Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   
Ancestors of Cedric and Brendan

Ancestors of Cedric and Brendan

 Home  |  Chinn  |  Buchanan  |  Skelton  |  Svenceski  |  XUE 

Cedric's Home Page

Brendan's Home Page

Cedric was born in the year 2001 his brother Brendan in 2003. This site is dedicated to them and their eventual descendants.

Ancestors of Cedric and Brendan


John Buchanan [Parents] was born in 1710. He married Margaret Crawford in 1748.

It is believed that John had a large family and possibly has descendants spread throughout Canada and the United States. Generally though there is no current record of the offspring.

Margaret Crawford was born in 1720. She married John Buchanan in 1748.

Margaret Crawford is probably related to Oliver Crawford (1719-1803). Oliver was the father of Robert and grandfather to the Margaret Crawford who married George Buchanan (1780-1865), George being the grandson of this marital union between Margaret Crawford and John Buchanan.

They had the following children:

  M i Archibald Buchanan

George Buchanan [Parents] 1 was born 2 on 7 Mar 1780 in townland of Lislimnaghan, Tyrone, Ireland. He died 3 on 4 Jun 1865 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. He married 4 Margaret Crawford on 14 Aug 1797.

As part of a leasehold exchange of two farm properties for the 61 acre farm located in Strathroy, Lord Mountjoy promised to Archibald Buchanan, George's father, to find suitable employment for his son. It is believed that this was done soon after the family moved to the new farm in 1793. John, George's brother, died of pleurisy as a result of a severe wetting received during the move.

In the course of time a position in Army Stores or Army Brokerage was offered to George, but seeing as he was the only heir to the Stratheroy farm his cousin George Crawford was recommended for the position. As a result of George Crawford's accepting the position it is stated that his descendants remained in the region as government officials until at least 1931. This was confirmed when Robert Buchanan (1801-1888), George's son, after returning to Ireland in 1855 and on a visit to Dublin in 1867 called upon John Cane Crawford who was then a 1st Class Clerk, 1st Section Paymaster General's Office, Dublin Branch.

George was the only offspring of the family to reach maturity. He was comfortably situated and apparently took life easy and lived well. Served as an Ensign in the Cappagh Yeomanry. They drilled in the vicinity of Newtownstewart. In 1814 George acquired an estate in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland which was sold in 1867 after his death. George was employed as an agent for Rector James Wilmot Ormsby, Sch. T. C. D. 1787, rector of Cappagh from 1819 until his demise in 1831. George's eldest, John, succeeded him in his position as agent for the Rector. In addition to his farm George opened a tannery on July 5, 1830, and operated it for some time there-after. George sold the first leather from the tannery on Oct 30, 1830.

W.P. Buchanan refers to George as, like many of the Buchanans, being of a generous disposition and suffered now and then by endorsing supposed friends or relations. Their house was open to friends and relations whom frequently attended at dinner, no invitation necessary.

George was known to frequently associate with his two brother-in-laws, all married to Crawford daughters. John Taylor and Andrew Rutherford were partial to what was referred to a generally fraternal celebration.

George did not frequent saloons, these being beneath him, but was far from being an abstainer as the terms of the following sufficiently ambiguous pledge testifies:-
"Nov 1, 1822. With the help of God, I will not for one year from the date above, drink more of spirituous liquors, than one quart of Beer, as near as I can guess, out of my own house in Strathroy, and two common glasses of spirits or punch, hobnobbing at dinner excepted in my own house, wine at Sacrament and a sick bed excepted.--G.B."

The above pledge also suggests a certain strength of will on the part of Margaret his wife.

