Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   


Selected Extracts of Scots in Ireland

1500-1585


November 18, 1501
Grant to the provost, bailiffs and community of the town of Carlingford, for 24 years, of certain customs towards the fortification of the town with a stone wall, because it has often been burned by both the Scottish and Irish.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 272/4]

June --, 1520
Expectation of an invasion from Scotland, in connexion with O'Neill.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland, 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 3]

May 7, 1536
Leonard Gray to Crumwell. Scots landed in Ireland.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland, 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 17]

August 22, 1538
William Brabazon, Aylmer and Allen to King Henry. O'Donnell seeks the favour of the King of Scots.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland, 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 44]

October 20, 1538
Lord Deputy Gray gone to Lecale to repel the Scots from Lecale.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 46]

November 29, 1538
John Allen, Lord Chancellor, to Crumwell. The Lord Montgomery has brought letters to Alexander Carragh M'Donnell, and has taken him and young Gerald, the late Earl of Kildare's son, over into Scotland. Expectation that the King of Scots will furnish the said Alexander and Gerald to subdue Ireland. The King of Scots sends divers tokens to O'Donnell. Dublin.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 47]

May 26, 1539
William Brabazon to Crumwell. A prophecy against the King and Crumwell. O'Neill, O'Donnell, and young Fitzgerald have combined. Above 2,000 Scots in Ireland under Alexander Carragh M'Donnell [McConnell]. Advises that two ships should cruise between Ireland and Scotland. Recommends that a Council should be appointed for Kilkenny, "Wexford, Waterford, Tipperary, Cork, and Limerick.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 49]

July 10, 1539
John Allen to Crumwell. Confederacy between Desmond, O'Neill, and O'Donnell in favour of young Fitzgerald, aided by the Pope and the King of Scots. Wages of the army to be increased, or its number diminished. Sends confessions as to the foregoing matters.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 49]

February 26, 1545
Sentleger to the Lord Chancellor Wriothesley. Apprehended invasion from the Scots under the Lord of the Isles. Dispute between Tyrone and O'Donnell.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 70]

August 12, 1545
Lord Deputy and Council to the King. "The Lord of the Isles is at Carrickfergus with 4,000 men, having left others to engage Argyle and Huntly. Want victuals. E. Sentleger keeps a private ship very usefully. Roderick M'Alister and Patrick M'Lean are come from the Lord of the Isles for money. £500. advanced. Roderick M'Alister chosen Bishop of the Isles."
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 72]

August 13, 1545
Lord Deputy to the Privy Council. Arrival of the Scots under the Lord of the Isles, at Carrickfergus. The measures they have adopted to furnish them with provisions. Require an immediate supply of money and stores from England.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 72]

September 5, 1545 Privy Council to the Lord Deputy and Council. "M'Alister and M'Lean have agreed to articles on behalf of Lord M'Lean and the Lord of the Isles. The King will pay 8,000 of their men, and will aid them with 2,000 to be commanded by Ormond, under the Earl of Lennox. Money is coining for Ireland”.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 73]

November 14, 1545
Lord Deputy and Council to the King. "The 2,000 Irish under Ormond have advanced to attend Lennox into Scotland.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 73]

November 19, 1545
Lord Deputy and Council to the King. Lennox and Ormond have sailed with a fair wind for Dumbarton.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 73]

February 15, 1546
Lord Deputy and Council to the Privy Council. "Forward letters from the Lord of the Isles. M'Alister, M'Lean, and others are at Dublin, and want money to proceed." Enclosed:

[1] January 24, 1546
James M'Conaill of Dunnewaik and Glinnis and apparent heir of the Isles to the Lord Deputy. His readiness to assist the Earl of Lennox. Names of his kinsmen and alliance requires two or three ships to be sent from his Majesty by the bearer Hector Dodson, being his pilot. Dated at Ardnamurchan.

[2] January 30, 1546
Ewyne Allane of Lockheld to the Lord Deputy. The Lord Bishop of the Isles can show his services done to the King's Grace of England. Has taken preys from the Earls of Huntly and Argyle. Desires the Deputy to send his servant the bearer to the King for the munition and money promised to him. Dated at Inverlochy.


