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The Regarde Bien

Issue No. 12




John Millikin merchant burgess of Ayr

In Issue #6, under the article headed “The Millikins in Ayr”, I make reference to John Millikin merchant weaver in Ireland, who was admitted burgess of Ayr in 1651. This entry, along with three others, appears in the published volume 'The Burgesses And Guild Brethern of Ayr 1647 - 1846, edited by Alistair Linday and Jean Kennedy. The names listed had been extracted from the old Burgh Council Registers of Ayr, the earliest of which are written in Old Scots. Whilst at the Carnegie Library, I made a point of having the original entries in the burgh records photocopied with a view to having them crossed checked. I sent them to Mrs. Alison Mowat, genealogist, and have since received back a copy of her translation. Mrs. Mowat is an expert in the Old Scots Language, and I must say, having now received her report, I have no reason to doubt her translation of the John Millikin entry taken from the original minutes, which has been scanned on to this Webpage for all to view.




The entry of John’s admission is recorded in the second paragraph with the crucial section immediately following the name of ‘John Milikin’, which appears to read ‘in Ireland’; this word should in fact be translated as merchant. Mrs. Mowat has translated the whole paragraph as: “Quhilk day Johne Milikin merchand man and indweller was admittit and receavit burges of this burgh for his service done and to be done to the same who maid faith as use is”. It is easy with hindsight to see how someone, who is perhaps less skilled translator of the Old Scots, could make the mistake of confusing the “meJchand” with “in Ireland”. So John was already a merchant and an indweller, that is, a resident in Ayr, at the time of his application in 1651. This new rendering provides a stronger basis upon which to argue, that he was succeed by Thomas Millikin in 1665, suggesting he may have died sometime before this date. If John had been Thomas’s father it would explain how the latter came to marry Jean Moore the lawful daughter of John Moore also a merchant burgess of Ayr in 1651.

The Mullikins of Edinburgh

With the rise of Edinburgh as Scotland’s principal royal burgh by 1500, we begin to hear the City fathers complaining of the ‘greitt confluence of sempill peipell’ who thronged daily through Edinburgh’s markets, being drawn from as far away as Perth and Dumfries. Their complaints are certainly vindicated in the burgh records, and make it all the more significant that we should find the names of Fergus Amuligane, first laird of Blackmyre, and Cuthbert Amuligane, laird of Crogo, both prosperous sheep farmers, along with others, beginning to appear in Edinburgh about the same time. Here they would have brought their livestock north from Blackmyre, Crogo and Holm of Dalquhairn to sell them in the market place, where they would have been slaughtered and skinned for their wool and hide, and then exported to the Low Countries of Europe. In the Records of the Ancient Privileges of the Canongate, there is mention of George Amuligan being a member of the Craft of the Hammermen in 1536 and Cuthbert Muligan master craft’s man of the Craft of the Shoemakers in 1538.

As the records themselves bear testimony, the first native “Ms” to appear in Edinburgh came from Dumfriesshire and Galloway, making any discussion about Jacobus Mullikin of Florence, being their ancestor, almost preposterous. It follows then, that if we are to understand the origins of the Mullikins of Edinburgh, whose names appear in the Church of Scotland parish index (see below), we need to follow the trail of documentation that leads back to Dumfriesshire. The most prominent family, headed by ‘Thomas Mullikin merchant burgess of Edinburgh’, was a junior branch of the Amuliganes alias Mullikins of Blackmyre. This Thomas was the second son of John third laird of Blackmyre; he married a near cousin, Janet daughter of Thomas Amuligane alias Mullikin, merchant burgess of Edinburgh. The elder Thomas also came from Dumfriesshire, where he had been actively engaged as a merchant in the burgh of Dumfries until about 1569, when he moved north to Edinburgh. I have listed below a selection of extracts relating to this Thomas: -

No. 1: Procuratory dated March 30, 1569, narrating that Thomas Mulikyne burgess of Dumfries appointed Cuthbert Amuliken his brother to resign into the hands of the baillies of Dumfries, the house and tenement of land occupied by John Brand on the north side of Friar’s Vennel between the lands of John Mitchell elder on the west and the land of John Carson on the east of the land of Sir James Maxwell on the north, in favour of Edward Moffat according to a charter dated March 11, 1568.
[Cunningham’s Protocol Book 1561-74, Dumfries]

No. 2: Admitted burgess and guild brother of Edinburgh on May 30, 1571, Thomas Amulekyn by right of wife Isabel, one of the daughters of the deceased Michael Clerk.
[Watson, Charles, B. Boog: Roll of Edinburgh Burgesses and Guild Brothers 1406-1700]

No. 3: Thomas Amuligane of Edinburgh paid stent tax on June 1583.
[Edinburgh, M. S. Stent Roll (NAS), I fos 15-30]

No. 4: Instrument of Sasine, dated June 6, 1588, narrating how that Helen Brown relict of James Johnston, burgess of Edinburgh, with consent of Thomas Amuligane, her spouse, resigned a tenement on the High street of Edinburgh in favour of James Johnston son and heir of James Johnston who then resigned it in favour of Robert Smart merchant of Edinburgh.
[Calendar of Charters (SRO), Vol. XIII 1587-1591, no. 2970]

No. 5: Deed of Contract by Thomas Millekin, merchant burgess of the burgh of Edinburgh, May 17, 1589.

