served Randolph County, North Carolina as a Justice, Register of Deeds, and Clerk of Courts during the Revolution. William Millikan died in 1804. In the 1920's, Mrs. J. S. Welborn, a D.A.R. Regent, found William Millikan's grave and original tombstone at Centre Quaker Cemetery south of Greensboro. She reported that his tombstone disappeared several years later.

From the book "Saco Valley Settlements & Families" by Rev. G. T. Ridlon published 1895/ Page 1069:

Millikans of Randolph County, N.C.

This was a Quaker family early settled in Pennsylvania, and the ancestors of the North Carolina branch were among the earliest patentees of land grants in Randolph county, as the records show; their settlement there was long before the Revolution. Their homesteads are among the oldest in the state. Few members of this family have attained prominence in the state, being of the retiring disposition characteristic of the Quaker faith. They were patriots during the Revolutionary War, but non-combatant. William Millikan, who was the first clerk of the court after the organization of Randolph county, was the man whose house was burned by the Tories under Col. David Fanning in 1778.

Although the Millikan connection has been numerous in the county, there is not a case in all the records there entitled State vs. Millikan. Benjamin Millikan was a bold and fearless leader of the anti-slavery movement in his state, and many were the acts of heroism in defense of the principles he advocated. The whole race to a man were loyal to the Federal cause during the Rebellion, and not one fought under the Confederate flag, while a number escaped and enlisted in the Union army.

Quite a number have held places of honor and trust, being elected to offices either as Whigs or Republicans, and in 1894 T. C. Millikan was the Republican nominee for Congress in his district against a heavy Populist element. Benjamin Millikan, of Asheboro, N.C., is ex-sheriff, and his son, J. M. Millikan, clerk of the Superior court of Randolph county. A brother of the latter, H. F. Millikan, of Santa Fe, KS. is register of deeds for Haskell county. The family hold the tradition of a Scottish ancestry.

From geneology research by Sandy Taylor: "After his settlement in Rowan Co., NC, William Millikan was called to fill positions of trust commensurate with his abilities. We know he was justly held in high esteem for his estimable character. Through his friend, James Marshall of Chester Co., PA, he had purchased instruments and expected to have renumerative employment under Earl Granville who claimed to own one-eighth of the Province, as surveyor. At the organization of Randolph Co, which was composed of parts of Rowan and Guilford Counties, March 8, 1779, William Millikan was chosen as one of the Just---? Courts and at the same time was elected Register of Deeds. He also served as Clerk of Courts for his county. The tradition in the family calls him "a lawyer" and has some foundation in the fact of his doing considerable business as acting agent or attorney.

The land upon which William Millikan lived as a "Squatter" for many years was part of the territory claimed by Earl Granville, but his right was disputed, a controversy respecting the validity of his title arose, there was a resort to arms, the war of the Revolution ensued, the case was determined and all issues turned in favor of the Colonists; then all lands remaining unsold became a part of the public domain and was subject to entry. After the Revolution, Nov 2, 1784, William Millikan secured a land grant comprising four hundred acres on Back Creek. This became his farm. Two years previously his house was burned by ___? and the following abstract from a character sketch of Col. David Fanning written by Rev. E. W. Caruthers, will be of interest to the Millikan family.

On Sunday, March 10, 1782, Fanning went to the house of William Millikan Esq., who lived on Back Creek, about two miles from Johnsonville, on the old cross road. As Millikan was away (it is said he was driving his cows home and discovered Fanning in time to hide) from home they burned his buildings and destroyed everything they could. While the house was on fire, Mrs. Jane Millikan carried out a favorite feather bed, but they carried it back and threw it on the fire. When the bed began to burn, they twisted a stick into the feathers and scattered them over the house. When the blazing feathers, as they flew in every direction through the room, caught in a bundle of yarn which was hanging on the wall, they taunted Mrs. Millikan and said: "Look at your yarn old woman". When leaving Millikan's, they compelled his son, Benjamin to go along and pilot them to the house of Col. John Collier. Young Millikan was used to tell the sentinel at Collier's that they were friends.

There is a tradition that Col. Fanning took Benjamin Millikan and another young man out to hang them, and that while they were stringing the other up to the branch of a tree, Benjamin managed to escape. During the Revolution William Millikan was living on the west side of the "Plank Road", south of New Market, but after the burning of his house, he took up his abode with his son Samuel. He was a zealous Quaker, an advocate of liberty, and took an active part in civil affairs of the county. He enjoyed in an eminent degree the esteem and confidence of the public. William Millikan m: Jane White who was probably a daughter of Alexander White of Chester Co., PA.

