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Alefounder of Faversham

Notes on some of those mentioned in the Faversham pedigree and the associated Clare, Rosbotham and Swift and Kingsnorth families.

John Alefounder, d. 1798

Known to be the father of a schoolmaster (Daniel), was John Alefounder also the son of a schoolmaster and maybe in that profession himself? At the moment, I have only one possibility for John's father: Thomas Alefounder (Dedham pedigree), schoolmaster and mapmaker of Nayland, Suffolk. So far I have no evidence that Thomas's son John was indeed the John buried at Davington, Kent in 1798.

Daniel Alefounder, 1780-1829

Only child of John (above) and his wife Mary, as is clear from administrations of their effects granted to Daniel in 1804. He appears to have died in 1829 aged 49 and knowledge of his profession comes from the 1861 census where Sarah Alefounder is recorded as a "Schoolmaster's Widow" and from her death certificate which describes her as "Widow of Daniel Alefounder Schoolmaster"

Market Square, Faversham, looking towards Market Street. Larger version of picture (476KB).

 

Market Street, Faversham. The shop front for number 2 is just to the right of the street lamp. Larger version of picture (500KB).

 

West Street, Faversham. Number 4 is now combined with number 5. Larger version of picture (479KB).

Pictures taken June 2005.

John Alefounder, 1806-1868

Son of Daniel (above) and his wife Sarah.

At the time of the 1841 census, he was working as a male servant and living at 13 Drayson Square, Faversham, Kent, but by 1851 was a Chemist and Druggist of 2 Market Street, Faversham where he lived for the rest of his life. In his will he gave his son John (below) the option of taking his business with the provision that his other children were to have equal shares (plus interest) after three years. A trade card is held at the Science & Society Picture Library.

John Alefounder, 1837-1890

On his father's death, took over the business of Chemist and Druggist, as is apparent from the entry in the Register of Chemists and Druggists for 1869: the date of registration is 31 December 1868, after his father's decease on 18 October that year. He must have been active in the profession before then however, as only those in business prior to 1 August 1868 were allowed to continue under the description of Chemist and Druggist; new entrants had to be qualified and were then known as Pharmaceutical Chemists. He is not listed in the Registers for 1870-1886, but appears again 1887-1889. He died in 1890 and by the time of the 1891 census the premises had left the family: nos 1 & 2 Market Street had been combined into one shop and were occupied by a tinsmith's shaperman.

William Alefounder, ca. 1817-1889

Basket maker; living on West Street at the time of the 1851 and 1861 censuses, more specifically, 4 West Street according to a trade directory of 1862. He married Charlotte Hope in the second quarter of 1861 and appears in the 1871 and 1881 census returns living at 51 Tanner Street, Faversham. In 1871 his wife was visiting her sister Frances Wheeler in St Martins Hill, Canterbury. The presence there of an "Infant" Wheeler, a 3-day-old girl, no doubt provides the reason for the visit. Frances Hope married George Wheeler in 1865. George was not at home at the time of the 1871 census, probably because he was in prison (Frances is listed as a "Prison Warders Wife").

Susan(nah) Alefounder, ca. 1814-1894

It was common practice for domestic servants to find work at annual hiring fairs. They were contracted to work for one year, after which the contract might be renewed. However, servants knew their value and would frequently move from one employer to another in search of better pay and conditions. Census returns in such cases can only provide a very partial employment record:

Susan Alefounder "of Clapham, Formerly a Domestic Servant" died on 11 March 1894 in the Union Infirmary, West Battersea, London.

Sarah Alefounder, b ca. 1812

Domestic servant; as for her sister above, a partial life history is provided by census returns and other records:

Ann Alefounder, 1820-1901

A witness to the marriage of William Alefounder and Charlotte Hope in 1861. She appears in census returns as follows:

She died in 1901 (registered 3rd quarter, in Canterbury), age 80.