The following is an extract from W.P. Buchanan's 1931 family publication "Archibald Buchanan (1748-1836) Bears and Forbears" pertaining to George's uncle Andrew McMaynes and the circumstances on the day of George's funeral:-

ANDREW McMAYNES

Either John the father or Archibald the grandfather (more probably the latter) of Archibald Buchanan, 1748-1836, was married secondly to an Irish (not Scotch-Irish) woman, and from this union, in second or third generation, Andrew McMaynes was descended. His visits to Strathroy were always interesting and appreciated. He attended the funeral of George Buchanan, 1780-1865, of whom he always spoke as Cousin George. On the evening before Geo. B. was buried the cock of the McMaynes household crew much later than usual. So unusual in fact, that Mr. McM. sent someone out to feel the rooster's feet and note the direction towards which he was turned. The messenger reported the feet cold and headed towards Omagh. Mr. McM. promptly interpreted these conditions as death and associate with his Cousin George, so he immediately retired, made an early start next morning, rode ten or twelve miles, was there two or three hours before the funeral, and here note that he had not been previously advised of the death. He put up at the residence of Robert Buchanan, 1801-1888, and had a late breakfast of boiled eggs, etc. Mrs. B. was of course busy that morning, so deputed her daughter Martha (afterwards wife of Rev. Thos. Hall) to act as hostess. Everything went on well until the guest ate a portion of the egg shells or "luck to the house." - the almost sixteen year old girl laughed in a smothered way at this and was after-wards very mildly reprimanded by her mother for discourtesy to the visitor. Let every reader draw their own conclusions.

A. McMaynes was representative of the peasant class of his day, honest and upright in every walk of life, but well lined with superstition.

For a great number of years, he started out every Fall with sufficient money to buy one animal, made a systematic round of the local Cattle Fairs, and traded until he had a Beef Cow and his original money intact. This took him from home, sometimes a few days, and sometimes two or three weeks. A shrewd, hard working man of character and principle, who in his time on a comparatively small farm, accumulated considerable money. He traded 'in cattle as long as he lived. He was on horseback at G. B.'s funeral in 1865, and then well over eighty. He left a daughter who was married over fifty years ago to a Government official connected with the local Prison. They resided in. Northern Ireland. Intercourse with the family practically ceased after death of. Mr. McM.

Margaret Crawford [Parents] 1 was born 2 in 1780 in Rash Mill, County Tyrone, Ireland. She died 3 on 11 May 1856 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. She married 4 George Buchanan on 14 Aug 1797.

Margaret was probably born at Rash Mill, not far from Cappagh Church, as her father moved from there to Knockmoyle Mill in about 1795. Margaret was the eldest of her father's family and until her marriage managed to dominate the Crawford household as well.

Margaret was a few years senior to her husband George and it is purported that she tore the leaf out of the family bible so as to even-up. W.P. Buchanan referred to her as a pattern wife and mother, a natural leader and exceptional executive and in fact managed almost everything and her husband George was all too happy to leave that responsibility in her hands.

Her family and husband all adored her. She corresponded frequently with her two sons Robert and Charles who both emigrated to Quebec, Canada.

They had the following children:

  M i John Buchanan
  M ii Robert Buchanan
  M iii James Buchanan
  F iv Elizabeth Buchanan
  F v Jane Buchanan
  M vi Charles William Buchanan Dr.
  F vii Margaret Buchanan
  M viii George Stuart Buchanan was born 1 on 11 Apr 1817 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. He died 2 on 24 Sep 1817 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland.

Robert Crawford [Parents] was born in 1746. He died in 1795 in Knockmoyle Mill, County Tyrone, Ireland. He married Jane Stewart.

3rd son of Oliver
Moved from Rash Mill to Knockmoyle Mill about 1795

Jane Stewart was born in 1746. She died in 1835. She married Robert Crawford.

Jane Stewart is reputed as having brought "some brains" into the Crawford and subsequently the Buchanan lineage. Jane Stewart's family remained in the Omagh district and in the 1870's there existed records of two William Stewarts both of the same family from which Jane descended.

They had the following children:

  F i Margaret Crawford
  M ii John Crawford
  F iii Crawford
  F iv Crawford

John Buchanan [Parents] was born 1 on 4 Jul 1798 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. He died 2 on 10 Nov 1858 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland.

