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MILTON ESTILL, 24TH TEXAS CAVALRY



MILTON ESTILL

MILTON ESTILL


Karen McCann Hett  All Rights Reserved 2003-2014



Milton Estill was born in about 1844 in Texas. He was son of Cumberland Presbyterian minister Milton B. Estill and his wife, Louise Boulton, who were married in Shelby County, Tennessee in 1833. Rev. Milton B. Estill established the first Presbyterian Church in Texas in Red River County in 1833. The family arrived in Texas between 1838 and 1842.

Milton, Jr., was a brother of Charles B. Estill.

Milton, Jr., was born in Texas in 1844. He was living with his family in Walker County in 1850, and he appears with them in Montgomery County in 1860. He would have been close to eighteen when he joined The Second Texas Lancers along with his brother, and he did give his age as eighteen.

He was enlisted in Captain S. D. Wooldridge's Company on March 29, 1862 at Danville by John E. George, and was mustered in at Camp Carter near Hempstead on April 28. The value of his horse was $110.00.

Milton rode his horse to Arkansas with the other men, where he was dismounted with the others. The Second Lancers became the 24th Regiment Texas Cavalry (Dismounted.) He was assigned to Garland's Brigade, and after infantry training at Camp Holmes, Arkansas, he was sent to Ft. Hindman.

In early January, Union forces came up the White River in Ironclads. The six thousand Confederates were attacked by 30,000 Union troops. Milton was killed in the Battle of Arkansas Post at Ft. Hindman on January 11, 1863. A notation on a muster roll states, “Killed in battle January 11, 1863.”

He was probably buried in a common grave on the battlefield, as were many others that day. You may read Ranger Eric Leonard's answers to questions about the burial of those who were killed.

His brother, Charles, was captured, along with a George Estill, who was listed on the rolls as Negro, Liberated. Charles died at the prison hospital in Illinois and George was freed by the Union captors.

Two other sons of Rev. Milton Estill, Ben Estill and Black Estill, died while serving in the Waverly Confederates in 1862.

For further information and records of all Confederate soldiers of Montgomery County, Texas, as well as histories of the regiments they served in, see Montgomery County, Texas, CSA by Frank M. Johnson. The book may be purchased by visiting Frank's website at frankmjohnson.net or by contacting Frank at fjohnson@wt.net.

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© Karen McCann Hett  All Rights Reserved 2003-2014
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