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Selected Extracts of Scots in Ireland

1400-1499



October 11, 1401
Licence to John [Dongan] bishiop of Down to treat and parly with all the king’s rebels and other enemies in Ulster, whether Scots, Irish or English, though they may be indicated and outlawed, and to restore them to the king’s peace, to grant them safe conducts and to do whatever may seems expedient for the king’s profit and the common good.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 160/8]

September 20, 1403
Licence to Roger Grymeston, citizen of Dublin, and John White of Carrickfergus to load wheat, flour, ale and salt and to transport it to Scotland and freely merchandize the same.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 171/90]

January 30, 1404
Roger Grymeston of Dublin has petitioned showing that now lately he was robbed by Scots, both of the highlands and also from the isles. Grant to him of a licence to cross by himself or this attorney, John White of Carrickfergus, on three occasions, to those parts and to the transport flour, wine, ale and salt to the value of £10. Dated at Dublin.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 178/88]

November 6, 1404
Petition to the Bishop of Lincoln chancellor, by Thomas Walton, Irish merchant, for licence for a year during the truce lately made with the Scots to export from Ireland to Scotland wheat, flour and other victuals and merchandise.
[Calendar of Document of Relating to Scotland 1357-1509 (Addenda 1221-1435), Vol. IV, no.668]

November 12, 1404
Petition to [blank] from Thomas Walton merchant of Drogheda. He came in his ship with merchandise from Ireland to the port of Lochryan in Scotland, in the lordship of the earl of Douglas, on Wednesday before the Annunciation [19 March], because truces had been made and proclaimed with the Scots. Alexander Cambel and Ector his brother, with assent of the abbot of Glenluce, seized the ship and its cargo. He asks for remedy. Letter was made by command of the king at Coventry.
[Calendar of Document of Relating to Scotland 1108-1516 (Supplementary), Vol. V, no. 923]

June 4, 1405
King grants by letters patent to Richard Sydgrave and his heirs of the reversion of all lands and tenements in Burtournestoun Galwey, Co. Meath, that Robert Sutton clk held for life by gift of Richard II and confirmation by the present king, which belonged to the abbey and convent of St. Mary of Dundreynan in Scotland [Scocia], and were taken into the king’s hand on account of their adherence to king’s enemies, to have to him and his heirs just as the said abbot, etc, held them.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 171/1]

September 16, 1405
Commission to J. Bishop of Doun in Ireland, and Janic Dartasso the king’s esquire, to treat for peace with Sir Donald of the Isles knight and John his brother.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1357-1509, Vol. 4, p. 145, no. 704]

January 6, 1409
Marion, wife of Thomas Makconlagh (McCulloch), kt, [...] prisoner of Janico Dartas esq., has freighted a certain ship (whose owner is Patrick Manus) so that the payment of the ransom of that Thomas might be carried speedily from Scotland to Ireland. Licence to Patrick to carry the said Marion and her goods to Scotland. Dated at Drogheda.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 193/160]

February 18, 1412
By grave complaint of Thomas Waltoun, burgess of the town of Drogheda, the king has learned that one Alexander Caumbell and Ector his brother of the lordship of Archibald, e. Douglas, in Scotland, took by armed force, merchandise of his to the valude of 100m, together with 1 barge and 1 cray, during a time of truce between the king and the people of Scotland. Licence to Thomas to cross to the said parts of Scotland during the truce to sue for restoration, or to send deputies; and to buy 8 crannocks of wheat, 2 crannocks of peas and 1 pipe of wine for their sustenance while staying there upon the suit.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 201/110]

May 14, 1412
Licence to Robert Sutton clk to carry six weys of wheat [to] Galwey (Galloway) in Scotland, during the truce [between the king and the people of Scotland.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 201/111]

June 21, 1413
Grant by the king to his liege William Lyndeseye, of the office of chief sergeant of the county of Loueth in Ireland during pleasure.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1357-1509, Vol. 4, p. 165, no. 843]

FM 1418.14
A great war broke out between Mac-I-Neill Boy, the Scots, and the English of Ulidia and the Route.
[O’Donovan, John: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland 1172-1372 (Dublin, 1856), Vol. IV, p. 837]

December 18, 1421
William Fyssher and Thomas Holywood have petitioned show how they were captured by Scottish enemies in a boat upon the sea with various other companions, together with the said boat and goods in the same, and led away to Scotland and detained until they made ransom with them, and two of their companions were detained as pledges for that ransom. Licence to them to cross to Scotland as often as they please for a term of one year and to take eight weys of wheat in the meantime from Ireland to Scotland for payment of the said ransom. Dated at Drogheda.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 221/118]

