Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   
Newspaper extracts from:
THE WEST BRITON AND CORNWALL ADVERTISER
1836 - 1839
BY Julia Symons Mosman and Rita Bone Kopp
Full transcripts at their site
Date Year Classification
Friday 7 October 1836 Marriage Lately, at Breage, Mr. W. Clark, of St. Ewe, to Miss Mary Glasson, of Godolphin, in the former place.
10 June 1836 Miscellaneous Fairs in Cornwall in June - Tywardreath - 10th, Grampond and Menheniot - 13th, St. Merryn - 15th, Breage - 20th, St. Keverne and Saltash - 21st, Constantine, St. Veep, and Wadebridge - 22nd, Mawgan in Pydar, Pelynt, Pool, Twelveheads in Gwennap, and Wainhouse Corner - 24th, Newgate in St. Stephens, by St. Austell - 27th, Camborne and Polperro - 29th
Friday 4 August 1837 Marriage At Cury, on Tuesday, the 24th ultimo, Mr. Lembry, builder &c., Breage, to Miss Hendy, of Swana, in Gunwalloe.
Friday 25 August 1837 Marriage At Wendron, on Sunday the 20th instant, Mr. Philip Robarts, of Breage, to Miss N. Osborn, of Helston.
Friday 20 October 1837 Marriage On Wednesday last, at Breage, Mr. H. Mathews, of that place, to Miss Holman, of Porthleaven.
Friday 3 March 1837 Birth At Crava, in Breage, on Friday last, Mrs. Thomas Hocking, of a daughter.
Friday 24 November 1837 Birth At Breage, on the 16th instant, Mrs. William Glasson, of a son.
31 March 1837 Deaths On Saturday last, at Pengersick in Breage, Mr. T. Harvey, aged 78 years.
31 March 1837 Deaths On Friday last, at Trew in Breage, Miss Hebbard, a highly respectable shopkeeper.
Friday 26 May 1837 Deaths Lately, after a short illness, at her residence, at Breage Church-town, aged 67 years, Miss Lydia Hamlin, who was nearly related to the families of Borlase and Trea.. here.
Friday 22 September 1837 Deaths At Breage, on Monday last, Miss Nanny Penberthy, after a few days illness.
Friday 7 April 1837 Miscellaneous Wholesale Robbery - For some time past, the mines and counting-houses of mines, in the parish of Breage and its vicinity, have been pillaged to no inconsiderable amount, without any discovery being made of the thief. Lately, however, the wife of a miner having sold to one person 223 lbs. of brass, suspicion was awakened that it was not honestly procured, and enquiries were instituted which led to the procuring of search warrants. Eventually, several hundred pounds weight of brass, a looking-glass, a handsome dial, and various other articles were discovered, and on the articles being identified by the several agents of the mines from whence they were stolen, James Pope, and Thomasine his wife, of Breage, and Henry Gundry of Sithney, were for the several offences, on Tuesday last, committed by John Borlase, Esq., to take their trial at the next general quarter Sessions of this place.
Friday 9 June 1837 Miscellaneous Fairs in Cornwall in June: Breage and Lanviet 19th
Friday 7 July 1837 Miscellaneous Horrible Event - A person named John Carsue, of Skewes, in Crowan, some time ago cohabited with a woman to whom he was supposed to be married, though it now turns out to be otherwise, and the result was the birth of a child.  On Thursday night, the 29th ult., about twelve o'clock, he went to the house of the woman's father, at Broadlane, in Breage, and demanded his child, which is about seven months old. The woman, who lives there, and to whom the application was made, refused to give it up.  He took the child by force, and left the house followed by its mother.  After proceeding some distance, he dealt a  blow to the mother which struck her senseless to the ground.  When she regained her senses, she was horror struck to find the innocent babe lying by her side with its throat cut in a dreadful manner; and before she could get back with it to her father's house, it was a corpse.  The feelings of the mother overcame her, and she was seized with delirium, from which she did not recover for some time.  A coroner's inquest was held on the body on Saturday, when a verdict of willful murder was returned against John Carsue, who was committed on the Coroner's warrant to take his trial at the next assizes.