Samuel Alefounder, 1834-1904

Samuel's father John (1806-1868) left his business as Chemist & Druggist to his second son John, presumably because Samuel, the eldest, had already by then moved away. In 1856 Samuel married Emma Smith in West London, was still living in that area when his daughter Emma was born in 1857, but had moved to Liverpool by 1860, where his son Samuel was born. His move does not appear to have been the result of any family dispute - he shared equally with the other children in his father's estate and his brother Charles Wesley Alefounder was married in Liverpool in 1866, although still normally resident in Faversham. Samuel appears in census returns as a chemist's apprentice in 1851, a Druggist's assistant of 13 Sophia Street, West Derby, Liverpool in 1860 (son's birth certificate), a "Chemist &c" in 1861 (census returns, same address but listed under the name of Alexander), a Druggist's Assistant of 22 Fitzroy St in 1871 and a Chemist of 60 Landseer Road, Everton, Liverpool in the 1881 census.

Charles Wesley Alefounder, 1847-1872

Tailor of St Mary's Road, Faversham in 1869. On the evening of Saturday 21st August that year, a fight broke out in Faversham market place when one Thomas Corke objected to the arrival of a band. He proceeded to assault various people, bandsmen and others, including a Mr. Joiner. Charles Alefounder helped Mr. Joiner and subsequently gave evidence as a witness at the trial of Thomas Corke. A lengthy account of the matter appeared in the Dover Express and East Kent Intelligencer on 27 August.

 

Mary Ann Alefounder, 1832/3-1873 and Alfred Kingsnorth, b. ca. 1838

Mary Ann Alefounder married Alfred Kingsnorth in 1860. He was a tailor, born in Ospringe, Kent, and appears in census returns as follows:

Mary Ann Alefounder William Kingsnorth and his wife Sarah née Richards, parents of Alfred Kingsnorth Elizabeth Wilson Susannah Nicholls
Daughters of Mary Ann and Alfred Kingsnorth
Photographs from Paul Willis. Click to enlarge.

 

Alfred Wise Kingsnorth (1861-1935) & Rosina Florence née Hill (1866-1957)

Family group, about 1926

Seated at back, Rosina Florence Kingsnorth née Hill and Alfred Wise Kingsnorth; on the right, their son Horace Andrew Kingsnorth; standing behind him, his wife Ruth Alice née Bradford; at the front, Mary Ruth Kingsnorth, daughter of Horace and Mary.

Click on picture to enlarge.

Rosina Kingsnorth née Hill

Click on picture to enlarge.

Horace Andrew Kingsnorth (1894-1965) & Ruth Alice née Bradford (1895-1985)

See Kingsnorth pedigree.

           
Horace Kingsnorth, 1914
 
Ruth Bradford 1915
 
Horace and Ruth
Click on pictures to enlarge
Horace Kingsnorth, 1938

Family group, 1918

Ruth and Horace Kingsnorth with their daughter Mary.

Vashti Wilmot, 1841-1893

Vashti Wilmot, second wife of Alfred Kingsnorth.

Algernon (1881-1917) & Cecil (1878-1956) Kingsnorth

Algernon Frank Wesley Kingsnorth and Cecil George Wilmot Kingsnorth, sons of Alfred Kingsnorth and Vashti née Wilmot.

William Nicholls, 1870-1932 and Susannah Nicholls née Kingsnorth, 1872-1938

Wedding photograph, 30th October 1895



Susannah Kingsnorth, daughter of Mary Ann and Alfred Kingsnorth, above, married William Nicholls in 1895.

Click on picture to enlarge.


 

1 unknown
2 Cecil George Wilmot Kingsnorth
3 Elizabeth Ann Nicholls (not on family tree)
4 John Gorman
5 Alfred Kingsnorth b 1837
6 Louisa May Norton
7 Thomas Wilson
8 Algernon Frank Wesley Kingsnorth
9 Ellen Gorman late Nicholls née Pyne
10 unknown
11 Bessie Lightfoot
12 William Nicholls b 1870
13 Susanna Kingsnorth
14 Elizabeth Jane Kingsnorth
15 William Thomas Kingsnorth
16 Thomas William Kingsnorth

 

Family group, about 1920


Larger version of picture (987KB)

Photograph from Paul Willis

1 William Nicholls
2 his wife Susannah née Kingsnorth
   Their children:
3 Elizabeth
4 Bertha
5 Dorothy Winifred
6 Kathleen
7 Alice
8 William

 

Ellen Nicholls née Pyne

Ellen Nicholls née Pyne, mother of William Nicholls who married Susannah Kingsnorth. Ellen's second husband was John Gorman. Further details of her family can be found on the web site of Paul Willis.