AU 1423.3
A great hosting was made by Ua Neill, namely, Domnall, and by Eogan Ua Neill and by Ua Domnaill, namely Niall, and by the Gaidhil of the rest of Ulster also against the Foreigners. And they went to Lughmadh that time and from that to Sradbhaile, and they made an attack on that expedition on the Foreigners of Meath and on the Foreigners of the Plain of Oirghialla and of Sradbhaile and on the deputy of the king of the Saxons. Great defeat was inflicted by them on the Foreigners that time, and they slew the knight who was the head of fighting for the Foreigners then and many more of the Foreigners along with him. And they got chattels numerous on that expedition, and made peace with the Foreigners likewise on that occasion, and left Sradbhaile and all the Foreigners under tribute and under covenants thenceforth, and so on.
[MacCarthy, B.: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1379-1541 (Dublin, 1901), Vol. III, p. 95]

June 9, 1424
On 9 June [1424] 2 Hen. VI, James [Butler], earl of Ormond, deputy of the Lt. Of Ireland, in Thomas Court declared to the council that McMaghone (McMahon), McGenous (McGuinnis), Nell Garrowe Odonyll (O'Donnell)’, and other Irish enemies of the king of the parts of Ulster, had assembled and confederated with a multitude of Irish, Scots and other rebels to burn, destroy and conquer the land unless they be resisted, which he declared he was unable to do without a great number of men-at-arms and archers, and especially without the aid of William Burgh kt and William Burgh his brother. Therefore the earl humbly pleaded to council that for their past services performed in the king’s wars, and so that they might more gladly aid the said deputy in his present necessity, a suitable reward might given to them. On deliberation it was agreed that William Burgh kt should have £40 and William Burgh his brother should have 20m from the issues both of the great new custom and the small custom in the ports of the towns of Galway and Slygagh [Sligo]. Dated at Dublin.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 233/15]

[May 25], 1425
The King, recte Regent of Scotland, i.e. Muireadhach Stewart, and his son, Walter Stewart, and the Great Steward of Leamhain, were slain by the King of Scotland, i.e. by the son of the lame King; and the King's other son, i.e. James Stewart, and the sons of the Great Steward of Lennox, were banished into Ireland.
[O’Donovan, John: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland 1172-1372 (Dublin, 1856), Vol. IV, p. 865-6]

Note: James Stewart, otherwise known as James the Fat, escaped to Ireland, where he died in 1429. The Great Steward of Leamhain (Lennox in Dumbrartonshire) was Duncan, earl of Lennox.

AU 1425.1
The Mortimer came to Ireland this year: namely, the Earl of March and many of the Saxons came with him. And it is that Earl had the guardianship of the king of the Saxons and of the greater part of France and of all the Foreigners of Ireland. For the king of the Saxons was left a child, and it is the Earl of March that had his protection and his guardianship. Now, there went many of the magnates of Ireland to the house of that Earl and came therefrom in great concord and honour. Moreover, the magnates of the Ulster Province went to the house of that Earl: namely, Ua Neill and Eogan Ua Neill and Nechtain Ua Domnaill and Mac-Ui-Neill-buidhe, that is, Brian the Freckled. And Mac Uibhilin went there apart from the rest, by himself. On the completion of their compact with the Earl, the Earl died of the plague before they went from out Meath. The Foreigners of Meath and Saxons followed those Gaidhil and the latter were all taken prisoners, and other worthy persons of their septs along with them. Ua Neill and Mac Ui-Neill-buidhe and Mac Uibilin submitted to the award of the Foreigners and were liberated. Many machinations and many evils were charged against Eogan and against the son of Ua Domnaill, and they were kept in custody through that. And a cause of great war in the whole of the Province of Ulster were those captures.
[MacCarthy, B.: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1379-1541 (Dublin, 1901), Vol. III, p. 99]

[May 25], 1425
Muiredach Stewart, namely; prince of Scotland, was cut off and his son, namely, Walter and his other son [Alexander] and the Great Steward of Leven were cut off in treachery by the king of Scotland. And James Stewart was expelled into Ireland.
[MacCarthy, B.: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1379-1541 (Dublin, 1901), Vol. III, p. 99]

