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BUNCH FAMILY by

Three mixed race members of the Bunch family were born before 1700. They

were

1 i. Paul1, born say 1680.

ii. John1. born say 1684. He, "a Mulatto," and Sarah Slayden, a

white woman, petitioned the Council of Virginia on 16 August

1705 to allow them to be married because the Minister of

Blisland Parish had refused to marry them [McIlwaine, Executive

Journals of the Council, III:28]. The Council was undecided on

the issue since "the intent of the Law (was) to prevent Negros

and White Persons intermarrying," and John Bunch was a

"Mulatto." The matter was referred to the Court to decide

[Ibid., 31].

2 iii. Henry1, born say 1690.

1. Paul1 Bunch, born perhaps 1680, received a patent for 265 acres in

North Carolina on the south side of the Roanoke River joining Quankey

Pocosin and Gideon Gibson on 1 January 1725, and he bought a further

300 acres joining this land [Halifax DB 8:283]. He may have been the

same Paul Bunch who was listed in the King William County, Virginia,

Rent Roll in 1704.

His Chowan County will was written on 16 November 1726 and probated

on 10 March 1726/7 [SS 876, 3:138-9]. He left his land and eight

slaves to his son, John, and to Fortune Holdbee and her daughters,

Keziah and Jemima. Elizabeth Bunch (no relationship stated) and his

daughter, Russell, received only one shilling each. He did not

mention a wife nor did he mention his relationship to Fortune

Holdbee. She may have been his common-law wife since he gave her one

slave as long as she remained single.

The May 1734 Bertie Court Minutes referred to Keziah as an orphan

Child Entitled to a considerable Estate ... (by the will of Paul

Bunch) bound to Capt. Thos. Bryant till the age of Thirty one

contrary to law ... [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, I:135], and

the August 1735 Bertie County Court Minutes referred to the estate

of a Mulatto woman, Keziah Holdebee, and three children ...[Ibid.,

154]. Paul1 Bunch had the following children:

3 i. John2, born say 1700.

ii. Russell, a daughter, received one shilling by her father's will.

iii. ?Keziah Holdebee.

iv. ?Jemima Holdebee.

2. Henry1 Bunch Sr., probably born around 1690, may have been a

descendant of William Bunch whose land near Wicacon and Brooks Creeks

in what was then Chowan County was mentioned in a 21 April 1714

Chowan County deed [W-#1: 200]. He was a resident of Chowan County

on 18 December 1727 when he purchased 200 acres in Bertie County on

Reedy Branch [C:21]. On 30 May 1729 he purchased 640 acres in Bertie

on Conaritsat Swamp from Thomas Pollock [C:266]. He was taxed on

himself and two slaves in the 1750 Bertie County summary tax list and

was a "Free Mulatto" taxable with two slaves in John Hill's 1763

Bertie tax list. Henry made a will in Bertie on 21 April 1775, proved

in August 1775. He had already deeded 840 acres of land on Conaritsat

and Mulberry to his grandson Jeremiah, Jr., in 1765, and in his will

left most of the remainder of his land to his grandson Cader Bass.

Henry Sr. named as heirs the following children:

4 i. Jeremiah1, Sr., born around 1715.

ii. Tamerson, married Thomas Bass.

iii. Susannah, married Lazarus Summerlin.

iv. Rachel, married Joseph Collins.

v. Nancy, married Isaac Bass.

5 vi. Embrey, born around 1730/35.

3. John2 Bunch, born say 1700, owned land adjoining Gideon Gibson's

land, and he probably named his son, Gideon, for him. He sold the

land that "my father Paul Bunch bought of James Kelly on Occaneche"

on 28 August 1728 [DB C:288] and purchased 100 acres in Bertie County

on the south side of the Roanoke River near Tuckahoe Marsh on 12 May

1729 [C:21]. He purchased 270 acres in Bertie on the south side of

the river on 8 February 1728/9 [C:146], and another 50 acres on the

south side of the river [C:142], and sold these two plots as one

parcel of 320 acres on 4 November 1732 [Edgecombe DB 1:19]. Like the

Gibsons he moved to Berkeley County, South Carolina, where he

recorded a Plat for 350 acres northeast of the Santee River and lot

177 in Amelia Township on 15 November 1735 [Colonial Plats 13:425].