 

Samuel Alefounder, 1860-1958

Samuel and Amy Alefounder in 1933.
Larger version of picture (100KB)


more photographs

Son of Samuel and his wife Emma; according to the census in that year, living in 1881 with his parents at 60 Landseer Road, Liverpool, as a cashier. They soon moved to 48 Grasmere Street, as is apparent from an advertisement in the Phonetic Journal for 1882: "Wanted, a Prayer Book in good condition, latest edition in Phonography. Send lowest price to S. Alefounder, junr., 48 Grasmere street, Liverpool." He was still living there as an engineer at the time of his marriage in 1890; his bride, Amy Brooks, was of 86 Kirkdale Road.

He is mentioned in an advertisement in the Birmingham Daily Post, 12 November 1886, under the heading "Secretary and Office" for the new company, J. P. Jackson & Co, Ltd., formed to acquire "the valuable Patents, Patent Rights, and the Business of Mr. J. P. Jackson, Engineer, &c., to the Wine, Spirit, and Aërated Water Trades carried on at Liverpool", 2000 shares of £5 each being offered for subscription.

In Kelly's Directory of Liverpool & Birkenhead for 1894 and 1895, he is listed as a mechanical engineer living on the south side of Sutton street, at number 83, his place of work being given in 1894 as Tildesley, Alefounder & Co. of 53 & 55 Cornwallis street, under the headings of Soda & Mineral Water Machinery Manufacturers and Bottling & Corking Machinery Manufacturers. In the London Gazette, 14 Jan 1896, there appeared a notice that the partnership between Henry Fletcher Tildesley and Samuel Alefounder, Engineers and Machinery Merchants, known as Tildesley, Alefounder and Co., had been dissolved on 31 Dec 1895, Henry Fletcher Tildesley continuing the business.

Gore's Directory of Liverpool & Birkenhead, 1900, lists Samuel Alefounder as an engineer of 6 Woodland Road, Walton; in the 1901 census, his address is given as number 7 Woodland Road, Walton on the Hill, occupation Commercial Traveller. It appears that by this time, he was working for Dawson Brothers, Ltd., Dairy Engineers – manufacturers of bottle washing machines etc. By 1910, he was one of the senior staff, as is clear from a photograph taken of the Dawson Brothers stand at the Horticultural Hall, London in that year. He appears alongside the Dawson Brothers directors in another photograph, taken at the Dairy Show, Olympia in 1948. He would have been long past the usual retirement age for an employee. This was a family firm and he could not have become a director himself.

Francis Samuel Alefounder, 1890-1962

Joined the Royal Field Artillery 23 May 1915. He was a a Gunner Corporal in C Battery, 276th Brigade at the time he was admitted to the RFA Officer Cadet School on 20 September 1918. Having completed his training there, he was promoted to Second Lieutenant on 8 April 1919 and then served in the Royal Artillery, Territorial Force. He resigned on 13 December 1920, suffering from the effects of a gassing on 2 April 1920. Can be seen in the family group photograph.

Harold Vincent Alefounder, 1891-1985


Sheffield Telegraph building in 2009. Click to enlarge.

Harold Vincent Alefounder, also in the family group photograph

Newspaper reporter at the time of the 1911 census. Served in the King's (Liverpool) Regiment during WWI, being reported as injured in the Times of 22 November 1916.

He was originally employed on the Liverpool Echo, but in 1919, moved to Sheffield, where he worked on the Sheffield Telegraph and Sheffield Independent. The picture on the right shows the Sheffield Telegraph building.

He married Gertrude Lilan Lindley (Lindley pedigree).

 

Charles Frederick Alefounder, 1894-1946

Usually known as Frederick Charles Alefounder. In 1911 census, a printer's clerk. Was working at Blake & MacKensie, Liverpool before joining the Army on 1 September 1914, as a private on the formation of the 19th Battalion of the King's (Liverpool) Regiment. His address then was 46 Wenlock Road. He served in France, being reported as wounded in the Times of 14 March 1916. Somewhat more serious appears to have been a fairly severe sprain of the left knee with synovitis, a result of being tackled while playing football on 8 May 1917. As men were required to take part in such games as physical exercise, this counted as performance of military duties. He underwent hospital treatment at least twice, being finally discharged on 15th February 1918. He was transferred to the Royal Engineers as a sapper on 1 June 1918, being posted to the Stores section on 25th October. He was transferred to the Reserve on 21st February 1919 "unlikely to become fit". Can be seen in this family group photograph.

