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GIBSON FAMILY

The Gibson family probably descended from Elizabeth Chavis. On 28 March

1672 she made a successful petition to the General Court of Virginia to

release her son, Gibson Gibson, who had been unlawfully bound by Berr.

Mercer to Thomas Barber who had gone to England leaving the boy with

Samuel Austin [McIlwaine, Minutes of the Council, 302-3]. Her children

were

1 i. ?Hubbard Gibson, born say 1665.

2 ii. Gibson Gibson, born say 1667.

1. Hubbard1 Gibson, born say 1665, was probably identical to Hubert

Gibson who appeared in Charles City County Court on 24 March 1691/2

and on 3 August 1693 when he sued John Hardiman for riding his

horse to its death [Orders 1687-95, 394, 454, 463]. He was listed

in the 1704 Rent Roll for Prince George County [des Cognets,

English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records]. In 1721 he was called

Hubbard Gibson when he was taxed on 370 acres and one poll in

Chowan County, North Carolina [Haun, Old Albemarle County NC

Miscellaneous Records, 330]. On 13 November 1727 he bought an

additional 100 acres on the north side of the Roanoke River in what

was then Bertie County. He was probably an elderly man by that time

since his daughter, Mary, cosigned this deed with him [DB B:324].

The land was situated on the south side of Cypress Swamp in what

became Northampton County in 1741. A little over 6 months later on

11 July 1728 he and his sons, Edward Gibson and Hubbard Gibson,

Jr., sold 370 acres in Bertie County on the north side of the

Roanoke River, explaining in the deed that the land had been

granted to Hubbard's deceased son, John, by patent of 10 August

1720 [C:37]. The family probably moved to South Carolina with

Gideon Gibson in 1731. Hubbard probably died before 1742 when Mary

Gibson of Amelia County, South Carolina, sold the 100 acres she and

Hubbard purchased in Northampton County [1:58]. His children were

i. John1, born perhaps 1685, a joint plaintiff with Adam Cockburn

in a Chowan County suit for a debt against Thomas Crank in

October Court 1718 [DB B-#1:45]. He was granted 370 acres on 5

April 1720 on a bank of Falling Run in the part of Chowan County

which later became Northampton County, but was not listed in the

Chowan County Tax list with his father who was taxable on this

land in 1721 [Patent 3:15, #1601]. He was said to have been

deceased in his father's deed of sale of this land on 11 July

1728 [Bertie DB C:37]. However, he may have been the same as

John2 who was still living in the same area later that year on

28 October 1728 [C:52].

ii. Edward, born before 1706, taxed in 1721 in the same district as

his father, witness to the 15 October 1732 Edgecombe deed of

William Sims to James Millikin for land on the south side of

Quankey Creek [1:20]. He may have been the father of another

Edward Gibson, (a Mulatto) a stout well-set Man, with short

black curly Hair who escaped prison in South Carolina according

to the 19 May 1767 issue of the South Carolina Gazette [Jordan,

White Over Black, 174].

iii. Hubbard2, Jr., born before 1706, taxed in 1721 in the same

district as his father.

iv. Mary, born perhaps 1705, cosigner of a Bertie County deed with

her father on 13 November 1727 [B:324]. She was living in Amelia

County, South Carolina, in 1742 when she sold this land in what

was by then Northampton County [1:58]. She recorded a plat for

200 acres on Flat Creek in Craven County, South Carolina, on 27

January 1756 [Colonial Plats 6:389].

2. Gibson Gibson, born say 1667, was released from his unlawful

apprenticeship to Thomas Barber on 28 March 1672. In 1704 he was

listed in the Quit Rent Rolls with 150 acres in James City County,

called Gibey Gibson [VHM 31:156]. He may have been the father of

3 i. Gideon1, born say 1700.