Other marriages:
Glass, Margaret

Early in his life John succeeded his father as agent to the Rector James Wilmot Ormsby. Feb 18, 1837 he was appointed rate collector for the Barony of East Omagh. He also handled occasional commercial transactions and at times served as a Quarter Sessions Grand Juror, a Governor of the local Hospital and as a Cappagh Church Warden. John was regarded as having advanced ideas on agriculture but his father insisted on the old methods.

John pre-deceased his father by almost seven years. He married late in life, about six years before his death, to Margaret, a woman 30 years his junior. They had no issue.

He had the following children:

  M i Buchanan was born in 1850.

The illegitimate son of John eventually emigrated to Australia and record of him is lost, however it was understood that he made himself into a very successful sheep farmer.

John Buchanan [Parents] was born 1 on 4 Jul 1798 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. He died 2 on 10 Nov 1858 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. He married 3 Margaret Glass in 1852.

Other marriages:
Unknown

Early in his life John succeeded his father as agent to the Rector James Wilmot Ormsby. Feb 18, 1837 he was appointed rate collector for the Barony of East Omagh. He also handled occasional commercial transactions and at times served as a Quarter Sessions Grand Juror, a Governor of the local Hospital and as a Cappagh Church Warden. John was regarded as having advanced ideas on agriculture but his father insisted on the old methods.

John pre-deceased his father by almost seven years. He married late in life, about six years before his death, to Margaret, a woman 30 years his junior. They had no issue.

Margaret Glass 1 was born 2 in 1828 in Glillygooley, Ireland. She died in Australia. She married 3 John Buchanan in 1852.

Other marriages:
,

Margaret's family lived in Gillygooley. She was 30 years younger than her husband John and he, having married late in life, survived only six years after their marriage. Subsequent to John's death, Margaret returned to her family and with her brother emigrated to Australia, where she married again and bore a family to her second husband.


Robert Buchanan [Parents] was born 1 on 20 Sep 1801 in Omagh, Tyrone, Ireland. He died 2 on 28 Apr 1888 in Point Levis Quebec Canada. He was buried in cemetery Quebec City. He married 3 Margaret Orr on 28 Oct 1824. Robert was employed as Lumber yard & shipbuilder.

Other marriages:
Crawford, Martha

Robert lived on the family lands in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. In 1832 he, his wife Margaret, and 4 oldest children emigrated to Point Levis, Quebec, Canada where he operated and later owned a lumber yard. In 1848 he remarried, became Magistrate for Quebec and Postmaster for Levis. In 1855 he became Cpt. of the Dorchester Militia. In 1855 he returned to the family estates in Ireland where he remained for just under 30 years. In 1867 the family farm in Omagh was sold following the death of his father George, two years previous. On a visit to Dublin in 1867 Robert called upon John Cane Crawford who was then a 1st Class Clerk, 1st Section Paymaster General's Office, Dublin Branch. In 1885 he returned to Quebec Canada where he died two and a half years later.

The following is an extract from W.P. Buchanan's 1931 family publication "Archibald Buchanan (1748-1836) Bears and Forbears":-