[Calendar of Deeds (NAS), Contract 30: 299]

No. 6: Testament testamentary of Cuthbert Archibaldson merchant burgess of Dumfries who died in August 1591 and given up by James Archibaldson his lawful brother as only executor under legacy dated July 20, 1591. The inventory consisted of merchandise in his booth in Dumfries and in his chamber in Edinburgh, mainly silk and textiles:- £495. 11s. 0d. The defunct owed sums to Thomas Mullikin merchant burgess of Edinburgh for a year’s rent of this chamber.
[Edinburgh Commissariot]

No. 7: Bonds of Caution dated June 21, 1595: Johnne Lees (sic Leyis), merchant, burgess of Edinburgh, principal, and Thomas Mullikin, burgess there, surety 1000 merks, and the said Johnne and Thomas for Johnne Lees, son of the said Johnne, 500 merks, not to harm Thomas Harbartousn in Glasgow, Johnne Govan there, Johnne Wallace there, William Napier there, Johnne Park there, Robert Brown there, and Gavin Wilson, all gardeners in Glasgow.
[Masson, David (editor): The Register of the Privy Council of Scotland 1592-99, Vol. V, p. 654]

No. 8: Case of Thomas Mulligan, merchant burgess of Edinburgh, one of fifteen persons who sat on the assize enquiring into the charge of counterfeiting money by Rauff Wallace skinner and burgess of Edinburgh. The case was brought before the Court of Session who dismissed the case and charged the assize of wrongfully conviction February 27, 1599.
[Pitcairns, Robert: Ancient Criminal Trials in Scotland, Vol. II, p. 77-80]


It is interesting to note how the variant surname of Mullikin is used interchangeably with the old Brythonic-Gaelic surname of Amuligane, just as it had been used with the Italian surname Meallus in 1358. Thomas married first Isobel daughter of Michael Clarke and by right of this marriage, was admitted guild brother of the burgh of Edinburgh on 30th May 1571. The couple had three known children, John, Isobel and Janet, whose names are all listed in their mother’s testament, which was made probate on 28th November 1582. She died in “the month of July the yeir of God 1581” having appointed her husband, Thomas, sole executor and lawful administrator of her three children. He married, secondly Helen Brown, described as being the relict of James Johnston merchant burgess of Edinburgh.

Thomas had two known brothers, George and Cuthbert. The elder of the two died in the ‘month of July the yeir of God 1586’, and is described in his testament as George Mullekin ‘goodman of the Parkiary’, which lies in the old barony of Holywood in Dumfriesshire. He died leaving no will of his own, for his brother Thomas Mullikin merchant burgess of Edinburgh was confirmed his “executor” before Homer Maxwell commissariot of Dumfries on 7th August 1590. I have had George’s testament dative extracted, the original of which is preserved in the National Archives of Scotland (NAS), and is given below. I should perhaps point out that the old Scots word ‘goodman’ is used of a tenant who had a small estate or farm, ranking below a laird.

Registered 25th December 1590
The Testament dative and inventar of the guids geir soumes of money and dettis pertaining to umquhil George Mullekin in Parkiary in the parochin of Holywode and sheriffdome of Dumfries the tyme of this deceis quha decessit in the moneth of July the yeir of God 1586 yeirs faithfullie maid and given up be Thomas Mullikin merchand burgess of Edinburgh his brother germane executor dative and [unclear] be decreit of Mr. Homer Maxwell commissar of Dumfries as the samyn decreit of the dait in Dumfries the 7th day of August the yeir of God forsaid at lenth perports. In the first the said umquhile George Mullekin hed the guids geir sowmes of money and dettis of the availl and pieces afterspecefeit.
In brief, he had a nag, an ox, 5 cows, 3 stots and quoyes of 2 years old, 30 old sheep, and 12 lambs. Five and a half bolls of oats, and bolls of beir, also utencils and domicils of his house. Sum of the inventory £185 13s 14d.
In the debts owing to the dead there are two Milligans vz. £8 from Jon Mullekin for oats, and £4 from John Mulekin dwelland under the gudman of the Parkiary.
Sum of the debts owing to the dead £109 18s 8d
Sum of the inventory with the debts £295 12s
No division of goods (so possibly he was not married and had no children)
The quot £8
Thomas Mullekin is confirmed as executor dative to his brother the deceased George Mullekin.
[Commissariot of Edinburgh, (NAS), CC8/8/22]


The land of Parkiary, better known as Parkjarg, lies in the barony of Holywood and parish of Kier in Nithsdale, and was part of the estate of John, 8th Lord Maxwell, one of the great feudal Lords of Dumfriesshire. For most of the sixteenth century, the Maxwells had been engaged in what has been described by George MacDonald Fraser in his book The Steel Bonnets: The Story of the Anglo-Scottish Border Reivers, as “probably the bitterest and bloodiest family quarrel in British history”, against the Johstones of Lochwood Castle. In 1586, the King imprisoned Maxwell, giving the Johnstones, lead by James Johnstone, Chief of the Clan, an opportunity to carry out a series of retaliatory raids on Maxwell’s estate, during which he killed a number of his men and burned a dozen villages. As George Mullekin died still in his prime and left no will, I wonder if perhaps he had been one of those killed by Johnstone’s men in July of that year.