Transcribed from Randolph County, NC. court records:
Randolph County, NC - Court - William Millikan Estate Sale - 1793
December Term 1793
Samuel Millikan, Administrator of the Estate of William Millikan, deceased. Returns the inventory found with the account of sales of said estate:
Amount of the sales of personal estate 39.10.7 (pounds)
Account of sundry notes of hand 60......5
Cash on hand 106.11.8
Book debts 14.00.0
--------------------------
220..7.3
5 notes on James Robbins for indian corn amounting in the whole to two hundred bushels.

Jane Rowan [Parents].Jane married William Millikan , Sr. in 1775.


Samuel Millikan 1 was born 2 in 1694 in Ireland.

He had the following children:

  M i William Millikan , Sr.

William Millikan , Jr. [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born 6, 7, 8, 9 on Jan 7 1753 in Chester Co, Pa.. He died 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 on Sep 2 1838 in Morriston, Jefferson Co, Tn. He was buried 17, 18, 19, 20 in 1838 in Morriston, Jefferson Co, Tn (Economy Cemetery). He married 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 Eleanor Smith on Aug 10 1776 in Guilford Co, Nc.

William Jr, after his marriage he settled on a land grant of 400 acres near New Salem, North Carolina. He crossed the Great Smokey Mountains in 1792 and settled on a tract of land in northwestern Tennessee, near Morriston (3 miles NW). The site of his dwelling commanded a view of the Clinch Mountains 10 miles north, and the Great Smokey Mountains 40 miles south. The lands are somewhat hilly, but overlook the fertile valley near at hand. There is a cool spring of limestone water on the east and a stream winds down to mingle with other spring streams on there way to the Great Holston river. From "Posterity of William Millikan" by G. T. Ridlon: William Millikan, second son of William Millikan, was born in Chester Co., PA, as early as 1754, was but four years of age when his parents removed to Rowan Co., NC. He married Aug 10, 1776, Eleanor Smith of Guilford Co., NC., and settled on a grant of 400 acres, not far distant from New Salem, where he was employed as farmer, blacksmith, and land surveyor; and some old "land plats" and "field notes", still in the family, show that he was a scientific man.

He crossed the Great Smokey mountains in 1792 and settled on a tract of land in northwestern Tennessee, near Morristown, (three miles NW) and the site of his dwelling commanded a view of the Clinch Mountains ten miles north, and the great Smokey mountains forty miles south. The lands are somewhat hilly, but overlook a fertile valley near at hand. There is a cool spring of limestone water on the east and a rill winds down to mingle with other spring-streams on their way to the great Holston river.

His house was built of large chestnut logs, hewed square, and was on the ground plan 20 x 30 feet, two stories, with a large cellar underneath. There were also two porches of two stories on the north and south sides, and the large chimneys were laid up with limestone rock. A spacious building of one room, used for a kitchen and dining room stood near the principal dwelling. Some parts of this house has stood the wear and tear of time more than a hundred years, and may still be seen.

William Millikan, Jr. remained on his farm until the death of his wife, Feb 5, 1837, but spent his last days in the home of his son-in-law, Jesse Howell, where he died aged 84 years. They were buried in the Economy grave yard not a distant from there home but no inscribed monuments mark their place of rest, only rude natural stones. He was a man of enormous size, not weighing not less than 300 pounds. His eyes were blue, his hair rather light, and his complexion fair and rather florid.

Mr. Millikan was not known to have used the land surveyor's instrument after his settlement in Tennessee, but he had a blacksmith's and gunsmith's shop near his house, where he made farm implements and guns, and did some work as a silversmith. A coin silver sleeve button made by him is now owned by John S. Howell, his grandson. He also owns and uses a large arm chair once owned by this William Millikan. The sturdy posts are of sugar wood, nicely turned, and the rungs of the best hickory, the seat is of split white oak. William and Eleanor had thirteen children.

From the book "Jefferson Co., TN Family & History 1792-1996:

William Millikan Jr, second son of William Sr., removed to Jefferson County, Tennessee in 1792. His wife was Eleanor Smith whom he had married in Guilford County, North Carolina in 1776.

William Jr., was a 300-pound blacksmith. He was also a gunsmith, which seems an odd occupation for a pacifist Quaker. Wife Eleanor died in 1837. William Millikan Jr., died in 1838, age about eighty-four. They both are buried at Economy Cemetery in what is now Morristown.

The children of William Millikan Jr., and Eleanor were as follows: David, Eli, Solomon, Elihu, Alexander, William, Samuel, George, Hannah and Eleanor. William and Eleanor's son Elihu Millikan would become on of Jefferson County's early leaders.