Robert Buchanan, 1801-1888, was the most aggressive of the family, and had a fully occupied life in Canada and Ireland, especially in the latter. Owing to his lengthened span and vigorous memory was recognized as an authority for three generations. He outlived all of his connection except his sister Elizabeth who was over 96; his grandfather, Archibald Buchanan, over 88; his grandmother, Jane Stuart Crawford, over 88; his daughter, Margaret Jane Caldecott, over 90 and his son, John Buchanan, within five weeks of 88. R. B. himself passed at 86 years, 7 months and 8 days. In early life he tried mercantile pursuits and then farming in Ireland, but found both far short of his ambitions and therefore decided to try the Colonies. He sailed for Canada in 1832 with his young wife and four children, Elizabeth, Margt. Jane, Mary and Catherine -- these were born in Ireland and all the rest of the two families were born in Canada. He arrived in Canada, settling in Quebec, May. 26, 1832, and left again for Ireland Augt. 25, 1858, thus spending 26 years and 3 months in Canada. He subsequently spent the later evening of his life in Canada, say, Sept. 1885 until his demise. In Canada from 1832 to 1858, he spent an exceedingly active life, engaging in various lines of business. For many years a large lumber and provision business for Wm. Phillips and later on his own account. When navigation was limited in winter by frozen conditions, he some times engaged in shipbuilding, including the "Charlotte Harrison" and the "St. Mary." The "Charlotte Harrison," a barque, was wrecked in 1874; the "St. Mary' was a smaller vessel. One of the reasons for shipbuilding in winter was to provide work in that season of the year for the labour so badly needed in summer. He was a Magistrate for the District of Quebec from 1848, Postmaster of Levis from 1848, Lieutenant in 1847 and Captain of the Dorchester Militia in 1855.

From 1858 he followed farming in Ireland for about nine years and after that he lived in retirement with the exception of one short period when he published the "Tyrone Constitution," practically keeping it alive between the ownerships of Geo. W. McCutcheon and Nathaniel Carson.

He possessed a wide grasp of public affairs, had an intimate knowledge of not only British and Canadian, but a comparatively clear Judgment of matters political and internal in every civilized part of the world -- was a great reader of worth while literature, had the capacity to understand and intelligently use what he did read, all of which combined rendered him an entertaining conversationalist.

He had an intense admiration for John Crawford, 1786 1828, who was his mother's brother and the father of his second wife, and it is mainly owing to his untiring zeal that any of the John Crawford poems are still in existence, and the remnant may some day be collected and printed for family distribution.

John Crawford, 1796-1828, and Robert Buchanan, 1801-1888, were the chief conspirators at the home baptism of James Rutherford, about 1822, when they manipulated the Reverend so successfully that the ceremony had to be postponed and of course another feast on a future day. They had everything staged for repetition and second postponement, but the women demanded the baptism first and the dinner afterwards -- wise women; they scored.

He had also a strong attachment for his cousins, Thos. 1821-1884 and Anne Taylor 1823-1884, and in contact and correspondence had lifetime close associations. Anne Taylor was first wife of Rev. Chas. Stringfellow.

He was fond of swimming as an exercise and thought nothing of a mile or two in practice. Was an expert marksman, and with an old style muzzle loading fowling piece invariably brought down whatever he went after; in Strathroy predatory dogs after the sheep and hawks were his principal quarry. Was a man of parts in many ways, mechanical and intellectual -- could operate a steamboat like an engineer, cut up an animal like a butcher or splice a rope like a sailor; also with his knowledge of Latin quickly acquired French, oral and written.

He was one of the original founders of the Levis Presbyterian Church, of which Rev. Duncan Anderson, M.A., was pastor for 32 years.

He was at all times free from double dealing or chicanery of any sort, held in absolute contempt anything approaching the level of sham or humbug, at once generous and hospitable to friends and relations, but relentless to enemies.

Many items now hard to locate would have been easy during his life, as possessed of a disciplined memory and cultivated mind, was on family matters a reliable authority

The many obituaries in the press of Ireland and Canada bore testimony to his active life and popularity, but obituaries in his case are too numerous and too long for inclusion in this production.

He died full of years and public esteem.

Margaret Orr 1 was born 2 on 31 Jan 1801. She died 3 on 4 May 1848. She married 4 Robert Buchanan on 28 Oct 1824.

