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THE ORIGINS OF THE O'MULLIGANS IN IRELAND


Part I

The Personal Name Maelacain



Milchu, a champion of Partholon

Ancient Irish history and legends have four main sources, known in modern times as the Mythological Cycle, the Fenian or Ossianic cycle, the Ulster Cycle (also known as the Ultonian or Red Branch Cycle) and the Historical cycle. The term "Mythological Cycle" is a collective term applied to the stories in Irish literature, which describe the doings of otherworldly characters. Six supernatural races arrived in Ireland before the Gaels: the company of Cessair, the granddaughter of Noah; the company of Partholon who led the first colonization of Ireland after the Flood. He came from Greece with his family and a large retinue, including three druids. Partholon and his people were wiped out by a plague. His character survives in moDern Irish folklore as a fertility Demon; the people of Named; the Fir Bolg or Men of the Bag; the Tuath De Dannan or the Children of Dann. Of these, the Fir Bolg became the aboriginal baddies of Irish tradition, while the Tuath De Dannan are remembered as the godlike race. The last invaders chronicled in the Lebor Gabála or Book of Invasions (c.1150) were the Gaels (Milesians), the first Celts and speakers of a Gaelic language.

The earliest known reference to the name Maelchu (or Milchu) appears in the Book of Invasions, under that section dealing with the company of Partholon.

The three druids of Partholon of the harbours, Fiss, Eolas, Eochmarc: the names of his three chamions further, Milchu, Meran, Muinechan.

[Macalister, R.A.S., (Ed and Trans): Lebor Gabála Érenn, 5 vols. (Dublin: Irish Texts Society), 1938-54]

NOTE: The book of the Invasions is thought to have been written c.1150, long after the events recorded in it.


Maelchu, king of Dalaradia

In or about the year 403, the Irish under the command of the great high king Niall of the Nine Hostages, king of Tara (379-406), invaded Briton and carried of many thousands of people among whom was a young sixteen-year, Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. Patrick wasn't the name he was born with but given to him much later in life by Pope Celestine. He was either named either Succat or Maewyn and was born a Briton c.387 at Bannavem Taberniae, probably Kilpatrick, near Dumbarton.. His parents Calphurnius and Conchessa belonged to a Roman family of high rank. His father, Calphurnius was a deacon and a government official, whilst his grandfather, Potitus, a priest (at that time, priests were permitted to marry and have children). His mother, Conchessa, is thought to have been related to St. Martin of Gaul in France. In his Historia Brittonum, Nennius writers of Patrick:

In those days Saint Patrick was a captive among the Scots. His master's name was Milcho, to whom he was a swineherd for seven years. When he had attained the age of seventeen he gave him his liberty. By the divine impulse, he applied himself to reading of the Scriptures, and afterwards went to Rome; where, replenished with the Holy Spirit, he continued a great while, studying the sacred mysteries of those writings. During his continuance there, Palladius, the first bishop, was sent by pope Celesting to convert the Scots {the Irish}. But tempests and signs from God prevented his landing, for no one can arrive in any country, except it be allowed from above; altering therefore his course from Ireland, he came to Britain and died in the land of the Picts.

Patrick was sold as a slave to a chieftain named Milchu (Míliucc), king of Dalaradia, a territory extending from Newry in south Co. Down to the hill of Slemish, the most conspicuous mountain in Co. Antrim. In the seventh century, traditions about his residence suggested he lived near the village of Broughshane, where the townland of Ballyligpatrick, the town of the hallow of Patrick, probably commemorates the position of the farm of where he fed Milchu’s swine and tended his sheep. During Patrick’s stay at the house of Milchu, he learned the language and customs of the land. After six years, he escaped to a monastery in Gaul where he studied under St. Germain, Bishop of Auxerre. Patrick spent more than a year with Germain, and he became instilled with the desire to convert pagans to Christianity.

Patrick returned to Ireland about 432/3, and is said to have directed his steps towards Milchu, also a druidical high priest, whose druids warned him that his former savant would triumphant over him. So Milchu set fire to all his household goods and perished in their midst just as Patrick appeared. Ironically, Melchu’s son, Guasacht, styled ’Guassacht, the son of Maelchu' in the Metrology of Donegal, became a disciple of Patrick and later bishop of Granard in County Longford. After 30 years of missionary work in Ireland, Patrick retired to Saul in County Down, where he died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, on 17 March, c.461.