[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 73-74]

February 25, 1545
Lord Deputy and Council to the Privy Council. Many Scots come, and need food and raiment. M'Alister and M'Lean still at Dublin.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 74]

May 13, 1545
M'Alister and M'Lean to the King. "Wish to return to Scotland." Dated at Dublin.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 75]

August 22, 1548
John Goldsmyth to the Lord Deputy Bellyngham. Logan, a Scotch pirate, appertaining of late to the Earl of Lennox, is hovering about Lambay and the Head of Howth ; he has taken several vessels. Rowland White and John Parker offer to pursue him if they may have commission. Dated at Dublin.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 86]

January 4, 1549
Calough O'Donnell to the same. Hopes to meet him in the spring or the beginning of summer. Requests his aid against the Scots, who detain his pledges without just or reasonable cause. Dated at the Lifford.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 98]

June 14, 1549
Andrew Brereton to the Lord Deputy Bellyngham. Two of the chief Scots of the Dufferin are taken at Knockfergus, and those that were the chief undoers of Lecale. John White, the heir of the Dufferin, who is like to be undone by the Scots, is an honest man, and ready to his power to serve.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 104]

Note: White was slain by the Scots; see November 18, 1551.

March 22, 1550
George [Dowdall] Primate of Armagh to Sir John Allen Knight, the Chancellor, and to the Council of Ireland, transmitting the letters sent to the Earl of Tyrone by the French King and by George Parys. An army of Frenchmen in Scotland ready to land in Ireland. They have 36 ships with as many Scots and Scottish ships. The blind Bishop [Waucop] at Derry: "he ys a very schrowth [shrewd] spy as I hyre say and a gret brewer of warr."
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 106]

March 26, 1550
Lord Justice Sir William Brabazon and Council to the Privy Council. "The wylde Yrishe begynne to be haulte and strange," hoping that the Frenchmen and Scots shall invade this realm.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 106]

July 8, 1550
Pardon of Alexander oge, son of Alexander Carraghe; Juvenes Rogen Aldo, son of said Alexander; Ronald Juvenes M'Donyll, and Collat M'Donyll, sons of said Alexander, of Glyn, in Claneboy.
[Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland of the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary and Elizabeth (Dublin, 1861), Vol. I, p. 208]

September 2, 1551
Lord Deputy and Council to the Privy Council. The Scots have made a prey in Claneboy; and the ships which arrived at Knockfergus with our victuals, hearing thereof, "are gone to cut their passage, which we trust they shall do, if they take the sea." Dated at Newry.
[Calendar of the State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 116]

September 27, 1551
Thomas Cusake, Chancellor of Ireland, to the Earl of Warwick, minutely describing the proceedings of the Lord Deputy and the forces, who in a general hosting set upon the Scots under James M'Donnell (M'Connell) in Raghlin Island. Colla [Maelduv] M'Donnell the second brother to James, had a strong castle over the sea, named the castle of Keanbaan, which the Lord Deputy caused to be defaced. Transactions with the Irish chieftains O'Donnell, Calough, his son, and Hugh O'Donnell, his second son. Contention between Savage of Arde and Hugh M'Neill Oge ordered. Sir Donnell Magennis to pay yearly 40 kine, and the finding of 80 galloglasses. O'Hanlon to pay 30 kine and 40 galloglasses. M'Cartan to pay 20 kine and 30 galloglasses. A general order taken amongst all the Irish Chiefs, that they should have no more Scots in bonnaught. The Lord Deputy "dud make a shiref in Clanneboy,...and another shiref in Arde, a contre next adyoyneng to the same." "The contre of Tyroon is brought throughe warre of the Erle and his sonnes (oon of them silves against other) to suche extream myserie, as there is nat ten plowes in all Tyroon." "Hundreddis this last yere and this somer died in the field throghe famen."
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 116]

November 6, 1551
Lord Deputy Croft to the Privy Council. In favour of the bearer Thos. Brown, who has served as a Captain in Scotland, and very honestly in France, and is desirous to serve in Ireland.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 118]