Thomas’s first wife died sometime before 1588, when the name of his second wife, Helen Broun, is styled relict of ‘James Johnstoun, merchant burgess of Edinburgh’ and now spouse of Thomas Amuligane. Helen died in 1606, predeceasing her husband whose date of death appears to have gone unrecorded. In her testament testamentar, that is, a legal document which confirmed a person as executor nominated, there is mention of Thomas’s sister “Agnes Amuligane”, possibly the spouse of Patrick Spens of Edinburgh. I have not been able, as yet, to determine the exact paternal ancestry of Thomas, George, Cuthbert and Agnes, but I suspect they may have been the children of John Amuligane merchant burgess of Dumfries or George Amuligane, merchant of Bennan. In the next issue, I hope to continue this article by looking at the family of his son-in-law, Thomas Mullikin, who inherited the family business in Edinburgh.

The Parish Index to
Baptisms and Marriages of Edinburgh

The City of Edinburgh has a long and chequered history that finds it origins in antiquity and is one of the oldest royal burghs in Scotland. During the middle ages, the parish boundary extended beyond the burgh gates and comprised the parochial districts of St. Gilies, Canongate and St. Cuthbert. Of these, the oldest records relate to Canongate, followed by St. Cuthbert and then St. Giles. They are of course, not complete, but nonetheless provide a rich source of genealogical information. I have extracted all the “M” entries I can find in the parish indexes to the Church of Scotland, and have listed them below. It will be noted that by the end of the 1600s, nearly all the “Ms” disappear from record and presumably from the burgh as whole.