They had the following children:

  F i Elizabeth Buchanan 1 was born 2 on 23 Aug 1825 in Omagh, County Tyrone Ireland. She died 3 on 11 Feb 1834 in Point Levis, Quebec.
  F ii Margaret Jane Buchanan
  F iii Mary Buchanan was born 1 on 4 Apr 1829 in Omagh, County Tyrone Ireland. She died 2 on 16 Apr 1834 in Point Levis, Quebec.
  F iv Catherine Buchanan was born 1 on 10 Apr 1831 in Omagh, County Tyrone Ireland. She died 2 on 28 May 1832 in Point Levis, Quebec.

Died just 2 days after arrival in Quebec.
  M v George Stuart Buchanan
  M vi Alex Orr Buchanan was born 1 on 17 Jul 1836 in Point Levis Quebec. He died 2 on 20 Feb 1840.
  M vii Robert Crawford Buchanan was born 1 on 10 Jun 1838 in Point Levis, Quebec. He died 2 on 9 Sep 1839.
  M viii John Buchanan

Robert Buchanan [Parents] was born 1 on 20 Sep 1801 in Omagh, Tyrone, Ireland. He died 2 on 28 Apr 1888 in Point Levis Quebec Canada. He was buried in cemetery Quebec City. He married 3 Martha Crawford on 13 Oct 1848. Robert was employed as Lumber yard & shipbuilder.

Other marriages:
Orr, Margaret

Robert lived on the family lands in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. In 1832 he, his wife Margaret, and 4 oldest children emigrated to Point Levis, Quebec, Canada where he operated and later owned a lumber yard. In 1848 he remarried, became Magistrate for Quebec and Postmaster for Levis. In 1855 he became Cpt. of the Dorchester Militia. In 1855 he returned to the family estates in Ireland where he remained for just under 30 years. In 1867 the family farm in Omagh was sold following the death of his father George, two years previous. On a visit to Dublin in 1867 Robert called upon John Cane Crawford who was then a 1st Class Clerk, 1st Section Paymaster General's Office, Dublin Branch. In 1885 he returned to Quebec Canada where he died two and a half years later.

The following is an extract from W.P. Buchanan's 1931 family publication "Archibald Buchanan (1748-1836) Bears and Forbears":-

Robert Buchanan, 1801-1888, was the most aggressive of the family, and had a fully occupied life in Canada and Ireland, especially in the latter. Owing to his lengthened span and vigorous memory was recognized as an authority for three generations. He outlived all of his connection except his sister Elizabeth who was over 96; his grandfather, Archibald Buchanan, over 88; his grandmother, Jane Stuart Crawford, over 88; his daughter, Margaret Jane Caldecott, over 90 and his son, John Buchanan, within five weeks of 88. R. B. himself passed at 86 years, 7 months and 8 days. In early life he tried mercantile pursuits and then farming in Ireland, but found both far short of his ambitions and therefore decided to try the Colonies. He sailed for Canada in 1832 with his young wife and four children, Elizabeth, Margt. Jane, Mary and Catherine -- these were born in Ireland and all the rest of the two families were born in Canada. He arrived in Canada, settling in Quebec, May. 26, 1832, and left again for Ireland Augt. 25, 1858, thus spending 26 years and 3 months in Canada. He subsequently spent the later evening of his life in Canada, say, Sept. 1885 until his demise. In Canada from 1832 to 1858, he spent an exceedingly active life, engaging in various lines of business. For many years a large lumber and provision business for Wm. Phillips and later on his own account. When navigation was limited in winter by frozen conditions, he some times engaged in shipbuilding, including the "Charlotte Harrison" and the "St. Mary." The "Charlotte Harrison," a barque, was wrecked in 1874; the "St. Mary' was a smaller vessel. One of the reasons for shipbuilding in winter was to provide work in that season of the year for the labour so badly needed in summer. He was a Magistrate for the District of Quebec from 1848, Postmaster of Levis from 1848, Lieutenant in 1847 and Captain of the Dorchester Militia in 1855.

From 1858 he followed farming in Ireland for about nine years and after that he lived in retirement with the exception of one short period when he published the "Tyrone Constitution," practically keeping it alive between the ownerships of Geo. W. McCutcheon and Nathaniel Carson.