May 8, 1552
Book by Sir Thomas Cusake, Lord Chancellor, sent to the Duke of Northumberland. Present state of Ireland. In Claneboy is one Moriertaghe Dulenaghe, one of the Neills, who hath the name as Captain of Claneboy, but he is not able to maintain the same; he hath eight tall gentlemen to his sons and all they cannot make past 24 horsemen. There is another sept in that country of Felim Bacagh's sons, tall men, which taketh part with Hugh M'Neill Oge, till now of late. The same Hugh was preyed by Marshal Bagenall, who has made preys upon other of those confines for the same. The said Hugh went to Colla M'Donnell (Connell) who landed with 140 bows.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 126]

1559
A device for the government of Ireland, showing by what means the countries of Offaley and Leix, and the ten countries adjoining to them may be brought to peace and quiet. Noting also by what means the Scots may be exiled. "Ther be certen Skotts that dwellithe in the Northe contre by the sea side, that have had certeyn terrytori es of certein gentlemen by marriage, and have contynued and kept ther possession thies 300 years, and ar now naturall Iryshemen and subjects." To this paragraph Sir John Alen has set in the margin, "A lye." "The greate favour and love that of oulde time hathe bene betwene the Quenes highenes auncestors and thauncestors of James M'Coynell, who is of the blode roiall of Skotlande."
[Calendar of the State Papers Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 158]

March 8, 1560
The Earl of Argyle's sister has lately come over to the Calough O'Donnell her husband, and brought with her 1,000 or 2,000 Scots. Shane O'Neill has engaged 1,000 or 1,500 Scots or other soldiers.
[Calendar of the State Papers Ireland 1509-1573 (Dublin, 1860), Vol. I, p. 160]

January 23, 1562
Exemplification of a certain article contained in letters from Dublin. King Henry VIII. to the Lord Deputy and Council of Ireland; relative to the expediency of granting Claneboy to Neill Conallagh O'Neill, nephew to the Earl of Tyrone, in recompense of land given to the Earl of Tyrone. The rent.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 185]

December 7, 1562
Alexander Craik, Bishop of Kildare, to the Lord Lieutenant Sussex, relative to certain "undecent" words spoken by William Leich, a Scotsman. Desires that his Lordship would protect the bearer John Douglas, whom Leich is endeavouring to oppress by a warrant for the keeping of the peace, on account of his testimony against him. Inclosed:

Certain articles against William Leich, Scotsman, accused by John Douglas, a Scotsman also, of certain indecent words spoken against the Queens’s court and subjects.

Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 211]

September 5, 1564
O'Neill to the Lord Justice and Council. Has received their letters of Aug. 30. Great usurpation of territory by the Scots in the Route, which is M'Quillin's country, in Claneboy [clan Aedha bidhe], the Dufferin [Dubh trian], and Lecale [Lethcathayle], and in the country of O'Cassidy [M'Cabhissidh]. O'Neill having no sufficient boats to cross the Bann, which is swollen, builds the castle of Culrath on this side of the Bann, and sends over a detachment in cots or coricles by two or three at a time, to occupy the monastery of Culrath on the further side of the river, which they defend 24 hours against the Scots. O'Neill's casualties. Sorley Boy M'Donnell wounded. O'Neill renews his requests for aid by the Earl of Kildare or others, and for letters to Knockfergus. Dated at Culrath (Coleraine).
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 185]

May 2, 1565 Shane O'Neill to the Lord Justice and Council. His journey to Claneboy. Builds a new and strong town. Assembly of the gentry. March to the Scottish borders. Conflict with Sorley Boy. Destruction of James M'Donnell's castle and town. Arrival of James M'Donnell with all his force from Scotland. Boile Caislein besieged. Great battle with James M'Donnell and Sorley. Slaughter of 700 Scots and the capture of James and Sorley. Dated at Boile Caislein.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 260]

May 22, 1565
Shane O'Neill to Sir Thomas Cusake. Has received his letters; thanks for his useful counsel. His victory over the Scots; James and Sorley Boy with many gentlemen captured. Aeneas [Aenghus] the proud, the brother of James M'Donnell, slain, with 600 or 700 Scots. To send a horse to England for the Earl of Leicester. From his Camp Clandaeda Byde (Claneboy)
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 261]

May 30, 1565 Sir W. Fytzwylliams to Cecill. [Shane] O'Neill is settling his people in the Glynns, the Route and other parts of Claneboy.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 261]