He recorded a plat for a further 100 acres on the Santee River and

a half acre town lot in Amelia Township a month later on 13 December

1735 [Colonial Plats 2:461]. On 15 December 1755 he and his wife,

Mary, made a deed of gift of half this land to their son, John,

Junior [Charleston DB Q-Q:193-4]. Their children were

6 i. Gideon, born perhaps 1725.

ii. John3, Jr., received half his father's land on 15 December 1755.

iii. ?Jacob, who recorded a plat for 200 acres in St. Matthew's

Parish on 2 June 1772 which was land adjoining Gideon and John

Bunch [Colonial Plats 13:425].

iv. ?James, who lived on land adjoining John Bunch in St. Matthew's

Parish, Berkeley County [Ibid.].

v. ?Naomy, married John Joyner, Junr., 23 December 1754 (both of

Amelia Township) [History of Orangeburg, S.C., 137].

4. Jeremiah1 Bunch, Sr., made a will in Bertie on 8 Mar. 1797, proved a

few days later. It did not identify his wife, who predeceased him,

but named his children:

i. William, probably born around 1740, but did not marry until

middle age, bond 23 December 1785 Mary Bunch, with Frederick

Bunch bondsman. He left a will in Bertie in 1816.

7 ii. Henry2, born perhaps 1743.

iii. Jeremiah2, born around 1745, married, bond 14 January 1765 Judah

Hill, Micajah Bunch bondsman. He died intestate in Bertie in

1809.

iv. Nehemiah, left a will in Bertie County in 1815.

v. Frederick, born about 1745/8, left a will in Bertie County in

1810.

vi. Nanny, married Collins.

5. Embrey Bunch made a will in Bertie on 20 July 1780, proved May 1789.

He left a wife Elizabeth and children:

i. Micajah2 Sr., born circa 1760/65, married bond 8 April 1791

Levinia Holder, with Elisha Holder bondsman, and secondly, bond

17 November 1801 Teletha Smith, with Micajah Bunch Jr. bondsman.

He moved to Christian County, Kentucky about 1803.

ii. Mary, married _____ Williams.

iii. Zadock, born before 1775. Unmarried, made his will 30 January

1801, proved May 1801.

iv. Nanny, married Rigdon Pritchard, 29 February 1792 Bertie County

bond.

v. Milley, unmarried in 1801.

6. Gideon Bunch, born perhaps 1725, was probably John2 Bunch's son since

he sold the land John inherited. He was living in Brunswick County,

Virginia, in 1740 [Orders 1732-41, 253; 1737-44, 41, 64]. He was a

defendant in a June 1747 Lunenburg County, Virginia, Court case

[Orders 1746-48, 209]. He was taxed as "Gibion" Bunch on 2 polls in

the 1750 Granville County, North Carolina, tax list of Samuel

Henderson [CR 44.701.19]. He was taxable on one black poll in 1755

in Orange County, North Carolina:

Bunch, Gideon a Molata 0/1 [T&C Box 1, p.4].

Members of the Gibson family were also taxed as "Molatas" in Orange

County in 1755. He was indebted to Samuel Benton of Orange County for

3 pounds, 11 shillings in June 1756 [Haun, Orange County Court

Minutes, I:171]. He moved to Berkeley County, South Carolina, where

he recorded a plat for 100 acres on the northeast side of Four Hole

Swamp on 5 December 1758 [Colonial Plats, 8:30], and he was listed

with (son?) Ephraim Bunch in the Berkeley County Detachment under

command of Captain Benjamin Elliot, drafted 8 November 1759;

discharged 8 January 1760 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South,

938]. He and his son, William, were "Black" taxables in Fishing Creek

District, Granville County, in 1761 and in 1762 with the notation,

Refs. to list his wife &c.

On 15 March 1763 while a resident of Berkeley County he sold 565

acres in Halifax County, North Carolina, of which 265 acres had been

patented to Paul Bunch on 1 Jan 1725, the remaining acreage having

been purchased by Paul Bunch from Thomas Wilkins on the south side

of the Roanoke River joining Quankey Pocoson, Sims, and Gideon

Gibson. William and Temperance Bunch were witnesses to the deed

[8:283].