He possessed a wide grasp of public affairs, had an intimate knowledge of not only British and Canadian, but a comparatively clear Judgment of matters political and internal in every civilized part of the world -- was a great reader of worth while literature, had the capacity to understand and intelligently use what he did read, all of which combined rendered him an entertaining conversationalist.

He had an intense admiration for John Crawford, 1786 1828, who was his mother's brother and the father of his second wife, and it is mainly owing to his untiring zeal that any of the John Crawford poems are still in existence, and the remnant may some day be collected and printed for family distribution.

John Crawford, 1796-1828, and Robert Buchanan, 1801-1888, were the chief conspirators at the home baptism of James Rutherford, about 1822, when they manipulated the Reverend so successfully that the ceremony had to be postponed and of course another feast on a future day. They had everything staged for repetition and second postponement, but the women demanded the baptism first and the dinner afterwards -- wise women; they scored.

He had also a strong attachment for his cousins, Thos. 1821-1884 and Anne Taylor 1823-1884, and in contact and correspondence had lifetime close associations. Anne Taylor was first wife of Rev. Chas. Stringfellow.

He was fond of swimming as an exercise and thought nothing of a mile or two in practice. Was an expert marksman, and with an old style muzzle loading fowling piece invariably brought down whatever he went after; in Strathroy predatory dogs after the sheep and hawks were his principal quarry. Was a man of parts in many ways, mechanical and intellectual -- could operate a steamboat like an engineer, cut up an animal like a butcher or splice a rope like a sailor; also with his knowledge of Latin quickly acquired French, oral and written.

He was one of the original founders of the Levis Presbyterian Church, of which Rev. Duncan Anderson, M.A., was pastor for 32 years.

He was at all times free from double dealing or chicanery of any sort, held in absolute contempt anything approaching the level of sham or humbug, at once generous and hospitable to friends and relations, but relentless to enemies.

Many items now hard to locate would have been easy during his life, as possessed of a disciplined memory and cultivated mind, was on family matters a reliable authority

The many obituaries in the press of Ireland and Canada bore testimony to his active life and popularity, but obituaries in his case are too numerous and too long for inclusion in this production.

He died full of years and public esteem.

Martha Crawford [Parents] 1 was born 2 on 10 Dec 1813. She died 3 on 18 May 1881. She married 4 Robert Buchanan on 13 Oct 1848.

The following is an extract from W.P. Buchanan's 1931 family publication "Archibald Buchanan (1748-1836) Bears and Forbears":-

Martha Crawford Buchanan, 1813-1881, second wife of Robert Buchanan, 1801-1888, although always a Presbyterian had a strong admiration for the Primitive Methodists, largely from the influence of the Graham family, close neighbours of the early years, so when the house built by John Buchanan, 1798-1858, was vacant or occupied by a caretaker, she assembled weekly all the Protestants in the district that cared to go, for singing and prayer-there were always volunteers for the major parts, but she herself was an humble listener. There was a cooper who claimed a special state of grace, who also had a fondness for gratis buttermilk and potatoes, etc. from Strathroy. This cooper was not particularly clean of person and when visiting Strathroy always preferred to sit in grandmother Crawford's chair and possibly this habit may have caused the old woman to have doubts about his sincerity. The mother and daughter had frequent debates on the matter, but mother Crawford bluntly asserted that the Lord never made any dirty Christians. When the cooper's wife died he made an ignominious fall -from grace and was banished from Strathroy.

They had the following children:

  F i Martha Buchanan
  M ii James Oliver Buchanan was born 1 on 27 Sep 1850 in Point Levis Quebec. He died on 12 Jan 1873.
  M iii Robert Crawford Buchanan II was born 1 on 3 Sep 1853 in Point Levis Quebec. He died on 13 Jul 1854 in Point Levis Quebec.
  M iv William Phillips Buchanan

James Buchanan [Parents] 1 was born 2 on 3 Aug 1803 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. He died 3 on 22 Mar 1855 in vicinity of Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. He married 4 Mary Hamilton on 11 May 1834.