Eleanor Smith 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 5, 6 in 1758 in Guilford Co, Nc.. She died 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 on Feb 5 1837 in Morriston, Jefferson Co, Tn. She was buried 14, 15, 16, 17 in 1837 in Morriston, Jefferson Co, Tn (Economy Cemetery). She married 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 William Millikan , Jr. on Aug 10 1776 in Guilford Co, Nc.

They had the following children:

  M i David Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born 6, 7, 8 on Dec 1 1776 in Guilford Co, Nc.. He died 9, 10 in 1855/1856.

David Millikan, went with his parents in 1795 to Lost Creek, Jefferson County, Tennessee where he lived until enfeebled by age; then his brother Alexander went with a horse train and brought them to his own home in Henry County, Indiana where he and wife were kindly cared for until their deaths in 1855 or 1856.
  F ii Sarah Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 5, 6, 7 on Feb 10 1778 in Guilford Co, Nc.. She died 8 in Died in infancy.
  F iii Nancy Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 5, 6, 7 on Aug 14 1779 in Guilford Co, Nc.. She died 8 in Died in infancy.
  M iv Jonathan Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 5, 6, 7 on Mar 31 1781 in Guilford Co, Nc.. He died 8 in Died in infancy.
  M v Eli Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born 6, 7, 8, 9 on Sep 17 1783 in Guilford Co, Nc.. He died 10, 11 in Aug 1849 in Wilmington, Clinton Co, Oh. He was buried 12, 13 in Little Creek, Clinton Co., Oh..

Eli and Mary, moved to Tennessee about 1810, then they moved to Warren County, Ohio, in 1811, and then in 1812 they moved to Todds Creek, Union Township, Clinton County, Ohio, where he cleared the land and built their home and farmed the land. He learned the trade of blacksmith with his father in North Carolina, and built a smithy on his farm in which he repaired his farm implements and shod his horses, but his principal employment was farming. He and his wife were Quakers and brought their children up in that faith. They were buried in an old cemetery at Little's Creek.
  M vi Solomon Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 was born 7, 8, 9, 10 on Feb 28 1784 in Guilford Co, Nc.. He died 11, 12 in 1868 in Marion, Kentucky.

It is believed, but not proven, that Solomon's wives are one in the same Nancy Morgan. However, two birthplaces are shown for the Nancy Morgans.

Solomon and Nancy lived in Grainger County, Tennessee not distant from Morristown. In November 1847, the family moved to Marion, Kentucky where Solomon died. He was a skillful gunsmith and early in life had a shop in Allen's Station, Tennessee, where he made rifles and holster guns. After his settlement in Kentucky he repaired and stocked guns and rifles. It is stated that his long rifles with hand forged barrels, cherry wood stocks and cunningly engraved brass mountings were considered to be fine shooters and Solomon was quite celebrated.
  M vii Elihu Millikan , Sr. Rev.
  M viii Alexander Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born 6, 7, 8 on Nov 12 1789 in Guilford Co, Nc.. He died 9, 10, 11 in Aug 1880 in Henry Co, Indiana.

Alexander, was carried by his parents to Lost Creek, Tennessee in 1795. When he grew to manhood settled on a farm a few miles west of Morristown, Hamblen County, Tennessee, where he remained until 1838, and where his children were born; he then moved by wagon to Henry County, Indiana. His aged parents died at his home while living in Tennessee and were buried near Morristown, Tennessee. He was a member of the Society of Friends, and a man of kindly generous impulses whose benevolence was almost boundless. He was very decided and courageous and manifested great strength of character. When his older brother, David and his wife, became aged and incapable of longer gaining support (they were childless) he went to Tennessee, brought them to his home in Indiana, provided them for the remainer of their days and gave them a Christian burial. Alexander lived to the great age of 93 years and died August 1880, in Henry County, Indiana. During his last days he became feeble-minded and did not know the members of his own family.
  M ix William Millikan III 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born 6, 7, 8 on Nov 12 1789 in Guilford Co, Nc..

William was twin brother to Alexander. William and Rebecca settled first in the neighborhood of his father's home, but later went to Ohio -- so says his nephew, John Howell of Tennessee -- where he is supposed to have raised a family. From an extensive correspondence I have found no reliable information concerning this man or of his family. One nephew is quite sure that he settled in Indiana, but relatives in that state have no knowledge of his living there. Unwillingly I must leave his history for others to investigate. From "The Posterity of William Millikan" by G. T. Ridlon.
  M x Samuel Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born 6, 7, 8 on Feb 29 1792 in Guilford Co, Nc.. He died 9, 10, 11 on Jan 29 1873 in Montpelier, Indiana. He was buried 12, 13 in Montpelier, Indiana (Twibell Cemetery).