3. Gideon1 Gibson, born say 1700, settled near the Roanoke River in

North Carolina about 1720. He purchased 200 acres in what was then

Chowan County on the south side of the Roanoke River on 24 July 1721

[C-1:142]. He acquired seven slaves and over one thousand acres of

land in present day Halifax County, North Carolina, and on the north

side of the Roanoke River in Northampton County. Sometime before 22

October 1728 he married Mary Brown, born about 1705, the white

daughter of a prosperous planter, William Brown. She (and each of her

6 brothers and sisters) received 150 acres from her father by his 15

December 1718 Chowan County will which was proved in July 1719 [SS

841]. Gideon and his wife, Mary, sold this 150 acres "bounded

according to the Will of William Brown Gentl decd..." on 22 October

1728 [Bertie DB C:36]. He must have impressed the other prosperous

free African Americans in that area of North Carolina because three

of them named their children after him: Gideon/Gibby Chavis, Gideon/

Gibby Bunch, and Gibson Cumbo. Many of the well to do Gibson and

Bunch families married whites and were considered white after a few

generations.

He sold 108 acres of his land on the south side of the Roanoke River

in the first few months of 1730 in what was then Bertie County

[C:276] before moving to South Carolina with several of his relatives

who were living on the other side of the Roanoke River in present-day

Northampton County. They came to the attention of the South Carolina

Commons House of Assembly in 1731 when a member announced in chamber

that several "free colored men with their white wives" had immigrated

from Virginia with the intention of settling on the Santee River"

[Jordan, White Over Black, 171]. Governor Robert Johnson of South

Carolina summoned Gideon Gibson and his family to explain their

presence there and after meeting them reported,

I have had them before me in Council and upon Examination find

that they are not Negroes nor Slaves but Free people, That the

Father of them here is named Gideon Gibson and his Father was

also free, I have been informed by a person who has lived in

Virginia that this Gibson has lived there Several Years in good

Repute and by his papers that he has produced before me that his

transactions there have been very regular, That he has for

several years paid Taxes for two tracts of Land and had seven

Negroes of his own, That he is a Carpenter by Trade and is come

hither for the support of his Family. ... I have in

Consideration of his Wifes being a white woman and several White

women Capable of working and being Serviceable in the Country

permitted him to Settle in this Country [Box 2, bundle: S.C.,

Minutes of House of Burgesses (1730-35), 9, Parish Transcripts,

N.Y. Hist. Soc. by Jordan, White over Black, 172].

Like the early settlers of the North Carolina frontier Governor

Johnson was more concerned with the Gibsons' social class than their

race.

Both Gideon Bunch and Gideon Gibson were in South Carolina when they

sold their adjoining Halifax County land to Montfort Eelbeck of

Halifax, and both families were taxed in 1755 as "free Molatas" in

Orange County, North Carolina [T&C, box 1].

Gideon and his wife, Mary, recorded the birth of their child,

William, in the Parish Register of Prince Frederick Winyaw on 9

October 1744. However, Mary may have died soon afterwards since

Martha Gibson was the mother of his children born on 29 July 1745 and

thereafter [NSCDA, Parish Register of Prince Frederick Winyaw, 15,

20]. As "Gideon Gibson of Pe De South Carolina" he sold part of his

Northampton County land on 16 November 1746 and the remainder on 15

February 1749 [1:280, 383]. In South Carolina he recorded a plat for

200 acres on the northwest side of the Peedee River in Craven County

on 13 April 1736 [Colonial Plats 4:320] and 200 acres on the south

side of the Peedee on 1 January 1746/7 [Ibid., 4:397]. According to

Gregg, he was granted 550 acres in April 1736 and settled in Hickory

Grove near Sandy Bluff in present day Marion County [Gregg, History

of the Old Cheraws, 73; Sellers, History of Marion County]. On 29

November 1750 he received a grant for 450 acres in Persimmon Grove

on the Little Peedee River in Craven County [Royal Grants 4:296].

Land which had been surveyed for him in North Carolina on the north

side of the Little Pee Dee River was mentioned in a 17 November 1753

Bladen County land entry [Philbeck, Land Entries: Bladen County, no.