June 18, 1565
Shane O'Neill to the Queen. In favour of Mr. Stucley, who had shown him much courtesy in his repair to Her presence. Would write of further matters, but is at present so much occupied with the expulsion of the Scots, that he has no time. From the camp Clandeboye.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 261]

June 18, 1565 Shane O'Neill to Cecill. For favour to be showen to Mr. Thomas Stucley. O'Neill obliged to abide in camp to resist the Scots, who daily threaten to invade the kingdom. From the camp Clandeboye.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 263]

June 22, 1565
Privy Council to Shane O'Neill. His letters to the Lord Justice of May 2, exhibited to the Queen. Desire from him a certificate of the occasion of his expedition in Claneboy, how the battle commenced, who are the captives, what forts and castles are reduced to the Queen's obedience. What Scottish captains survive. How that part of Ulster may be freed from them.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 264]

July 28, 1565
Shane O'Neill to the Queen. His fervent desire to perform some acceptable service, and the letters of the Earl of Leicester and Sir W. Cecill lead him to attack the Scots. The manner of the conflict on the 2nd of May. The hurts done by the Scots to the O'Neills in time past. Enormous ransoms. The Earl of Argyle and the Lords of the Isles have written to him strongly, by the Queen of Scots' authority, for the release of the Scots, to which he has answered that he cannot deal therein until he know his own Queen's mind. His fidelity to Her Majesty. He desires his affairs may be settled. His claim to Boile Griffin [Belgriffin]. Earnest solicitation for Capt. Stucley's pardon. Latin.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 268]

August 25, 1565 Shane O'Neill to the Privy Council. Received the Privy Council's letters of June 25 on August 12, desiring to be informed of the manner of the service against the Scots, the victory and the captives. The Dean of Armagh despatched to make known the same. James M'Donnell is dead. Sorley Boy is still in captivity. The captives are kept in the most secure places. 700 or 800 Scots were slain. All the towns and castles of the Scots are now in the Queen's possession. The Scots all expelled the kingdom. O'Neill's opinion as to a chief governor. Praise of Sir N. Arnold. Hopes Sir H. Sydney will be as good. Latin.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 270]

November 18, 1565
Earl of Argyle to the Archbishop of Armagh. Received his letter of October 21. James M'Donnell was Argyle's friend and servant. The letter whereof Armagh wrote to him counterfeit. Knavery of the messenger. The bearer John Douglas, Armagh's man, will relate particulars at full. Douglas to have credit. The cause moving Argyle to speak of war against O'Neill was the disobedience of O'Neill to God and his Princess. The Duke of Chatelherault, the Earls of Murray, Glencairn, and Rothes, with the Lord Uchiltre (Ochiltre) and others are gone into England to seek aid of the Queen there. Argyle and Boyd alone remain in the mountains, set upon on all sides. Argyle desires to be furnished by Queen Elizabeth with four or two good and well furnished ships of war. John Knox has informed Argyle of Armagh's fervency. Religion the only cause of Argyle's distresses. Incloses Copy of the general Protestation of the Scots' Nobility and Congregation professing the right religion. Date Dunnune (Dunoon).
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 282]

June 9, 1566
Lord Deputy Sydney to Cecill. Whilst Sydney's man, [John] Douglas, was at Edinburgh, the Earl of Argyle brought a gentleman of O'Neill's country to court. O'Neill hath excused the same to Sydney by Mr. Justice James Dowdall.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 304]

August 10, 1568
Cecill to Sir Henry Sydney the Lord Deputy of Ireland. Sydney's minister, [John] Douglas has come from Scotland. The pardon is signed for Sydney's man.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 385]

April 26, 1567
Patent granting to Hugh M'Manus O'Donnell the captainry of Tirconnell. [Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 331]

April 28, 1567 Hugh M'Manus O'Donnell to the Lord Deputy. His grief for the ruin of the Derry. The keepers of his castles refuse him submission, and are about to give them to O'Neill. Desires license from Sydney to hire soldiers into the Queen's pay. Also that ships may be sent to take the castle of Donegal. O'Concawayr (O'Conor Sligo) will not furnish his supplement of men against Shane O'Neill, but succours the rebel Henry "O'Duwocan". Has treated of marriage with James "Mic Donayll's" widow, who would willingly be allied to him in order to be avenged of Shane, for the death of her late husband. Desires leave to join the Scots now come against Shane O'Neill.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 331]