Cenel Maelchi
(County Antrim - Dál Araida)

AD 914

Slogad la Niall m. n-Aedho i n-Dal n-Araide Iunio mense. Loingsech h. Lethlabhair, ri Dal Araide, dia tairecht oc Fregabul & maidm fair co fargabh a brathair asa lurgg, .i. Flathrue h. Lethlabair. Aedh m. Eochocain, ri in Coicidh, & Loingsech, ri Dal Araide, dia tairecht oc Carn Erenn & maidm foraibh. Cerran m. Colman, tosech Cenel Maelche & m. Allacain m. Laichtechain & alaile du fhacbail asa lurgg. Aed autem cum paucissimis ex fuga reuertens & acerrime intra fugam resistens, quosdam ex militibus Neill prostrauit. Dubgall filius eius uulneratus euasit.

Translation: Niall son of Aed made an expedition into Dál Araidi in the month of June. Loingsech grandson of Lethlabar, king of Dál Araidi, came upon him at Fregabal and was defeated, and left behind on his retreat Flathruae grandson of Lethlabar, his kinsman. Aed son of Eochucán, king of the Province, and Loingsech, king of Dál Araidi, met them again at Carn Éirenn and were defeated. Cerrán son of Colman, chief of Cenél Maelchi, and the son of Allacán son of Laíchthechán, and others, were left behind. Aed, however, returning from the flight with a very few, and fiercely resisting during the flight, wiped out some of Niall's soldiers. His son Dubgall was wounded and escaped.


Maelchu, Patrick’s nephew

According to tradition, Patrick’s had a sister called Darecea, who married twice, firstly Restitutus the Lombard, and secondly, Chonas, kings of Brittany. He founded the church of Both-chonais , now Binnion in the parish of Clonmany in Inishowen, County Donegal. She had families by both husbands and some say she had upwards of 20 children: Gradlon Mawr, Echea, Lalloca, Mel-Noch, Rioch, Muinis, Cruman, Midgman, Loman, Loarn, Cieran, Carantog, Magalle, Columb, Brychan, Brychad, Brendan, Fine, Melchu and Bolcan. While all of the children are reputed to have entered religious life, Mel and Melchu, together with their brothers Muinis and Rioch, accompanied Patrick to Ireland and joined him in his missionary work c.432/3. Patrick is reputed to have appointed Mel bishop of Ardagh, and Melchu to the see of Armagh (or vice versa). There is some evidence that Melchu may have been a bishop with no fixed see or succeeded his brother. Both he and his brother Mel are mentioned in the Leabhar Breac or the Life of St. Brigit, translated by Whitley Stokes:

“Great was the honour in which God held this girl [Dubthach]. For two bishops of the Britons came to her from Alba to prophesy of her and to sanctify her, to wit, Bishop Mél and Melchu nomina eorum. So Dubthach gave them a welcome and the bondmaid served them and tended them”.

[Whitley Stokes, A Parallel. RC III (1878) 443f. {The story of Brigit and Breccán from Lebar Brecc (63b), with translation)]

The name Melchu survives in the old church of Ardmulchan in the parish of Beauparc in County Meath. Ardulchan derives its name from Ard Maelchon, Maelchu’s Hill. The parish of Beauparc is on the south side of the river Boyne between Navan and Slane. The Annals of Ireland by the Four Masters record a battle, which took place there in 968. Olaf Cuaran, King of Dublin and his men plundered Kells and carried off a prey of cows. They were returning south when they were met by a band of the southern Hy Neill and compelled to fight at Ardmulchan. The Dublin Norsemen won this battle.

Maelmilchon of Sil Aeda Slaine
(County Meath)

AD 660

Iomairecc i n-Oghamain, oc Cinn Corbadain, la Muintir Diarmata, mic Aodha Sláine, .i. Onchú, mac Saráin, & Maol Miolchon, & Cathusach, mac Eimhine, for Blathmac, mac Aodha Sláine, maighen in ro marbhadh Conaing, mac Congaile, mic Aodha Slaine.

Translation: A battle was gained at Ogamhain, at Ceann Corbadain, by the people of Diarmaid, son of Aedh Slaine, namely, Onchu, son of Saran, Maelmilchon, and Cathasach, son of Eimhin, over Blathmac, son of Aedh Slaine, in which were slain Conaing, son of Conall, son of Aedh Slaine.