904]. On 13 July 1755 he was granted administration on the estate of

James Rowe "late of Prince George's parish planter as greatest

creditor," and on the same day he was granted administration on the

estate of Matthew Driggers also as greatest creditor [Record of Court

Proceedings, 35, 97, 127]. On 2 September 1755 he recorded a plat for

200 acres on the southwest side of the Peedee River adjoining Jordan

Gibson [Colonial Plats 6:45]. On 15 January 1760 he was paid 343

pounds by the Public Treasurer for supplying the militia in the

campaign against the Cherokees [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the

South, 936]. On 15 February 1765 he was granted administration on the

estate of John Herring and appointed guardian to John, Peter, Mary,

and Hester G___eys of Prince George's Parish [Record of Court

Proceedings, 97]. On 25 July 1767 as a leader of the Regulators,

Gideon was involved in a skirmish with a constable's party near

Marr's Bluff on the Peedee River. The incident brought matters

between the Governor and the Regulators to a head. The South Carolina

Gazette, which like the government was far removed from the location,

reported in the 15 August 1768 edition that there were two parties

of Regulators. One was made up of people of good principle and

property, and the other made up of a

gang of banditi, a numerous collection of outcast Mulattos,

Mustees, Free Negroes, etc. all horse thieves from the borders of

Virginia and other Northern Colonies ... headed by one Gideon

Gibson...

Perhaps in a move to divide the two parties Governor Bull pardoned

all those involved except

those persons concerned with the outrages and daring violences

committed by Gideon Gibson and others upon George Thompson, a

lawful constable, and his party, in the actual execution of a

legal warrant, at or near Mars Bluff, in Craven County, upon the

25th day of July last. ... 6 August 1768 [Council Journal, no.

34, 208-211].

Colonel Gabriel Powell, sent to arrest Gideon, arrived with 300 men,

but to his utter humiliation, his men sided with Gideon saying he was

"one of them" [Hooker, The Carolina Backcountry on the Eve of the

Revolution, 177]. Powell resigned his commission and made a racist

attack on Gideon Gibson in a discussion of the incident on the floor

of Commons. Apparently, he fared little better amongst his colleagues

of the Commons than he had in the back country. There are no minutes

of the session, but a prominent Charleston merchant, Henry Laurens,

was present and described the discussion years later in a letter to

England:

Reasoning from the colour carries no conviction ... Gideon Gibson

escaped the penalties of the negro law by producing upon

camparison more red and white in his face than could be

discovered in the faces of half the descendants of the French

refugees in our House of Assembly... [Wallace, David Duncan, The

Life of Henry Laurens, (N.Y. and London, 1915) by Jordan, White

over Black].

Gideon was described by Gregg as

a man of very marked character, of commanding influence, and

prominently connected with the leading events of the region in

which he lived.

He was shot dead by his nephew, Colonel Maurice Murphy, during an

argument over Murphy's mistreatment of an elderly Tory during the

Revolutionary War [Gregg, History of the Old Cheraws, 354]. His

children were

4 i. ?John3, born perhaps 1730.

ii. ?Jordan1, born perhaps 1730. He was listed in the accounts of

the Public Treasurer on 29 October 1759 for supplying the

expedition against the Cherokees with 18 horses which he

apparently failed to deliver [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the

South, 937]. He was granted land in what was then Bladen County,

North Carolina, on the east side of Mitchel's Creek in present

day Robeson County near the South Carolina border which he sold

on 25 September 1761 [Bladen DB 1738-79: 85]. He may have been

the father of Jordan Gibson, Jr., who recorded a plat for 150

acres adjoining Jordan Gibson, Sr., on the southwest side of the

Peedee River in Craven County, South Carolina on 26 January 1765

[Colonial Plats 8:20]. He sold 200 acres in Anson County, North

Carolina, on the north side of the Pee Dee River on the Falling

Creek branch of Hitchcock's Creek to Benjamin Deas on 15

November 1768 by deed witnessed by Gideon Gibson [7:224], and

he sold another 300 acres in Anson County in the same area on

2 May 1777 [7:320]. Perhaps he was related to Thomas Gibson

who purchased land in this same area of Anson County on eight__

August 1761 [6:190]. According to Gregg, Jordan went to the West

as a companion of Daniel Boone. He was among those "killed by

Indians" in North Carolina on 7 January 1788 [NCGSJ IX:236].

iii. ?Luke, listed in the accounts of the Public Treasurer of South

Carolina, paid 4.17.6 pounds on 31 October 1759 for unspecified

services to the battalion in the expedition against the

Cherokees [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 936].

iv. William, born 15 September 1743, son of Gideon and Mary,

baptized 9 October 1743 [NSCDA, Parish Register of Prince

Frederick Winyaw, 15].