Index to Baptisms and Marriages of Edinburgh Parish 1595-1799
Marriage of Thomas Mullikin, merchant, and Jonet Mullikin on March 25, 1600
Baptism of Helene daughter of Thomas Mullikin on December 28, 1600
Baptism of Johnne son of Thomas Mullikin on February 25, 1602
Baptism of James son of Thomas Mullikin on August 30, 1603
Baptism of Helene daughter of Thomas Mullikin on March 20, 1606
Baptism of Jonet daughter of Thomas Mullikin on June 11, 1607
Baptism of Thomas son of Thomas Mullikin & Jonet Mullikin on September 10, 1609
Baptism of William son of Thomas Mullikin & Jonet Mullikin on September 10, 1610
Baptism of Catherine daughter of Thomas Mullikin & Jonet Mullikin on April 24, 1611
Baptism of Marione daughter of Thomas Mullikin & Jonet Mullikin on May 6, 1613
Baptism of Alexander son of Thomas Mullikin & Jonet Mullikin on August 14, 1614
Marriage of Andrew Mullikin, merchant, and Margaret Christie on December 5, 1616
Baptism of Jonet daughter of Andrew Mullikin & Margaret Christie on September 13, 1617
Marriage of Gilbert Mullikin, tailor, and Beatrix Bishope on June 11, 1618
Marriage of Andrew Mullikin, merchant, and Jonet Newtoun on June 22, 1620
Baptism of Thomas son of Andrew Mullikin & Jonet Newton on June 21, 1621
Baptism of Jonet daughter of Andrew Mullikin & Jonet Newton on June 15, 1624
Marriage of Johnne Mullikine, tailor, and Margaret Broun on October 14, 1624
Baptism of Isobell daughter of Andrew Mullikin & Jonet Newton on February 14, 1626
Baptism of James son of Johnne Mullikin & Margaret Broun on May 2, 1626
Marriage of Robert Reid, horse boy, and Jonat Mullikin on October 9, 1627
Baptism of Johnne son of Johnne Mullikin & Margaret Broun on June 15, 1628
Baptism of Magdaline daughter of Robert Mullikin & Jonet Main on January 25, 1628
Marriage of James Ramsay, skinner, and Jonet Mullikin on November 4, 1629
Marriage of Robert Mullikin and Rachel Gibsone on June 10, 1630
Baptism of Walter son of Robert Mullikin & Rachael Gibsone on November 5, 1630
Baptism of Alexander son of Johnne Mullikin & Margaret Broun on November 17, 1630
Marriage of Abrahame Mullikin, husbandman, and Isobell Tod on June 14, 1631
Baptism of Alexander son of Robert Mullikin & Rachael Gibsone on March 18, 1632
Baptism of Walter son of Abrahame Mullikin & Issobel Tod on February 29, 1632
Marriage of James Andersone, skinner, and Christiane Mullikin on October 10, 1632
Marriage of Johnne Mullikin, tailor, and Marione Rutherfoord on November 8, 1632
Marriage of James Calendar, merchant, and Catherine Mulligin on July 24, 1633
Baptism of Johnne son of Johnne Mulligin & Marione Rutherfoord on September 8, 1633
Baptism of Johnne son of Robert Mulligin & Rachel Gibsone on October 20, 1633
Baptism of Issobell daughter of Abraham Mulligin & Issobell Tod on March 30, 1634
Baptism of Williame son of Johnne Mullikin & Marione Rutherford on November 1, 1635
Baptism of Robert son of Robert Mulligin & Rachel Gibsone on March 31, 1637
Baptism of Andrew son of Johnne Mulligin & Marione Rutherfoord on October 1, 1637
Baptism of Rachel daughter of Robert Mulligin & Rachel Gibsone on December 9, 1638
Baptism of Jonet daughter of Johnne Mulligin & Marione Rutherfoord on March 22, 1640
Baptism of Sarah daughter of Robert Mulligin & Rachel Gibsoune on December 16, 1640
Baptism of Marione daughter of Johnne Mulligin & Marione Rutherfoord on May 8, 1642
Baptism of Williame son of Robert Mulligin & Rachel Gibsone on June 10, 1645
Marriage of Johnne Mulligin, tailor, and Christiane Lowdiane on April 22, 1646
Marriage of William Mulligin, tailor, and Margaret Hill on April 26, 1650
Baptism of David son of Williame Mulligin & Margaret Hill on June 17, 1651
Baptism of Margaret daughter of Williame Mulligin & Margaret Hill on May 3, 1653
Baptism of Elizabeth daughter of Williame Mullgin & Margaret Hill on May 10, 1655
Marriage of Robert Mulligin, vulgar school master, and Margaret Broun on September 5, 1656
Marriage of Thomas Mulligin, tailor, and Susanna Bartlman on November 27, 1656
Baptism of Thomas son of Thomas Mullgin & Susanna Bartleman on October 18, 1657
Baptism of James son of Robert Mulligin & Magdalene Broun on November 29, 1657
Baptism of Johne son of Williame Mulligin & Margaret Hill on November 29, 1657
Baptism of Barbara daughter of Robert Mulligin & Margaret Broun on May 24, 1659
Baptism of Johne son of Thomas Mulligin & Susanna Bartleman on April 27, 1660
Baptism of Robert son of Robert Mulligin & Magdalene Broun on April 13, 1662
Baptism of Jean daughter of Thomas Mulligin & Susanna Bartlman on March 8, 1663
Baptism of John son of Robert Mulligin & Magdalene Broun on June 7, 1663
Baptism of William son of Thomas Mulligine & Susanna Bartlman on March 26, 1665
Baptism of Susanna daughter of Thomas Mulligin & Susanna Bartlman on February 2, 1668
Baptism of James son of Thomas Mulligin & Susanna Bartlman on April 17, 1670
Baptism of Andrew son of Thomas Mulligine & Susanna Bartlman on August 9, 1672
Baptism of Robert son of Thomas Mulligine & Susanna Bartlman on August 9, 1672
Marriage of David Mulligine, tailor, and Elspeth McIntosh on January 14, 1676
Marriage of James Halden, tailor, and Jonet Mulligine on March 12, 1675
Marriage of John Mulligine, workman, and Issobell Blaikader on July 14, 1676
Baptism of Marion daughter of John Mulligine & Issobell Blaikader on June 27, 1680
Baptism of John son of John Mulligine & Issobell Blaiketter on July 8, 1683
Baptism of James son of John Milligen & Issobell Blaikiter on May 13, 1688
Baptism of Robert son of John Mulliken & Margaret Low on March 20, 1692
Baptism of Alexander son of John Molicken & Alison Currie on June 26, 1692
Marriage of George Mulliken, minister at Bowden, and Elizabeth Hume on June 1, 1693
Baptism of Thomas son of John Mulliken & Margaret Low on May 8, 1696
Baptism of Jannet daughter of James Mulliken & Bessie Brown on April 28, 1696
Baptism of Marion daughter of James Mulliken & Bessie Brown on November 29, 1698
Baptism of Alexander son of James Mullikine & Bessie Brown on November 17, 1700
Marriage of James Milliken and Jean McDowall on April 21, 1734
Baptism of Jean daughter of James Milliken & Jean McDowell on May 8, 1735
Marriage of Margaret Millighan and William Rutherford on February 18, 1759
Marriage of Andrew Milligan and Janet Irvine on February 24, 1771
Marriage of James Milligan and Agnes Stewart on March 10, 1791
Marriage of Margaret Milligan and George Gall on September 13, 1796
Marriage of James Milligen and Mary Dickson on June 5, 1798

