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City of Antigo and Langlade County, Wisconsin Genealogical Research Sources

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Ghost Towns

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Ghost Towns
Bass LakeLocated in the Town of Upham , Section 12 of T33N, R10E. Post Office 1904-1921. Location of several logging camps.
BavariaLocated in Town of Summit. Section 27. Post Office 1905-1921. Research References: Antigo Daily Journal, November 18, 2006, Hidden Places Series, page 1. "Bavaria was the 'center' of the George Paine lumber company logging efforts in that portion of Langlade County. Various logging railroad spurs radiated outward from Bavaria to gain access to Paine's timber tracts." source 1
BryantLocated in the Town of Price. Post Office 1884-1997. I am guessing the first name of this community might have been "Hoxie" but further research is needed. There was a logging camp in this area owned by Hoxie and Muller (also spelled Mellor and Miller).
Casper/Kasper/Casper LandingLocated in the Town of Vilas. NE 1/4, NE 1/4, Sec. 30, T32N, R9E, In the vicinity of the intersection of County Highway "C" and Peterson Road. "Apparently a site of a Heinemann logging camp." source 1
ChoateLocated in Town of Langlade. Intersection of State Higway "52" and Forest County Highway "DD" on the Langlade-Forest County Line. NW1/4, NW 1/4, Sec. 1, T33N, R13E.
(45° 22.69' N, -88° 49.33' W).
Choate named after Leander Choate (1834-1909), lumberman, businessman, banker. "Leander Choate was one of the promoters who helped develop the Wisconsin & Northern railroad between Crandon and Shawano." source 1
ClarkPost Office 1912-1912. The location of this historical community is unknown and any help determining the location would be appreciated!
CulverLocated in Town of Wolf River/Elton. NW 1/4, NW 1/4, Sec. 31, T31N, R14E. Near railroad tracks and Evergreen River. Southeast of Evans Mill.
(45° 7.84' N, -88° 48.06' W)
I could not find direct information on the name of this ghost town. However, I did find the following circumstantial information which might establish a connection. A Mr. John Culver died January 18, 1910. His daughter's name was Mrs. E.H. Van Ostrand. According to the 1905 state census he lived in the Town of Evergreen. His wife's name was "Amorette." She died March 2, 1907." I wonder if the E. in his daughter's married name might be "Evan" as in Evans Mill? "First 'station' on the Wisconsin & Northern railroad north of the Menominee Indian Reservation." source 1
Dobbson/DobbstonLocated in the Town of Wolf River. Post Office 1877-1894. Also called Markton
DorzeskiLocated in Town of Wolf River/Elton. Area on State Highway 55 called Dorzeski where the Dorzeski Family lived. It was not an actual village, just area of a few neighbors in 1917. Sec. 7, T32N, R14E.
DrexelLocated in the Town of Price. Just northeast of Sherry Junction? Drexel was the first name for Kent Post Office 1890-1925. "Site of one of Henry Sherry's many sawmills. The railroad between 'Sherry Spur' and Drexel was paid for by Henry Sherry although the operating equipment was provided by the C&NW RR. Henry Sherry developed a network of logging railroad spurs north, east and south of Drexel. These spurs never crossed the Wolf River." source 1
EhlingerPost Office 1918-1923. Named for the area around the Ehlinger Brothers sawmill which was located just south of Hollister.
ElmhurstLocated in Town of Rolling. Post Office 1881-1928. Research References: Antigo Daily Journal, November 11, 2006, Hidden Places Series.
Eric SawmillSee Rolling history of District No. 6 Pine Grove District.
Evans MillLocated in Town of Wolf River. SW 1/4, SW 1/4, Sec. 30, T31N, R14E.
(45° 7.91' N, -88° 48.37' W)
Saw Mill. On short railroad spur and connected to two different railroad main lines on opposite ends. Northwest of Culver. "Located at the end of a spur which was developed by the Wolf River Branch Line of the C&NW RR." source 1
GarrisonPost Office 1884-1885. The location of this historical community is unknown and any help determining the location would be appreciated!
GoodlandPost Office 1880-1881. The location of this historical community is unknown and any help determining the location would be appreciated!