v. Sarah, born 29 July 1744/5, daughter of Gideon and Martha,

baptized 20 October 1745 [Ibid., 20].

vi. Gideon2, born 12 March 1750, son of Gideon and Martha, baptized

2 June 1753 [Ibid., 34]. On 21 September 1773 he was accused

before the court in Charleston of having assaulted James McCasey

the previous month in Georgetown [Judgment Roll 1774, Box 99B,

23A]. He received about 39 pounds for providing provisions to

the militia between 1780 and 1782 [Accounts Audited, no.2786].

vii. Reuben, born 29 November 1751, son of Gideon and Martha,

baptized 29 May 1753 [NSCDA, Parish Register of Prince Frederick

Winyaw, 32].

viii. ?Stephen. According to Gregg, Gideon had three sons, one of whom

was Stephen who became wealthy and moved to Georgia about the

year 1800. The Hon. Thomas Butler King married his daughter

[Gregg, History of the Old Cheraws, 74].

ix. ?Roger, another son of Gideon who went West before the

Revolution [Ibid, 74].

x. ?Daniel, head of a Georgetown District, Prince Fredericks

Parish, household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

4. John3 Gibson, born perhaps 1730, and his wife, Jemima, were living in

South Carolina when the birth of their children was recorded. Their

children were

i. Gibson, born 25 February 1749, baptized 29 May 1753 [NSCDA,

Parish Register of Prince Frederick Winyaw, 33].

ii. John4, born 6 January 1753, baptized 29 May 1753 [Ibid.].

Perhaps he was the John Gibson who was head of a Charleston

District, St. Bartholomew's Parish, household of 7 "other free"

in 1790 [SC:36].

5. John2 Gibson, born perhaps 1705, received a grant for 328 acres on

the south side of the Roanoke joining John Lowe, Jackson, and the

swamp on 1 December 1727 [Patent 3:249, #2552]. He was a witness to

the 12 August 1728 Bertie County deed of William Whitehead to Edward

Bass for land near Urahaw Swamp [C:135]. He may have been Gideon1's

brother or cousin since it appears he was living near Gideon's land

in Northampton County which Gideon purchased on 7 August 1727 and

sold on 15 February 1749 while a resident of South Carolina. John2

purchased 335 acres in Bertie County on the north side of Cashie

River and Wahton Swamp near the Northampton County line on 28 October

1728 [C:52] and was a resident of Bertie on 28 October 1731 when he

sold 250 acres in Bertie County on Elk Marsh by an Edgecombe County

deed [1:7]. Perhaps he was the John Gibson who recorded a plat for

300 acres in Congrees Township, Berkeley County, South Carolina, on

3 February 1735/6 [Colonial Plats, 4:43]. On 5 February 1756 he made

a deed of gift of his household goods in Northampton County to his

son, George Gibson [2:251]. His children were

6 i. George1, born perhaps 1730, died in 1776.

ii. ?William, born perhaps 1732, a resident of Northampton County

on 18 February 1755 when he purchased 100 acres on Burnt Coat

Swamp in the part of Edgecombe County which became Halifax

County in 1758 [2:186].

iii. ?Charles, born before 1739 since he was taxable in 1750 in John

Wade's list for Granville County [CR 44.701.23]. This part of

Granville County became Orange County in 1752 and Charles was

"a Molata" taxable there in 1755 [T&C Box 1, p.19]. He received

a grant for 190 acres on the south side of Bear Swamp in

Northampton County on 9 August 1786 and sold it two years later

on 31 December 1788 [8:169]. He was head of a Northampton County

household of 7 free males and 2 free females in Captain

Winborne's District for the state census in 1786 [Census p.29].

He was living in Wayne County, North Carolina, in August 1818

when he made a declaration to obtain a pension for Revolutionary

War service. He claimed that he enlisted for 9 months in the

Tenth Regiment at the courthouse in Northampton County, North

Carolina. However, there was no record of his discharge or

service [M805-355, frame 0055]. Perhaps he was the same Charles

Gibson who applied for a pension from Hawkins County, Tennessee,

at the age of 92 years on 19 January 1839. He claimed to have

been born in Louisa County, Virginia on 19 January 1739 and

entered into the service in Salisbury, North Carolina. His

neighbors, Jordan and Jonathan Gibson and Benjamin Collins,

testified on his behalf [Ibid., frame 0062].