November, 24, 1426
Privy seal letter from King Henry Vll to King James [I]. John Bray, David Neethe, John Lacy, William Touky, Morice Spenser and David Walter, tenants of Sir Hugh Lutterell's lordship of Minehead in Somerset, have complained to the council that on [20 August] last, while they were anchored at Carlingford in Ireland to fish, John Goo [sic] of Spain came with a ship armed a foere de guerre, seized them, and took them to Scotland where William Carneys, esquire, imprisoned them in Buittle castle. Asks that James command Carneys to release them without fine or ransom. Dated at the palace of Westminster. Written in French.
[Calendar of Document of Relating to Scotland 1108-1516 (Supplementary), Vol. V, no. 1003]

March 20, 1428
James White, kt, constable of Carrickfergus has pleaded that he received information that Odownyll sent for a great multitude of Scots to come and join his own forces in a short time in order to destroy that castle, to the damage of the whole of land of Ireland, and that the said John has had custody of the said castle for two years without any payment except 10m, and he is not sufficient to keep that castle without the fees and rewards pertaining to it, so that he might sufficiently victual the castle to resist the Irish enemies. [Edward Dantsey], bp Meath, deputy of John Grey, kt, Lt, and the council, have granted John £10 in part-payment of the said fees and wages. Order to pay him that sum.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 246/21]

FM 1429.1
James Stuart, son of the King of Scotland, and Roydamna (king-material) of Scotland, who had been banished from Scotland to Ireland, died, after the arrival of a fleet from the men of Scotland to convey him home, that he might be made king.
[O’Donovan, John: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland 1172-1372 (Dublin, 1856), Vol. IV, p. 875]

December 8, 1463
Petition by James earl of Douglas, asking the king to grant him the keeping of the castle of Cragfergus in Ireland during his pleasure.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1357-1509, Vol. 4, p. 272, no. 1339]

February 23, 1468
The castle of Carrickfergus is a garrion of war and is surrounded by Irish and Scots without succour of the English for 60 miles; and the constables of that castle formerly had 24 soldiers of its safe-keeping, but James Dokray esq., constable of that castle, keeps it alone with a force at his own expense. In order that James might have 10 soldiers with the castle and 4d a day for each of them. Grant to him for life, for his good service to the king’s father and the king, of 40m p.a. from the king’s manor or lordship of Ardmulghan and the customs and cokets in the ports and franchises of the Ardeglasses and Carrickfergus, in part-payment [of those 4d a day for the 10 soldiers].
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828)]

June 28, 1468
Letter from the lords spiritual [and temporal of Ireland] to [King Edward IV]. [The Fitzgeralds of Munster have ravaged Meath and Kildare.] James Savage, called seneschal of Ulster, being at war with Conn Oneell, a captain of the north, assembled the king's subjects of Co. Lecale in Ulster with divers others, Scots as well as the king's Irish enemies, and entered Conn's country. By a ruse Conn had 500 men of Lecale killed.[Request for aid for the deputy lieutenant, John earl of Worcester.]
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1108-1516, Vol. V (supplementary), p. 302, no. 1091]

AU 1488.38
The wife of the king of Scotland, namely, wife of James Stewart, namely, daughter of the king of Lochlann, was put to death this year by poison. The king of Scotland himself, namely, James Stewart, was slain in battle after that, the same year, by his own son, namely, James Stewart junior. And many of the superior lords of Scotland were slain with him there, because he did not deliver to his son the people on whom it was charged to have given the poison to his mother.
[MacCarthy, B.: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1379-1541 (Dublin, 1901), Vol. III, p. 335]

June, 1490
Ua Cathain, namely, John, son of Aibne, son of Diarmait Ua Cathain, was taken by a ship that came from Scotland, namely, from Inverary, in the month of June in this year.
[MacCarthy, B.: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1379-1541 (Dublin, 1901), Vol. III, p. 349]

AU 1494.15
Ua Domnaill, namely, Aedh the Red, son of Niall the Rough, was under the castle of Sligech in the end of Summer and in the beginning of Harvest of this year. And Eogan, son of Cormac Carrach Ua Gallchobair and William, son of Ua Gallchobair, namely, son of Edmund, son of Domnall, son of Lochlann Ua Gallchobair and Domnall of Aran, namely, a Scottish leader that was with Ua Domnall—those were slain by the people of the castle, namely, by Brian Blind-eye, son of Tadhg, son of Eogan, son of Domnall, son of Muircertach Ua Concobuir, and by the Calbach Blind-eye, son of Domnall, son of Eogan, and by the Muintir-Airt.
[MacCarthy, B.: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1379-1541 (Dublin, 1901), Vol. III, p. 383]

AU 1495.20
Ua Domnaill, namely, Aedh the Red, son of Niall Ua Domnaill the Rough, went to the house of the king of Scotland this year, a month before Lammas.