Heinemann"Located at the forks of the West and East branches of the Eau Claire River immediately south of U.S. Highway 64, across the road from Shady Road [SE 1/4 of PLSS Section 20 T31N, R10E]. Two 'Heinemanns' existed, one in Langlade County and one in Lincoln County. The Langlade County 'Heinemann' was the center of the Benjamin Heinemann sawmill complex. The Lincoln County 'Heinemann' was the center of the Sigmund Heinemann [brother] sawmill complex. The Lincoln County 'Heinemann' was completely destroyed by fire; whereas only the sawmill at the Langlade County 'Heinemann' was destroyed by fire. The Heinemann brothers were closely associated with lumbering operations in Wausau, Merrill, the Foster-Latimer Lumber Company of Mellen, as well as in banks in Wausau and Merrill. The Langlade 'Heinemann' was apparently a local [Antigo] reference to the millsite whereas the Lincoln 'Heniemann' was a platted site." source 1
HoxiePost Office 1887-1888. The location of this historical community is unknown and any help determining the location would be appreciated!
Irwin Post Office 1915-1922. More information is needed about this community. Any help would be appreciated!
  • Located in the Town of Parrish at (45° 27.27' N, -89° 21.33' W) SE 1/4, SW 1/4, Sec. 3, T34N, R9E.
  • Based on the following circumstantial evidence I would guess this was at one time a supply base for logging camps in the area or saw mill and probably named after the person who ran it?
    • Shown on map of Railroad Lines in the County, in Not Long Ago book by Larry Van Goethem.
    • A 1997 plat book shows a 40 acre section at this location owned by Robert & Matthew Fronek, MFL.
    • The area was full of logging camps and was located one-half mile east of the Parrish Junction to Parrish railroad tracks which is now County Highway "Q" and one mile south of Parrish Junction.
    • A topographic map shows the area is just west of a marsh or swamp.
    • A topographic map shows a walking trail starts at Highway "Q" (45° 27.61' N, -89° 22.04' W) going through Irwin and ending in the northeast corner of section 10.
    • An aerial photograph of the area seems to show the trail and a clearing among the trees.
KentSee Drexel. Located in the Town of Price. Post Office 1890-1925.
KoepenickLocated in the Town of Upham. "Also Koepenick('s) Siding. Post Office 1890-1925. The Milwaukee Lake Shore & Western [C&NW] Rwy constructed a small depot at Koepenick Siding. In conjunction with a sawmill erected by Andrew Bruette prior to 1892, the Milwaukee Lake Shore & Western Rwy constructed a two mile long spur west from the main line [C&NW Ashland Division main line] to his mill. The point of connection with the MSL&W was named Koepenick. Apparently there were a number of Koepenicks involved in Langlade County politics at that time. Circa 1892, Bruette sold his mill to Henry Sherry who, in turn, operated it for approximately eight years. Under Sherry's ownership, the spur became a short branch line which pushed west another five miles to put its end of track across the Wolf River from the hamlet of Pearson. A southerly branch line was built from a point one mile southwest of the end of track which was pushed southward for approximately four miles. After the area between Koepenick('s) Siding and the west bank of the Wolf River was logged off, Sherry moved this sawmill to the Upper Peninsula. The Koepenick branch line was removed by the Chicago & North Western railroad circa 1941." source 1
LangladePost Office 1873-1915. Located in the Town of Wolf River.
Lost Nation1884-1886: The six and one-third eastern townships of Langlade County. Then became the town of Langlade for one year. Then the two northwestern townships became the present town of Langlade while the remaining 4 one-third townships became the town of Elton. Elton Township was later renamed the Wolf River Township.
MalcolmPost Office 1882-1891. Located in the Town of Price at the northeast corner of State Highway 52 and Polar Road. One-half mile east was Sherry Junction.
MarktonIt is important to know that originally Markton and Dobbson/Dobbston were two different places located a little more than one mile apart. Latter Dobbston was named Markton. The Markton Post Office (1896-1954) was at the original Markton location. "I believe that the house which is at the entrance to Gardner Dam [south side of the road] was the actual site of the Markton post office." source 1
MaykingPost Office 1894-1902.