Index to Baptisms and Marriages of Canongate Parish 1564-1799
Marriage of Margaret Mulinkin and James Murtrey on July 15, 1565
Marriage of Margaret Mulinkin and James Melven on July15, 1565 [Session Minute]
Marriage of Alexander Thomsoun and Margaret Mulliken on January 19, 1604
Marriage of Nicoll Bartone and Jonett Mullikinn on September 6, 1614
Marriage of Christopher Parker and Margaret Mullikine on June 13, 1615
Marriage of Abraham Mulliken and Isobell Tod on June --, 1631
Marriage of David Mullikin and Margaret Murray on October 9, 1653
Marriage of David Mullikin and Margaret Murray on October 11, 1653
Baptism of Cristane daughter of David Mullikin & Margaret Murray on August 19, 1655
Baptism of Jeane daughter of David Millikin & Margaret Murray on December 20, 1657
Baptism of Thomas son of James Millikin & Helen Aitkin on August 25, 1668
Baptism of Barbara daughter of James Mullikin & Helen Aitkin on July 23, 1671
Baptism of James son of James Mullikin & Helen Aitkin on June 2, 1674
Baptism of Marion daughter of John Mullikin & Issobell Blaikader on August 19, 1677
Baptism of Elespeth daughter of James Mullikin & Helen Aitkin on September 16, 1677
Baptism of Patrick son of James Mullikin & Helen Aitkin on September 26, 1680
Baptism of William son of Alexander Mullikin & Jonet Robertsone on February 9, 1682
Marriage of Agnes Mullekin and William Nimmo on February 7, 1686
Marriage of Alexander Smith and Jonet Mullikin on November 13, 1697
Marriage of John Mullikin and Elizabeth McPhersone on May 10, 1705
Baptism of Janet daughter of John Mullikin & Elizabeth McPherson on January 1, 1710
Baptism of Marion daughter of John Mulliken & Elizabeth McPherson on October 20, 1713
Baptism of Robert son of John Mulikine and Elizabeth MacFirson on July 5, 1718
Baptism of William son of John Mullikin & Elizabeth McPherson on February 26, 1723
Baptism of Catherin daughter of John Mulliken & Elizabeth McPherson on January 28, 1727
Marriage of Andrew Milligan and Sussan Richardson on September 2, 1781
Baptism of John son of Andrew Milligan & Sussana Richardson on July 2, 1782
Baptism of Jannet daughter of Andrew Milligan & Susanna Richardson on October 19, 1783
Baptism of Ann daughter of Andrew Milligan & Sussan Richardson on August 21, 1785
Baptism of Andrew son of Andrew Milligan & Sussana Richardson on October 8, 1787
Marriage of Margaret Miligan and William Bain on October 15, 1789
Baptism of John son of Andrew Milligan & Sussan Richardson on May 24, 1790
Marriage of James Milligan and Ann Crumbie on February 20, 1792
Baptism of Margaret daughter of Andrew Miligan & Susan Richardson on June 28, 1792
Marriage of Agness Milligan and Archibald Ainslie on November 13, 1793
Baptism of Robert son of Andrew Milligan & Susanna Richardson on November 4, 1794
Baptism of George son of Andrew Milligan & Susanna Richardson on July 1, 1797

Index to Baptisms and Marriages of St. Cuthbert’s Parish 1573-1799
Baptism of Katherine daughter of William Mulickine and Margaret Aitken on March 19, 1676
Marriage of Agnas Muliken and William Wright on July 12, 1694
Baptism of Agnes daughter of John Mulliken & Elizabeth McPherson on February 3, 1706
Baptism of Elizabeth daughter of John Mulliken & Elizabeth McPherson on August 12, 1708
Baptism of Martha daughter of John Mulliken & Elizabeth McPherson on April 19, 1711
Baptism of James son of Andrew Milligan & Janet Irvine on June 30 1772
Baptism of Elizabeth daughter of Andrew Milligan & Janet Irvine on January 8, 1774
Baptism of Hellen daughter of James Milligan & Elizabeth Mosman on July 13, 1775
Baptism of Margaret daughter of John Millican & Jean Hill on August 1, 1783
Baptism of Margaret daughter of William Millican & Elizabeth Harley on July 10, 1784
Marriage of Andrew Milligan and Helen Girvan on July 2, 1785
Baptism of Mary daughter of William Millican & Elizabeth Harley on September 8, 1786
Baptism of William son of William Millican & Elizabeth Harley on February 12, 1788
Baptism of John son of William Mullican & Elizabeth Harley on August 9, 1793

The Mulligans of Banbridge

The oldest family tradition relating to the “Ms” in the North of Ireland dates from the outbreak of the Irish Rebellion in 1641, which propelled the whole of Ireland into civil war and drove the colonists in the North, the English and Scottish settlers, into enclaves located mainly in South Antrim, North Down, and the Cities of Derry and Enniskillen. Reference has already been made to the Banbridge tradition (see Issue #8), which narrates that the Mulligans of Banbridge descended from two brothers of the name of Millikin "who during the inter-racial broils of Scotland emigrated to Ireland and landed at Bangor in Co. Down", one brother moved into the Ards peninsula and the other directed his course towards Belfast and settled in that neighbourhood and after sometime married the sister of [John] Stewart of Ballydrain House in the parish of Drumbeg. It goes on to narrate that at the outbreak of the Irish Rebellion in 1641, this man came to the defence of Ballydrain House. By his marriage to the sister of John Stewart of Ballydrain, Millikin is said to have had a son called James who after sometime made his way to the neighbourhood of Banbridge and settled in the townland of Ballievy.