Joseph Clare, 1846-1914


Auctioneer's notice for sale of stock, Moor Game Farm, 1892. Click to enlarge.

Appears on the Clare pedigree. Took over Moor Game farm from his father, but gave up farming there in 1892, as is clear from the sale of stock in that year. The sale did not include the farm itself, which was presumably rented. It may well be that other livestock had already been disposed of – it would hardly have been economic to have just one cow producing milk, a heifer and a horse.

Henry Edward Rushbrook Alefounder, 1882-1966

Listed as a Civil Service Clerk in the 1901 census: his work was with the Post Office. He is mentioned in the Times in 1924 and in various reports until 1939 as General Secretary of the Post Office Controlling Officers' Association and in 1931, 1932 and 1938 as representing the Federation of Post Office Supervising Officers. For the latter, he compiled The Supervising Officer's Handbook 1937, and as such is the only Alefounder to have an entry in the British Museum Catalogue of Printed Books.

His wife, Maud, stood unsuccessfully in the South Norwood ward, Croydon, in the local elections each year from 1920-1923. According to reports in the Times, she was appointed as a magistrate in Croydon on 14th September 1926 and was chairman of the magistrates in 1937 when Walter Saemann, a German from Nurnberg, was convicted of attempting to defraud the Customs of the duty due on a camera.

Henry Alefounder later became an alderman in Worthing.

James Love Lightfoot, 1841-1922

He shall prick that annual blister
Marriage with deceased wife's sister
                   - Iolanthe, W.S. Gilbert

According to the 1881 census, James L. Lightfoot was a refreshment (Coffee) house keeper of Underhill Road, Camberwell, Surrey, employing 1 man and 2 boys. In 1891 he was living at Milton House, Camberwell. His wife is named as Susanna: the ages of the children indicate that she was their mother. James's first wife, his cousin Elizabeth Alefounder, mentioned by her father John in his will (1868), died in 1870. At the time of the 1871 census James was living with her sister, Susanna (listed in the census as his sister) and later that year they were "married". Under the 1835 Marriage Act this would have been illegal and, it seems, by the period in question was a contentious issue. There are many references in The Times from 1849 onwards to attempts to change the law in this respect, all of which were defeated until the Deceased Wife's Sister's Marriage Act was passed in 1907. It is hardly credible to suppose that James and Susanna would have been unaware of what they were doing.

James became a Freeman of the City of London in 1885, at which time he was an oyster merchant of 22 Lime Street. In the 1901 census, after Susanna had died, he appears at 134 Underhill Rd, Camberwell, as a refreshment house keeper.

He, his wife and five of their children are buried in the same grave at Camberwell Old Cemetery. Their son James Love, buried at Ealing, is also mentioned on the stone.

Richard Brooks b. 1 Feb 1809

Born in Coombmartin, Devon. Joined the merchant navy at age 14 and obtained his Certificate of Service as a Mate in 1850, under the Mercantile Marine Act of that year. His service record at that time was as follows:

Vessel's NamePort belonging toTonsCapacity, whether Apprentice, Seaman or MateIn what TradeDate of Service
FromTo
William SmithIlfracombe55ApprenticeCoasting10 April 182310 April 1827
Different ShipsDifferent PortsDifferent tonageSeamanDifferent trades10 April 1827September 1832 at sea all the time
PilotBristol300Second MateDalasiaSeptember 1832May 1834
AjaxBristol300Sea manEast IndiesJune 1834May 1835
William HenryBristol150MateCoastingMay 1835September 1836
FelizaBristol350MateWest IndiesSeptember 1836August 1840
ElizaBristol300MateN. America?August 1840May 1842
MargaratBristol176MateJehaboeJune 1842September 1844
ClydesideBristol280MatePatagoniaOctober 1844June 1846
WoodpeckerBristol270MateWest IndiesJune 1846July 1848
MonmouthBristol210MateCubaJuly 1848August 1849
UrgentBristol276MateCubaAugust 1849Present Date [3 Dec 1850]
Jehaboe was almost certainly Ichaboe Island, a British possession off the coast of South West Africa, used as a source of guano.