Melnik/Star NevaLocated in the Town of Neva. Post Office 1881-1886. After George Krueger painted the local tavern operated by George Schroepfer with a big star the community gradually became known as Star Neva.
MorleyLocated in the Town of Peck. Post Office 1886-1920. Morley had a stage stop and store for area farmers and loggers.
Muller's LakeAlso known as Mueller's Lake, Sylvan Lake, and Polar. Post Office 1879-1889. Polar Post Office 1882-1887 and 1897-1967. Village name changed back and forth which accounts for the different periods listed.
NewSee Lily. Post Office 1878-1890Also the name of the county before it was named "Langlade."
NorwoodPost Office 1880-1888. Not sure if this is Phlox which had a post office 1880-1963.
OrmsbyLocated in the Town of Peck. Post Office 1902-1922. "Originally developed after a log-driving dam was constructed across the West Branch of the West Branch of the Eau Claire River. Ormsby, Peck, Twp, center of PLSS Section 16 T32N, R10E, saw the construction of a sawmill. The settlement was entered by the C&NW RR circa 1902 as the Ormsby Branch Line. This branch line connected to the Chicago & North Western Ashland Division immediately south of the hamlet of Kempster. In addition, Honzick's Spur met this Ormsby branch line approximately one mile west of the C&NW Ashland Division main line. Where the Ormsby branch line curved to the south and west from Kempster, the Honzick's Spur curved to the north and west further south of Kempster. This latter Spur was probably build because the main thrust of rail traffic from Ormsby would be in a southbound direction a that time. Both right of ways were removed circa 1940." source 1. For a time during Prohibition Ormsby was home to one of the largest stills that ever existed in Wisconsin. The Summit Lake C&NW railroad station handled a large amount of rye, corn, and sugar traffic for the Ormsby Junction according to a book written by Jon Schmidt titled "The Phantom Still, and other tales of northwoods moonshining.
ParrishParrish was located in both the Towns of Summit and Parrish at different times. Post Office 1889-1963. It was the location of a Brooks & Ross sawmill.
Post LakePost Office 1884-1913. Located in the Town of Elcho.
PriemInformation needed. Located in the Town of Langlade. Had a post office in 1917. Early name for Lily/New/Twin Lakes
ReevesReeves was a platted community just south of Deerbrook in the Town of Neva. Post Office 1885-1887.
RollingPost Office 1882-1884. Not sure if this refers to the Town of Rolling?
RoseLocated in Town of Norwood. Post Office 1880-1880. Small saw mill community on the east end of Moose Lake.
Research References: See the history of both the Sugar Bush and Riverside School Districts on the Town of Norwood page.
SherburnAn eary name for the village of Bryant in the Town of Price.
Sherry
aka Sherry Junction
Area around railroad Sherry Junction. (Town of Price)
Located approximately at the intersection of State Highway 52 and Polar Road.
Research Reference: Antigo Daily Journal, November 4, 2006, Hidden Places Series, page 1.
Strassburg Strassburg was a sawmill community in the Town of Rolling. Post Office 1886-1893.
StraussEarly "stopping place." Located one mile south of Pickerel on the Wolf River in the Town of Langlade. Named after early settler Henry Strauss.
Sylvan LakeAn early name for the village of Polar in the Town of Polar. Post Office 1889-1893.
TaylorTaylor was another name for the village of Lily in the Town of Langlade. [confirm later, webmaster]
Twin LakesEarly name for Lily/New in the Town of Langlade.
Van OstrandVan Ostrand was a platted community near White Lake that never was built because of fighting between railroads and politicians.
VaughnVaughn was located in both the towns of Ackley and Peck. Post Office 1895-1901. The Ross-Edwards sawmill was the main employer.
WeedWeed was a sawmill community just south of the City of Antigo in the Town of Antigo. Post Office 1886-1895.
WilburPost Office 1884-1885. The location of this historical community is unknown and any help determining the location would be appreciated!
Railroad Ghost Places
Logging RailroadsTimothy Sasse's History of Logging Railroads Website.
Antigo JunctionSection 35, T35N-R7E, Lincoln County, Town of King, about 8 miles east of Tomahawk and about 3 miles east of Harrison. Not located in Langlade County despite the "Antigo" name.