[O'Donovan, John (editor): Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, 1st edition (1848-51), Vol. 1, p. 271.]

NOTE: The territory of Sil Aeda Slaine suits the place name Ardmulchan.
[Airt, Seán Mac & Niocaill, Gearóid Mac (Ed): The Annals of Ulster (Dublin (1983), Vol. I, p 360]

Note: The Cenel Maelchi might be directly descended from Milchu, king of Dal nAraida c.403.

Ardmulchan of Sil Aeda Slaine
(County Meath-Ui Neill)

Ardmulchan lies in the old territory of Sil Aeda Slaine, a branch of the Southern Ui Neill, in Co. Meath, where the Annals of Ireland by the Four Masters records the name of Maelmilchon of the people of Diarmaid son of Aeda Slaine, whose name indicates he was the servant of St. Maelchu, the nephew of St. Patrick.

AD 968

Ceanannas was plundered by Amhlaeibh Cuaran, with the foreigners and Leinstermen; and he carried off a great prey of cows, but lost numbers of his people, together with Breasal, son of Ailill; and he gained a victory over the Ui-Neill at Ard-Maelchon.

[O'Donovan, John (editor): Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, 1st edition (1848-51), Vol. 2, p. 693.]


Cethri mc Máel Mílcon
(Arghialla)

AD c.670

Rawlinson B 502 Manuscript

De Genelogia Ceneuil Totan Incipit

Máel Mílcon mac-side Máeli Fithrich m. Trí m. Cummíne m. Lóchine m. Cóic m. Totan m. Amalgada m. Muiredaich m. Meic Cáirthind m. Eircc m. Colla Uais m. Echdach Dampliúin m. Cairpri Liphechair.

Cethri mc Máel Mílcon .i. Fáeldobur, Snímach, Condae, Fianchú.

[Genealogies from Rawlinson B 502, see O’Brien, M. A.: Corpus Genealogiarum Hiberniae, (Dublin, 1962), p.145]

Book of Ballymote

Incipit genelach Totai

Totan mc. Amladga mc. Mc. Cairthaind mc. Eirc mc. Colla Uais .u. filios habuit .i. Baedan, Forannan, Conall, Lochene, Colman dibaid.

Lochene mc. Totain mc. do sidhe Cummaeine.

Tri mc. la Cummaein .i. Maelochtraich, Faeldobar, mc. do side Baigleach ailiter & is dibaidh.

Maelmilchon mc. side Mailfithrig.

Ceitri mc. Mailimilcon .i. Faeldobar, Snimach, Condae, Fianchu.

[Atkinson, R (editor): Book of Ballymote [facsimile] (Dublin 1887)]

AD 675

Dúnchad son of Ultán, chief of Oirghialla, was slain by Mael Dúin son of Mael Fithrigh.

[O'Donovan, John (editor): Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, 1st edition (1848-51), Vol. 2, p. 285.]

Note: Collas Uais or Carioll was the 121st Monarch of Ireland AD c.327, when Muireadhach Tireach expelled him and his brothers, Colla da Chrioch or Muireadach and Colla Mean or Meann into Alba (Scotland) with three hundred along with them. They returned the same year. In 331, the annals record a battle between the three Collas against the Ulstermen, in which fell Fearghus Fogha, son of Fraechar Foirtriun, the last king of Ulster, who resided at Eamhain. Afterwards, they took from the Ulstermen that part of the province extending from the Righe and Loch nEathach westwards.

Maolgain son of Ceallaigh
(Arghialla)

AD c.750

Domhnaill m. Maolgain m. Ceallaigh a nabairthar Cloinn Cheallaigh m. Tuathuil m. Maoile Duin m. Tuachtoin m. Tuathuil m. Dainhin m. Cairbre an Daimh Arigid m. Eachaigh m. Criomhthain (a quo Ui Cremthainn) m. Feigh m. Deaghaidh dhurin m. Rochaidh m. Colla dha chrioch m. Eachach Doibhlein.

Note: The territory of Ui Cremthainn lies in eastern Co. Fermangh and northern Co. Monaghan. The Clankelly or Clann Cheallaigh is derived from Cheallaigh son of Tuathal, king of the Ui Chremthainn who was killed in AD 731.