18 May 1838 Marriage On Monday last, at the Superintendent Registrars office, Helston, before Mr. J. K..ey, Registrar, Mr. Thos.Rivington, of Breage, to Miss Mary Martin, of Crowan.
14 December 1838 Birth At Breage, on Wednesday last, Mrs. M. Martin, of a daughter.
5 January 1838 Death On Saturday last at Breage, Thomas, youngest son of Mr. William James, farmer.  Mr. James has [buried] his wife, two sons, a daughter in about three weeks.
12 January 1838 Death At Breage, on Sunday lst, Mr. Weare, of Pengilly, a respectable farmer of that parish, deeply regretted by all who knew him.
2 February 1838 Death At Troon, in the parish of Breage, on Wednesday, the 24th ultimo, aged 82 years, Mr. Thomas Goldsworthy, for many years a respectable farmer in Breage and Sithney; he retreated from the business world about 11 years since; He was a member of the Methodist Society for upwards of 30 years, and his end was peace.
13 July 1838 Miscellaneous EMIGRATION TO NEW SOUTH WALESWe understand that a Gentleman from London, connected with Emigration to Australia, will, at the request of numerous applicants, attend a meeting to be held at the Angel Inn, Helston, on Friday, July 20, at eleven o’clock in the forenoon precisely, on which occasion all persons in that neighbourhood desirous of information are requested to attend.  In the meanwhile, all necessary information may be obtained from Mr. Richard Glasson, Breage, or Mr. T. H. Edwards, Helston.
Friday 19 October 1838 Miscellaneous Alice CARNOW, 38, was charged with having concealed the birth of a male child, of which she was delivered at the work-house of the Helston Union, at St. Breage.  This was an indictment under the Act 9th Geo. 4th, ch 31.  The witnesses were Mr. Wm. Thomas, master of the workhouse, Ann Williams, an inmate, and Mrs. Rebecca Thomas, a matron, who proved the birth and concealment of the child, as well as the prisoner’s denial of her real condition previously.  The details were such as are not usually published, and they were not at all interesting.  Verdict, Guilty.  One month’s imprisonment.
Friday 19 October 1838 Miscellaneous Benjamin MATTHEWS, charged with stealing from the market-house, at Helston, several sacks which contained 24 gallons of wheat, and 12 gallons of barley, the property of Samuel HOSKING, of Breage.  These articles were entrusted to Matthews to take charge of, whilst Mr. Hocking went to purchase some more; on returning to the place where they were deposited, they were found wanting.  The evidence against the prisoner was very satisfactory, and he was found guilty, and sentenced to nine months’ imprisonment at hard labour.
29, March 1839 Court Hearings Robert LEAN, 37, was charged with having stolen a quantity of barley in the sheaf, the property of James ROWE.  The prosecutor resides in Breage, about a mile and a half from the prisoner, who was his tenant.   He had a bullock's house which adjoined a pig's house of the prisoner's, and the prisoner "meated" his cattle, in return for which he lived rent free.  There is a hole in the wall communicating from the bullock's to the pig's house; and in consequence of what he heard, William ROWE was, on the 6th of January, induced to watch the prisoner's motions, and he then saw him bring into the bullock's house a bundle of straw, which he was in the .. of passing through the hole in the wall for the benefit of the porkers, when the prosecutor laid his astounding hand on his collar, and made him drop it.  The prisoner was then given into custody to a constable, named HUDY, who had a conversation with him.  The constable asked him why he did it, and the prisoner replied that he did! 
 not know, but it was very foolish.  He said he had done it at different times - he did not want it -  but he had done it, and he must bear the punishment.  The prisoner now said that he had never received any thing from the prosecutor for what he had done for him, and he did not consider that he was doing any wrong in taking the straw.  He then called Mr. James PAYNTER, who gave him a good character, saying that the prisoner had worked for him three years, and he had found him a very honest man, and would again employ him immediately he was freed from this charge.  The jury found him GUILTY, and the JUDGE sentenced him to one month's hard labour.