Plat Map Location

However, one railroad map shows the junction located just east of Merrill?

Bellemyer SpurLocated in the Town of Ackley (West) Sec. 32, T31N, R9E. "A logging spur of the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul [Milwaukee Road] railroad located in far southwestern Langlade County near Russian Spur." source 1
Boehm SpurLocated in the Town of Ackley (West) Sec. 30, T31N, R9E. "A logging spur of the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul [Milwaukee Road] railroad located in far southwestern Langlade County near Russian Spur." source 1
Bonita Line [Spur/branch line]Located in Sec. 6, T31N, R15E, Town of Doty, Oconto Co. "The Bonita Line was a group effort. The Milwaukee Lake Shore & Western [C&NW] Rwy constructed a logging branch line in a westerly direction from the hamlet of Bonita. Bonita is located in Highway 32 and formerly on the Wisconsin Northern [not Wisconsin & Northern railroad which was a proprietary property of the MSL&W RR. The MLS&W RR portion of the Bonita Line ended approximately at the Oconto-Langlade County line not too far east of Wis. Highway 55. From that point, and other points along the line, a number of lumber companies constructed logging branch lines to the north into Oconto and Langlade Counties. They may have even run south into the current Menomonee Indian Reservation [lots of excellent timer there!]. Companies involved in logging in these areas included the Oconto Company and the Holt Lumber Company. Trains pulled the logs out of the woods and took them to Oconto for processing. This line was another attempted incursion of the MLS&W [C&NW] Rwy into lands 'protected' for the Wisconsin & Northern RR [see Wolf River Junction] above." source 1
Donahue Spur"A logging siding on the Wolf River branch line constructed for a logging contractor named 'Donahue' located approximately three miles northeast of Wolf River Junction." source 1
Freeman's SidingInformation needed. Located about 2 miles south of Choate. Near the Freeman School.
Gilmans Spur"Located on the Milwaukee Lake Shore & Western [C&NW] railroad's Wolf River Branch Line seven miles northeast of Wolf River Junction. This spur was removed ca. 1912. It was 745 feet long. It was located at the point where the Wolf River branch line split between continuing further to Sherry's Junction and branching southward to Elton. ...Probably constructed for a logging contractor named 'Gillman'" source 1
Honzicks Spur"See Ormsby, above. This spur connected with the Milwaukee Lake Shore & Western [C&NW} Rwy just slightly over one mile south of Kempster. It curved to the northwest and connected with the Ormsby branch line approximately one mile west of the main north-south MLSL&W line. No doubt constructed for a logging contractor named 'Honzick'" source 1
Langlade Land & Logging Spur"A 1, 203 foot long spur to the west of the main line, located approximately two miles south of Hollister on the Wisconsin & Northern [SOO Line] railroad and built for the Langlade Land & Logging company." source 1
Malcolm Spur [Siding]"Malcolm Spur [Siding] was located on the Wolf River Branch Line approximately nine miles northeast of Wolf River Junction and approximately one-half mile west of Sherry's Junction. It was approximately 541 feet long. It was named after Malcolm Hutchinson and early settler.'" source 1
McGinnis/McInnis SpurIn West Ackley. Section 19, T31N, R9E. Near Russian Spur. McGinnis name not found in Dessureau's history of Ackley. Also near Boehm spur and Bellemyer Spur. "A point developed on the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul [Milwaukee Road] railroad. McInnes was on a right of way constructed between Gleason, Lincoln County and Kalinke, Marathon County. A portion of this right of way passed through the far southwestern corner of Langlade County. McInnes was located in the Ackley Wildlife Area, south of U.S. Highway 64 and nearly in the center of PLSS Section 30 T31N, R9E. This Gleason-Kalinke branch line connected with the Otis-Gleason branch line which, in turn, connected with the main north-south right of way of the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad north of Merrill. The area west of the Wisconsin River, north of Kalinke and south of Lincoln County Highway D was heavily traversed by spurs and branch line of the CM&StPRR. Probably named for a logging contractor who cut-over that area." source 1
Mill?? Spur 825Information needed. This might be Muller's Lake Spur?