May 17, 1570
Clause in the Queen’s letter, directed to the Lord Deputy, instructing him to grant to John Douglass, either a pension or some lands in Ireland.
[Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary and Elizabeth (Dublin, 1861), Vol. I, p. 545]

March 15, 1571 Sorley Boy has returned to Scotland with Turlough Lynagh's messenger, and left his son Donnell M'Donnell and 300 Scots to keep the Glynns, and Alexander M'Randal Boy in the Ardes.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 438]

April 12, 1571 Lord Justice Fytzwylliam to the Privy Council. The Scots in the North build, manure the ground, and settle, as though they should never be removed. Lecale is quite barren. The Dufferm and the Ardes well replenished with Scots.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 444]

July 6, 1571 Captain William Piers to the Queen. Device for planting Ulster and banishing the Irish Scots. Sir Brian M'Felim to have the ancient lands of Claneboy on both sides the Ban. The right heir of O'Cahan's country. The Queen to write letters to Sir Brian M'Felim and Rory Oge M'Quillin. Knockfergus.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 451]

July 16, 1572
Lord President of Connaught to Lord Deputy. The rebels, with Scots, have burnt Athlone wholly to the ground. The steeple of the Abbey, where the store is, was well defended. Twentyfour rebels slain. M'Gawle, Dillons', and Daltons' countries burned. Mr. Mostyn's town, called the Toeghe, burned, and his castle taken. James Fitzmaurice, one of the Glandonnells, and a Captain of the Scots were the chief leaders. Dated at Athlone.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 477]

July 16, 1572
John Crofton to Lord Deputy. Rebels and Scots have burnt Athlone, and the body of the church, where he had his malt, biscuit, and beer, and all his brewing and baking vessels, which are consumed. Dated at Athlone.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 477]

September 1, 1572
Thomas Arthure, Recorder of Limerick, to Sir John Perrot. M'-I-Brien Arra has sent word that James Fitzmaurice and the Earl's second son have come over the Shannon with 1,400 Scots, 2,000 galloglas, and many horsemen. Dated at Limerick.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 482]

September 10, 1572
Thomas Smith to Burghley. Landed at Strangford August 31. Sir Brian M'Felim would not part with one foot of the land. The matter is referred to the Lord Deputy. Has withdrawn his soldiers from Newtown in the Ardes to Renoughaddy [Ringhaddy], in the Dufferin. Dated at Down.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 482]

October 28, 1572
Nicholas Malbie to Burghley. At Mr. Smith's coming Sir B. M'Felim joined Turlough Lynagh and the Scots, and entered the Ardes, burning and spoiling. Malbie having drawn from him Nele M'Brian Fartagh, whose father was Lord of Claneboy, he seeks pardon from the Deputy, and peace with Mr. Smith. [Brian Fartagh O'Neill, the brilliant star of the tribe to which he belonged, was slain by Shane O'Neill in 1548.] Dated at Down in Lecale.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 487]

April 14, 1573
Letters patent, granting denization to "Sorley Boy:"—We are given to understand that a nobleman named "Sorley Boy," and others, who be of the Scotch-Irish race, and some of the wild Irish, at this time are content to acknowledge our true and mere right to the countie of Ulster and to the Crowne of Ireland, to profess due obedience to us and our crown of England or Ireland, and to swear to be true subjects to us and our successors, as other our natural subjects, born in the English pale, be or ought to be, submitting themselves to our laws and orders, upon condition that they may be received as denizens of England and Ireland; and we (being willing by all gentle means to bring the strayed sheep home again to the right fold, and to maintain peace and quietness in the realm, and to refuse none that will acknowledge their duty) are content that any "meer Irish," or Scotch-Irish, or other strangers who claim inheritance, or shall hold any lands, or be resident in an place which is within our grant made to Sir Thomas Smyth and Thomas, his son, now Colonel of the Ards and Claneboy, who will be sworn to be true lieges to us and our successors (as the denizen strangers do swear in the Chancery of England), before the said Thomas Smith, junior, or the Bishop of Down, accompanied with other discreet persons, and from that day be content to hold their lands of us and the said Colonel, and shall yearly pay to us 20s. for every plowland as all Englishmen, followers of the said Smith, pay, shall be reputed and taken for denizens and not for meer Irish; and that the said Smith, or the Bishop of Down, may take the said oath during the space of seven years; and upon a certificate of the Colonel of any person or persons having taken the said oath, the Lord Deputy or Chancellor shall cause letters of denizenship to be passed to him or them (including twelve in each patent, if it should be considered convenient). Dated April 14, 15°.
[Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland of the Reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary and Elizabeth (Dublin, 1861), Vol. I, p. 553]