Cairbre an Daimh Airgid died AD 513. Daimh, a leared man or poet, and "airgid", wealth, money, was so called from the many presents and gifts of silver and gold he usually bestowed and gave away to all sorts of people. He had more than eight sons. 1. Daimhin, a quo Siol Diamhin; 2. Cormaic, a quo the territory of Ua Cormaic, and who was the ancestor of Maquire; 3. Nadsluagh, a quo Clann Nadsluaigh and who was the ancestor of MacMahon of Ulster; 4. Fearach; 5. Fiacha; 6 Longseach; 7. Brian; 8. Dobhron etc.

Maolagan son of Cumagan
(Arghialla)

AD c.850

Muireadach m. Maolagan (a quo O’Maolagan) m. Cumagan m. Cuborin m. Mactigh m. Faolan m. Hugh m. Fergus Garhgeill (a quo O’Garbhgeill, O’Garvaly) m. Brian m. Caribre an-Daimh-Airgid m. Eochaidh m. Criomhthan (a quo Ui Cremthainn) m. Fiach m. Daig Duirn m. Reochad m. Colla da Chrioch.

[O’Hart, John: Irish Pedigrees (1892), Vol. 2., p. 465-466]

O’Hart compiled his genealogical sources from the writings of O'Clery, MacFirbis and O'Farrell, along with the annals of the Four Masters. He used the works of Burke, Collins, Harris, Lodge and Ware to extend his genealogies to the 17th century. The Book of Ballymote traces Maolagan, spelt as Mailacain, from Lugdach son of Fiach.

Book of Ballymote

Genelach Sil Gairbgaela

Muiridach m. Mailacain m. Caemhan m. Conboirenn m. Maictich m. Folain m. Aedain m. Fergusa Gairbgaela m. Cairill m. Fuiric m. Forco m. Lugdach m. Feic m. Feidlimid m. Fiachach Casan m. Colla Da Crich.

[Atkinson, R (editor): Book of Ballymote [facsimile] (Dublin 1887)]

Note: In AD c.327, Colla da Chrioch (also called Muireadach) and and his brothers Collas Uais and Colla Mean were expelled by Muireadhach Tireach into Alba (Scotland). They returned the same year. In 331, the annals record a battle between the three Collas against the Ulstermen, in which fell Fearghus Fogha, son of Fraechar Foirtriun, the last king of Ulster, who resided at Eamhain. Afterwards, they took from the Ulstermen that part of the province extending from the Righe and Loch nEathach westwards.


Maelgoan son of Eochaidh
(County Donegal - Ui Neill)

AD 845

Maol Goan, mac Eathach, tigherna Ceneoil m-Bóghaine, d'écc.

Translation: Maelgoan, son of Eochaidh, lord of Cinel Boghaine, died.

[O'Donovan, John (editor): Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, 1st edition (1848-51), Vol. 1, p. 475]

AD 847

Mael Goan m. Ecdhach, rex Ceniuil Bogaine, mortuus est.

Translation: Maelgoán son of Echaid, king of Cenél Bógaine, died.

[Airt, Seán Mac & Niocaill, Gearóid Mac (Ed): The Annals of Ulster (Dublin (1983), Vol. I, p 306]

Maelgoan Mac Eochaid, king of Cenel Bogaine, appears in the Book of Ballymote and Rawlinson B 502 Manuscript, where his name is spelt respectively as Maeloghra and Mael Ograi.

Book of Ballymote

Genelach Cenel mBogaine.

Muircertach m. Muirchodach m. Maeloghra m. Echach m. Forbasaigh m. Seachnasaigh m. Dungaili m. Maeltuile m. Seachnasaigh m. Garban m. Branduibh m. Melge m. Bogaine m. Conaill .g. m. Neill .ix.g.

[Atkinson, R (editor): Book of Ballymote [facsimile] (Dublin 1887)]

Rawlinson B 502 Manuscript

Genelach Ceniuil Boguine

Murchad m. Máel Ograi m. Echdach m. Forbassaich m. Sechnassaich m. Dúngalaich m. Máel Tuili m. Sechnassaich m. Garbáin m. Branduib m. Meilge m. Énnae Bóguine m. Conaill Gulban.

[Genealogies from Rawlinson B 502, see O’Brien, M. A.: Corpus Genealogiarum Hiberniae, (Dublin, 1962), p.165]

Note: According to O'Dubhagain’s poem Tír Boghaine as the barony of Banagh, and part of the barony of Boylagh, in county Donegal.