The tradition cited above is important as there are many Mulligans living in the North of Ireland who do not descend from the Irish Clan of O’Mulligan, but belong to that very distinct and separate Clan or Family Surname of Amuligane in Scotland. For reasons that will be explained at some point in the future, many of the Scottish “Ms” who came into Ulster during the 1600s, later adopted the variant form of Mulligan, and to this day, their descendants still bear this surname. The Banbridge Mulligans are the best known and their descendants had the good sense to leave a record of their families origin. There are at least four manuscripts that relate slightly different pedigrees and are:

1. Draft pedigree of the Mulligan family of Tullyconnaught, Brague and Lisnasliggan in Co. Down c.1600-1926, Genealogical Office, Dublin, MS 817 (2).
2. Genealogical notes relating to the Hall and Mulligan families, mostly in the Banbridge area 1641-1954, and includes the Mulligans of Loughbrickland, Tullyconnaght, Katesbridge, Lisnaliggan, Drumgooland, Clare, Scarva, Aghaderg, Drumlee, Magherally and Bannside. Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Belfast, D.2330.
3. Typescript copy of the family history of John Francis Mulligan, Solicitor, Belfast, compiled by Dr. John Campbell c.1721-1912. PRONI T.2516.
4. Genealogical table of the Mulligan family of Tullyconnaught, Co. Down, 1726-1969. PRONI D.3000/9/1.

The oldest account of the Mulligan tradition is found in the Manuscript on the ‘Genealogical notes relating to the Hall and Mulligan families’. Banbridge itself lies in the parish of Seapatrick and the diocese of Dromore, which for most of the first half the 1600s, had been in the hands of Irish landlords. However, with the defeat of the northern alliance against the Cromwellian regime, nearly all the native Irish gentry lost their land during the confiscations that followed in the early 1650s. In the words of Jonathan Bardon, an eminent Northern Irish historian, 'around 12, 000 (Irish and Colonists) were transported to the West Indies, 3, 400 soldiers were exiled to the European mainland' (including a number of prominent Scottish Colonial landowners, such as Sir James Montgomery of Rosemount in the Ards) and millions of acres were confiscated. In Ulster the biggest confiscations were in the east and south of the province: 41 per cent of the land of Antrim; 26 per cent of Down; 34 per cent of Armagh; and 38 per cent of Monaghan, most of which were taken from the native Irish (1).

Based on the 1642 muster rolls, which record the names of nearly 15 Scottish “Ms” and presumably there were more that joined or came over during the mid 1640s, it is reasonable to assume that some of these men may have been amongst the 12, 000 transported to the West Indies. As yet, I have never had the opportunity to try and find out if any of the listings of names for those actually transported has survived at the Public Record Office in London. If such a list does exist, it may well provide a rich nest of “Ms”, for most, if not all the Scots who had fought on the side of Covenanters during the Scottish and Irish civil war, sided with the royalist cause after the English Parliamentarians beheaded Charles I in 1649. From the 1650s onwards, Crowellian policy aimed to place the confiscated lands in the hands of men, who would encourage the settlement of Protestants, both English and Scots, into those areas that had until then been left in the hands of Irish landlords.

The district of Banbridge was one such area, and if we are to believe the Ballyskeagh tradition relating to my own family, at least three brothers settled in the area, and not just one. In the tradition cited above, it narrates that the son, called James Millikin, “married a wife of the name of Sarah Jelly (?), [perhaps Kelly], and by her had children one a son named Robert, this Robert had a son named William. This William had then Robert, William, James, David and Joseph”. In the manuscript called ‘Genealogical table of the Mulligan family of Tullyconnaught, Co. Down’, the lineage of James Charles Mulligan of Tullyconnaught and latterly the City of Chicago, USA, is traced to the same ancestor, James Millikin, but he is said to have married Isabella Glen, and that he had a son, called James Mulligan, who married a Sarah Smith. Over the years I have spent a good deal of time trying to establish the veracity of these traditions, and include several documents found in the Registry of Deed in Dublin, which I hope will settle the question.

Ref: 97/44/67549 Extract
A Memorial of Indented Deed dated 8th February, 1734 between James McMullan of Malone in the barony of Belfast of the first part and John Mulligan of Tullyconaught in the barony of Upper Iveagh, farmer, of the other part; it witnesses a lease dated 1st February 1705 made between Right Honourable Marcus Lord Viscount of Dungannon, Isabella Viscountess of Dungannon, Right Honorable Lord Baron Howth, Blaney Tourly and Robert Saunders Esq of the one part, and Thomas Gordon, Jas McMullan, John Wright, William Martin, George Mullhallon, John Gordon, Joseph Martin and Jas Mulligan the younger all of Tullyconaught of the other part, reciting that the Grantors demised to Thomas Gordon, Jas McMullan, John Wright, William Martin, George Mullhallon, John Gordon, Joseph Martin and Jas Mulligan the younger all the townland of Tullyconaught. And this deed witnessed that Jas McMullan died possessed of his land in Tullyconaught but before his death made a will whereby he demised a portion of his land to Henry McMullan late of Malone aforesaid deceased father of Jas, party to this indented lease of 8th February 1734,and his sons, and appointed the said Henry his sole executor; Now the deed again witnesses that the said Jas McMullan in consideration of the sum of £28 demised, granted unto John Mulligan one half of the land of Tullyconaught which descended to him of the said Jas McMullan at his said fathers death.
Registered Downpatrick on 22nd August 1739.