July 18, 1573
John Smythe of the Arde to Lord Burghley. Con O'Donnell is desirous to see the Queen's Majesty; he needs no interpreter by reason of his good bringing up with Sir Thomas Cusake. Sir Hugh O'Donnell. To plant the Raghlin Island with English. O'Dogherty, Lord of Inishowen, is now in Scotland with the Earl of Argyle. Turlough Lynagh.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 518]

September 27, 1573
Sir Nicholas Bagenall to the Lord Deputy and Council. Sir Brian M'Felim has revolted from the Earl of Essex and combined with Turlough Lynagh. James M'Donnell's son, with 500 Scots, has landed. Bagenall is not able to resist without more aid.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 522]

November 2, 1573
Instructions given by Essex to Edward Waterhous to inform the Privy Council. State of the North when Essex arrived. Causes of Sir B. M'Felim's revolt. Confederacy in Ulster between Turlough Lynagh, Maguire, and the Scots under Sorley Boy and M'Gillaspick, O'Cahan, M'Quillin. O'Donnell's fair show and message. The Baron of Dungannon to be advanced as Tyrone. A corporate town to be erected near Belfast. The fortification for the circuit, and a store house for victuals to be made at the Queen's charges, all other buildings at the cost of Essex and the planters; and for the doing thereof Robert Lythe, the engineer, or some other skilful in fortification should be sent, who shall also build a bridge upon the Lagan without Her Majesty's charge. Bridges. To request that Sorley Boy may enjoy by grant from Her Majesty a portion of the Glynns claimed by him by inheritance from the Missetts. To make Sorley Boy a denizen and assign him a service in lieu of rent as captain of Her Majesty's kerne, which he, being a mercenary man and a soldier, will easily consent unto. To desire that Hugh M'Felim, brother to Sir Brian M'Felim, and who challenges the country of Claneboy upon the north side of the Bay of Knockfergus, and Con M'Neill Oge who was Lord of Claneboy, on the south side of the bay, may be released cut of Dublin Castle and put into his hands. Essex to have two of the Council of Ireland continually resident with him in Ulster. Their diet shall be borne at his own table.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 526]

December 2, 1573 Nicholas Walshe to Burghley. Desmond keeps a brother to John Harbert and others of the ward prisoners. He is combined with the Lords of Connaught and Thomond. A Scot, who has changed his Scottish attire for Irish, has promised Desmond 500 Scots.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 530]

December 23, 1573 Lord Deputy and Council to the Privy Council. Turlough Lynagh still retains Scots.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1509-1573 (London, 1860), Vol. I, p. 533]

March 8, 1574
Essex's offers for surrendering his patent of Claneboy. Lord Deputy to undertake the war. Essex to have the Isle of M'Gee [Magee]. Extracts of letters of 7 and 8 March.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), Vol. II, p. 11]

March 30, 1574
The Queen to the Earl of Essex. Hearty thanks for divers letters. Esteem for his intolerable toil in Ireland. Accepts his offer of surrendering Claneboy. Will allow the pay of 600 foot and 100 horse. Will grant him the island of M'Gwyse [Magee Island]. Has appointed the Lord Deputy to join with him in the service. Secrecy.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 15]

July 30, 1574 Earl of Essex to the Lord Deputy. Ten vessels full of Irish Scots landed in Loughfoyle. Turlough Lynagh hath sent a defiance to the Baron of Dungannon. Dated at Dundalk.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 36]