Samuel and Clarissa Millikan first settled near Morristown. He subsequently followed his brother Eli to Ohio and lived some time in Wilmington County. He finally removed to Chester Township, Wells County, Indiana where he built a water sawmill on the Salamona river about 1849. He also had a shop in which he worked as a blacksmith. He owned a good farm and farming was his principal occupation. He died on his farm, aged 80 years and 11 months. Samuel Millikan served for many years as a justice of the peace, and was a man of upright character and commanding influence in his community. They were buried in the Twibell cemetery one-half mile north of Montpelier, IN. There were eight children. From "The Posterity of William Millikan" by G. T. Ridlon.
  M xi George Washington Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 was born 7, 8, 9, 10 on Jun 24 1794 in Panther Springs, Hamblen Co, Tn. He died 11, 12, 13, 14 on Aug 19 1864 in Hamblen Co, Tn.. He was buried 15 in Morriston, Jefferson Co, Tn (Economy Cemetery).

George Millikan, was a blacksmith and farmer, and lived on a section of his father's land. He died at the age of 70.
  F xii Hannah Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 5, 6, 7 on Aug 26 1796 in Hamblen Co, Tn.. She died 8, 9 on Aug 1 1881 in Henry Co, in. She was buried 10 in Henry Co, in.

William and Hannah, removed to Indiana at the time of the migration of her brother to that state, and was living near New Castle in a comfortable home when visited by John Howell of Tennessee in 1865. Mrs. Ezekial Cast (Margaret Elinor Millikan) of Ohio also remembers Hannah as she saw her when visiting relatives in Indiana many years ago. She was described as a tall woman and of a fair complexion. Several children.
  F xiii Eleanor Millikan 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 was born 6, 7, 8, 9 on Mar 27 1800 in Panther Springs, Hamblen Co, Tn.. She died 10, 11 on Mar 25 1875 in Morristown, Jefferson Co, Tn..

Jesse and Eleanor, their place of residence was four miles west of Morristown, Tennessee in the New Market Valley. Her son, John S. Howell, writes of the farm on which his parents lived; "It was then a barren country destitute of water and without much timber; we now have plenty of cisterns of good water, and ponds for our stock. The land is good and rather level. A railroad now runs through the farm." Eleanor was tall and had fair hair and complexion.

Alexander White 1, 2 was born 3 in 1694 in Chester Co, Pa.. He died 4 in 1743 in Chester Co, Pa.. He married Jean.

Jean 1, 2 was born 3 in 1698 in Chester Co, Pa.. She married Alexander White.

They had the following children:

  F i Jane White

Walter McChesney Jr. [Parents] was born on Jun 25 1772 in Rockbridge Co., Va. He died on Oct 17 1833 in Caldwell Co, Ky. He was buried in Morse Cemetery, Caldwell Co., kY. He married Margaret Stevenson in 1802 in Caldwell Co., kY.

Scotch-Irish descent. Information from Kentucky: A History to the State, Battle, Perrin, Kniffin , 2nd ed, 1885 Caldwell Co., KY Walter was on 4/3/1801 a resident of SC, as an affidavit accompanying the 3/31/1801 deed of his fathers. He moved before 1810 to Caldwell Co, KY.

In the Caldwell Co. history it says that they moved with two children from SC before going to KY. In the 1810 census he had land on Donaldson's Fork. Some of the area got swapped with Livingston Co. so you have to look at both Co. He was one of first settlers in Farmersville. Walter is in the US 1790 Census in S. C. In Kentucky Land Grants , he had 194 acres, book 18, pg 176 on 8/14/1806 in Livingston Co., Watercourse Donaldson CK.

Margaret Stevenson was born on Dec 25 1784 in Sc. She died on Apr 20 1852 in Caldwell co., Ky. She was buried in Morse Cemetery, Caldwell Co., Ky. She married Walter McChesney Jr. in 1802 in Caldwell Co., kY.

They had the following children:

  F i Martha McChesney
  M ii Samuel Arnet McChesney
  F iii Isabella McChesney was born in 1808.
  M iv William A. McChesney
  M v Alexander S. McChesney was born in 1813. He died on Aug 20 1849.
  M vi James Hervey McChesney
  M vii Andrew Washington McChesney
  F viii Mary Jane McChesney
  F ix Elizabeth McChesney was born in 1824.
  M x Matthew McChesney was born in 1830 in Caldwell Co., Ky. He died on Dec 20 1858.
  F xi Sarah Caldwell McChesney was born in 1833 in Caldwell Co., Ky.

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