June 1495
The tyme that Idoneill come to the King in Glasgow, fra Adame of Hakkarstoune, xvij ellis of vellous, to be the King a lang gowne; price of the ell iij li.
[Account of the Lord High Treasurer A.D. 1473-1498 (Edinburgh, 1877), Vol. 1, p. 227]

June 1495
To Adam Wauchop, currour, passand with lettres in the Est and Southlandis for the ressauing of the gre[a]t Adoneill, x shillings.
[Account of the Lord High Treasurer A.D. 1473-1498 (Edinburgh, 1877), Vol. 1, p. 242]

June 1495
To Master Alexander Shawis expensis passand fra the toune of Air to Edinburghe for the copburd, and remaning thare vpone the Kingis clething to the ressauing of Adoneill .. xx shilling.
[Account of the Lord High Treasurer A.D. 1473-1498 (Edinburgh, 1877), Vol. 1, p. 242]

AU 1495.25
The son of Ua Domnaill, namely, Conn, son of Aedh the Red, son of Niall the Rough, sat under the castle of Sligech this year about the time of Lammas. Ua Domnaill came to his own town, that is, to Dun-na-Gall, from the town of the king of Scotland the Friday after Lammas and went on Saturday to follow his son to Sligech. And he had done nothing more than enter the town when it was told him that a host of Lower Connacht—at instigation of Brian, son of Tadhg, son of Eogan Ua Concobair—and the Calbach, son of Domnall, son of Eogan Ua Concobair, were marching to the town to put the son of Ua Domnaill from the castle. And they thought not that Ua Domnaill himself was nearer to them than the house of the king of Scotland. And neither fear nor flight did Ua Domnaill at those tidings, but took with him what was of his own people under the castle, both foot and horse, and struck out i.e. went against the host and defeated them spiritedly, successfully. And there were slain there Brian, son of Tadhg, son of Eogan Ua Concobuir and Tadhg, son of Domnall, son of Eogan and Mac Donnchaidh of Tir-Oilella, namely, Tadhg, son of Brian, son of Concobar Mac Donnchaidh and Ua Dubda, namely, Eogan Blindeye, son of Ruaidhri Ua Dubda. And Ua Gadhra, namely, Diarmait, son of Eogan, was taken there and, in all, there were destroyed there, by taking and slaying and drowning, three score and ten. In the fight was slain there Tadhg, son of Ua Baidhill, namely, son of Niall, son of Toirdelbach Ua Baidhill.
[MacCarthy, B.: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1379-1541 (Dublin, 1901), Vol. III, p. 391]

October 15, 1496
That day [the xv day of October], giffin at the Kingis command to Odonelis man, vij li, iiij s.
[Account of the Lord High Treasurer A.D. 1473-1498 (Edinburgh, 1877), Vol. 1, p. 303]

October 31, 1496
Letter from R[alph] Verney to Sir Reginald Bray. [The passage of Gerald Fitzgerald, earl of Kildare, to Ireland; submissions to him, including those of men who had assisted James IV in the cause of Perkin Warbeke; the expedition to Ireland of 'Jhon of the oute lies' (John Mor MacDonald of Islay); relations with the earl of Desmond.] Dated at Dublin.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1108-1516, Vol. V (supplementary), p. 304, no. 1109]

June 5, 1497
[The fift day of Junij], giffin be the Kingis command, to ane Ireland man that come fra Odonald, and passit agane with the Kingis lettrez, vij lib.
[Account of the Lord High Treasurer A.D. 1473-1498 (Edinburgh, 1877), Vol. 1, p. 339]

AU 1499.15
A great deed was done in Scotland this year by the king of Scotland, namely, by James Stewart,—to wit, John Mor Mac Domnaill, king of Insi-Gall, and John Cathanach, his son and Ragnall the Red and Domnall the Freckled were hung on one gallows, the three four, a month before Lammas.
[MacCarthy, B.: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1379-1541 (Dublin, 1901), Vol. III, p. 443]




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