He passed the relevant examination and obtained his mariners' Master Ordinary certificate (number 11580) at Liverpool in 1854. For this, he had to give testimonial certificates and a statement of service:

No. of TestimonialShip's NamePort belonging toRankdate of servicetime served
FromToYearsMonthsWeeks
1PilotBristol2d MateAug 1837Feb 1838060
"Feliza   dodo & MateFeb 1838Jun 1841340
2Eliza   doMateJune 1841Dec 1843260
3MargaretLiverpooldoDec 1843July 1845150
4WoodpeckerBristoldoJan 1848Jan 1851300
"Urgent   dodo
5AilsaBridgewaterdoMarch 1851Sep 1851060
6EdwardLiverpooldoOct 1852Jan 1853140
7ManillaLiverpooldoMarch 1854Dec 1854080

He thus claimed for 13 years 3 months at sea, for which he had certificates, and also claimed a further 19 years and 1 month with no certificates, total 32 years 4 months. His Certificate of Competency as Master was granted on 30 December 1854.

According to Lloyds Captains Register, 1869, he then served on the following ships:

Shipnumberpositiondatesvoyagesnotes
Frederick Mate1855Austlost Oct 13, 1855
Wm. Gibson Mate1855-6E.I. 
Water Witch24295Mate1856-8S.A. 
James Hull21683Mate1859-60S.A. 
Antilla7034Mate1860S.A., U.S. 
Hawthorne27408Master1861W.I. 
Mary Block19086Master1861-2S.A. 
Favourite27404Master1862S.A. 
Sea Nymph5783Mate1863F.P.S. 
Druid10518Mate1863-4W.I., S.A.lost Nov 14, 1864
Ullswater47596Mate1865-7S.A. 
Persia41559Mate1867S.A. 

Voyages: 
Aust. Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand
E.I. East Indies, Birmah, Mauritius, Red Sea
F.P.S. France south of Brest, Portugal, Spain outside Straits of Gibraltar, Azores
S.A. Brazils, River Plate
U.S. America North, United States (Atlantic and Gulf Ports)
W.I. West Indies, Vera Cruz, Belize and Caribbean Sea

Richard Brooks had died by the time of the 1871 census; his wife is listed as a widow of 90 Burlington Street, Liverpool.

Charles Stephenson b. ca. 1822

According to census returns, born in Horncastle, Lincolnshire in about 1822, but he was living in Liverpool by the time of his marriage in 1845. In the 1851 census, he appears in the same house (but in a separate household) as Absalom Stephenson, a tailor of an earlier generation born in Horncastle. Absalom Stephenson was a witness to Charles's marriage, and was no doubt a relative. He can be found, with his family, in the 1841 census, living at 14 Prospect Street, Liverpool, but I have not located Charles in 1841.

Charles's wife, Elizabeth, is shown in 1851 and 1861 as having being born about 1824-5 in Liverpool. However, in 1871 and 1881, this becomes 1832 and Shrewsbury. It is this that leads me to believe that Charles married twice, both wives being called Elizabeth. The only record I can find that matches the second marriage is for an Elizabeth Armstrong, but until I have examined the parish register, I cannot be certain that this is the correct one.

His address at various times and other details can be found in parish registers and census returns:

1845marriagetailor of Basnett Street
1846bp of sontailor of Fleet Street
1851censusMaster Tailor of 16 Basnett Street
1860bp of sontailor of Radcliffe Street
1861censusTailor employing 3 men, of 23 Falkland Street
1862, 1863bp of daughterstailor of Falkland Street
1867bp of daughtertailor of Everton
1871censusMaster Tailor employing 10 men, of 16 Rockwood Street
1881censusTailor & Draper of 110 Shaw Street, Everton
1891censusLiving on own means, with daughter Elizabeth and son-in-law Thomas Reay at 29 Mount Street, Liverpool.

He died in 1897 aged 76.

Acknowledgments

My thanks to Peter James for information concerning Daniel Alefounder, his wife and children, to the late John Lightfoot and particularly to Nick Lightfoot and Stephen Kingsnorth for information on, respectively, the Lightfoot and Kingsnorth parts of the pedigree.

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Last updated 21 May 2013 by Peter Alefounder

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