On the following day, 16 March 1763, he bought another 150 acres in

Berkeley County [SC Archives Index 9-3-8-79-01 & 30-2-6-455-01]. He

was the plaintiff in a suit in Granville County, North Carolina, on

11 August 1765 in which he accused William Bowling of trespass, but

Gideon did not appear [Minutes 1754-70, 138]. On 2 March 1773 he

recorded a plat for 200 acres in St. Matthew's Parish, Berkeley

County, South Carolina, on a branch of Four Holes called Target,

adjoining Jacob and John Bunch [Colonial Plats, 13:424]. Perhaps he

was the Gidian Bunch whose 17 March 1804 St. James, Goose Creek,

Charleston County, South Carolina will was proved 7 May the same year

[WB 29:629]. His children living in North Carolina were

i. William, born perhaps 1740, an over 16 year old taxable in his

father's household in the 1762 list for Fishing Creek District:

"Son William." A 7 November 1763 Granville County deed of sale

for land from Henry Fuller to William Chavers refers to land on

the north side of Tar River adjoining Chavis and William Bunch,

and in 1764 he was a "Black" taxable in Henry Fuller's household

in the Granville County list of Samuel Benton. He may have been

the William Bunch who witnessed Gideon Bunch's sale of land in

Halifax County on 15 March 1763 and owned land in St. Matthew's,

Berkeley County, South Carolina, on 2 June 1772 [Colonial Plats,

13:425].

ii. ?Liddy, born before 1743, taxable in the 1754 Granville County

tax list of Gideon Macon with (her brother?) Micajah Bunch in

John Stroud's household.

8 iii. Micajah1, born before 1743.

iv. Fanny, born before 1745-49, a 12-16 year old taxable in the

Fishing Creek District, Granville County household of John

Griffin and his wife Miles Griffin in 1761.

7. Henry2 Bunch, born perhaps 1743, was taxed as a "Free Mulatto" in his

father's Bertie County household in the 1763 list of John Hill. He

married in Bertie, bond 29 February 1764 Eleanor Baysson, with Thomas

Bass bondsman. In 1764 he was taxed on himself in his own household

in Jonathan Standley's list, in 1767 on one slave, and he was taxed

for the last time in Bertie County in 1769 in the household of

Abraham Moses. He moved to Orange County where he was a taxable in

St. Mary's District on 2,179 pounds assessment in 1780 [CR 073.701.1

by NCGSJ XI:155]. He was head of an Orange County household of 3

"other free," one white woman, and 3 slaves in 1800 [NC:550] and 5

"other free" and one slave in 1810 [NC:953]. He may have been the

father of

i. Thomas, head of an Orange County household of 3 "other free" and

1 white woman in 1800 [NC:550].

ii. Eleanor, married John Perry, 2 March 1797, (her brother?) Thomas

Bunch bondsman. She obtained a divorce from the General Assembly

in December 1798. In her petition she claimed that John Perry

took to card playing, wasting his property, and abusing her soon

after they married. She and her child moved to her father's

house [NCGSJ XVII:206].

Gideon's children named in the South Carolina will were

iii. Jeremiah, who purchased land from John Bunch by deed recorded

in Charleston District between 1800 and 1801 [Lucas, Index to

Deeds of South Carolina, D-7:224].

iv. Hester Chern.

v. Mary Chamberlain.

vi. Daniel, head of a white Charleston County household of 10

persons in 1800 [SC:60].

vii. David.

8. Micajah1 Bunch, born before 1743, was taxable in 1754 in the

Granville County list of Gideon Macon in John Stroud's household [CR

44.702.19]. He was called "Micager Bunch Molata" when he was taxed

on 1 "Black" tithe in Orange County in 1755 [T&C Box, p.19]. He may

have been the father of

i. Clement, born perhaps 1770, an orphan boy bound to Anthony

Cozart by the Orange County Court on 25 November 1777. He was

surrendered to the Granville County Court by his bondsman, John

Wilburn, on 1 November 1790 [Minutes 1789-91]. In December 1798

he posted a bastardy bond in Granville County for a child he had

by Mildred Bass [Camin, N.C. Bastardy Bonds, 87].