Neff Siding"Located on the Milwaukee Lake Shore & Western [C&NW] Rwy Wolf River branch line approximately four and one-half miles northeast of Wolf River Junction. No doubt named for a logging contractor named 'Neff'" source 1
Parrish Junction."Located in the far northwestern corner of Langlade on the former Wolf & Wisconsin Rivers railroad. It was the junction between the railroad which originated in Pelican Lake [actually, Post Lake], passed through in Parrish and terminated in Gleason, at the end of the Otis-Gleason branch line itself an asset of the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul [Milwaukee Road] branch line. At Parrish Junction, [located on the Langlade-Oneida County line at the point where Langlade County Highway 'Q' crosses the border [NE corner of PLSS Section 4 / NW corner Section 3 T34N, R9E] a branch line was constructed northwesterly to Harrison, Lincoln County. Later the Marinette Tomahawk & Western railroad connected with the end of track at Harrison and used the former Wolf & Wisconsin Rivers railroad trackage to Pelican Lake." source 1
Powell Siding"A logging siding constructed for a logging contractor named 'Powell' by the Wisconsin & Northern [SOO Line] railroad approximately two miles northwest of Hollister." source 1
Pratt Junction"A part of the 'Pratt Road'. George W. Pratt was heavily involved in lumbering in the Parrish-Harrison-Jeffris area. Pratt Junction is located a the crossing diamond of the Wolf and Wisconsin Rivers railroad [owned by Pratt] and the Milwaukee Lake Shore & Western [C&NW] railroad one mile south of the village of Pelican Lake. Pratt harvested logs north, east and south of Post Lake, floated the logs to the western shore of that lake and hoisted them onto railroad flat cars. He then transported them west on his own Wolf & Wisconsin Rivers railroad to the MLS&W, then south to Oshkosh where he operated a sawmill. Transporting by rail was more efficient that driving the logs down the Wolf River each spring. This method provided for a more uniform supply of logs to the mill." source 1
Russian SpurLocated in the Town of Ackley (West) Sec. 19, T31N, R9E. "A part of the vast network of logging spurs and branch lines which blanketed western Langlade County and eastern Lincoln County and were established by the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul [Milwaukee Road] railroad. This spur wasw 1, 403 feet long." source 1
Seering Siding"Located just north of Freeman's Siding, approximately one and three-quarters of a mile south of Choate. Choate was located on the Wisconsin & Northern [SOO Line] railroad immediately south of the Langlade-Forest County line at the northeast corner of PLSS Section 2 / the northwest corner of PLSS Section 2 T33N, R13E. This was a siding or spur constructed for a logging contractor named "Seering." source 1
Setaside by J.D. Polar Cem. 1917Information needed. Located in the Town of Ainsworth.
Sherry's Extension"That right of way between Sherry's Junction and Kent [Drexel] at the end of the Milwaukee Lake Shore & Western [C&NW] railway's Wolf River branch line railroad. Apparently a gentleman name Brotherton proposed this spur to be extended to the west bank of the Wolf River [and beyond?]" source 1
Sherry JunctionA railroad junction southwest of Kent named after Henry Sherry. Sherry's saw mill was at Kent. (Town of Price)
Located at the intersection of State Highway 52 and Grey Road. One-half mile to the west was the community of Malcolm.
Spur X277"A spur which was constructed westward from the Wisconsin & Northern [SOO Line] railroad at Oxbow Rapids [PLSS Section 25 T32N, R13E.] This spur was 681 feet long and on the west side of the Wolf River." source 1
Wallrich Spur"Named for Michael Wallrich, a promoter of the Wisconsin & Northern [SOO Line] railroad, and lumberman. For many years, Wallrich owned and operated a lorge sawmill immediately north of Shawano on the Wolf River. The family is now in the insurance business. Wallrich Spur was located approximately three-quarters of a mile northeast of Van Ostrand on the Wisconsin & Northern [SOO Line] railroad at the point where US Highway 64 crosses the SOO Line right of way [NW 1/4 of PLSS Section 9 T31N, R14E]" source 1
Wolf River Junction.Located (on maps) in White Lake near the end of the Wolf River Branch Line. Sometimes the junction just north of the City of Antigo that went to Bryant is also referred to as Wolf River Junction since it was the beginning of the Wolf River Branch Line.

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