Maelchon son of Odran
(County Donegal - Ui Neill)

The Laud 610 Manuscript

Croab Cheniuil Binnig inso

Eocho Binnech mac Eogain, secht maic les .i. Larein, Crimthand, Eocho, Dare, Mane, Gocan.

Cland Chremthaind .i. cland forballaig 7 cland Odran .i. muinter Chuaich 7 cland Tirechain.

Cuac mac Maelchon mic Odran mic Failgussa mic Failgniaith mic Airmedaig mic Cathbath mic Erblaind mic Gaure mic Colman, o fuilit muinter Chuaic.

[Dillon, Myles: Laud Misc. 610, Celtica 5, p. 64-76 & p. 135-55 (1960)]

Book of Ballymote

Craeb coibnesa Ceniel mBindig andso

Eochaid bindech mc. Eogain .ui. mc. lais .i. Lairen Crimthand Eocho Daire Maine Gogan.

Cland Cremthaind .i. Clann Forballaigh & Cland Odhran & Muinter Cuaich & Clann Tirechan Clann Echach & .H. Lachtnan & .H. Cormaic & .H. Tuatghaile.

Cuach mc. Maelco– mc. Odrain mc. Faelgusa mc. Failgniadh mc. Airmeduigh mc. Cobthaigh mc. Erbluind mc. Guaire mc. Coluim o fhuilet Muinter Cuaich.

[Atkinson, R (editor): Book of Ballymote [facsimile] (Dublin 1887)]

Book of Ballymote

Cenel n-Echach Bindigh

623. Eochaidh bindech m Eoghain sen a cloinde; (tri mic imlesna in cech suil do co ro soi Padraic i n-aenmac imlesna arba cuma ba forreil do sis et suas) .i. Lairen, Crimthann, Eocho, Daire, Maine, Gogan.

627. Clann Criomthainn .i. clann Forballaig m Criomhthainn mic Echach binnicch.

633. Clann Odran .i. muinter Cuag, ocus clann Tirechan, ocus clann Eachach et .h. Lachtnan, .h. Corpmaic, .h. Tuatgaile.

634. Do clainn Cremtainn mic Eachach binnigh annsin.

667. Cuag mac Mael chon mic Odran m Fialgusa mic Flaithniadh mic Oirmedhaigh mic Cathmadh mic Erbloind mic Guaire mic Colluind o fuilit muinter Cuag.

[Pender. S: The O Clery Book of Genealogies, Analecta Hibernica 18, p. 65]

Cenél mBinnigh, of the Cenél Eóghain, descendants of Eochu Binnigh, son of Eoghan, included the O’Hamills, who advanced into Airghialla territory, northwest of Lough Neagh, as early as the 6th century. According to the Book of Ballymote, their branches included Cenél mBinnig Glinne (valley of Glenconkeine, barony of Loughinsholin, county Derry), Cenél mBindigh Locha Droichid (east of Magh Ith in Tir Owen), and Cenél mBindigh Tuaithe Rois (east of the Foyle, in ancient Tir Owne). Several branches of the Cenél mBindigh Locha Droichid are noted, in the Index to the Four Masters, in the north of the barony of Loughinsholin, Co. Derry.

Note: According to O'Dubhagain's poem, they are called the Cinel Binnigh of the Glen, whose territory originally lay in County Donegal but thought to have later settled in County Tyrone, on the east of the river Foyle. The exact location has not yet been ascertained.

Maelgoan Ua Loingsig
(County Donegal - Ui Neill)

AD 1100

Cath eter Cenel Lugdach fén du i thorchair Ua Domnaill, rí Ceneuil Lugdach, & Máel Goan Ua Loi[n]gsich & a mc., & alii multi , & Ua Maeil Gaithe i frithguin.

A battle between the Cenél Lugdach themselves, in which Ua Domnaill, king of Cenél Lugdach, Maelgoan Ua Loingsig and his son and many others fell, and Ua Maíl Gaíthe was slain on the other side.

[Seán Mac Airt: The Annals of Inisfallen (MS. Rawlinson B. 503) (Dublin 1951). p. 257]


Maelagan son of Conmael
(County Leitrim-Conmaicne Rein)


Findfer m. Cumscrach m. Cecht m. Erc m. Erdail m. Cecht m. Dubh m. Medhruadh m. Nert m. Fornert m. Cecht m. Uisel m. Beiri m. Beidhbe m. [m. Doilbhre] m. Lughaidh Conmac (a quo Conmaicni) m. Oirbsen the Great (a quo Loch-Oirbsen) m. Sethnon m. Seghda m. Atri m. Alta m. Ogamun m. Fidhehar m. Doilbhre m. Eon m. Calusach m. Mochta m. Mesamun m. Mogh Taeth m. Conmac m. Fergus, king of Conaucht.