February 5, 1575 Letter of John Graufurd, Burgess of Air, to the Earl of Essex. The Lord M’Connell, Macclane [M’Lean], the Captain of Clan Rannall, M’Cloyd Hairye [M’Leod Carragh], and M’Cloyd Lewris, and the laird of M'Canze [M'Kenzie] and M'Ky, have chosen among them Lord M’Connell [M’Donnell] to be their lord and ruler of the isles. Argyle means to burn Cantyre. They intend to attack Essex. Craufurd is coming to Lough Swilly to get a revenge of his goods. [Scotch. Original] Feb. 5, Air.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 58]

September 28, 1575
Lord Deputy Sydney to the Queen. Reference being made to him, he recommends that the Earl of Essex should have his demands of the leading of 300 men for life, and Magee Island.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 80]

January 15, 1578
President Drury to the Privy Council. Sends Robert Hicks in the custody of the bearer Coleman. Hicks has been employed against Robinson, a Scottish pirate, since his apprehension.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 128]

May 31, 1579 Sir Nicholas Malbie to Walsyngham. Scottish captain and 36 of his men maintained by O'Rourke slain.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 169]

March 9, 1580
Council of Ireland to the Privy Council. Sorley Boy and Donnell Gorme at Knockballybrian Boy with 500 Scots. Captain Crawford with 60 Inland Scots all shot. Sir Nicholas Bagenall prepares his forces to resist them.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 212]

Note: The term inland Scots was usually applied to the Scots from the lowlands, rather than those who came from the northern and western coasts of Scotland.

August 18, 1580
Captain William Piers, the elder, to Sir Francis Walsyngham. Letter includes reference to Captain Crayford's outrages by land and sea.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 245]

November 3, 1580
Sir Nicholas Bagenall to Sir Francis Walsyngham, Secretary of State. Turlough Lynagh, hearing reports of the success of the enemy in Munster, assembled by the Newry with 1,000 soldiers and burnt O'Hanlon's country, notwithstanding the peace. Bagenall's efforts. Turlough Lynagh swears again to the peace. Craford's letter to O'Neill's wife saying that the King of Scots had granted him 600 men which he would bring to Carlingford. Prays for a resident force.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 265]

January 4, 1584
Lords Justices to same. Have not received any communications since the death of Desmond. The Earl of Mar, of Scotland, arrived at Knockfergus 23 December, for the same cause as the Master of Glames came. Date at Dublin.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 488]

January 21, 1584 Geoffrey Fenton to Sir William Cecill, Lord Burghley, Secretary and Treasurer. Some directions should be sent to the Lords Justices how to use the Earl of Marr and other Scottish gentlemen retired to Knockfergus out of Scotland.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 491]

April 22, 1584
Sir Henry Wallop, Lord Justice, to Sir Francis Walsyngham, Secretary of State. The Earl of Mar and the Master of Glaymis have returned to Scotland. The importance of suppressing the French faction in Scotland. Inclosed:

Capt. Dawtrey to the Lord Justice Wallop. Relates the manner of the departure of [John Erskine] the [seventh] Earl of Marr and [Thomas] the master of Glaymis. The Protestants of Scotland, assured of Elizabeth's support, will cause the King to dismiss the French faction or immediately enter war. The object of the Pope and the King of Spain is, to introduce foreigners into Scotland with a pretence of aiding that King, but in effect to send many men and overthrow both him and the Queen of England. Dated April 16, at Carrickfergus.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 507]

August 6, 1584
Lord Deputy to the Queen. The invasion of Scots and Spaniards. Divers inland Scots, sent by the King of Scots, have landed of late in O'Donnell's country. Necessity of a supply of victuals, money, armour, weapon, and soldiers. He has but 600 foot and 300 horse to take the field. He has stayed the Earl of Ormond in Her Highnesses name to assist him in this service. Have been advertised of William Nugent's late coming out of France into Scotland, and his departure from thence. Mr. Norreys will declare the whole of their intention to go into the North. Inclosed.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 520]

There letters enclosed:

July 27, 1584
Hugh O'Donnell to the Lord Deputy Perrot. "Makelayen" the Scot has landed in his country with 2,000 well appointed men, and have not left a cow in M'Sweeny's country, “which was the best man of his name under me”. He is plagued for minding his Prince's will, while the transgressors of it are more favoured than he. O'Neill was never true, but practising with fair words. O'Donnell might get more Scots than O'Neill, and if he should maintain them, and suffer them to pass to spoil and invade Connaught, they ivould serve him against all men. Dated at Loughswilley.