Others in South Carolina

i. Lovet, head of a South Orangeburg District household of 8 "other

free" in 1790. He lived for a while in Robeson County, North

Carolina, since "Lovec Bunches old field" was mentioned in the

1 March 1811 will of John Hammons [1:125].

ii. Paul2, head of a Union District, South Carolina, household of 6

"other free" in 1800 [SC:241].

iii. Henry3, head of a Newberry District, South Carolina, household

of 2 "other free" in 1800 [SC:66].

iv. Ralph J., Nobel Peace Prize winner in 1950, probably descended

from the South Carolina branch of the family, but this has not

been proved. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on 7 August 1904,

son of Fred and Olive Bunche. The 1900 and 1910 census for

Detroit lists several members of the Bunch family who were born

in South Carolina, but Fred Bunch was not among them.

COLLINS FAMILY

The Collins and Bunch families were taxable "Molatas" in Orange

County, North Carolina, in 1755 [T&C, box 1]. They were also associated

with the Gibson family. Lucrecy Collins witnessed the 1775 Orange

County, North Carolina, will of George Gibson [A:195]. Some members of

the family moved to Wilkes County with the Gibsons and like the Gibsons,

they were counted there as white in 1790. This part of Wilkes County

became Ashe County in 1799, and both families were counted there as

"other free" in 1800.

1. Catherine McCollins, born perhaps 1687, was a white woman servant of

Elias Edmonds when she confessed in Lancaster County Court on 12

August 1705 that she had a "mulattoe Child born of her body begotten

by a Negroe" [Orders 1702-13, 127]. Her children may have been

i. Catherine Collins, born say 1705, a "free mulatto woman" of

North Farnham Parish presented by the Richmond County, Virginia

Court in November 1725 for having an illegitimate child [Orders

1721-32, 248, 267].

2 ii. Susan, say 1707.

3 iii. Thomas, born say 1708.

2. Susan Collens, born say 1707, was a "Negro" taxable in Digby Semore's

Northampton County, Virginia household in the 1737 list of Hilary

Stringer [L.P. 1737]. Her descendants who remained in Northampton

County were

i. John, married Nany Sabers, 11 August 1790 Northampton County

bond, Peter Warren security; second, Betsy Jeffries, 3 February

1803 Northampton County bond, Samuel Beavans security.

ii. Lighty, married Lear Drighouse, 3 January 1794 Northampton

County bond, Thomas Lewis security.

iii. Ralph, married Tamar Bingham, 20 December 1799 Northampton

County bond, John Simkins security.

iv. Mack, married Betsey Shepherd, 27 November 1809 Northampton

County bond, Abraham Lang security.

v. Nathaniel, married Salley Stockley, 6 October 1807 Northampton

County bond; and second, Molly Sample, 16 August 1810

Northampton County bond, Isaiah Carter security.

3. Thomas1 Collins, born say 1708, was a taxable in the 1750 Granville

County list of John Wade [CR 44.701.23]. This part of Granville

County became Orange County in 1752, and Thomas was a "Molata"

taxable there on 3 "Black" tithes in 1755 [T&C, box 1, p.19]. He

owned land on Flat River adjoining George Gibson and Moses Ridley

[Orange County Loose Papers, vol. V, no. 131; vol.VI, no. 579]. He

may have been the father of

4 i. George1, born about 1728.

ii. Thomas2, Junr., born say 1734, an Orange County taxable listed

nearby Thomas Collins in 1755 [T&C, box 1, p.19]. He may have

been the Thomas Collins, Sr., who was head of a white Moore

County household of one male over 16, two females, and one slave

in 1790 [NC:44], and there was a Thomas Collins, Jr., head of

a white Moore County household of two males under 16, three over

16, and four females in 1790 [NC:43]. He was head of an Ashe

County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:74].

iii. John, born say 1736, a "Molata" taxable in Orange County, taxed

on one Black tithe in 1755 [T&C, box 1, p.15].

4. George1 Collins, born about 1728, purchased 100 acres in Anson County

on 14 June 1764 [3:268]. This part of Anson County became Richmond

County in 1779, and his land was mentioned in a 2 February 1780

Richmond County land entry [Pruitt, Richmond County Land Entries, 10,

58]. He sold land by deed proved in the March 1783 session of

Richmond County Court [Minutes 1780-95, 33]. In December 1783 he and

Arthur Dees were security for (his sons?) Thomas and George Collins,

Jr. in a Richmond County Court case [Ibid., 47]. The Richmond County

Court excused him from paying poll tax in 1788 because he was sixty

years old. He was head of a Georgetown District, Prince George's

Parish, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [SC:54].