The descendants of Finder m. Cumscrach were the Conmicni-Rien in Breifni.

Onchu m. Findlugh m. Findfer m. Cumscrach had three sons, Neidhe and Filledh and Luachan.

The descendants of Maelfitrech son of Neidhe were the Clann-Clothachtaigh and Clann-Oirechtaigh.

The five sons of Macniadh m. Fidhlin m. Neidhe were Maenachan, Cuaille, Maelagan, Conmael and Cellachan.

Maelcain son of Dubh

The same genealogical lineage as above.

Dubh m. Luachan m. Findfer m. Cumscrach had thirteen sons, including, Maelcain a quo Ui Maelcain.

[Irish Manuscript Commission, Book of Fenagh (1939), p. 383-391]

Note: The townland of Cloonmulligan in the parish of Kiltoghart, which bounds the parish of Fenagh to the west, provides a potential geographical link with Maelagan or Maelcain.


Maelocain son of Conaigen
(Co. Meath – Ui Neill)

AD c.850

Book of Ballymote

Clann Guaire m. Lugdach mc. Laegaire

Ceiternach m. Dinimen m. Maelocain m. Conaigen m. Rechtabrad m. Rechtcride m. Moga m. Doir m. Ulltan m. Ronan m. Cellaich m. Failbe m. Floind Fidbeadh m. Oililla m. Guaire m. Luigdech m. Laegaire m. Néill Noígiallaig.

[Atkinson, R (editor): Book of Ballymote [facsimile] (Dublin 1887)]


Lorcan son of Maelcein
(County Offaly - Laighin)

AD 926

Lorcán, mac Maoil Céin, tigherna Ua Failghe, d'ég.

Translation: Lorcan, son of Maelcein, lord of the Ui-Failghe, died.

[O'Donovan, John (editor): Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, 1st edition (1848-51), Vol. 2, p. 620]


Conchobhar son of Maelchein
(County Offaly - Laighin)

AD 936

Conchobhar, mac Maeil Chein, tighearna Ua Failghe, & a dhá mhac do mharbhadh lá Lorcán, mac Faoláin, tighearna Laighen.

Translation: Conchobhar, son of Maelchein, lord of Ui-Failghe, and his two sons, were killed by Lorcan, son of Faelan, lord of Leinster.

[O'Donovan, John (editor): Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, 1st edition (1848-51), Vol. 2, p. 634]

AD 938

Concobur m. Mael Cein, ri h-U Foilghi, iugulatus est o Laignibh.

Translation Conchobor son of Mael Cian, king of Uí Fhailgi, was killed by the Laigin.

[Airt, Seán Mac & Niocaill, Gearóid Mac (Ed): The Annals of Ulster (Dublin (1983), Vol. I, p. 386]


Guaire son of Maelecan
(County Offaly)

AD 942

Guaire, mac Mailecáin, sacart Cluana Mic Nóis, d'écc.

Translation: Guaire, son of Maelecan, priest of Cluain-mic-Nois (Clonmacnoise), died.

[O'Donovan, John (editor): Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, 1st edition (1848-51), Vol. 2, p. 650]


Donnghal son of Maelacan
(County Laois - Laighin)

AD 878

Dondghal, mac Maile Cáin, flaith Ua Conandla, d'ég.

Translation: Donnghal son of Maelacan, chief of Ui Conannla, died.

[O'Donovan, John (editor): Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, 1st edition (1848-51), Vol.1, p.475]

Note: The Ui Conannla (Conamla) was a branch of the Ui Bairrche being descended from Daire Barrach, son of Cathair Mor, monarch of Ireland in the second century.

Two branches of the Ui Bairrche are known to have existed at the time of Maelacan; the Ui Bairrche of Laois and those of southern Wexford.

Rawlinson B 502 Manuscript

Genelach Ua m-Bairrche.

Éitchíne m. Sóergusa m. Conamla m. Émíne m. Cillíne m. Fínáin m. Colmáin m. Maine m. Fiachrach m. Féicc m. Muiredaig m. Dáre Barraig m. Cathaír Mor.