Ref: 149/18/96863 Extract
Memorial of Indented Deed dated 8th April 1736 between Josias Wright, Wm Wright, Jas Wright all of the townland of Tullyconaught in the parish of Seapatrick, farmers, of the one part and Jas Mulligan younger of the same townland, carpenter, of the other part; reciting that the Right Honorable Marcus of Dungannon, Lady Anabella Susanna Dungannon, the Right Honorable Thomas Lord Baron of Howth, Blaney Townley of Aclare in County of Louth and Robert Saunders of the City of Dublin Esq by a deed dated 1st February 1705 demised unto Thomas Gordon, Jas McMullan, John Wright, William Martin, George Mullhallon, John Gordon, Joseph Martin and Jas Mulligan the younger all the townland of Tullyconaught. And this deed recites that John Wright did duly leave four sons and a daughter viz Josias, John, Wm, Jas, and Jane having since married George McCormick who made over his right to the lease of land to the four brothers being divided among them. The deed further witnesses that Josias, John, Wm and Jas Wright in consideration of £40 paid to them by Jas Mulligan demised, let, granted all that portion of the four lands of Tullyconaught that fell to the said Wm Wright at the death of John Wright the father. It is witnessed by George Mahallem late of Tullyconaught farmer deceased, Jas Robinson of Ballivey in the parish of Seapatrick farmer deceased, and John Mulligan of Tullyconaught linen draper, John Wright of the same weaver and David Martin of the same farmer; Memorial signed and sealed by John and James in the presences of John Mulligan and John Willcock of Dublin Gent.
Registered at Downpatrick 25th March 1751.


These two memorials of indented deeds cite an earlier deed granted on the 1st February, 1705, whereby the Right Honourable Marcus Lord Viscount of Dungannon, Anabella Viscountess of Dungannon, the Right Honorable Lord Baron Howth, Blaney Tourly and Robert Saunders Esq of the City of Dublin granted to Thomas Gordon, Jas McMullan, John Wright, William Martin, George Mullhallon, John Gordon, Joseph Martin and James Mulligan the younger all of Tullyconaught, all and whole of the townland of Tullyconaught. In this deed, James Mulligan is styled the younger, indicating there was an elder James Mulligan still living in 1705. It is also worth noting that James Mulligan, the younger of 1705, is styled “carpenter”, and John Mulligan “linen draper” of Tullyconnaught in 1736. Both these men appear in the Parliamentary Religious Survey or Returns of 1740, which has survived for the parish of Seapatrick. It lists the name of all Protestant housekeepers in the parish, but doesn’t give their place of residence. I have extracted the relevant information below and listed them as they might have been listed according to townland.

1740 Religious Survey – Seapatrick
Hu[gh] Mulligan and Sam[uel] Moligan; mentioned almost at the beginning of the list of about 122 householders, indicating that they lived in a different part of the parish from those listed next.

John Adair, Jam. Robson, Wid. Orr, Am. Robson, Gilbert Craford, Sam[uel] Moligan and Wm. Muligan and Jos[isa] Wright, along with others, all probably of the town of Ballievy.

John McCormick, John Gordan, Geor. Mahalem, Mick Hook, Jam. Hook, John Molligan, Jam. Piery, Wm Morton [Martin], Jam. Muligan, Alex. Gordan, Isaac Mathews [last name in roll], all probably of the town of Tullyconnaught (2).


In his footnote on the 1740 Religious Survey of Seapatrick, Richard Linn notes that an Alexander Gordon appears in the Subsidy Roll of Down, 1663, as a resident of Ballyvally, and in the 1728 map of the parish, John Gordon appears as a tenant holding 74 acres (Irish). This indicates that Gordons, at least, had settled in the area as early as 1663. There are at least four other deeds belonging to Mulligans of Tullyconnaugth and Ballievy in the Register of Deeds, which shed additional light on the family’s circumstance between 1740 and 1766, the year of the next Parliamentary religious survey of Ireland.

Ref: 144/148/96848 Extract
Memorial of Article dated May 28, 1744, between Robert Morrow and Margaret his wife of Tullyconaught in the parish of Seapatrick of the one part and William Mulligan of Tullyconaught linen draper of the other part, reciting that Henry McMullan of Mallone in the county of Antrim did by his deed dated July 22, 1722, demise unto Jan Ceery then of Tullyconaught that park field in the possession of James Ceery to hold during the term of the grand lease and also recited that James Ceery by assignment conveyed on July 23, 1741, to his wife Margaret Ceery the said land. Now the wife of the said Robert Morrow, she demised the property as then containing a field, house and garden, which she and Robert Morrow in consideration of £10 demised, grant, and sell to William Mulligan to hold during the term of the grand lease. The Article witnessed by George Mahallem of Tullyconaught linen draper and Joseph Mulligan of Tullyconaught labourer and memorial witnessed by George Mahallem and Joseph Mulligan.
Registered in Dublin on November 23, 1750.