The following is an extract from W.P. Buchanan's 1931 family publication "Archibald Buchanan (1748-1836) Bears and Forbears":-

Jas. Buchanan, 1803-1855, was reckoned the most level beaded and possibly the most studious of the four brothers that lived to maturity. He was also of more stationary habits -- born in Strathroy, married in his thirty-first year, lived his entire life and died in vicinity of Omagh. He held many offices of public trust with credit to himself and satisfaction to the community. He was appointed Deputy Clerk of the Crown in 1841 and held the office for many years, possibly during entire term of Mr. Doran the Clerk of the Crown. He was also Commissioner for Affidavits and Special Bail from 1831 until, his demise. Unfortunately he died in middle age. His wife came of good stock long settled in the Strabane district. He kept a Private Hotel for some time and a frequent visitor was Wm. Carleton, the famous Irish novelist. After his death, his widow and three children, Margaret, Mary Allen and Chas. Stuart Hamilton removed to the New World and settled in New York. The other son Wm. Thompson remained with his grandfather Geo. Buchanan, 1780-1865, in Ireland. This son, W. T. Buchanan, 1836-1916, got the best education the locality could afford, and identified himself with Railroad work during his entire life, but a disability of deafness kept him down far below his capacity, intelligence or deserts, but the C.P.R. must have been appreciative as they kept him in service far over the age limit. He was a voracious reader and brilliant both as a conversationalist and correspondent.

All of the four brothers were good correspondents but James was outstanding. The Tyrone Constitution of March 23, 1855, in his death notice included the following- "He held commissions for affidavits for the Superior Courts for upwards of twenty years: much regretted by a large circle of friends and acquaintances."

Mary Hamilton 1 was born 2 on 2 Sep 1815. She died 3 on 23 Mar 1888. She married 4 James Buchanan on 11 May 1834.

They had the following children:

  M i George Buchanan was born 1 on 10 Jun 1835. He died 2 on 9 Mar 1838.
  M ii William Thompson Buchanan was born 1 on 11 Dec 1836. He died 2 on 30 Jan 1916.
  M iii Archibald Buchanan was born 1 on 22 Sep 1838. He died 2 on 4 Jun 1839.
  F iv Margaret Buchanan
  F v Mary Allen Buchanan was born 1 on 28 Mar 1844. She died 2 on 22 Dec 1895.
  M vi Charles Stuart Hamilton Buchanan was born 1 on 22 Feb 1854.

Thomas Stephens was born in 1806. He married Elizabeth Buchanan.

Elizabeth Buchanan [Parents] was born 1 on 21 Mar 1806 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. She died 2 on 22 Nov 1902 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. She married Thomas Stephens.

Elizabeth and her husband Thomas Stephens had no issue


John Moore Rev. was born in 1808. He married Jane Buchanan. John was employed as Reverend.

Rev. John Moore was a Royal Navy Chaplain. He predeceased his wife Jane as it is stated that she survived him and as a widow had for many years a pension of 40 Pounds a year.

Jane Buchanan [Parents] was born 1 on 2 Mar 1808 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland. She died 2 on 4 Feb 1891. She married John Moore Rev..

Jane survived her husband John and it is stated that as a widow she collected for many years a pension of 40 Pounds a year.

Home First Previous Next Last

Surname List | Name Index

Ancestors of Cedric and Brendan

 Home  |  Chinn  |  Buchanan  |  Skelton  |  Svenceski  |  XUE 

 

Content provided within these pages is made available on an "as is" basis without warranty  as to

accuracy other than I  do  attempt to  verify the  content prior to  publication. Use of this information

for any purposes other than personal interest is denied without express written consent. Any use

for commercial purposes is prohibited.

Contact Us   |  Privacy Statement  |  Copyright