Cethri mc Conamla: Échtgus & Dub Caille, Fualascach & Snédgus.

[Genealogies from Rawlinson B 502, see O’Brien, M. A.: Corpus Genealogiarum Hiberniae, (Dublin, 1962), p. 51]


Ceandubhan son of Maelecan
(Co. Wexford)

AD 899

Cionaedh, mac Mael Ruanaidh, and Aodh, mac Iolguine, flaith Ua m-Bairrche, do mharbhadh na n-dís lá Cendubhan, mac Maele Cáin.

Translation: Cinaedh, son of Maelruanaidh, and Aedh, son of Ilguine, chief of Ui Bairrche, were both slain by Ceandubhan, son of Maelecan.

[O'Donovan, John (editor): Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, 1st edition (1848-51), Vol. 1, p. 560]

Rawlinson B 502 Manuscript

Genelach Benntraige

Cillíne m. Dochartaich m. Eóin m. Feromuin m. Aildíne m. Oirenn m. Mágach m. Cellaich Croto m. Nechta m. Lugna m. Inomuin m. Benta a quo Bentraige nominantur nó Benta filius Conchobuir m. Nessa ut alii dicunt m. Máil m. Formáil m. Sírnae m. Forich m. Rochada m. Clothnai m. Coirbb m. Sethrann m. Loga m. Cethnenn (Eithlend no Cethrend, Lec).

Sóerchlanna Laíchsi trá Síl Bairr mc Cáirthind uile cip sí áitt i Loíchis do-s-fail.

Síl m-Beraich immorro m. Mescill ind rígrad a quo sunt reges .i. Berach na bennachtan .i. Sóergus Doithnennach do-rat bennachtain for dá mc déc Beraich m. Meiscill .i.

Cathal a quo reges .i. Gáethíne cona chlaind.

Fachtna mc Beraich a quo Clann Beraich (meic Maelocain, Lec).

Cenndubán m. Máelucáin m. Finguine m. Flaithniad m. Beraich m. Mescill.

Note: Lec = Book of Lecan.

[Genealogies from Rawlinson B 502, see O’Brien, M. A.: Corpus Genealogiarum Hiberniae, (Dublin, 1962), p. 91-93]

Note: The Clan Benntraige are considered to be of the same origins as the Loigis (Laois)


Maelacain son of Dinertaich
(Co. Waterford – Deisi)

AD c.900

Rawlinson B 502 Manuscript

Genelach Oengusa Gaebuaibthig.

Dochartach m. Gusáin m. h-Írgusa m. Máelacáin m. Dínertaich m. Finnáin m. Con Óenaich m. Óengusa m. Branduib qui & Ciarán m. Bressail ind Uarammair m. Brain m. Fianboith m. Nadstáir m. Dímmáin m. Echdach m. Dubthaich m. Fergnae m. Muredaich m. Sinill Sírchossaich m. Breogain Brígmair m. Óengusa Aslethain .i. Gáebuaibthich m. Éogain Bricc m. Fiachach Suidge m. Feideilmid Rechtada m. Tuathail Techtmair.

[Genealogies from Rawlinson B 502, see O’Brien, M. A.: Corpus Genealogiarum Hiberniae, (Dublin, 1962), p. 158]

Note: Oengusa Gaebuaibthig (or Aenghus Gaibhuaibhtheach) was killed in AD 276 by the Fiacha Sraibhtine and Eochaidh Doimhlen sons of Cairbre Liffechair. A branch of the Desis Brega migrated to Co. Waterford and southern Co. Tipperary after committing certain crimes against the kings of Tara, over-kings of the other territorial kings. Dubthach son of Fergnae was king of the Deisi Brega early in the 5th Century.


Ua Mailcain
(County Clare)

AD 1096

Ua Mail Cain, ollamh Dal g-Cais, d'écc.

Ua Mailcain, chief poet of Dal-gCais, died.

[O'Donovan, John (editor): Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, 1st edition (1848-51), Vol. 2, p. 952]


Ua Minnegan
(County Meath - Ui Neill)

AD 1106

Donnchadh Ua Maeleachlainn, i.e. the son of Murchadh, son of Flann, King of Meath, was killed by the Ui-Minnegain, i.e. some of the Ui-Mic-Uais of Meath.

[O'Donovan, John (editor): Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616, 1st edition (1848-51), Vol. 2, p. 983]



Part II