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Nelson W. Aldrich

 

Nelson W. Aldrich (1841--1915)

US politician, born in Foster, RI. He was elected to Congress (1879--81), after which the Rhode Island legislature chose him for a seat in the US Senate (1881--1911). By the turn of the century he controlled the Senate for the Republicans on domestic issues, ruthlessly defending big business and a high protective tariff.

Nelson W. Aldrich was once a very influential figure in Rhode Island politics. He served as member and president of the Providence city council, a member and Speaker of the House, and member of U.S. Congress. He was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1881. Aldrich had very important financial interests in Rhode Island and elsewhere. He became such a leading figure in the Senate and in the national government that he was often referred to as the "general manager of the United States."

In 1908, Sen. Nelson Aldrich of Rhode Island introduced an amendment to establish an income tax after he had denounced it as "communistic" in 1894. Aldrich was viewed as the "authentic voice of J.P. Morgan". His daughter later married the son of John D. Rockefeller. Vice-President Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller was named for his maternal grand-father. Congress moved to revise the monetary system by creating the National Monetary Commission, led by U.S. Senator Nelson W Aldrich of Rhode Island as chairman, in 1908 (From The History Of the Rhode Island General Assembly)

In 1908, Sen. Nelson Aldrich of Rhode Island introduced an amendment to establish an income tax after he had denounced it as "communistic" in 1894. Aldrich was viewed as the "authentic voice of J.P. Morgan". His daughter later married the son of John D. Rockefeller. Vice-President Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller was named for his maternal grand-father. Nelson W. Aldrich was chief sponsor of The National Monetary Commission--the National Reserve Association which eventually became the Federal Reserve System.

Sen. Aldrich was seen as the embodiment of the "eastern establishment"--the perception by southern and western states that the wealthy families and large corporations of the northeast ran the country.