6.. George1 Gibson, born perhaps 1730, was a taxable in 1750 in John

Wade's list for Granville County [CR 44.701.23]. This part of

Granville became Orange County in 1752, and George was a "Molata"

taxable there in 1755 [T&C Box 1, p.19]. By 19 November 1757 he had

married Elizabeth Lowe, a white woman of Northampton County, daughter

of John and Sarah Lowe. She was mentioned in her father's will of

that date. By the terms of this will his wife received a slave and

he was allowed to continue to live on 150 acres of land in

Northampton County [WB 1:41]. While resident in Northampton County

he purchased 439 acres on Quankey Creek in Halifax County on 5 June

1761 and sold it for the same price 2 years later on 17 January 1763

[7:318; 8:209]. While residing in Orange County on 18 July the same

year, he sold two slaves and sixteen head of cattle (which he

received from his mother-in-law's estate) to his brother-in-law,

Thomas Lowe, of Northampton County [3:622]. On 26 May 1770 he

purchased 150 acres on the west side of Flat River in Orange County

from (his uncle?) Thomas Gibson. His 5 November 1775 Orange County

will was proved in May 1776 [A:195]. He named his (then) wife, Mary,

and mentioned but did not name his "Sons and Daughters now living in

the County" and provided for the schooling of his unnamed younger

children. Joel Gibson and Lucrecy Collins were witnesses; Thomas

Gibson, Sr., was executor. After his death Mary entered 300 acres on

Greens Creek and Rutledges Creek in Caswell County on 13 January 1779

on a line agreed between William Hog and Julius Gibson [Pruitt, Land

Entries: Caswell County, 75], and she entered 200 acres in Caswell

County on the South Hyco Creek bordering Orange County on 26 July

1779 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Caswell County, I:89]. She was taxable

in Caswell in 1790 [NC:79]. The inventory of her Caswell County

estate was recorded by Joel Gibson in 1795. The inventory mentioned

James, John, and Richard Gibson [WB C:118]. Perhaps George Gibson's

children were

i. Andrew, born perhaps 1755, a Caswell County taxable in 1777. He

entered 100 acres on both sides of Kilgore's Bridge in Caswell

County on 25 August 1778 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Caswell County,

47]. He may have been the Andrew Gibson who was appointed Tax

Collector for Chatham District of Orange County at the 29 August

1782 session of the County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions.

He was a juror on 26 November 1783. In 1790 he was counted as

white in the Tenth Company of Wilkes County, head of a household

of one male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 6 females [NC:123].

He was head of an Ashe County household of 7 "other free" in

1800 [NC:79].

ii. George2, born perhaps 1757, a Randolph County taxable in 1779.

iii. John6, born in Orange County, North Carolina on 16 September

1760 according to his father's family bible. He grew up in

Guilford County, North Carolina where he entered the service.

He moved to Tennessee in 1805, and was living there on 16 July

1833 when he made his pension application. He was a horseman

employed in collecting cattle for the use of the army [M805-355,

frame 0197]

iv. Thomas2, born in Randolph County, North Carolina, on 15 November

1763. When he was 18 years old he volunteered in Guilford County

and served for two years. He was allowed a pension while a

resident of Randolph County. He died 15 October 1850 leaving his

children, David, Joseph, Hannah (wife of P.M. Nixon), Mary (wife

of John H. Hill), and George Gibson [M805-355, frame 0409].

v. Wilbourne, born in Guilford County in 1763 according to his

father's family bible. He was drafted into the service in

Randolph County in 1781. He applied for a pension while residing

in Ripley County, Indiana, on 15 May 1838. His wife, Rebecca,

died 3 March 1839, and he died on 4 April 1843. His only heirs

were his daughter, Mary Ann Lewis and her husband, George W.

Lewis, who were living in Ripley County, Indiana, on 19 October

1852 when they applied for a survivor's pension [M805-355, frame

0411]. There is a marriage bond recorded for him in Stokes

County on 20 November 1797 with Thomas Hill bondsman, but the

bride's name was not recorded. His 16 year old son, Hezekiah,

was bound to James Reed in Burke County in October 1804 "due to

abandonment" [Wills, Administrations, & Orphans, 1791-1810, 511

by N.C. Genealogy XIX:2827].

vi. Julius, a Wilkes County taxable in 1784.

vii. Lucrecy Collins.