He may have been the father of

i. Thomas3, born perhaps 1760, a defendant in Richmond County Court

in December 1783 [Minutes 1780-95, 47].

ii. Charles, born perhaps 1765, ordered by the January 1787 Richmond

County Court to receive 20 lashes for larceny committed in 1783

[Ibid., 50, 111].

iii. George3, Jr., born perhaps 1767, head of a Richmond County

household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:45]. He entered 50 acres

in Richmond County on Mayners Creek of Hitchcock Creek on 12

June 1794 [Pruitt, Richmond County Land Entries, nos. 169, 1013]

and was taxed on 160 acres in 1795. He purchased 100 acres by

deed proved in the January 1796 session of the Richmond County

Court and sold 50 acres to (his brother?) Elisha Collins by deed

proved in the same session [Minutes 1793-1804, 312-3].

iv. Elisha, born perhaps 1770, one of the freeholders ordered by the

October 1794 session of the Richmond County Court to work on the

road to Catfish Road [Ibid., 282]. He was taxable on 250 acres

in 1795. He purchased 50 acres from (his father?) George Collins

by deed proved in Richmond County in January 1796 [Ibid., 313].

v. David, head of an Anson County household of 4 "other free" in

1800 [NC:203].

5. Samuel Collins, born perhaps 1734, was a "Molata" taxable in Orange

County on 2 Black tithes in 1755 [T&C, box 1, p.19]. He may have been

the Samuel Collins who was head of a Wilkes County household of one

male 21-60 and one female in the 1787 state census.

Wilkes and Ashe County descendants were

i. George2, head of a Wilkes County household of one male 21-60,

three males under 21 or over 60, and three free females for the

1787 state census.

ii. David, head of a Tenth Company, Wilkes County household of three

males over 16, two under 16, and six females in 1790 [NC:123].

iii. Martin, head of a Tenth Company, Wilkes County household of one

male over 16, 3 under 16, and four females in 1790 [NC:123].

iv. Valentine, head of a Tenth Company, Wilkes County household of

one male over 16 and two females in 1790 (abstracted as Vol)

[NC:123] and head of an Ashe County household of 6 "other free"

in 1800 [NC:75].

v. Vadery, perhaps the "Hardy" Collins who was head of a Wilkes

County household of one male over 16, one under 16, and four

females in 1790 [NC:123]. He was called Vadery in 1800, head of

an Ashe County household of 4 "other free" in 1800. The 26

January 1791 Wilkes County Court referred to a road near Sandy

Island Ford and Vardie Collens [Absher, Wilkes County Court

Minutes 1789-97, 20].

vi. Ambrose, head of a Tenth Company, Wilkes County household of one

male over 16, one under 16, and two females in 1790 [NC:123].

He was head of an Ashe County household of 4 "other free" in

1800 [NC:76].

Bertie County

6. Josiah Collins was a "free Molatto" taxable in his own household in

the 1771 list of Jonathan Standley [CR 10.702.1, box 2]. Perhaps he

was the same Josiah Collins who was appointed a Bertie County

constable in February 1777 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes,

IV:212]. His family was associated with the Henry Bunch family of

Bertie County. He was probably related to Lucy Collins, head of a

Bertie County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:36].

Hyde County

7. Cate Collings was called an "Indian Woman" servant of William Gibbs

when she was summoned by the March 1765 Hyde County Court [Minutes

II:113]. Perhaps her descendants were

i. Susannah, born before 1776, head of a Hyde County household of

2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:248].

ii. Charity, born 1794-1806, head of a Hyde County household of 6

"free colored" in 1820 [NC:246].

iii. Horatio, a "free man of color" who had "taken up with" a slave

named Winney, property of Henry Lucas, in Hyde County on 1 April

1843 [CR 053.928.2].

iv. Nancy, a "free woman of color" who had "taken up with" a slave

named Ellick, property of Ananias Sadler, in Hyde County on 1

October 1842 [Ibid.].

South Carolina

Those who were counted as "other free" in South Carolina were

i. Cary, head of a South Orangeburg District, South Carolina

household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Elias, head of a Winyan County household of 6 "other free" and

68 slaves in 1800 [SC:760] and a Georgetown household of 6

"other free" and 16 slaves in 1810 [SC:219].

iii. Jonathan, head of a St. Dennis, Berkeley household of 1 "other

free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [SC:442].

iv. Reason, head of a Fairfield District household of 5 "other free"

in 1810 [SC:606].

v. Rob, head of a St. Dennis, Berkeley household of 2 "other free"

and 10 slaves in 1810 [SC:442].