Ref: 146/116/96899 Extract
Memorial of Indented Lease dated March 3, 1749, between Jas. Mulligan of Tullyconaught of the one part and Wm. Mulligan of Tullyconaught of the other part; whereby Jas Mulligan in consideration of the sum of £1 demised to Wm. Mulligan that part of the townland of Tullyconaught then in his possession being estimated 15 acres with an equal third of the common moss then in the possession of Jas Mulligan, John Mulligan and the above Wm Mulligan. Lease witnessed by Thomas McCleland of [Lebnane?] in County Down, linen draper, and Jas. McCleland of Tullyconaught linen draper and Robert Mulligan, linen draper.
Registered in Dublin on November 27, 1750.

Ref: 143/175/96465 Extract
Memorial of Indented Deed dated November 13, 1749, between Hans Campbell of Lisnagenall in county Down of the one part and James Mulligan of Tullyconaught in the parish of Seapatrick of the other part; reciting the marriage designed to be solemnised between Charles Mulligan son of James Mulligan, and Mary Campbell daughter of Hans Campbell; and by the said deed James Mulligan did bond himself to give the house offices containing crop stock that in the house and farm in Tullyconaught if the marriage should take place provided he live with him and at the death of the said James Mulligan and his wife Sarah convey his right unto Charles his son and Mary Campbell his right to the property which he held by a deed of lease from the late Lord Dungannon which consisted of about 20 Irish acres of and all that he possessed, except five pounds which was to be paid to John Mackay. Which deed was duly effected by Hans Campbell, James Mulligan, Charles Mulligan and Mary Campbell in the presences of John Mulligan of Tullyconaught farmer and Hugh Campbell of Loughbrickland, merchant. Memorial witnessed by Hugh Campbell and Ezekiel Bullock of the City of Dublin Gent and registered Armagh on August 22, 1750.

Ref: 206/290/136052 Extract
Memorial of Indented Lease dated May 20, 1760, between William Robinson of Ballivey, linen draper, in the parish of Seapatrick, Isabella Robinson and Bella Robinson of Clontanakelly in the parish of [?] of the first part and James Mulligan of Tullyconaught in the parish of Seapatrick linen draper of the other part; reciting that the Right Honorable Marcus Lord Viscount of Dungannon and the Honorable Thomas Lord Baron Howth of Blaney and others did by a deed of lease dated November 1, 1705, demise the farm to William Robinson and other part of the townland of Ballivey to hold 2000 years. Whereupon on the death of William Robinson his part of the lease of land etc fell to his two sons James and Sam Robinson who enjoyed the same as ample manner as said William Robinson farmer did in his life. And whereas the said James died and his part fell to his son William Robinson linen, draper, who became actually possessed of all the said property held by James Robinson deceased. Whereby William Robinson in consideration of £230 did grant James Mulligan the farm and land in the townland of Ballivey late in the possession of James Robinson to hold for 1,900 years. Leased witnessed by George Crawford of Ballivey linen draper and George Crawford of Ballivey linen draper and farmer. Memorial witnessed by George Crawford and John Willock of City of Dublin Gent and register in Dublin on June 17, 1760.


These documents list the names of four additional Mulligans, William Mulligan and Robert Mulligan, linen drapers, Joseph Mulligan, labourer, and Charles Mulligan son of James Mulligan of Tullyconnaught. Most importantly, the third document confirms the Christian name of the spouse of James Mulligan, the younger of Tullyconnaught. If, as is stated in the ‘Genealogical Table’, this Sarah bore the surname of Smith, it is worth noting that name of the Wid. Smith appears on the same list along with John and James Mulligan in the 1740 survey, which also notes the name of George Glan (Glen) in the same parish. The document also appears to indicate that John, James, William and Robert Mulligan could potentially all have been brothers, and that William Mulligan held land both in the townland of Ballievy and Tullyconnaught. I have also included the names of those Mulligans found in the 1766 Protestant Religious Survey below:

1766 Religious Survey – Seapatrick
Hugh Mulligan
Joseph Mulligan
Charles & Hugh Mulligan [listed together]
John & James Mulligan “
Daniel & James Mulligan “
James & Widow Mulligan “
Samuel Mulligan


The Mulligans of Tullyconnaght and Ballievy were staunch Presbyterians and attended the First Presbyterian Church of Banbridge. In the Church’s graveyard there is a headstone erected to the memory of Charles Mulligan and Mary Campbell of Tullyconnaught. It records that he departed this life on 9th September 1808 aged 80 years, giving him an approximate birth date of 1728. According to the ‘Genealogical Table’, he was the son of James and Sarah Mulligan, a fact confirmed in his marriage contract of 1749, and grandson of James Millikin, the son of the first Millikin or Mullikin to settle along the Lagan valley near Belfast, shortly before 1641. It is evident then, that there is a link missing in the pedigree given the ‘Genealogical notes relating to the Hall and Mulligan families’, unless Robert Mulligan was the son of the first James Millikin, though, it seems more than likely he was the son of the second James Millikin, who changed his surname to Mulligan sometime early in the 1700s. It would be a real feat if the name of the first ancestor to settle in Ulster could be discovered; at this time, however, I am not optimistic.
______________________________
1. Bardon, Jonathan: A History of Ulster, 1992, p. 141-142.
2. Linn, Capt. Richard: A History of Banbridge, edited by W. S. Kerr, 1925, p. 209.
3. Ditto, p. 210-213.




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