7. Thomas1 Gibson, born perhaps 1720, was taxable in Granville County

with Charles and George Gibson in John Wade's list in 1750 [CR

44.701.23]. He received two patents for a total of 250 acres in

Granville County on Flat River on 2 May 1752 [Hoffman, Granville Land

Grants, 31-2]. Orange County was formed from this part of Granville

County in 1752, and he was head of an Orange County household of 3

taxable "Molatas" in 1755 [T&C, box 1, p.19]. This land was on Flat

River adjoining Charles Gibson, Moses Ridley, and Thomas Collins

[Bennett, Abstract of Loose Papers in Granville Proprietary Office,

34, 43]. On 26 May 1770 he sold three tracts of land on the west

side of Flat River "part of 606 acres which the sd. Thos. Gibson

purchased of Earl Granville:" 100 acres to James Williams [3:468],

150 acres to George Gibson [3:622], and land to Joel Gibson [3:471].

He received a grant for 150 acres in Wilkes County on the north side

of Obed's Creek on the South Fork of New River on 3 November 1796

[A:142] and sold 100 acres of this land on 18 January 1800 [A:147].

He probably died about 1802 when (his son?) Joel sold land in this

same area. His children may have been

i. Major, born before 1746, "a Molata" taxable in 1755 in Orange

County [T&C Box 1, p.19], and a taxable in Randolph County in

1779. He was counted as white in the 1790 Burke County census,

head of a household of 2 males and 3 females in the Eighth

company [NC:109]. He was taxable in Burke County on 55 acres and

no polls in 1794 (since he was over 50 years old) [Huggins,

Burke County, N.C. Records, IV:110].

ii. Joel, born about 1750, purchased land in Orange County from (his

father?) on 26 May 1770. He was a Caswell County taxable in 1777

and 1786. He was counted as white in Tenth Company of Burke

County in 1790, head of a household of one male over 16 and one

female [NC:123]. He sold 200 acres in Ashe County on Obed's

Creek on 29 January 1802 [A:213] and another 100 acres on 6

March 1804 [B:311]. He bought 50 acres on the north bank of the

South Fork of New River in Ashe County on 13 July 1804 and sold

it a year later on 5 March 1805 [B:339]. He was head of an Ashe

County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:78] and was

counted as white in Wilkes County in 1810 [NC:853]. He may have

been the Joel Gibson who applied for a pension in Henderson

County, Kentucky, on 25 April 1825 at the age of 75 for service

in the First North Carolina Regiment. His wife was deceased at

the time and all his children but one were married and away from

home. He was supported by his son, Bailey Gibson, who had

numerous small children to support [M805-355, frame 0162].

iii. John5/Jack Gibson, born perhaps 1756, a Caswell County taxable

in 1777, 1784, and 1786. He was head of a Wilkes County

household of 2 "other free" and 1 white woman over 45 years of

age in 1810 [NC:853]. The white woman was probably Milley Gibson

who made a Wilkes County deed of gift of 2 tracts of land in

Burke County on 27 February 1818. The land was to be held by her

son, Drury, in trust for her son, Isom, when he came of age

[I:138].

iv. Nathan, born before 1776, head of a Burke County household of

6 "other free" in 1800 and 12 "free colored" in Haywood County

in 1830.

v. Archibald, who was counted as white in the Tenth Company of

Wilkes County, head of a household of one male over 16, one

under 16, and 9 females in 1790 [NC:123] but counted as "other

free" in 1800, head of an Ashe County household of 7 [NC:78].

vi. Jordan2, head of a Tenth Company, Wilkes County household of one

white over 16, 3 under 16 and one white female in 1790 [NC:123].

vii. Dorothy, head of a Tenth Company, Wilkes County household of two

males over 16, two males under 16, and two females in 1790

[NC:123].

viii. Ezekiel, born perhaps 1763, head of a household of one white

male over 16 years in the Tenth Company of Wilkes county in 1790

[NC:123] and head of an Ashe County household of 3 "other free"

in 1800 [NC:78].