Maryland

Those counted as "other free" in Maryland were

i. Sarah, head of an Ann-Arundel County household of 3 "other free"

in 1790.

ii. George "Negro," head of a Kent County household of one "other

free" in 1790.

iii. George (Mulatto), head of a Charles County household of one

"other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:522].

iv. Samuel, Sr., head of a Charles County household of 2 "other

free" in 1800 [MD:562].

v. Samuel, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 12

"other free" with Thomas Proctor in 1790, perhaps the same

Samuel Collins who was head of a Charles County household of 9

"other free" in 1800 [MD:561].

vi. Samuel, Jr., head of a Charles County household of 10 "other

free" in 1800 [MD:562].

vii. Henry, "free Mulatto" head of a Prince George County household

of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:263].

viii. Henry, head of a St. Mary's County household of 4 "other free"

in 1800 [MD:411].

ix. Peter, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free"

in 1800 [MD:673].

DEMERY FAMILY

1. Frederick Demmery, born perhaps 1730, was living in Southampton

County, Virginia, on 28 August 1780, when he made his will,

proved 8 November 1781, David Demmery executor [WB 3:348]. He

named the following beneficiaries but did not state his

relationship to them:

i. Richard, born perhaps 1765, a Southampton County taxable

in 1787, his tax charged to David Dimmory [Schreiner-

Yantis, 1787 Census, 1128]. Richard was head of a

Northampton County, North Carolina household of 6 "other

free" in 1800 [NC:435].

ii. Tempy.

iii. Micajah1, born perhaps 1770, a "Black" person 12-50 years

old living alone in Captain Dupree's District of

Northampton County in 1786 for the state census. He called

himself Micajah Young on 30 April 1794 when he married

Elizabeth Evans, Wake County bond. He was head of a Wake

County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 (abstracted as

Micajah Dempsey) [NC:106]. He was head of an Anson County

household of 5 "other free" in 1800, counted as Micajah

Young [NC:203] and counted a second time as Micajah Demery

[NC:207], 7 in 1810 (as Micajah Demery) [NC:44], and 11

"free colored" in 1820, called "Micajah Demery alias

Young" [NC:12].

iv. Day.

v. Collin.

2. John1 Demery, born about 1735, perhaps a brother of Frederick

Demery, purchased 100 acres near Corduroy Swamp in Northampton

County, North Carolina, on 8 January 1757 and another 100 acres

adjoining this on 16 April 1771 [DB 2:345, 5:93]. He may have

been a descendant of John Demaree of Northampton County who was

excused by the 3 May 1758 session of the Assembly from paying

taxes because he was old and disabled [Saunders, Colonial

Records of North Carolina, V:1008]. John Demery voted for Joseph

Sikes in the Northampton County election of 1762 [SS 837 by

NCGSJ XII:170]. He was one of the "Black" members of the undated

colonial muster of Captain James Fason's Northampton County

militia [Troop Returns, 1-3]. He sold his Northampton County

land on 15 February 1778 [DB 6:227], and was taxed on 350 acres

and one Black Poll in Captain Dupree's District of Bladen County

in 1784 [Bladen Co. Historical Soc., 1784 Tax List, Bladen

County, 13]. He was head of a Bladen County household of 9

"other free" in 1790 [NC:188] and a Liberty County, South

Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:779]. Perhaps

his wife was Derinda, head of a Bladen County household of 3

"other free" in 1800 and 4 "free colored" women in 1820

[NC:132]. His probable children were

i. Allen, born say 1760, head of an Anson County household of

7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:35] and 5 in 1800 [NC:203]. He

enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment [Clark,

Colonial and State Records, 16:1047]. He received an Anson

County grant for land on Savannah Creek on 21 January 1800

and sold this land on 27 August 1806, 20 February 1807,

and 2 April 1807 [DB 12:170, S:167, N&O:142, T:39, 90].

3 ii. John2, born about 1774 in Charleston, South Carolina.

iii. Wiley, born say 1777, head of an Anson County household of

3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:207], and counted a second time

as Wiley Young [NC:203], called William Demery in 1810,

head of a Marion District, South Carolina, household of 3

"other free" in [SC:80].