August 3, 1584
Capt. Joshua Mynce to Deputy Perrot. His view of the Scottish camp and galleys. The report in the country is, they are 30 with 3,000 men. They mean no good and are very well appointed of artillery, and cast pieces of great and small size. Tirconnel.

July 26, 1584
Oliver Eustace to Sir Lucas Dillon. M'llane and two of Shane O'Neill's sons arrived. The King of Scots is to send 5,000 men more. The 1,500 Scots that came early in July are in bonnaught with O'Neill. Some report is made that the Baron of Dungannon's charge of horsemen, and his country and territories, are bestowed upon some Englishman, the intelligence whereof, had out of England, hasteneth his repair to O'Neill, as they say, to combine. "And this maketh me presume upon some likelihood of the same, because mine own friend Maguire, the Baron's uncle, is estranged from the old opinion I conceived of him."
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 520]


August 6, 1584
Lord Deputy Perrot to Walsyngham. He is sorry we have no better espials in Spain and Scotland to warn us of real dangers as this is. 120 more galleys ready to come from Scotland with trained men.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 522]

August 16, 1584 G. Fenton to Burghley. Arrival of 4,000 Scots, some being from the inland, well trained and perfect shot. Turlough Lynagh has put in his son and prepares to join his forces to the army to expulse the Scots.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 523]

August 21, 1584
Lord Deputy Perrot to the Privy Council. His intention to look through his fingers at Ulster, as a fit receptacle for all the savage beasts of the land, has been altered by the arrival of MacIlane's sons and many Scots. Their pretence to set up Shane O'Neill's issue to be opposed against the Queen's party. There are of the last coming over 1,100 bows, 500 shot, "and of them 200 inland trained men in the service of the Low Countries," and 800 swords, besides 1,600 that came over with James McDonnell's sons and 300 or 400 maintained by Sorley Boy M'Donnell, and to these; are joined Brian Carragh with the Donnellaghs and O'Chaan, who were before Turlough Lynagh's followers. He sets forward with all the protectees of Munster, the O'Mores, O'Conors, and Kavanaghs, a trusty guard. His plan to send some to the Out Isles of Scotland to do there as Scottish men do in Ireland. Dated at Dublin Castle.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 524]

August 22, 1584
G. Fenton to Walsyngham. The Lord Deputy begins his march August 25. The Donnoloughes and O'Kane have left Turlough Lynagh and joined the Scots. The Lord Deputy has employed some shipping to intercept their galleys in Loughfoyle. Dated at Dublin.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 525]

August 30, 1584
Sir Richard Byngham to Walsyngham. Many of the Scots are returned into Scotland. Report that six of their gallies were taken or drowned by the Queen's ship. Dated from Roscommon.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 525]

November 26, 1584
Lord Deputy Perrot to same. Respecting the groundless claim of one Douglas a Scottishman to the mill called Clandalkin, which the said Scot's brother John [Douglas] had left to his widow and child. Dated at Dublin Castle.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 538]

June 27, 1585
Sir Nicholas White to same. The bearer, Mr Carleill, hath dealt with him as a feoffee of trust to the Earl of Essex touching Macgyes Island. Sends his son to Burghley and the Earl, to pass the same over to Carleill. A tarsel of a goshawk.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 569]

August 6, 1585
Advertisements that Con M'Neale Oge's son, the Scots of the Dufferin, the O'Kellies, the woodmen of Oulverlin (Kilwarlen), and M'Cartan’s country, and Hugh M'Phelim's sons are joined with the Scots last arrived. Sorley Boy hath written very humbly to the Lord Deputy by a soldier of Captain Henshaw's. Agnus M'Donnell claims the Glynns as ivell as Sorley Boy. The Donologhes refractory. Dated from Camp, near to Dungannon.
[Calendar of State Papers relating to Ireland 1574-1585 (London, 1867), p. 577]




BACK TO INDEX