3. John2 Demery, born about 1774 in Charleston, South Carolina,

married Sarah Robinson in Anson County, North Carolina, in 1801

according to his own recollection [History of Randolph County,

Indiana, 137]. He was head of a Bladen County household of 4

"other free" in 1800, 3 in Marion District, South Carolina in

1810 [SC:80, 84a], and 5 "free colored" in Anson County in 1820

[NC:12]. He was taxed on 300 acres and two free Negroes in Horry

District, South Carolina, in 1824 [Comptroller General, Returns

1824, no.311]. He purchased land in Anson County on Island Creek

that same year on 12 January and sold it three months later on

6 April 1824 [DB V:108, 140]. He was the first African American

to settle in the western part of Randolph County, Indiana. He

came to Randolph County with Lemuel Vestal in 1825 and settled

in Stony Creek. He had 80 acres of land and a house and lot in

Winchester at the time of his death in 1860 [History of Randolph

County, Indiana, 137]. He was a 69 year old head of a Washington

Township, Randolph County, Indiana household with Polly (60

years) and (son) Maston (13 years) in 1850. His children were

i. Mary, married William Weaver.

ii. Irvin.

iii. John4, born perhaps 1805.

iv. Hannah, married James Scott, son of Robert Scott who was

emancipated in 1779 in North Carolina. They came to

Randolph County from Wayne County in 1832. They had 14

children.

v. Robert, who lived in Cabin Creek settlement.

vi. Charles.

vii. Coleman.

viii. William H., born perhaps 1830, told his life story to the

author of the History of Randolph County in 1888 as

follows: He started life at sea in 1845 as servant to

Commodore Perry aboard the James K. Polk which burned at

the Strait of Gibraltar. In 1847 he worked as a steward on

a steamer to Europe, the Middle East, and the West Indies.

In 1852 he worked on several Mississippi steamboats and

later returned to farm life in Randolph County [Ibid.,

137-138].

ix. Zachary.

x. Phebe Ann, married Jacob Felters.

xi. Maston, born about 1837, 13 years old in 1850.

4. Daniel Demery, born about 1740, perhaps a brother of John1, was

head of a household of 7 "Black" persons 12-50 years old and 8

"Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Captain

Dupree's District in 1786 for the state census for Northampton

County. He was head of a Northampton County household of 10

"other free" in 1790 [NC:74]. The administration of his

Northampton County estate was granted to Edward Lawry on 1 June

1795 on security of 100 pounds [Minutes 1772-96, 172]. His

children were probably:

i. Shadrack, born perhaps 1775, married Charlotte Hicks, 8

February 1794 Southampton County, Virginia, bond, Aaron

Heathcock (Haithcock) surety. He was head of a Northampton

County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:718].

5 ii. Wright, born perhaps 1777.

iii. James, head of a Halifax County household of 11 "other

free" in 1810. Perhaps his widow was Winny, born before

1776, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "free

colored" females in 1820 [NC:145].

iv. John3, born about 1783, married Rebecca Stewart, 10

February 1806 Greensville County, Virginia bond, Frederick

Shelton surety. He registered in Greensville County on 9

May 1807: Born free as appears from a Certificate of

Norfolk County, aged twenty four years ... five feet five

Inches & 3/4 high [Register, no.10]. He and his wife,

Rebecca, sold land in Greensville County to Henry Stewart

about 1808, Ben Gowing witness [DB 1806-10].

v. Beehy, head of a Greensville County household of 3 "free

colored" in 1820 [VA:261].

5. Wright Demery, born perhaps 1777, was head of a Northampton

County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:718]. Perhaps his

widow was Lucy, head of a Northampton County household of 4

"free colored" in 1820 [NC:226]. His children may have been

i. William, born perhaps 1798, married Tamer Wilkins, 31

January 1816 Northampton County marriage bond with Wright

Demery bondsman. William and Tamer were found dead six

years later on 5 March 1822 when a coroner's jury was

appointed by the Northampton County Court to determine the

cause of death [Minutes 1821-25, 84].

ii. Micajah2, born 1814, married Nancy Roberts, 20 August 1833

Northampton County bond, and were counted in the 1850

Logan County, Ohio, census in Jefferson Township

[Household no.231].